Cross Post: John Adams Bernardi fails national economic test

Update: The Spectator cut a paragraph from John’s original op-ed. It is restored below in bold.

~*~

Senator Cory Bernardi, as the leader of Australian Conservatives, has failed his first critical national economic test.

A fortnight ago, Bernardi issued his weekly ‘common sense’ e-mail to supporters calling on Australia to force Qatar to divest billions of dollars of investment in Australia due to Qatar’s role in funding international Islamic terrorism.

Bernardi’s rationale is that Australia should deal with other nations with the ‘ethic of reciprocity’.

However, Bernardi’s so-called ‘common sense’ call to arms fails on several grounds which brings into question his ability to develop and formulate public policy and lead a forward-looking, proactive political movement.

Were Australia to force Qatar to divest its Australia’s holdings, this would dramatically increase sovereign risk among non-European and non-North American companies and investors who would view such a dramatic policy shift in the context of Australia’s long history of being hostile to non-western sources of foreign capital.

Greater sovereign risk would place existing and additional investments and thereby jobs and economic growth in jeopardy.

Moreover, Bernardi’s singling out of Qatar, with no mention of Saudi Arabia, is completely disingenuous and ineffective given that Saudi Arabia is the largest funder of global terrorism.

Hence, if Bernardi believes that it is common sense for Australia to impose an economic embargo on Qatar, then it makes even more common sense for Australia to impose an economic embargo on Saudi Arabia as well as other Islamic countries that have a history of funding international Islamic terrorism such as Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates.

Yet even if these flaws were not concerning enough, Bernardi’s policy position demonstrates a complete failure to accurately analyse core economic issues facing Australia.

Australians have historically lived an unsustainable lifestyle involving high rates of consumption and debt as well as low rates of savings. Australia’s current circumstances are no different and our unsustainable lifestyle has been amplified through a flawed monetary policy framework as well as consumption-and debt-encouraging tax and welfare policies.

As a result, Australia’s lack of national savings (both nongovernment and government) means that Australia has, and continues to, rely on foreigners to fund both its consumption and investment requirements. This has occurred through the sale of our assets (mainly through sales of company equity and of direct assets such as agricultural land) and the racking up of foreign debt which is currently at a historic high in excess of $AUD 1 trillion (or 63 per cent of GDP as of June 2016).

Hence, whether it is Cory Bernardi, Pauline Hanson or Alan Jones or other nationalistic conservative populists who rail against non-western sources of foreign investment, the underlying public policy issue is not the purity of foreign capital, but rather Australian culture and the ‘Australian way of life’ which has largely been defined by white Australians of Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Celtic heritage dating back to transported British convicts with respect to attitudes regarding the philosophical purpose of life, work, money, entrepreneurship, risk, savings and investment.

Australian history consists of a plethora of anecdotal stories from immigrants who came to Australia from continental Europe following World War II who were caught up in the ‘wog’ cultural phenomena, whether they be Polish, Greek, Italian or Macedonian (both Christian and Jewish) among others.

These stories indicate that the rationale for social friction in the 1950s, sixties and seventies between British and Irish Australians and continental Europeans went beyond language, food, dress and skin colour, but also encompassed differences in attitudes to work, consumption, savings and wealth creation, particularly when differences in wealth and social status became observable and therefore generated social resentment.

If Australian Conservatives or Pauline Hanson’s One Nation are serious in protecting Australia’s national economic sovereignty from perceived untoward foreign capital, then they are must stare down their own voter base of largely older Australians of British and Irish heritage and the broader electorate and tell them that while government is only part of the problem behind Australia’s mounting challenges, the voters themselves are the greater problem.

Singling out foreign nations (irrespective of the merits) as a policy announcement may make some conservative and nationalistic voters feel good, but does nothing to solve Australia’s underlying economic and social challenges.

