With Friends Like Chris…

Whatever charred remains existed of what the Liberal Party once stood for, Chris Pyne managed to show up and empty his bladder on them last week.

People like me have been calling out the ‘Turnbull Coalition’ for not upholding basic Liberal Party values for some time. I’ve even gone to the length of keeping a running list of Turnbull’s thought bubbles and leftist policies so that we don’t forget them all.

Quick tangent: for some fun at home, I highly recommend going here, hitting Ctrl+F, typing in ‘liberal’ and seeing how many hits you get (!). Then do the same with ‘Turnbull’ (!!) and ‘Malcolm’ (!!!).

(Yes, you really want to do this).

(It’s ok, I’ll wait…).

To more people than ever before, it’s now clear that Turnbull and his team have funneled Australian politics into an unsustainable tailspin where:

  • the Liberals continually give their conservative base the middle finger – and keep moving to the left in a cyncial attempt to steal Labor’s customers (hint: it’s not working). Obvious examples of this include: Gonski, renewable energy targets, socialistic regulation of the gas industry, new super taxes, bank taxes and record federal taxation and spending (if you haven’t done so already, go grab yourself a cup of coffee or stiff drink of your choice, sit down, click on that last link, survey the terrible mess that is our federal budget and get informed – and then get a politically apathetic friend to do the same):

Budget 2017

  • Labor keeps responding the only way it can – by moving further to the left and raising lowering the bar (effectively setting the nation’s agenda); and
  • the Liberals keep inching further to the left.

It’s obvious that things can’t and won’t keep going this way for much longer.

To be fair to Pyne, if it wasn’t him plopping on the final straw, then it was going to be something or someone else. Anything that can be sustained – whether good or bad – will eventually break through:

“When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it — but all that had gone before.”

Jacob Riis

What next?

One of the following must happen:

  • Turnbull stays on (or is replaced by a similarly leftist leader), the Liberals lose big at the next federal election and rebuild from the ground up;
  • Turnbull is replaced within the next 6-12 months by a more conservative and competent leader – with the next election result being more or less up in the air; or
  • a major conservative breakaway party will be formed (it’s been done before and could very easily happen again).

Some people fear that a split in the Liberal Party would serve only to hand power to Labor for a very long time. I’m not convinced of this for the following reasons:

  • the Liberal Party is already split and well on track to hand power to Labor for a long time;
  • the last time something like this was done, it took only three years for the breakaway party to be elected into office in three states – and five years to be elected to office federally; and

A split in the Liberal Party wouldn’t change any of this: you can’t simply transform people into leftists (or vice versa) by changing labels. All it would do is label a spade a spade and allow people to make a clearer choice.

‘Black Handers’ like Pyne and Turnbull would then be flanked by Labor and the Greens to the left and the conservatives to the right – and they would then have to choose to either side with:

  • Labor and the Greens – and cede the entire centre-right ground to the conservatives (to the point of being eventually swallowed up by the left); or
  • the conservatives – and be properly held in check in any government they formed (and vice versa if the conservatives won more seats).

If well over a million voters were prepared to vote for a rag-tag bunch of conservative, centre-right and far right parties in the Senate at the 2016 Federal election, then it begs the question: what would happen if a major, organised centre-right party came along?

If a breakaway party was formed, then as far as the numbers go, my best guess involves applying a loose rule of thirds in predicting how many would leave the Liberals. That is:

  • one third would move over (let’s say about 25 out of 76 lower house members and 10 out of 29 upper house members);
  • one third would definitely stay with the Liberals; and
  • one third would be unsure – with almost all of them probably staying put.

From there, things would become very interesting indeed.

Could it happen?


Postscript

I came across the following post which I wrote about 15 months ago. The real Chris Pyne and the things he stands for were all on show then as much as they are now:

Tony Abbott came out today and labelled the Safe Schools ‘All of Us’ school program as social engineering:

‘It’s not an anti-bullying program … its funding should be terminated,’ Mr Abbott told The Australian…

I found this remark to be very interesting given that it was Abbott’s government which launched the program:

The Safe Schools teaching manual, set up by Labor but launched by the Coalition in 2014, has been under fire in recent weeks from conservative politicians, the ACL and News Corp newspapers.

Sources said this was not the first time the party room had discussed the Safe Schools program, with concerns also raised under Tony Abbott’s leadership. 

Given Abbott’s clear views expressed today on the program, how could it possibly have been launched under his watch?

When I wrote about this last week, I speculated that Abbott may have felt like it was a fight he couldn’t afford to have given his popularity issues. Perhaps this is still true, particularly if you believe The Sydney Morning Herald’s ‘sources’ (*) that there were party room discussions about the program while Abbott was leader (I wonder if he was present?).

(*) as a general rule, you shouldn’t.

However, if that was the case, then why would Abbott say anything at all now? It’s hardly in his interest to do so – all it would show is that he didn’t have control of the party room as leader.

Perhaps Abbott wasn’t aware of the program until well after it had been launched? After all, the cost was ‘only’ $8 million (and pretty much already spent), so it might not have made his radar. Which then begs the obvious question (which should be asked regardless): which flake was the Education Minister at the time?

Now this is where things get interesting

I’m not going to get involved with any unsubstantiated rumours regarding Christopher Pyne – you’re more than capable of doing that yourself if you want to. However, I will say that he voted for Turnbull in the leadership spill:

In South Australia, the moderate faction led by Christopher Pyne and Simon Birmingham delivered Mr Turnbull seven of the state’s 11 votes.

Wait a minute, who’s the current Education Minister? Ah, yes. Excellent.

Isn’t it curious how political circles manage to complete themselves so neatly?

So, in a nutshell: he stands for an extreme-left education indoctrination agenda, homosexual marriage without the public’s consent and $50 billion committed to French submarines – the first of which won’t be delivered for another 10-15 years. Oh, and a steady diet of duplicity…

Bravo Chris.

Bravo.

