Monday Forum: July 3, 2017

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1,582 Responses to Monday Forum: July 3, 2017

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  1. OldOzzie

    PAUL KELLY
    Turnbull faces decisive test on energy policy

    Anybody thinking the Turnbull-Abbott showdown has reached its zenith is deluded — this clash is about identity and policy, and it is heading towards a greater escalation over the Finkel report ­recommendation for a clean ­energy target.

    Malcolm Turnbull has reached the decisive stage on devising a long-run energy policy, which, ­incredibly, he still lacks. The Finkel report will be the foundation. Turnbull and his minister, Josh Frydenberg, will take the best elements from the CET, modify or add proposals from the energy regulator about further government action to promote reliable power, and then seek the support of the partyroom and parliament.

    This is the most critical internal challenge the Prime Minister has faced. The task for Frydenberg is one of the most dia­bolical for a senior minister this term. At stake is the government’s ability to prevent blackouts and counter spiralling price pressures on house­holds and business. If this fails, Turnbull is history at the election.

    Turnbull and Frydenberg will stay pledged to the 26-28 per cent emissions reduction target under the Paris Agreement. For Turnbull, a concession on that front would be unthinkable. Have no doubt, the government intends a fierce campaign against the economic consequences of Labor’s 45 per cent target.

    So far neither Turnbull nor Frydenberg has formally committed to the CET in deference to internal sensitivities. That is understandable and herein lies the political test — Tony Abbott has condemned the Finkel report and the CET as a sellout to the Greens and has drawn a line in the sand: this battle will be decisive.

    The conundrum is what ­Energy and Environment Minister Frydenberg calls the trilemma of affordability, reliability and emissions reduction. The terrible truth is that these are in conflict. This truth will bring the Liberal Party to a new moment of crisis.

    For Turnbull, each goal is ­essential in political terms — policy must tackle untenable energy prices, prevent blackouts and honour Australia’s Paris pledges. Yet there is a hierarchy to these needs: security comes first since blackouts are intolerable; affordability comes second since households and business demand relief from rising prices; and climate change goals come third. The tensions within the trilemma are politically explosive.

    Turnbull has lauded the Finkel report. On June 9 he said its recommendation would be looked at “very favourably”. The government embraced the bulk of the ­report but the remaining issue is Finkel’s recommendation for a CET. The central theme of Finkel is that policy uncertainty has shot long-run investor confidence in the electricity sector, that emissions reduction policy must be ­integrated with energy policy, and that without new capacity the ­reliability of the system will be compromised and consumers will be punished by higher prices.

    Finkel’s CET is the alternative to the emissions intensity scheme Turnbull was forced to ­reject for political reasons. That adds to the urgency for an agreed CET within the partyroom. Yet Abbott has declared a war not just against the CET but against much of the government’s energy policy.

    Abbott told this column yesterday: “This issue is the best hope for the government to win the next election.” For Abbott, upon this electoral conviction, upon this rock, the fortunes of the Turnbull government will either be built or smashed. He sees the energy crisis not so much as a problem but as a political opportunity to save the government.

    Abbott believes the government must be prepared to soften its 26-28 per cent emissions reduc­tion targets as endorsed by his own cabinet. He sees it as an aspiration that must be modified given the domestic energy crisis, a different message to that of 2015.

    This is an incendiary position within the Liberal Party. Abbott believes such a concession is necessary to deliver price relief and energy security, thereby putting up in lights the urgent new shift in Liberal priorities.

    He attacks the Finkel report’s CET recommendation as a project in green politics, pro-renewables and anti-coal. Abbott has targeted Finkel for seeking renewable generation at 42 per cent of the mix by 2030 as virtually destroying the differentiation between Liberal and Labor.

    This needs some qualification: within the 42 per cent is 9 per cent hydro and 9 per cent solar panels on roofs. So the large-scale wind and solar component is 24 per cent. Government estimates are that under Finkel’s CET, by 2050 coal provides 53 per cent of the mix, more than any developed ­nation except Poland.

    Yet the extent of conflict is vast. While Finkel hammers the need for a political settlement to underpin new investment, Abbott ­believes bipartisanship is a false mantra — that while Labor backs an ambitious ideological position on renewables, it must be fought by Liberals and conservatives.

    Last week Abbott offered a competing view to Finkel: “It’s the renewable energy target that’s doing the damage. Trying to fix the problems caused by too much wind and solar power with yet more wind and solar power is ­perverse.”