The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

A fundamental cultural transformation is required to effectively eliminate Australia’s mammoth foreign debt and investment capital deficit. Australian households need to dramatically lift their saving rates close to 40 per cent rather than the 4.7 per cent which was reported in the March 2017 National Accounts by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Changes in public policy can provide more incentives for Australians to save and fund domestic investment, but fundamentally we must change.

We must live simpler, work harder, sacrifice more, create more value and be willing to embrace entrepreneurship, industry and commercial risk.

Only then may we be able to create real prosperity and our own capital base, while simultaneously protecting Australia’s national economic sovereignty and interests by reducing our reliance on foreign capital.

This may be an unpopular political message, but this is what Australians need to be told.

This is real leadership. This is real conservatism.

John Adams is a former Coalition Advisor. This op-ed first appeared in The Spectator Australia. 

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75 Responses to Cross Post: John Adams Bernardi fails national economic test

  1. Leo G

    We must live simpler, work harder, sacrifice more, create more value and be willing to embrace entrepreneurship, industry and commercial risk.

    How does living simpler, working harder and sacrificing more, create more value in our lives when government and corporate elites increasingly eschew entrepreneurship, industry and commercial risk.

  2. jupes

    The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

    You’re trolling right?

    Either that or move to North Korea you dipstick.

  3. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Don’t force them to divest the assets, CONFISCATE THEM!!

    Time to stop being pussies with islamofascism

  4. The Hunted Mind

    Another white-hating nanny state fkwit. And … wait for it … he’s a former Coalition Advisor! Thus hilariously demonstrating why people are turning to Bernardi and Hanson in the first place.

  5. David from Canberra

    Let me summarise this essay:
    (1) Bernadi singles out Qatar to disinvest when Saudi Arabia “is the largest funder of global terrorism” Really? Proof please. I seriously doubt it. Note the tense, the claim is that SA is the largest funder now.
    (2) Extended to cause disinvestment by other ME countries “a history of funding international Islamic terrorism”. Really? Proof please. By “history” do you mean they funded terrorism a century ago but are now our firm allies?
    (3) Argument extended again based upon Australian attitudes towards immigrants immediately after the second World War – 72 years ago. Continues meandering for several paragraphs into the 50s, 60s and 70s – 62, 52 and 42 years ago*. What point he is trying to make is unclear – maybe that our parents, grandparents and great-grandparents were bad people so therefore we are bad people now? We inherit the sins of our forebears? I dunno.
    (4) States an established fact that the membership of Bernadi and PH are “largely older Australians of British and Irish heritage”. Really? Proof please. Sounds like speculation and personal bias.
    (5) Another pejorative paragraph against the “typical Aussie”. Ok, whatever
    (6) Finish off with a few motherhood statements that have no relationship to the statements made in the preceding paragraphs.

    *taking the mid-point of each decade

  6. The Hunted Mind

    The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

    The fking nerve of this guy. We need to spend less? Us? Not the government? Us? I’ll spend whatever the fk I like. You shut the fk up and tax me less so I can spend more, xunt.

  7. Brett

    Surely this is a joke; we are more likely to get ‘leadership’ and ‘conservatism’ from Bernardi than from the Manchurian Turnbull and his faux Labor government. The Liberal Party is dead, and any rational conservative knows that they must look elsewhere for representation and vote for the emergent parties like the Australian Conservatives.

    And as for this:

    Australian households need to dramatically lift their saving rates close to 40 per cent rather than the 4.7 per cent which was reported in the March 2017 National Accounts

    The primary method by which Australian save is superannuation. If Turnbull and Co stopped attacking it as a convenient pot of money to to offset their grossly irresponsible spending then people might be more inclined to contribute more. As it stands, why would you; because the rules today are very unlikely to the rules tomorrow, the money you contribute is conveniently is locked up for the next government cash grab.

  8. Entropy

    This reads like someone complaining about the mote in some other dude’s eye while blinded himself by a lump of four by three.

  9. Baldrick

    Give us a break!

    John Adams has over 7 years experience in working within the Federal Government arena both as a member of the Australian Public Service, a policy consultant to government clients and recently a policy advisor to a federal senator, Arthur Sinodinos.
    John has a passion for public policy and a particular interest in regulatory reform, economic policy and public sector and corporate governance.