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102 Responses to With Friends Like Chris…

  1. The Liberal Party, as it exists today, is the walking dead. I think that we have to accept that the next election will be a Labor Party victory and hopefully there will be a massive purge of Leftist Liberals from the existing party. The only saving grace might be that the minor parties can hold Labor in some check while another conservative party forms.

  2. StrayanDrongo

    I hope your right Bemused, but from hearing what the Young Libs are like from Bolts blog today, sounds like there are many more issues in the pipeline. First thing they must change is democratization of the party and getting rid of Photios and his ilk

  3. john constantine

    Peta Credlin explained the simple Turnbull coalition team rebranding on Alan Jones.

    Turnbull holds unswervingly to the polling that shows shorten is unelectable, and has always trailed turnbull as preferred leader.

    Therefore it makes sense to turnbull to neutralise labor on policy and fight the election on leader personality.

    The second most despised person in Australia, fighting the most despised person in Australia.

    How could it go wrong?. turnbull is preferred as leader by a mass of people that will never vote liberal, and despised as leader by a mass of people that will shatter the non-labor vote amongst a spectrum of parties, some of them will actually win lower house seats, probably off the nationals.

  4. H B Bear

    … and hopefully there will be a massive purge of Leftist Liberals from the existing party.

    Sorry to break this to you but Leftist Lieborals are the party.

  5. H B Bear

    Turnbull holds unswervingly to the polling that shows shorten is unelectable, and has always trailed turnbull as preferred leader.

    Preferred PM is a completely meaningless number. Howard’s preferred PM numbers were always poor and he won 2 elections and bought another 2 in the process.

    Corbyn, Trump, Tits (2016) and Abbott himself are proof no-one is unelectable. Arguably the only one who was truly unelectable was the Hilldebeast herself.

  6. a happy little debunker

    Lomborg’s research Centre was defunded after Tony lost the leadership.

    Birmingham acknowledges that this was done by his predecessor.

    But Pyne was never, ever Turnbull’s education minister.

    Which meant he never had permission (from his leader, nor the cabinet, nor the partyroom) to axe that funding offer.

    He has repeatedly played it fast and loose, without accountability.

  7. Sorry to break this to you but Leftist Lieborals are the party.

    Not all, but a clear majority.

  8. OldOzzie

    Totally irrelevant to the Blog

    But from your mention above

    “When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it — but all that had gone before.”

    Stonemason Father-in-Law, Large (B’Huge) Rock on Land we had purchased, using Bitch Pick with Pups, dig grooves, line across where you want Rock to split, put wedges into grooves and then gads into/between the wedges, Hammer Line of Gads – amazing how big a rock you can split.

  9. OldOzzie

    bemused

    hopefully there will be a massive purge of Leftist Liberals from the existing party.

    Won’t happen in NSW – Photios has Parachuted a Phalanx of Pontificating Poncing Poodles into all the safe NSW Liberal Seats both Federal and State – and although they will and have lost hugely on Primary Vote will probably stay in place.

  10. Tintarella di Luna

    What’s really interesting is that George Christensen knew about the plot to by these disgusting treacherous snakes to cross the floor with a Private Members Bill to legislate for same -sex marriage and didn’t say a thing. Not a thing. Thanks for the heads up George. I loathe the lot of them and will assiduously work, pray and help in any way I can to bury the Liberal party. What a loathsome pack of hyenas.

  11. Tim Neilson

    I think that we have to accept that the next election will be a Labor Party victory

    We have to EMBRACE it. We know that Peanut Head is going to win. This is therefore as near to a consequence free chance as we’re ever going to have to destroy the Termite wing of the duopolistic cartel.

    If the Termite wing won, or even came close, on the back of preferences from minor conservative or libertarian candidate, that would be treated (delusionally I know, but) as a signal that “by golly if only we’d gone harder left on SSM, climate change, indigenous recognition and anti-Islamophobia, we would have picked up a few more hipster votes and won”.

    Anyone who casts a HoR ballot that sends their preference to a Termite supporter will be a traitor to Australia. And sending that preference to Peanut Head (no matter what chain of minor candidates it passes through) will be seen by the Termite election winning machine as proof that they need to go harder left.

    Mass informal HoR voting, and mass refraining from numbering Termite supporters on the Senate ballot, is our only hope. If the termite wing gets crushed under the most humiliating defeat in electoral history then either they will pay attention or they’ll die a quick death.

  12. Philippa, Baroness St Vincent de Paul

    Tony Abbott is not the answer.

    He is not the Once and Future King.

    Not without some really interesting – and preferably televised – special effects where he is infused with cracking Conservative Libertarian mystery blue light that bursts into him when he touches a relic of Ludwig von Mises.

    Said crackling blue light imparting superpowers to introduce fiscal responsibility at Federal level and win over MSM and entire electorate.

    Otherwise, no deal.

  13. meher baba

    “more than 50% of Australian voters (on a two party preferred basis) have wanted centre-right leadership for some time: they voted overwhelmingly for it in 2013, expressed their utter disgust that it was removed without their consent in 2016 and are showing exactly what they think of entrenched centre-left leadership in the current polls.”

    A curious analysis. My interpretation is that:

    In 2013, more than 50% voted against a complete mess on the Labor side of politics in 2013, and some also might have been attracted by TA’s promises of stopping the boats (delivered), lowering electricity prices by abolishing the emissions trading scheme (scheme abolished, but power prices haven’t fallen) and a return to surplus without any painful savings measures (impossible, and therefore hasn’t been delivered).

    In 2016, a large minority voted against the Turnbull Government because, while Labor appeared united (albeit this was just a facade), the Libs appeared to replicate the chaos of the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd era: both in Turnbull having replaced Abbott, and then by Abbott and some of his mates engaging in undermining of Turnbull even though they said they wouldn’t.

    The current polls reflect the apparent continuing disunity of the Libs under Turnbull.

    But I can’t see a return to Abbott or the rise of some other conservative solving the problem. My impression is that a large segment of the voters want 1) a united government and 2) a smart, centrist leader (or someone who looks like one) in the lodge.