    Abbott wants the RET frozen at the 15 per cent level, a moratorium on wind farms and a coal-fired power station built as soon as possible. If the market refuses to ­finance this, that is proof of market failure — the government must drive the project. He believes a radical policy ­recasting will enable the Liberals to make the issue of the next election the energy price crisis, exposing Labor as allowing higher prices in the cause of climate change action.

    The Finkel report found, contrary to Abbott, that industry, stakeholders and the wider public expected Australia to honour its Paris targets. It found the investment crisis was tied to the absence of any policy mechanism designed to achieve the 26-28 per cent targets. It said such a policy needed to be enduring and offer stability to underpin investment.

    Frydenberg has consulted stakeholders and there is broad agreement on the need for a CET. Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce has been positive about the CET, a critical point. He called it the “number one” priority and he backed the Paris commitments.

    Joyce said: “It is vastly more likely to get a coal-fired power station built to provide baseload power under something like the CET.” Conservative backbencher Craig Kelly has said he would back a CET if it is seen to assist dispatchable power into the system. These are vital signals for Turnbull and Frydenberg in designing their response.

    Turnbull is running out of ­options. How many policies does he ditch in deference to the partyroom? An emissions trading scheme went long ago. An emissions intensity scheme last year. Without a CET, Turnbull is ­defenceless.

    Turnbull has to satisfy two big partyroom concerns: agitation about price (which he and Frydenberg share) and the scepticism about renewables in relation to coal. The government has already announced a gas intervention policy to apply from next January 1 to redirect exports to the domestic market to help prices.

    At the same time, Frydenberg has written to the Australian ­Energy Market Operator seeking advice by September 1 on how to guarantee “new continuous dispatchable power” including, critically, what government action might be needed to provide such investment. This opens the door to more public intervention on a range of options — coal, gas, ­renewables — as part of the ­package.

    In the end and absent a fiasco, Turnbull will carry the partyroom. The big test is: can he halt defections that destroy his policy on the floor of parliament? Turnbull and Frydenberg sensibly assume Labor’s offer of bipartisanship is posture and will not translate into legislative backing. This means the issue of defections is the real “make or break” for Turnbull.

  2. Notafan

    Oh yes bitter hopelessness to think that the doctors and nurses at GOSH have love and respect for their patients, that British judges can make decisions in the best interest of Charlie Gard, that our systems sometimes work.

    It is you that despises all people and have not an ounce of Christian charity, all evident in the ugliness that daily drips through your keyboard.

  3. OldOzzie

    SA bank levy flips national fiscal debate on its head

    Viewed from the nation’s capital, the state of South Australia must look like a kind of topsy-turvy world this week. Jay Weatherill’s state Labor government is demanding that parliament respect his budget mandate, while the Liberal Opposition Leader, Steven Marshall, is railing against a surprise new tax on banking. It is a case of role reversal for the major parties where neither state leader will be thanking their federal counterparts for the precedents they have set, and where their arguments are likely to undercut the rhetoric of their parties’ national leaders. “It threatens deposit and home loan interest rates of all customers that bank here,” Mr Marshall said of Labor’s proposed state bank levy. “It threatens investment and job creation in South Australia.” An almost identical argument can be made against the national bank levy included in May’s federal budget by Malcolm Turnbull and his Treasurer, Scott Morrison. The levy will doubtless be passed on by the banks to customers. Surprise new taxes on commerce only undermine competitiveness and inhibit business confidence.

    The Coalition in Canberra provided the opening for a fiscally opportunistic and politically painless raid on bank profits and Mr Weatherill’s Labor state government decided it would have a bit of that same action. For no other reason than he needed the money and the banks had some, the Premier has come up with a double-dip state-based levy that is worse than the federal tax by any measure. Worse because it puts his state at a competitive disadvantage; worse because there can be no parallel case about pricing the commonwealth’s implicit guarantee; and worse because the states promised to drop and abstain from financial services taxes in return for all the proceeds of the GST. Mr Weatherill is one of those politicians who despises big business, big coal and big banks but has an enduring passion for big government. So instead of trimming his spending in an election year, he chose to increase taxes. Now he has a fight on his hands.