  10. hzhousewife

    We must live simpler, work harder, sacrifice more, create more value and be willing to embrace entrepreneurship, industry and commercial risk.

    Why on earth would we do these things just so that the Government (Public Servants) can take all our residual Superannuation and apply death Taxes to whatever is left?

  11. Myrddin Seren

    Baldrick

    …recently a policy advisor to a federal senator, Arthur Sinodinos.

    Ah hahahahaha !

    So the subtext of this article is really:

    Dear Chickens

    Please put all your nest eggs here in a very large pile. It is for the collective good of the farm.

    Thanks
    The Foxes

  12. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Why do we allow John Adams to post here?

  13. RobK

    JA,
    I’m not sure you’ve established that Cori has failed an actual test. A test of opinions, perhaps.

  14. custard

    Note to self

    read more

  15. Tim Neilson

    We must live simpler, work harder, sacrifice more, create more value and be willing to embrace entrepreneurship, industry and commercial risk.

    No.

    Step one is for government to stop squandering vast sums of money on counterproductive national vandalism like “renewable energy”.

    Step two is for governments to stop squandering vast sums of money on favoured identity groups.

    Step three is for government to get rid of stifling regulations that are destroying productivity, and ruinous taxes that destroy businesses.

    Step four, when the budget starts to self correct, and people are able to get real reward for their efforts, is for government to turn off the spigot of unnecessary “welfare”, since people should then be able to fend for themselves if they choose to do so.

    If, at that point, people can’t pay for their chosen lifestyle, then tough luck for them. Then, maybe some people will find that they “must” make changes, but it will be up to them to decide what those changes are.

    But two things don’t make the list at all:
    (a) mandated virtue for the masses; and
    (b) second guessing foreign policy decisions, on the presumption that we have to keep sucking jihadist’s dicks or they won’t like us any more.

  16. I do love the para where ‘we’ must tighten our belts and live the frugal life of peasants (being imposed on us already due to the Green insanity). Where’s the government’s contribution to it’s own belt-tightening?

    Every time another Liberal Party hack opens their mouth, it adds more reason to not support the Liberal Party in any shape or form. Keep at it, soon you won’t have one member remaining.

  17. marcus

    The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

    I’m going to go right ahead and politely decline this article’s invitation to eradicate human behaviour.

    This tripe belongs in Pravda.

    Let me know when the chocolate rationing begins…

  18. Ray

    The purpose of economic growth is to improve our standard of living. How does living simpler achieve this?

    For thousands of years, humans lived simply and their reward for this was stagnant GDP per capita.

    Rather than living simpler, we need to encourage innovation, which means working smarter and encouraging investment. The reward for working smarter and greater investment is an increased standard of living and of that means more leisure time, more toys and expensive holidays then so be it. Indeed, the leisure time which Australians enjoy today are the dividends for investment and innovation made by our ancestors. Take away that reward and the incentive investment and innovation goes as well.

    There is much that is wrong with Australian economic policy but simpler living is not the solution.

  19. The Hunted Mind

    Why do we allow John Adams to post here?

    And how was this an op-ed in The Spectator?

  20. Confused Old Misfit

    TIGER 2.0

    As you well know, to defeat your enemy you must know him better than your friends (per some ancient).

    It is well to be occasionally subjected, at arms length, to their slimy perfidy.

  21. Rob MW

    A fortnight ago, Bernardi issued his weekly ‘common sense’ e-mail to supporters calling on Australia to force Qatar to divest billions of dollars of investment in Australia due to Qatar’s role in funding international Islamic terrorism.

    Bernardi’s rationale is that Australia ……………..”

    Bernardi’s rationale is self explanatory. Of course it would be much more efficient if Australia dealt directly with the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas or Al Quaeda on investment proposals. The economics of terrorism sponsorship is not at your discretion dipshit.