    That’s why, even though Rudd was perhaps the most arrogant and malevolent figure in Australian political history (a big call I know), the public continued to love him right up until they pulled the plug in 2013. Rudd looked and talked like the sort of leader a large segment of the Australian public want. Turnbull likewise.

    I can’t see any good coming from a move by the Libs to the right, or by a split. I think that will just hand victory to Labor on a plate.

    And anybody who wants to praise George Christensen will need to convince me that it was ok for him to cross the floor in favour of retaining outmoded penalty rates.

  14. Tim Neilson

    I can’t see any good coming from a move by the Libs to the right, or by a split. I think that will just hand victory to Labor on a plate.

    True, but what’s wrong with that if the Termite wing of the duopolistic cartel are just going to give us Peanut Head’s policies plus a $50 billion invoice for submarines in 2066?

  15. Ez

    With any luck history will remember Christopher Pyne fondly as the real-life Inspector Clouseau who unwittingly bumbled his way to saving Australia by destroying the contemporary Liberal Party.

    In one week he has managed to do more to deep six that broken excuse for a ‘conservative’ party than we (the voters) could ever have hoped to.

    He is the anti-hero we needed.

  16. Jo Smyth

    Anyone in the Turnbull Government who now gives their support to Turnbull is agreeing to a left wing agenda and by definition stating they are left wing. Those who still consider themselves liberal conservative should cut their losses, think of their supporters, and move to the Conservative Party. They have nothing to lose because at the next election they will be out on their ear anyway. Anybody who says the current Liberals can rebuild are living in cloud cuckoo land, there are too many rotten apples and they won’t be trusted by the voters again. As has been stated, new Parties have been started before and now is the right time for one now.

  17. incoherent rambler

    Best outcome.

    Spill. Tony wins.

    THEN he resigns to become Deputy leader of the Australian Conservatives, taking 20 with him.

  18. candy

    any unsubstantiated rumours regarding Christopher Pyne

    which are?

  19. duncanm

    I hope your right Bemused, but from hearing what the Young Libs are like from Bolts blog today, sounds like there are many more issues in the pipeline. First thing they must change is democratization of the party and getting rid of Photios and his ilk

    Which is exactly why it should be banished to the political bandlands – its rotton from the top to the bottom.

    There’s no hope for it.

    Australian Conservatives and others of similar bent should try to consolidate.

  20. duncanm

    Best outcome.

    Spill. Tony wins.

    THEN he resigns to become Deputy leader of the Australian Conservatives, taking 20 with him.

    I’d like to see that.. it would be glorious in a Dresden sort of way.

  21. Ubique

    Pyne is the only Liberal Party elected member more loathsome than Turnbull. A low-down, treacherous, socialist creep.

  22. Neil

    The Australian people are to blame.

    In 2007 unemployment was at 4.3% and falling. Debt was ZERO in 2005 and had fallen to minus 3.8% of GDP by 2007 ie less than zero. But Australia wanted Rudd and said the good economic numbers under Howard were just dumb luck.

  23. iampeter

    extreme-left education indoctrination agenda, homosexual marriage without the public’s consent and $50 billion committed to French submarines – the first of which won’t be delivered for another 10-15 years.

    Support and even leadership in big government, leftists legislation described the LNP for the last 30 years, it didn’t just start with Pyne. What this is really about is his position on SSM, everything else doesn’t really concern Conservatives anyway.

    If Pyne categorically opposed SSM and came out as a Socialist most Conservatives would be cheering and calling for him to replace Turnbull as leader. The only thing Conservatives care about aside from banning immigrants is ensuring no deviation from judeao/christian marriage ritual.

    These nonsensical priorities is why the LNP is in the sorry state it’s in today.

  24. jupes

    Pyne is the only Liberal Party elected member more loathsome than Turnbull.

    Arguable.

    Arthur Sinodinos?

    Craig Laundy?

    George Brandis?

  25. jupes

    The only thing Conservatives care about aside from banning immigrants is ensuring no deviation from judeao/christian marriage ritual.

    Seriously, as a troll you are true B Grader.

    Sharpen up dickhead.

  26. littledozer

    These nonsensical priorities is why the LNP is in the sorry state it’s in today.

    Wong was against SSM a couple of elections ago saying exactly what Gillard said. Your analysis is ridiculous.

    Pick any issue other than boats and the Libs mirror the left that’s the issue the lack of fight for any centre right positions even from so called conservative members.

  27. Faye

    In my simple mind – the best outcome is to have ready the Australian Conservatives Party.
    I think there would be enough voters to put them into government at the next election if everyone got their finger out, planned, financed, structured and interviewed excellent candidates including any experienced rightwing politician who wanted to get out of the Liberal Party. I would presume there are enough disgusted Liberal Party Conservative donors to help the ACP get going. The Nationals too must pick either to stay where they are or team up with ACP. Let’s hope the majority of the Nats would come over to be the ACP coalition partner (even just to get back to their core beliefs instead of kidding around Turnbull). Who knows Pauline may want to join.
    Our manifesto would be written and the public would be constantly informed (ads, tv, radio, internet, various Seat events, fund raisers, etc etc) of the developments of the Australian Conservatives Party. Everybody (public) becomes a part of it. Old Liberal Party volunteers, ex members and I’ve met some fantastic conservative Young Liberals would pitch in.
    I am assuming when Mr Menzies started his new Liberal Party, that there wasn’t such a unified desperation especially because social media and the internet makes it easier to be infinitesimally informed on what everybody else is thinking.
    There is nothing like desperation to inspire a movement to get the job done.
    Mr Abbott said that we had to give the public hope and our own people something to fight for.
    This is it! There is no better feeling than a job well done.
    (I would like to know what Cory Bernardi thinks of Tony Abbott being the Australian Conservatives Party Leader? Cory’s party will grow decade by decade into the future – Tony Abbott would be catalyst to get it going.)

  28. the best outcome is to have ready the Australian Conservatives Party.
    I think there would be enough voters to put them into government at the next election

    Folks, please refrain from posting for at least 30 minutes after sucking on the bong.