    Urged on by Cory Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives — who now include two former Family First MPs in SA’s upper house — the Liberals have pledged to block the state-based bank levy. Many pundits have been hollering for Mr Marshall to toughen up and on this issue he has chosen to rumble. It is the right decision for his state, which has squandered the fiscal repair of the last Liberal government 15 years ago to once more become a high-spending, high-taxing and debt-ridden economic laggard. The Opposition Leader will look to leverage his levy opposition into a broader debate about business costs, including energy. But to be successful in opposing a surprise impost on business that will dampen economic growth, the Liberal leader needs to run a critique that could easily be used against the Turnbull-Morrison federal levy. Still the Premier is left to beg for his mandate to be respected, directly contradicting the rhetoric and practices of his federal ALP colleagues who have played merry hell with most attempts at fiscal repair in Canberra. Topsy-turvy it is but this will take weeks to play out and help to shape the themes of the state election just nine months away.

    As the federal Coalition struggles through another debilitating period of infighting and confusion, the SA debate highlights the Turnbull government’s failure to create an economic narrative. This is what Mr Turnbull promised when he took the prime ministership almost two years ago. Yet through two budgets and an election we are yet to see a consistent economic plan. Talk of jobs and growth, taxation reform, agility, innovation, energy reform, debt increases, business tax cuts, spending boosts and a banking levy has created false starts and conflicting messages. The bank levy’s surprise state offshoot is just the latest instalment. If the Prime Minister and Mr Morrison wonder how their government can be knocked off course so easily by one ill-disciplined factional speech or a series of thought bubbles from a former leader, they need look no further than their own inability to seize the agenda, map out a process of reform and dominate the debate around their cause. As they watch Mr Marshall undertake his defining battle in SA, perhaps they will realise that choosing even a difficult issue on which to take a stand might just give them the unity of purpose they need.

  4. Leigh Lowe

    Anybody thinking the Turnbull-Abbott showdown has reached its zenith is deluded — this clash is about identity and policy, and it is heading towards a greater escalation over the Finkel report ­recommendation for a clean ­energy target

    Party like it’s 2009.

  5. jupes

    Arthur Sinodinos, British Prime Minister Theresa May and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, share his position, Mr Turnbull said.

    LOL

    Arthur’s support is sure to sway The Donald.

  6. jupes

    PAUL KELLY

    Has that clown ever been right about anything?

    The Tim Flannery of journalism.

  7. Nick

    Turnbull has lauded the Finkel report.

    Just watch. The excretia will hit the fan and Turnbull will deny any support for the Finel report and will throw Fraudenberg under a bus.

  8. Baldrick

    Channel 7 removes ‘hateful’ poll over Yassmin Abdel-Magied’s decision to leave the country

    CHANNEL 7 has removed a Facebook poll asking commenters to vote on whether Yassmin Abdel-Magied should leave the country or “face her critics”.
    The poll, posted on the 7 News Australia Facebook page, was slammed by followers and commentators for inciting racist discussion and bullying, and Ms Abdel-Magied herself said it invited “prejudice and discrimination”.
    After being questioned by news.com.au, the station removed the poll and admitted it “should never have been posted”.

    Before closing, the poll was 85% in favour of leaving and 15% against.

  9. Nick

    Ms Abdel-Magied herself said it invited “prejudice and discrimination”.

    All that from a simple question. The Right can learn a lot from the Left. Imagine the fun we could have if every accusation was met by a response like YAM’s? It’s all designed to create mock guilt and to stifle debate.

  10. struth

    The poll, posted on the 7 News Australia Facebook page, was slammed by followers and commentators for inciting racist discussion and bullying,

    How?

  11. struth

    Keep your eye out for the new thread……………………………………………………………..

  12. struth

    How popular is catallaxy files becoming?

    Look at the number of comments per thread.

    It’s a winner.

  13. A Lurker

    Senator Malcolm Roberts of PHON continues to do the work of the angels.
    Here is a copy of today’s press release found on his Facebook page…

    PRESS RELEASE – 5 July 2017

    AUDIT OF ‘FINKEL REVIEW’ REVEALS DEVASTATING HITS TO ECONOMY

    Dr Alan Moran, a world expert on electricity market regulations has conducted an independent analysis and report on the Finkel Review.

    Released today, Dr Moran’s report reveals that the Finkel panel’s recommendations are based on unreliable and unrealistic assumptions and forecasts.

    Senator Malcolm Roberts commissioned the independent report by Dr Moran on behalf of Queenslanders and Australians. Dr Moran’s report, “Impacts on the Australian Economy and Australian Consumers” was released in Melbourne.

    Dr. Moran’s audit shows that the Finkel Review’s implications will devastate the economy and would slug average households up to an astonishing $768 more a year in electricity costs.