  22. Even BBQ’s have to be eliminated !

    I particularly like the bit about people should save 40%. I have no doubt his mate Sinodinos was able to save 40% of his Sydney Water directorship fees.

    If author was a Coalition advisor it is no wonder the country is screwed.

  23. Suburban Boy

    What a bizarre piece.

    Casting Bernardi as some sort of crusader trying to protect Australian culture from the perfidious Wog is laughable. For God’s sake, Bernardi’s father was an Italian immigrant.

  24. john malpas

    “We must live simpler, work harder, sacrifice more, ”
    When I came to Australia in 1961 the population was about ten million or so . It is more than double that now. And who paid for all those new schools, roads, prisons , politicians etc etc. ?
    People like me.
    I even did some breeding which is more than the current lot do.
    And what’s in it for me – now I am an old untermensch.

  25. Confused Old Misfit

    If author was a Coalition advisor it is no wonder the country is screwed.

    It really gets depressing when you consider the mindset of the cretins that hire them. It really illustrates the parlous mental capacity of our elected representatives and, I cringe to say it, the electorate.

  26. jupes

    Step one is for government to stop squandering vast sums of money on counterproductive national vandalism like “renewable energy”…

    … Step 5 is to stop engaging in crony capitalism like paying dodgy companies such as Australian Water Holdings millions of taxpayer dollars so they in turn can pay millions of dollars to former politicians for securing contracts on top of the hundreds of thousands of dollars these cronies are already hoovering from the taxpayer for doing a couple of days work.

    The commission has heard Senator Sinodinos – a former AWH director and NSW Liberal Party treasurer – stood to make up to $20 million if AWH won a lucrative contract with the state-owned Sydney Water company.

    There may not be a law against what Sinodinos did but there should be. And I bet Adams wasn’t advising Sinodinos to stop eating out at restaurants or stop going on holidays.

    Fancy being lectured to by someone who advised that prick. What is happening to the Cat?

  27. A Lurker

    Hence, whether it is Cory Bernardi, Pauline Hanson or Alan Jones or other nationalistic conservative populists who rail against non-western sources of foreign investment, the underlying public policy issue is not the purity of foreign capital, but rather Australian culture and the ‘Australian way of life’ which has largely been defined by white Australians of Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Celtic heritage dating back to transported British convicts with respect to attitudes regarding the philosophical purpose of life, work, money, entrepreneurship, risk, savings and investment.

    I didn’t read any further – that paragraph alone was enough evidence to tell me exactly where the author sat on the political spectrum and that anti-Conservative, anti-Anglo-Saxon bias was his underlying agenda.

  28. sabena

    Here’s a link to his Linked in profile:
    https://au.linkedin.com/in/jadams1796
    I fail to detect anything in his CV which qualifies him to talk on the subject of foreign investment,the starting point of his article,let alone the other matters.

  29. A Lurker

    Australian households need to dramatically lift their saving rates close to 40 per cent rather than the 4.7 per cent which was reported in the March 2017 National Accounts

    What? So sometime down the S-bend-future the indebted Australian Government of some socialist hue will have more goodies to raid when they start targeting individual savings in the banks?

  30. Myrddin Seren

    … Step 5 is to stop engaging in crony capitalism like paying dodgy companies such as Australian Water Holdings millions of taxpayer dollars so they in turn can pay millions of dollars to former politicians for securing contracts on top of the hundreds of thousands of dollars these cronies are already hoovering from the taxpayer for doing a couple of days work.

    The now-apparent naked corruption surging through the Australian economy is one big reason why the cost of living is so appallingly high in this country. ( viz. Underbelly: ATO )

    And hence ( in part ) savings low.

    Zilch said on any of this.

  31. Peter Greagg

    To join the ‘pile-on:
    I am not sure what JA thinks is the objective of work, but to an old privileged white guy like me, it is to earn so I can consume what I want, when I want is (provided that consumption doesn’t hurt any one else)!