  29. The BigBlueCat

    Pyne is just pretending to be Frank Underwood (1st series) …

    But seriously, someone who is this duplicitous won’t get the shove from their current “Dear Leader”, who will want to keep him close. Pyne will never lead the Liberal Party, so his best bet is to be seen as the one with his finger on the pulse. It’s where he takes his pulse that is a big concern.

    Fair dinkum, his arrogance knows no bounds, and it’s well overdue that Christopher Pyne gets his electoral comeuppance.

  30. iampeter

    Seriously, as a troll you are true B Grader.

    Trust me if you knew anything about politics, then you would grade my trolling as the A+ it deserves.

    Alas…

  31. Uh oh

    Marcus, I wasn’t aware of your existence before reading the above article and visiting your website. Lots of very good stuff there; I’ll be a regular visitor from here-on. To anyone else as unaware as me, drop in for a look – “The Marcus Review” (down at the bottom of the ‘blogroll’)

  32. Faye

    Memory Vault, have you had enough time sucking on the bong? Now if you don’t like what I have written, give me your reasons. I would very much like to know what they are. I might learn something. Faye

  33. cui bono

    Let the Turnbull Team get thrashed first. Only an electoral trouncing will convince insiders, outsiders and dunnos that an anti-GreenLabor realignment is necessary.

    Bernardi won’t accept TA, so let that one go for a start.

    Let Zimmerman, Leeser and Payne live with what they have created. They’ll be big wigs in a minor party. Pyne will be looking for a new job.

  34. rickw

    Christopher Pyne

    A disgrace to people who like taking it up the arse.

  35. the sting

    Not sure of the numbers but if enough Liberals went and sat with the Nationals to make them the senior party in the Coalition then Barnaby would become PM in an almost bloodless coup.

  36. Marcus

    Anyone remember Jamie Briggs? A young up-and-comer from the dry side of the Liberal party who had his career destroyed because he made a clumsy pass in a bar in Hong Kong or somewhere?

    Meanwhile, Pyne, in the space of a week, publicly calls the Catholic education sector liars, gets caught out confirming all the worst fears the so-called Del-Cons have had ever since Turnbull took over, ignited the gay marriage agenda when no one had been talking about it for months, and as the face of the Liberal Party in South Australia has presided over a collapse in the vote bigger than anywhere else in the country.

    Given how low Turnbull set the bar with Briggs, how can Pyne’s position possibly be tenable?

  37. incoherent rambler

    Let the Turnbull Team get thrashed first.

    I (and most of Australia) was bitterly disappointed that I did not get to see JEG embarrassingly thrashed at an election. Long suffering voters had earned that right.

    Similar with Mal.

    However, I’ll happily go with whatever wounds his ego the most.

  38. Mark A

    incoherent rambler
    #2425649, posted on June 28, 2017 at 4:30 pm
    Best outcome.

    Spill. Tony wins.
    THEN he resigns to become Deputy leader of the Australian Conservatives, taking 20 with him.

    No way, Cory hates his guts and I think the feeling is mutual. You can play politics to a certain degree but there is a limit to goodwill.

  39. Dr Faustus

    Much as the Brits did from 1974 to 1979, most Australians need to look into the abyss before accepting economic conservatism. In the UK it was ruinous inflation driven by the Labour/TUC ‘social compact’, three day working weeks, national level industrial chaos that left garbage on the streets and the dead unburied – and a structural industrial collapse.

    A Shorten satrapy is just the dog’s knob to get us peering attentively over the edge, wondering how we are going to eat fairness and social justice.

    Australia’s Maggie Thatcher is probably not in the house.

  40. Just Interested

    The premise that the Liberal Party was a ‘breakaway’ party from the UAP is erroneous.

    From the Menzies biography on the National Archives site:

    http://primeministers.naa.gov.au/primeministers/menzies/in-office.aspx

    Menzies immediately ended the United Australia Party’s alliance with the Country Party. As leader of the largest non-government party in the House of Representatives, he now assumed the role of Leader of the Opposition. Internal reports into the UAP electoral defeat acknowledged that the party, born out of the peculiar political circumstances of the Depression, had long since lost its unity and sense of direction. The number of independent anti-Labor candidates who stood at the 1943 election was a clear indication of this.

    The creation of a new anti-Labor party, with a new structure and a new name, was the solution proposed. It was argued that only a new party representing genuine liberalism could unite the dispirited anti-Labor forces and act as an effective alternative to Labor’s socialism.

    Menzies took a leading role in the creation of what would eventually become the Liberal Party. He was not its sole inspiration, nor its only leading light. Nor was his position as federal parliamentary leader of the new party completely secure in the early years. Menzies did, however, help produce the first draft of the new party’s constitution. At a conference in Canberra in October 1944 he used a paper entitled ‘Looking forward’, by Charles Kemp, economic adviser to Victoria’s Institute of Public Affairs, to argue the direction the new party should take. At the end of the party’s second convention, held in Albury in December 1944, Menzies was appointed a member of its provisional Federal Council and chairman of its policy committee.

    The new party was to have a federal structure, with a permanent secretariat to do research and assist the federal parliamentary party. State organisations would be under the control of elected State Councils and the Federal Council would comprise one representative from each State organisation plus the two federal parliamentary leaders. Under a deal Menzies arranged with the powerful Australian Women’s National League, women would be guaranteed representation on the State executive.

    Most important of all, the new party would raise and control its own funds, distancing itself from the charges constantly laid against the United Australia Party, that it was the party of big business. At the inaugural meeting of the Federal Council held in Sydney in August 1945, the Liberal Party formally came into being.

    Therefore, properly characterised the Liberal Party was a successor party to the UAP, not a ‘breakaway’.

    In the current case, the closer analogue is the post 1955 breakaway of some Labor members to form the DLP and the subsequent interest being whether the Not the Liberal Party will be more successful than the DLP.

  41. Haidee

    Who could forget the Briggs case – especially the Modern Woman on Overseas Posting who couldn’t manage a man making a pass.

    That would be good, Faye. You made me smile with the “Bernardi’s thoughts on Abbott as ACP leader?” anyone? lol

  42. I’m curious.
    How many gays are there in the Parliamentary Liberal Party who refuse to allow a referendum on unnatural marriage?