    “The Moran Review of Dr Finkel’s work is an in-depth and comprehensive road map to cheaper electricity. It demonstrates how Australia can return to low-cost reliable energy and a productive economy that it had before renewable energy policies started to bite,” Senator Roberts said.

    Dr Moran’s own policy recommendations entail a dismantling of the energy market regulations that are forcing low cost reliable coal based electricity to be substituted for high cost unreliable wind and solar.

    “The alternative to Dr Moran’s recommendations is expensive, intermittent, economy-destroying electricity,”

    “The impacts of Dr Moran’s review will be felt far and wide as Australians, for the first time, are able to assess the real impacts of Dr Finkel’s devastating blue-print that will wreck the Australian economy,”

    “It was important we commissioned this independent review so as to provide robust and sound economic data for parliamentarians and policy makers as they consider the Finkel recommendations,” Senator Roberts said.

    “Over regulation and implementation of the now discredited climate change policies such as the RET, is the reason Australia’s electricity has become so costly over the past few years,” Dr Moran said.

    He added, “We can expect it to become even more costly under present policies, and prohibitively so, should the Finkel recommendations of increasingly greater subsidies on unreliable electricity sources be adopted.”

    Dr Moran’s key recommendations include:

    1. Rejecting the Finkel’s recommendations
    2. Abolishing the RET
    3. Ceasing all government subsidies to bodies such as the Clean Energy Regulator and the Clean Energy Finance Corporation.

    Senator Roberts has recently declared victory in smashing open the climate change racket, as more and more lies are exposed each day about these devastating policies.

    “Even if the climate change alarmists were telling the truth (which they are not), Dr Finkel has admitted under oath to parliament that Australia reducing its emissions will contribute ‘virtually nothing’ to a reduction in global temperatures.

    By Dr Finkel’s own admission, his report is based on an assumption that if Australia should address the fabricated lies of anthropogenic climate change through hikes in electricity prices and job losses, we would still not have any real effect on global temperatures.

    Senator Roberts has said he will ask to meet with the Prime Minister as a matter of urgency to present Dr Moran’s road map to low-cost electricity for all Australians.

    Here is a link to the document in question.

  14. OldOzzie

    While Sleezebag Hamas Supporter -Bob Carr attacks Israel’s ‘foul’ occupation

    Haley Urges UN To Drop Anti-Israel Hebron Resolution

    TEL AVIV – U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley called on the secretary-general of the UN and the UNESCO chief to oppose the Palestinian Authority’s efforts to inscribe Hebron’s old city and the Tomb of the Patriarchs on its list of endangered sites under the “State of Palestine.”
    “The Tomb of the Patriarchs, which is sacred to three faiths, is under no immediate threat. Such a designation risks undermining the seriousness such an assessment by UNESCO should have,” Haley wrote in a letter addressed to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova.

    A vote on the motion is scheduled for Friday during the World Heritage Committee’s meeting in Krakow, Poland. The Palestinian Authority sped up the process with claims of “Israeli violations… including vandalism” at the site.

    “Many precious sites — from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Libya to Iraq to Syria — are under real and imminent threat of destruction today. They urgently demand UNESCO’s full and immediate attention, which should not be wasted on this sort of symbolic action,” Haley wrote in her letter.

    “As the United States is engaged in trying to increase the chances of a peace deal that is in the best interest of both Israelis and Palestinians, this effort at UNESCO… is particularly ill-timed and unfortunate,” Haley continued. “I hope you will join the United States in opposing this measure.”

    UNESCO has come under fire by Israel, the US and other nations for a series of moves deemed anti-Israel, most recently in May, when its executive board ratified a resolution denying any Jewish legal or historical Israeli links to Jerusalem and calling Israel an “occupying power” in its own capital.

    That resolution also criticized the Israeli government for archaeological projects in the capital and in Hebron and lambasted its naval blockade of the Hamas-run Gaza Strip.

    Guterres, considered more sympathetic to Israel than his predecessors, is slated to visit the Jewish state next month. He has been critical of efforts to politicize UNESCO. Bokovo, who will end her term as the agency’s director-general later this year, also has spoken out in the past against anti-Israel resolutions that deny the Jewish people’s link to religious sites in the Holy Land.

    Israel’s ambassador to UNESCO, Carmel Shama-Hacohen, thanked Haley for her support.