  32. Tim Neilson

    Step 5 is to stop engaging in crony capitalism like paying dodgy companies such as Australian Water Holdings millions of taxpayer dollars so they in turn can pay millions of dollars to former politicians for securing contracts on top of the hundreds of thousands of dollars these cronies are already hoovering from the taxpayer for doing a couple of days work.

    Thanks jupes.

    Forgot that one.

    And while we’re at it, instantly abolish all taxpayer funding, forever, for any organisation that lobbies for more “public funding”.

  33. Phill

    So, the vision expounded here is for all white australians to live in their yurts, burning cow shit for warmth, while the recent immigrants buy all of the real houses using welfare money. Its a great plan. True dinks.

  34. Harald

    Were Australia to force Qatar to divest its Australia’s holdings, this would dramatically increase sovereign risk among non-European and non-North American companies


    I don’t see this. If Australia were to slap sanctions on Qatar because they sponsor terrorism, it would actually be joining Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait, Egypt and other Middle East states in their efforts against Qatar. We would be helping them to clean up their neighbourhood. I think it was even the Saudi’s who initiated this. If anything, Australia would tighten relations with the Saudi’s more likely than to distance itself from them.

    Furthermore I don’t quite get the flow of this argument that:
    1. Bernardi wants sanctions on Qatar
    2. Therefore, according to the author’s projections, Bernardi must want sanctions on Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait.
    3. And that threat of sanctions against Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait would be bad for Australia.
    4. Therefore Bernardi fails, fails, fails The Economic Test!

    The flow of the logic here appears to fall apart at (2):
    Bernardi is not seeking to impose sanctions on those countries, just Qatar. In contrast, Bernardi is joining those countries in their actions against Qatar, even adopting their reasoning for imposing them. The author may be annoyed at some perceived ideological inconsistency on the part of Bernardi, but that does not change the fact that (2) simply does not hold.

    The rest reads as the usual tripe: projecting all manner of nativist, racist motives on Bernardi – the usual mudslinging in the hope something sticks. And the author throws in some contempt for what’s “Aussie”, for good measure:

    “… our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes …”

    After lamenting our failings, there is the verdict on all of us: “we must change!” But hardly a word on how that should be brought about. Dr. Phil is more constructive than this.

    This is a “strategist”…?

    The only “strategy” I read between the lines here, is an attack on Bernardi presumably out fear of too much of the Libs vote will walk off to join the Australian Conservatives.

    But the bright side:
    At least he’s not saying conservatives don’t matter. Up from irrelevant we are now promoted to being nativists and racists with an affinity for fat, gambling, alcohol, drugs tattoos and unnecessary home renovations who need to

  35. A Lurker

    The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

    Welcome to your Government-approved hovel, peasants. I’m sure the Government woudl approve the lack of house renovations.

  36. Rebel with cause

    Those material possessions are unnecessary Comrades.

  37. .

    John,

    I think you’ve been reading too much Lee “Crackpot” Ken Yew.

    Having free capital flows has got nothing necessarily with forced austerity, let alone the budget or nationalism or not.

    Eating out, 2nd hand boats, motorcycles, high end electronics are actually very cheap.

  38. RobK

    Hmm. Says John: that went down well.

  39. Senile Old Guy

    The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

    You’re trolling right?

    From time to time, there are pieces on this site that are closer to trolling than informed commentary and this is yet another. As noted by someone else, we have a large chunk of savings called ‘superannuation’. As noted by another, large pots of money invite politicians to go grabbing it to spend; as they have done with superannuation and are now doing with the bank tax.

    The sensible response to these tax grabs is to turn your money into something that makes it harder for the government to get and this will often mean spending it; but then the GST kicks in.

    Finally, because this is — okay, sometimes vaguely resembles — a free country, if I earn it, I decide how to spend it, even if it is on some things some twit deems unnecessary.

    Addendum. A motorcycle is a means of transportation; for many people, it is how they get to work and not a ‘fancy toy’. I’ll also note that computers and mobile phones (i.e. computers) are ‘high-end electronics’ but are indispensable for many.