  43. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    No way, Cory hates his guts and I think the feeling is mutual.

    People can make up when necessary. Abbott should be speaking to Bernardi, now. Where else does he have to go?

    I’d like to see the Australian Conservatives rise to become a significant party in the Reps as well as in the Senate. The name itself sends a good message.

    Most people are conservative at heart. They want to keep what they have and improve it for their children, live according to established principles they were brought up to respect, treat others kindly but fairly and not have too much change too soon.

    Conservative? Vote here.

  44. Squirrel

    The Australian debt bomb is due to go off quite soon, so the Labor/Green politicians who have done so much to contribute to the scale of the pending explosion (assisted by their mates in the progressive media) should, in all fairness, have their hands on the levers of power when things get interesting.

    Whatever configuration the centre/right has in the Parliament at that time, the real issue is to have workable plans for when they next get into power, and to avoid silly, undeliverable promises (particularly on election eve).

  45. Perfidious Albino

    “We have to destroy the village in order to save it” or words to that effect…

  46. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Indeed Haidee, the Briggs case.
    I am beginning to appreciate your comments here. At last.
    People are surprising; let’s hope that Abbott and Bernardi can be. 🙂

  47. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    politicians who have done so much to contribute to the scale of the pending explosion (assisted by their mates in the progressive media) should, in all fairness, have their hands on the levers of power when things get interesting.

    That’s the general case for letting Labor win the next election.
    There is one hell of a bump coming and a big mess to clean up after that.
    Trouble is, as Venezuela shows, people tend to think more socialism will cure bumps.
    It doesn’t, of course. But they keep on voting for it even while standing in bread lines.

  48. Tel

    How many gays are there in the Parliamentary Liberal Party who refuse to allow a referendum on unnatural marriage?

    None. It was blocked in the Senate by the cross bench, the Greens and the ALP. That should basically be then end of the matter until next election.

  49. GerardO

    The only thing stopping Abbott from being PM again is:
    *The spectacular failure of his first Prime Ministership
    *Being widely despised (outside of Catallaxy-style echo chambers)
    *[That’s unnecessary. Sinc]

    Apart from that, it’s ‘ALL ABOARD THE TONY TRAIN!’

  50. Neil

    The Australian debt bomb is due to go off quite soon,

    It is upsetting to know that Costello celebrated debt free day in 2005 when he announced the Commonwealth was debt free. By 2007 we had $44B in the kitty (3.8% of GDP) earning $1B/year in income.

    Our debt is still relatively low compared to most Western countries with one big difference.Most of our debt is foreign. We do not have enough savers in this country to lend the govt money. Most Western countries can fund their budget deficits from their own people meaning interest on the debt goes to local savers and stays in the country. Our goes overseas never to return.

  51. Infidel Tiger

    *[That’s unnecessary. Sinc]

    It’s true. He is friends with too many ABC staffers and ALP members.

  52. candy

    *[That’s unnecessary. Sinc]

    I suspect GerardO is saying Tony ABbott is a [edited. Sinc].

    Why does Prof.D. let such comments go by?

    [Candy – contrary to popular belief the blog is not live-moderated. Sinc]

  53. Memory Vault, have you had enough time sucking on the bong? Now if you don’t like what I have written, give me your reasons.

    My apologies, Faye. My comment was over the top. I just get frustrated at the lack of political reality here sometimes most times. If we are ever going to accomplish anything, we have to proceed by aiming for the doable, not the dreamable.

    For Bernardi to win government – as you suggest – would require the ACP to gain the preference votes of just under three million people at the next election. It is doubtful that even a tenth of that number have ever even heard of Bernardi and the ACP, let alone are likely to vote for them.

    Prior to the last election a regular here was confidently predicting the ALA would get 24% of the first preference vote. In most seats they were lucky to achieve triple digit numbers. Clive Palmer threw $12 million (at least) at the 2013 election, and won precisely one federal HoR seat.

    Failing an Act of God Labor will almost certainly win the next election in a landslide, which will be a disaster for Australia. There is a minuscule chance that the LNP could scrape home on the back of minor party preferences (ACP, PHON, ALA etc), which would be just as big a disaster. Or those same preferences could actually deliver a paper thin majority to the LNP, which would be the biggest disaster of all, since it would only convince them they needed to go even further left.

    Go back and read Tim Nielson’s excellent post at 3.38pm. It is as good an analysis of the situation as you’re going to get. As he explains, the only way forward is for people to cast an informal vote in the HoR, and vote for the minor conservative parties in the Senate. An obvious corollary to this is that the Minors shouldn’t be running HoR candidates at all, since they’re not going to win anyway – not yet at least – and doing so only increases the chances of one of three scenarios I outlined above by funneling votes to Labor and the Libs via preferences.

    Eventually winning government will require money, time, effort, public exposure, research and resources. The best – in fact only way – for the Minors to accumulate these things is by increasing their presence in the Senate. This also has the benefit of acting as shield for the rest of us, against the excesses of whoever does win government at the next election.

  54. cui bono

    Hopefully not so dark a ‘lived experience’ for Aussies Dr F, but it will only be the discomfort of a downturn that convinces enough ‘presently disengaged’ voters that politics does matter.
    That it does matter how much tax a worker pays and how that tax is spent.
    It will be in that environment that a strong clear centre-right message will resonate. Like-minded people will group to find our Maggie Thatcher, while our David Cameron fronts Labor Branch fund raisers in support of action on climate change.

  55. I think Zyconoclast posted this a year or so ago:

    “The danger to America is not Barack Obama, but a citizenry capable of entrusting a man like him with the presidency. It will be far easier to limit and undo the follies of an Obama presidency than to restore the necessary common sense and good judgment to a depraved electorate willing to have such a man for their president. The problem is much deeper and far more serious than Mr. Obama, who is a mere symptom of what ails America. Blaming the prince of the fools should not blind anyone to the vast confederacy of fools that made him their prince. The republic can survive a Barack Obama, who is, after all, merely a fool. It is less likely to survive a multitude of fools, such as those who made him their president.”