    “Ambassador Nikki Haley’s letter speaks for itself about the absurdity that is the persecution of the Jewish state in every international forum and especially at UNESCO,” he said. “Unfortunately, no new US ambassador to UNESCO has yet been appointed, and if only we had on our side here an ambassador who had the determination and the courage of Nikki Haley, the conditions of our battle would be entirely different.”

    Last week, Israel banned a fact-finding mission from entering Hebron ahead of the vote.

    Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu refused to grant permits to a group of scholars from the International Council on Monuments and Sites.

    A few days later, Israel’s mission to the UN petitioned UNESCO to conduct a secret ballot for the vote.

  15. Empire

    Turnbull to pressure Trump to ban encryption.

    Trump might give some consideration as to whether he asks the SS guy to apply a half or full Nelson on Talkbull while he serves him a little humiliating nipple cripple. Apart from that, Trump doesn’t give a shit.

  16. struth

    One bureaucrat,( a neuroscientist), and his left wing political hacks does not an energy report make.
    Dr Fink el is just a lefty telling socialist political elite nation wreckers what they want to hear.

    How quick would his report be binned if saving our energy system meant no comm cars for MP’s?

  17. john constantine

    Their shorten would be naturally worse, but the team turnfailure debacle coalition try harder.

  18. Senile Old Guy

    The ABC goes to Dylan Voller, again.

    The personal files of Dylan Voller, whose experience in youth detention sparked a royal commission, are among those of 33 clients of Territory Families accidentally dumped at the Alice Springs tip. Mr Voller has shown the ABC a letter from the department’s CEO, Ken Davies, confirming his file was among them. “My family history is not for other people’s eyes and people, and things that I’ve gone through [when I was] younger,” he said. “Not everything is for everyone else’s eyes.”

    What he went through when he was younger? What an odd way to refer to crimes he committed not so long ago, including trying to run over a police officer.

    He said the department clearly did not have appropriate strategies in place to deal with the storage and disposal of confidential documents. “Someone should have gone through the cabinet and made sure they’ve been put into appropriate spaces before someone was even refurnishing,” he said.

    So now he’s an expert on security? Well, since he was convicted of theft, I suppose, in a way, he is.

    The ABC is running a new ‘Dylan Voller’, victim, story every day. Because indigenous and NAIDOC. Or something.

  19. incoherent rambler

    Arthur Sinodinos, …

    I made that up jupes.

  20. incoherent rambler

    Dr Finkel’s devastating blue-print that will wreck the Australian economy…

    Too late!

  21. john constantine

    Climate Justice is just the easy way for the left to export the wealth and energy of the West to the totalitarian hellholes of the world, under signed international conventions.

    We also need to keep track of their next weapons to be deployed.

    Open Borders Justice is a little too soon to play out.

    The coming Robot Tax for Social Wages could be played like the Carbon Tax, the left ceaselessly writhing to find a loophole where intenational socialism gets a fixed percentage of australian tax reciepts, locked in through signed conventions:

    “For the children, Comrades”.

  22. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The ABC is running a new ‘Dylan Voller’, victim, story every day. Because indigenous and NAIDOC. Or something.

    Dylan Voller is the new David Hicks of the A.B.C. The next step is for Leigh Sales to write his biography.

  23. struth

    Abbott is not doing a good thing.
    He is helping Turncoat by making it seem like there are conservatives in the party and it’s just Turnbull a bit too far left.
    The rest of them have the integrity and conviction of Judas, and the whole party needs to take responsibility for their traitorous action.
    It’s too late.
    Abbott is a gutless prick.
    We need a leader.
    He isn’t and never will be one and the liberal party are so far removed from the voters they think the opinion of the media is what the voters think.
    All this with Trump and Brexit to learn from, and still as useless as tits on a bull.

    My main concern now, is that the minor conservative parties have the brains to preference each other and not the liberals.

  24. incoherent rambler

    1. Rejecting the Finkel’s recommendations
    2. Abolishing the RET
    3. Ceasing all government subsidies to bodies such as the Clean Energy Regulator and the Clean Energy Finance Corporation.

    Fixed it!

    And add –

    4. Remove all energy taxes, including excise.

  25. Anthony

    Has that thug, Fahour, been sacked yet? It’s almost lunch time.

  26. Snoopy

    Notafan
    #2432442, posted on July 5, 2017 at 10:09 am
    ***
    Not to mention how little the proposed treatment is likely to change this, and in fact may cause harmful mutations.

    So there’s a possibility that Charlie may live to have a child?