  40. Rebel with cause

    I’ll start saving more when the Government lets me keep more of what I saved. Deal?

  41. Rebel with cause

    Savings are unnecessary for the vast majority of people when you have a firmly entrenched cradle to grave welfare system. What in heavens would they be saving for?

  42. Haidee

    Our “affinity” with sugar? the weekend away?
    Foolish attention-seeking.

    That attack on Bernardi. Feeble.
    Support for Bernardi will grow.

  43. Rohan

    …and tell them that while government is only part of the problem behind Australia’s mounting challenges, the voters themselves are the greater problem.

    That’s right, the people who get 1 say in 23 million (or whatever the voting population is) are the problem. But the government is the real problem because of arrogant narcissistic self interest and pushing their own version of the modern Marxist cause not the problem because they’re all altruistic an honest to a fault, tirelessly looking after the nation, supporting free enterprise, individual citizens interest, freedom and mutual prosperity.

    If this is what we can expect from an allegedly centre-right political party, then I want that party destroyed in its entirety. I’m so sick of this Marxist shit.

  44. max

    John Adams
    Australian people need : small government,small taxes and little regulation.

  45. Roger

    It seems that Bernardi is really getting under some Liberal skins.

    Good.

  46. Rabz

    John has a passion for telling people how to live their lives.

    Fixed. I actually save quite a bit, BTW and would be able to save even more if our beloved governments stopped stealing my money.

    Over the last three months I have paid $91,000 to two governments, one $47,000 CGT bill and one $44,000 theft duty bill on the purchase of my house (on which I may decide in the future to conduct some “necessary” renovations as it is about 80+ years old).

    So please kindly f*ck off good sir, you are an embarrassing idiot who appears to possess all the intellectual firepower of a peanut.

  47. Alfie

    I think John is advocating less spending on consumption so that people have a buffer in case things go bad – not so that the government can misappropriate your savings. He is not advocating a particular savings product such as superannuation in fact paying down debt is his central theme in all of his work.

  48. The Hunted Mind

    I think John is advocating less spending on consumption so that people have a buffer in case things go bad – not so that the government can misappropriate your savings. He is not advocating a particular savings product such as superannuation in fact paying down debt is his central theme in all of his work.

    I won’t be lectured to by the government or its representatives about paying down debt.

  49. A Lurker

    in fact paying down debt is his central theme in all of his work…

    Then he’d be better off first directing his sermon at the spendthrift State and Federal Governments before vexing the plebs with calls for frugality.

    p.s. I wonder if John Adams is aware that many people working in low paying jobs already live frugally, can’t save much, and many survive from paycheck to paycheck. I think John Adams ought to ‘check his own privilege first’ before asking ordinary, knockabout Aussies to check theirs.

  50. Jo Smyth

    Cory Bernardi hasn’t been getting much publicity over the past months. Now all of a sudden he is because of the pathetic Liberals. Lots of people have said they are switching to the Australian Conservatives so now Cory will find he is in the firing line, constantly, just like Pauline Hanson. Hinch seems to be the go to man to vilify Hanson. I wonder who the chief vilifier will be for Bernardi.

  51. PB

    Has Bernardi just come back from one of these Middle-Eastern Air-Dadon junkets that the pollies and journos so love but are so reluctant to talk about?

  52. PB

    “I don’t see this. If Australia were to slap sanctions on Qatar because they sponsor terrorism, it would actually be joining Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait, Egypt and other Middle East states in their efforts against Qatar. We would be helping them to clean up their neighbourhood.

    Please tell me this is satire.

  53. Deplorable

    Fancy being lectured to by someone who advised that prick. What is happening to the Cat?

    Exactly, I read the piece elsewhere and thought my god what a left winger. Now I see he “advises” Sinodinos it all makes sense just another of Turnbull’s labor lite. At least in reading it on the Cat we can see what the enemy is thinking.

  54. .

    Going to nuke and developing our own oil exports otherwise would deprive terrorist supporting Gulf States.