    It holds true today for Australia as much as it did for the US.

  56. Haidee

    If only more people had the nerve …. to cast that informal vote

  57. Dr Faustus:

    Much as the Brits did from 1974 to 1979, most Australians need to look into the abyss before accepting economic conservatism.

    Yep.
    Let it burn.
    Every generation must learn for itself that the top of the stove is hot.

  58. JC

    It is upsetting to know that Costello celebrated debt free day in 2005 when he announced the Commonwealth was debt free. By 2007 we had $44B in the kitty (3.8% of GDP) earning $1B/year in income.

    Our debt is still relatively low compared to most Western countries with one big difference.Most of our debt is foreign. We do not have enough savers in this country to lend the govt money. Most Western countries can fund their budget deficits from their own people meaning interest on the debt goes to local savers and stays in the country. Our goes overseas never to return.

    People always seem to have a problem understanding deficits and debt.

  59. Irreversible

    Blah. Blah. Blah.
    Here’s the list of candidates that fit the alternative conservative leader category:

    1. Abbott
    2. Dutton
    3. Andrews

    Each is a gift to Shorten, who is otherwise unelectable.

    Fact is that governments do not appeal to a “base” unless they are corrupt, like the ALP. They govern for a nation, which requires a step away from sectional interest.

  60. Makka

    Now we know why that fat airhead Payne got elevated to take care of the Nations Defence and why the portfolio with ALL THAT SPENDING was split to house the gay parasite, Pyne.

    To payback the Blackhand. Good name actually – the kiss of death.

  61. Neil

    People always seem to have a problem understanding deficits and debt.

    Please explain?

    I believe our Federal govt debt is now approx 20% of GDP up from minus 3.8% in 2007. Our budget deficits add to this every year and have to be funded by borrowing. 70% from overseas.

  62. Muddy

    I’ve made my thoughts on this topic known multiple times previously, so I shan’t repeat them, but they are along similar lines as Tim Nielson and memoryvault have written. I will be watching the Australian Conservatives closely, and hope that in time, they can build something we deserve.

    Winston, your Zyconoclast quote is spot on. We have the power, but we frequently choose to waste it. We don’t value our vote. WE are the masters.

  63. Tel

    Failing an Act of God Labor will almost certainly win the next election in a landslide, which will be a disaster for Australia.

    There you go, at least we will be able to resolve that old question for once and for all.

  64. Jannie

    Shorten’s ALP will make Whitlam’s experiment look like a success. It has to get worse before it gets better but two terms for the socialists will be enough to make reform impossible. The political future makes me feel lucky to be old.

  65. Tel

    http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibition/holsworthy/the-black-hand/index.html

    Fourteen other Black Hand members were later arrested and thrown into the camp gaol and after that the Camp quietened down to the usual routine.

    From the evidence given at the Coronial Inquest into the death of Portman in Sydney on the 10th of May 1916 it is clear there was no political motive behind the Black Hand gang and extortion and stand over tactics was its main objective.

    So there you go.

  66. Tel

    http://gangstersinc.ning.com/profiles/blogs/italian-australian-gangsters-criminals/

    In 1928, Vincenzo D’Agostino arrived in Brisbane from Milan. With a small but thriving community of Italian migrants having taken root in Ingham, he set his sights on the small rural town and settled there. Though a baker by trade, unlike most of his kin D’Agostino was evidently not prepared to sweat for his earn, and the Milanese attracted to himself a gang of criminal Italians consisting of several small time thugs and cut-throats. (Known members the gang would eventually be identified by victims and police as Vincenzo Speranzo, Niccolo Mammone, Giuseppe Parisi, Giuseppe Buette, Domenico Belle and Francesco Femio, men that had in most cases been in Australia for a short time and were known as violent, petty criminals and conmen)

    Via the extortionate practice of the ‘Black Hand’, D’Agostino and his crew began demanding payments from fellow Italians, mostly farmers and labourers, banking on traditional fears backed up with implicit threats of violence. If ignored, they would first destroy livestock, poison water supplies and ruin crops. Further refusal would result in bodily harm to the victim and/or his family. There was a string of fire-bombings in and around Ingham during this time linked to extortion attempts. Failing persuasion, victims were murdered. During the years of D’Agostino’s peak (late 20’s, early 30’s), a number of murders took place around the Queensland cane fields. At least eleven are documented directly in relation to D’Agostino and his crew.

  67. Oh come on

    Too Late Tony doesn’t deserve another shot. The Libs need to go down, Hindenburg-style. Who cares if this means the ALP win the next election? We could debate about whether the Libs are driving the country towards the cliff’s edge at a slightly slower pace than the ALP would if they were behind the wheel, but this seems like a monumental waste of time to me. We’re going over the cliff, by hook or by crook.

    Better to burn the Libs to the ground and see what arises from the ashes.

  68. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Shorten’s ALP will make Whitlam’s experiment look like a success.

    I’m betting on a return of death duties, and a wealth tax of some sort.

  69. Oh come on

    Oh, and there’s one thing that’s being overlooked in Pyne’s skiting – yes it’s unseemly and yes he’s a dissembling weasel but the situation as he describes it in the Liberal Party is exactly right.

  70. I’m betting on a return of death duties, and a wealth tax of some sort.

    It’s going to be exercised via residual super funds on death. However, it’s already penciled in for implementation, regardless of who is in government when the time comes.

  71. Tel

    http://awn.bz/MafiaTriadGangsAustralia.html

    The history of the ‘Ndrangheta in Australia begins in Queensland in the early 20th century, when, between 1928 and 1940, 10 murders and 30 attempted murders were attributed by authorities to the Calabrian Black Hand organisation. The disappearance in 1977 of Griffith Liberal politician Donald Mackay is well known, while fans of Underbelly are familiar with the exploits of Australian ‘Ndrangheta boss Robert Trimbole.

    In 1994, an ‘Ndrangheta parcel bomb delivered to the Adelaide office of the National Crime Authority killed NCA investigator Geoffrey Bowen, who was due to give evidence about an ‘Ndrangheta cannabis operation the following day. Before being blown up with members of his police escort by a massive mafia bomb in 1992, Sicilian judge Giovanni Falcone had followed the ‘Ndrangheta money trail to Australia, while Nicola Calipari (the Italian secret service agent who died tragically in a hail of American bullets in Iraq in 2005 while rescuing Italian journalist Giuliana Sgrena) also came to Australia on a secret ‘Ndrangheta-related mission in 1988.

    His report, along with the Adelaide and Canberra mafia initiation texts, has been published for the first time in Australian ‘ndrangheta. Earlier this year, Italian police sought the extradition of Calabrian former mayor of the city of Stirling in Perth, Tony Vallelonga, in connection with suspicious conversations secretly recorded between him and ‘Ndrangheta boss Giuseppe Commisso while the ex-mayor was visiting his home town in Calabria.

  72. Marcus Classis

    John C:

    Turnbull holds unswervingly to the polling that shows shorten is unelectable, and has always trailed turnbull as preferred leader.

    Therefore it makes sense to turnbull to neutralise labor on policy and fight the election on leader personality.

    The second most despised person in Australia, fighting the most despised person in Australia.

    How could it go wrong?

    Dunno. Hmmmmm……

    Maybe Campbell Newman could give the Turdball a hint?

  73. Julian the deplorable

    Chris was also the meat in the sandwich with the Slipper – Ashby affair. Hmmmmm interesting.

  74. Harry

    Hey the wisdom of the great Trumble is stunning. Amazing and spectacular political strategy —> wedge Shorten and the ALP soooo far to the ridiculous left, so that it’s not funny. Then Trumble carks it … arranges to get hit by a bus. Leaving the budgie to sneak back to the far off centre and pull off an easy win in the next election, where the ALP is relegated to oblivion by the Greens (who actually are also in oblivion)!

    Yeah well, we can all dream a bit AND remember the in-famous words … “look on the brighter side of life, te dum”

    At least the Kiwis have the All Blacks😶

  75. Marcus Classis

    There’s always been malice-filled whispers that Miss Prissy Pyne is a sexual deviant/ pervert/ rockspider/ tontine fanger etc etc. Such whisperers are idiots given what a loathesome thing he really is.

    It’s all BS. The guy was a fairly well known root-rat in SA, who has stuck to his missus since being married.

    So focus on what he IS, not on what he is not.

    And he is now clearly demonstrated by his own voice to be a duplicitous chancer, a treacherous, slimy, two-faced, coat-turning, untrustworthy, backstabbing, lying swine of a left-wing dirtbag of the first order.

    And those are his good points.

    Plenty to focus on there without nonsensical rubbish about him being a pervert.

  76. Sean

    Probably the only hope is to run hard on how the ALP would undo stopping boats at the next election. The ALP are soft in this area and the electorate know it.

  77. cohenite

    I’m selling all real estate except the family home and stocking the safe with ingots and guns.

  78. Rob MW

    There isn’t any doubt that Bill Shorten and the ALP fully endorse Malcolm Turnbull as leader of the Liberal Party and current Prime Minister.

    What is unclear however, is whether or not Bill Shorten and the ALP fully endorse Christopher Pyne as a party hole, of some sort, that either sucking or blowing depending on the bent of the situation.

  79. OldOzzie

    With Friends Like Malcolm

    Malcolm Turnbull’s webpage tells the story of Malcolm Turnbull’s average weighted priorities.
    Wednesday, 28 June 2017 – H/T Michael Smith News

    Thanks to Tim Andrews for the tip!

    On the Prime Minister’s website – you know, the one with the M logo – you’ll find the following word mentions:

    Malcolm – 56 times
    Turnbull – 47 times
    Liberal – nil. Nothing. Zip. Nada. Not a sausage. Bugger all.

  80. OldOzzie

    Liberals Unbelievable Again- Love to slam the Taxpayers, Self Funded Retirees, Pensions, Banks whilst at the same time handing out Taxpayers Money with Gay Abandon

    How in the Hell does Lord Waffles of Wentworth Turdbull and the Turdbull Coalition/Labor-Lite Liberals justify this

    Turnbull’s $625,000 Ramadan grant to Basher Houli’s program two days after the Basher KO’d Jed Lamb –

    here’s the Turnbull speech

    Off the ball.

    A mongrel act.

    And after two days to think about it – this from Turnbull.

    Now I’m delighted to be here to announce the government’s continued support for the Bachar Houli Cup and Leadership Program. And I want to wish everyone here and all those in the wider Australian Muslim community a joyful Eid-al-Fitr.

    Eid Mubarak!

    Eid marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. It’s a month of spiritual reflection, forgiveness and compassion. By fasting, through acts of charity, Muslims take time in Ramadan to remember those in our community who are less fortunate.
    Celebrations like this one today and all those around the nation remind us of our success as a multicultural society.

    So when do you hold a Celebration for the Catholics/Buddhists/Anglicans/Hindus etc – Malcolm or do you only appear at Muslim Functions?

  81. OldOzzie

    From Tim Blair Blog

    Sky’s Paul Murray takes aim at Christopher Pyne and does not miss.

    Enjoy.

    Also from Paul, comparative Turnbull/Shorten personal preference results:

    Paul Murray ✔ @PMOnAir
    You know you are in trouble when fewer people trust you to mind their pets than babysit their kids.
    #auspol #pmlive
    1:37 PM – 27 Jun 2017

    The question about helping with home renovations really should have included a Julia Gillard option.

  82. Crossie

    I have already written to the Prime Minister that I will not vote Liberal as long as Christopher Pyne is in the Liberal Party. I understand that his remaining in Paliament depends on South Australian voters however, wheteher he remains a Liberal deoends on Malcolm and therefore whether I vote Liberal at the next election.

  83. I am the Walras, Equilibrate, and Price-Take

    It’s all BS. The guy was a fairly well known root-rat in SA

    Who on earth was desperate enough to take the other side of that trade??