    All of them. Not just the dumb one that bailed out some royals who were taken hostage.

  55. Driftforge

    The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

    The hatred for Australia and Australians is strong in this one; membership of the traitor class confirmed. Pity is there is a nugget of truth at the heart of this paragraph, but its overwhelmed by the distaste he has for his own people.

  56. Razor

    Though I could not tolerate reading the article in depth I felt a priordial urge to write Bullshit John Adams.

    Can’t help but think this is to put down Cory primarily. Is Cory a threat to the MT’s ? YEP.
    Is Cory a threat to TA should TA win back the leadership? YEP
    Has John Adams heard of living by principle? NUP
    Still: gave me a good trigger for the day.

  57. Mother Lode

    Please tell me your usual occupation is putting on big floppy shoes, a big orange wig and red nose, and making children laugh at your various antics*.

    Then I can say “Stick to your day job.”

    *Is the laughter of children an unnecessary distraction and counter to the spirit of the new revolutionary government that will love us if we give it enough? Probably best if mother government takes over and brings them up properly.

    What a putz.

  58. Suave Dave

    What narcissistic, poorly-argued tripe.

    Anyone even know who this bloke is, or what his qualifications are, to imagine that he should be sitting in judgement of Bernardi? Let alone arrogantly, self-righteously asserting that Bernardi is failing critical tests (?) – LOL.

    Just complete, unmitigated, Marxist rubbish. But what else would you expect from the generally useless advisers to Turnbull’s inner sanctum?

  59. Mother Lode

    Can we skip to the bit where “There are traitors among us!”

    We might only have a flickering black and white TV, but an evening of watching public executions while eating boiled ‘Victory’ turnips under the buzzing flouro lights would easily be as good as a weekend away – and we would be closer to the mill to get straight back to work on Monday.

  60. H B Bear

    So please kindly f*ck off good sir, you are an embarrassing idiot who appears to possess all the intellectual firepower of a peanut.

    Bwahahaaa. You should have give Basher Houli a character reference instead of Waffleworth. I’m guessing John Adams won’t be approaching any Cats for one down the track either.

    John Adams won’t have to worry too much about Australian savings deficits for much longer. Between imposing export restrictions on gas reserves, destroying IP through plain packaging laws and various other increases in sovereign risk, no multi-national company would willingly invest in this country.

  61. Mother Lode

    in fact paying down debt is his central theme in all of his work…

    Since government is such a worthy creature, and John would know once having been a drone nuzzling the great pheromone-producing butt of this Queen of the nest, I will follow their example.

    I am going to blow all my money, and when I run out, I will just increase my pay. Why would my boss mind any more than taxpayers do?

  62. Qley

    It seems that Bernardi is really getting under some Liberal skins.

    This. Expect more and more of this as he becomes a bigger danger to the failing libs

  63. Empire

    If the state adopted rational policy settings, the prolifigate and indolent would be brought to heel by the market.

    Another confused post from dangerous authoritarian Adams, who fully supports the projection of state power into the private sphere.

    Question for JA: which would be the priority in your glorious dystopia – executing my weed dealer or incarcerating me for taking a long lunch? Inquiring minds gotta know.

  64. And how was this an op-ed in The Spectator?

    Aren’t they all like this? That publication is a competition for superannuated Tories to see how far out of touch they can get.

  65. harrys on the boat

    So we’re a bunch of lazy, workshy scumbags who should eliminate anything fun and decent in this world all to give more money to public service wankers like John Adams to piss up the wall for us. Yeah, cheers mate.

    That said Bernardi is a clown for dismissing Qatars cash, but he’s a politician and therefore a fuckwit.

  66. Jane

    The system is completely broken.

    The tiny nation of Singapore has dazzled economists and pundits since it gained its independence from Great Britain. By embracing free market principles Singapore has raised its per capita income from $500 to over $52,000 in the short time it has been free of colonial shackles.