    ‘Hay thay’re, ah’m Chris Pahne, how’s about yau cahm back to mahn and we make the beast with the two backs?’

    Seriously? The mind boggles.

  84. Leo G

    “I apologise to anyone they have offended. My remarks were ill chosen and unwise and I can see how unhelpful and damaging they have been” – Christopher Pyne

    That’s more like it Chris. Your frank and truthful remarks were out of character. We appreciate they were the result of a momentary aberration and note your assurance that it won’t be repeated.

  85. Sean

    Pyne is a smug prick, but I doubt any of the conservatives currently wetting the bed haven’t made similar comments to their own group when they thought they were off the record. He just got caught out. It’s not like people expect every member of the party to have the exact same opinion.

  86. marcus

    On the Prime Minister’s website – you know, the one with the M logo – you’ll find the following word mentions:

    Malcolm – 56 times
    Turnbull – 47 times
    Liberal – nil. Nothing. Zip. Nada. Not a sausage. Bugger all.

    Good to see someone taking up my invitation 🙂

    The pic/graphic over at Michael Smith’s looks great.

    Thanks Old Ozzie

  87. marcus

    OldOzzie – thanks also for your story regarding the stone.

    I know the quote as I’m a mad NBA basketball fan and it has been posted in the San Antonio Spurs locker room for the last 20 or so years.

  88. marcus

    Folks, please refrain from posting for at least 30 minutes after sucking on the bong.

    Memoryvault – this wins my award for best comment on this post. It was horribly harsh – and you were right to apologise to Faye (good on you engaging her on the substance) – but I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t rolling around in stitches!

    PS: I disagree that informal voting is the answer. My views on this issue (from the last election) are here:

    https://themarcusreview.com/2016/06/20/editorial-how-to-vote-conservative/

  89. OldOzzie

    Marcus re your link above on voting HOR Senate – basically how I did it st the last Federal Election and Many State By-election where I put Photios pick James Griffin Liberal last – no Labor but would have put him after Labor

  90. OldOzzie

    Sorry Mobile big fingers Manly By-election

  91. Diogenes

    I think Faye is partially correct. My in-laws, as branch secretary & President, over the period of 20 years helped make one of the safest Country party seats into going ALP (after this they had a falling out with party (parachuting in an apparatchik instead of the guy who did the work to get the seat) & ended strong PHON supporters).
    Select good candidates, and get them some grass roots help. Start early – not the day the election is called,keep the same same candidate over several elections. Targeted mail outs, with a follow up door knock, attending and speaking at all sorts of local events, getting their mugs in the paper making comment on local issues, eg the Wyong Chronically Ill seems to run Green candidate’s press releases unchanged, alongthe lines “under our policy local residents will see an improvement in X by Y , set up stands at the local markets, flyer bus interchanges & railway stations get name recognition for both the candidate & the party (eg the first time I saw the local lib candidate’s name was at the booth – most people in the former Wyong Shire loathe our former mayor m, but people recognise his name). A lot of this stuff is relatively cheap but time consuming, but done over 2 or 3 cycles …

  92. Peko

    Pyne is on the right side of history, but maybe not on the right side of his party.

  93. Leo G

    And he is now clearly demonstrated by his own voice to be a duplicitous chancer, a treacherous, slimy, two-faced, coat-turning, untrustworthy, backstabbing, lying swine of a left-wing dirtbag of the first order.
    And those are his good points.

    You’ve been too long on preselection committees.

  94. Dr Fred Lenin

    Can you imagine the destruction Bob Menzies would wreak on the “liberal communists ” like that littlr poofter pyne ,the bastards would be in tears ,hiding under the bed ,still I suppose reds are used to being under beds . Interlekchools mocked = the reds under the bed idea ,but it was true. ,they trained the oresent lot who have infiltrated every institution Sovietism by Stealth ,stuff the revolution,we might get hurt.]’

  95. Pyne is the only Liberal Party elected member more loathsome than Turnbull. A low-down, treacherous, socialist creep.

    Hmmm, don’t forget Bishop and all the rest, there’s only a nanometre between them all for loathsomeness, especially Bishop.

    She’s been very quiet of late, don’t take your eye off her, I keep wondering if she’s taken the low profile to emerge as the front runner to replace Maladroit as PM if there is a spill. She’d be another Gillard pandering to the UN, throwing our money at the likes of the Clintons and any “project” that raises her profile and gets her a seat on the UN gravy train post-politics here. Rest assured, “our Julie” has ambitions far beyond the dusty shores of Australia.

  96. Nom de plume

    I tried your little game, and expanded it to trying the word ‘values’. It only comes up once, in a Tweet about the values of those competing in the Invictus Games. Does Malcolm Turnbull MP have any?

  97. Suave Dave

    Great piece, marcus. Thank you.

  98. Faye

    memoryvault, I appreciate your apology but there is no need. All’s fair in love and war. I do appreciate your taking the time to explain your reasoning to me although I see where marcus doesn’t agree with your “informal voting” answer. When my husband and I voted in July 2016, we researched how to vote conservatively and did so below the line.

  99. Faye

    So marcus I made you laugh. That’s good. I suspect I made you cry too. I appreciated memoryvault taking the time to explain his reasons to me. I guess you were rolling around in stitches for the same reasons he had to go suck on the bong.

  100. When my husband and I voted in July 2016, we researched how to vote conservatively and did so below the line.

    Voting “below the line” refers to voting for the Senate, Faye. My comments about casting an informal vote apply only to the HoR. In the Senate the only hope is to vote “below the line” for a group of minor party/independent candidates who will hopefully keep the bastards reasonably honest.

  101. PS: I disagree that informal voting is the answer.
    My views on this issue (from the last election) are here:

    I’m glad my reply to Fay gave you a giggle, Marcus.
    I read your post on voting conservative prior to the last election.
    And again just now. My Reader’s Digest take on it:

    “Vote Liberal coz at least they’re not Labor”.

    One would have thought after sixty years of the same failed plan, Textorites might be ready to try something different. But apparently not. Oh well. Now you’re going to get Shorten anyway.

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