    Even more exciting is the attitude the government takes on social welfare programming. Since its inception, the state has taken a hard stance on handouts. The government’s longtime approach has been underpinned by the idea that universal benefits are “wasteful and inequitable” and has chosen to base their safety net on social pressures. Singapore’s philosophy on welfare follows

    Singapore’s philosophy on welfare follows three basic principles: each generation should pay its own way, each family should pay its own way, and each individual should pay his or her own way. These aren’t just guidelines. The legislators codified the importance of family reliance by enabling seniors to file litigation against their children if they refuse to support them.

    I am working as hard as I ever did, living very simply and sacrificing more than ever. I just wish everyone else did as well.

  67. a reader

    There’s one line in this article I agree with. Getting rid of tattoos would be a blessing. The rest of it is bullshit.

  68. Stimpson J. Cat

    Getting rid of tattoos would be a blessing.

    Don’t forget Hi-Vis.

  69. Rebel with cause

    I’m sure Sinodinis can provide some tips to Anglos on corruption, graft and tax avoidance, all of which will become essential skills as our economy drifts towards basket case status.

  70. Tel

    The majority of foreign money coming into Australia goes to government bonds and ends up getting spent either directly on consumption, or else on brain dead infrastructure projects like the pink bats, the school canteens, or the NBN, and none of these things will deliver a long term return.

    We don’t need more of it… stop digging please.

    Singling out foreign nations (irrespective of the merits) as a policy announcement may make some conservative and nationalistic voters feel good, but does nothing to solve Australia’s underlying economic and social challenges.

    The typical Aussie holiday; the weekend away; eating out; unnecessary house renovations; fancy toys such as boats, motorcycles, barbeques, high-end electronics, furniture and fashion; our affinity with sugar, fat, alcohol, gambling, drugs and now tattoos; the ‘thank God it’s Friday’, ‘she’ll be right’ and ‘don’t work too hard’ attitudes as well as placating our children’s every wish and whim by trying to buy their love must all be eliminated.

    OK, so if people spend their own money that they earned on luxury items, frivolous expenditure, that’s their choice entirely. Sure, if they spend in excess it might not be good for them but they can worry about that all for themselves without help from me or anyone else.

    It they are spending borrowed money on such things, then there’s a problem… and doubly so when the borrowed money comes from overseas, triply so when it’s government guaranteed and our grandchildren are going to be paying it back. One option to prevent this is to block the flow of easy money promised on the never never and make Australia self sufficient in terms of debt. If we cannot just rack it up on the credit card then suddenly we start thinking a whole lot harder about what we are spending it on.

    Indeed, it’s the easy flow of foreign money that makes Australians take the attitude they do.

  71. Tel

    Hence, if Bernardi believes that it is common sense for Australia to impose an economic embargo on Qatar, then it makes even more common sense for Australia to impose an economic embargo on Saudi Arabia as well as other Islamic countries that have a history of funding international Islamic terrorism such as Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates.

    So the little girl is throwing starfish off the beach and back into the ocean to make sure they don’t dry out and die. Then she gets told, “You know you can’t save all the starfish.”

    She throws another one back in the ocean and says, “Saved that one.”

    Look, I would be the first one to say that Saudi Arabia needs a kick in the cods, and on the scale of extremism Qatar is probably one cigarette paper less extremist than their neighbour. Trump is selling tech-weapons to both of them, probably in the hope they use these on each other. I would be in favour of doing business with neither.

    As for Iran, they have actually reduced their sponsorship of terrorism, and their proxies Hezbollah have largely stopped antagonizing Israel. They aren’t the best either, but they aren’t the worst.

  72. miltonf

    So this tripe was published in the Spectator. What a good reason not to buy it. Another one of those bogans shouldn’t have nice things articles. Reminds me of John Dawkins- ‘a spokeswoman for Mr Dawkins said it’s time Australians took a long look at themselves’.

  73. miltonf

    Sure this isn’t a spoof?

  74. Pingback: Guest Post John Adams: Response to Bernardi Article | Catallaxy Files

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