  27. struth

    Actually, if the next election is between Turnbull’s socialists and Bill’s communists the whole thing should be called off.
    We will certainly see how useless “Tits on a bull” will be.

  28. Myrddin Seren

    Former Labor foreign minister Bob Carr has spoken out against Israel’s “cruel” and “foul” occupation of Palestinian land, and its “ruinous path” in rejecting the creation of a state of Palestine.

    Bob has doubtless seen how much money Tony Blair has made as a ‘celebrity’ intermediary on deals with the ‘Rabs and is positioning Bob Carr & Associates as the go-to guy for Middle East money heading this way, so he can clip the ticket.

    One fears that he may be viewing a return to Labor’s love affair with Middle Eastern funding sources to keep the endless rivers of welfare and cronyism flowing once the ALP-ACTU return to power.

  29. Arky

    Notafan
    #2432461, posted on July 5, 2017 at 10:36 am
    Oh yes bitter hopelessness to think that the doctors and nurses at GOSH have love and respect for their patients, that British judges can make decisions in the best interest of Charlie Gard, that our systems sometimes work.

    ..
    Maybe they do, maybe they don’t. On an individual, case by case basis each and every possible level of love and respect probably exists in a government doctors heart.
    But exactly what the fuck has that got to do with arguments about the parents rights and obligations to seek out treatment for their dying son?

  30. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Former Labor foreign minister Bob Carr has spoken out against Israel’s “cruel” and “foul” occupation of Palestinian land, and its “ruinous path” in rejecting the creation of a state of Palestine.

    It’s actually the Palestinians that have rejected three Israeli offers of a Palestinian State, in the past twenty years, but we won’t confuse Comrade Carr with the truth, will we.

  31. Leigh Lowe

    Has that thug, Fahour, been sacked yet? It’s almost lunch time.

    No.
    Gillon McPolo-Pony is waiting for tonight’s tribunal … which is code for “it should blow over by Thursday”.
    But it won’t.
    I may be wrong on this, but the two greatest lefty arbiters of the individual failings of others – Caroline Wilson and Patrick Smith – seem to have been as silent as a tomb about Ali Coat-Hanger’s antics.

  32. John64

    Jay Weatherill’s state Labor government is demanding that parliament respect his budget mandate, while the Liberal Opposition Leader, Steven Marshall, is railing against a surprise new tax on banking.

    Ah, so Windmills Weatherill and the Greek Finance Minister put the bank levy to the People as an ALP policy at the last SA election?

    That’s what a mandate is, chump.

    Mind you, given the SA gerrymander/malapportionment, it’s hard to argue that Weatherill has a mandate to do anything.

  33. Hydra

    Hey all

    I’ve just applied to leave drab Melbourne for a 12-24 month secondment to Houston to work on an oil and gas contract.

    Hoping to learn what they in Texas and Trump are doing right to bring it back to Australia. It’s potentially my foot in the door in the energy sector.

    And to watch Victoria burn while I’m away.

    Wish me luck!

  34. Last week: Monty laughed that Putin didn’t have time for Trump at the G20.

    This week: Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin to have first face-to-face meeting at G20 summit.

    Yes, Putin openly insulted Trump and now Trump will kiss his ring like the tinpot dictator of a client state always does. One wonders which classified secret Trump will blurt out this time. It is all ground work to lift sanctions, that is the end game.

  35. Nick

    I may be wrong on this, but the two greatest lefty arbiters of the individual failings of others – Caroline Wilson and Patrick Smith – seem to have been as silent as a tomb about Ali Coat-Hanger’s antics.

    No doubt Caro will scratch out a piece talking about ‘racism’ having inflamed any decision.

  36. Arky

    Yes, Putin openly insulted Trump and now Trump will kiss his ring

    ..
    Trump may possibly turn out to be the greatest man to have lived in the twenty first century.
    He is certainly shaping up well.

  37. incoherent rambler

    Seriously,
    Subsidies, RETs, extra taxes, meddling with regulations on a short term basis are the source of our power generation woes. A certaindy that government will increase regulations, taxes, RETs and subsidies at random intervals compounds the problem.

    if you want to fix the power generation crisis, remove the cause.

  38. rickw

    The poll, posted on the 7 News Australia Facebook page, was slammed by followers and commentators for inciting racist discussion and bullying, and Ms Abdel-Magied herself said it invited “prejudice and discrimination”.

    What a stupid bint, steps up to the plate holding a race card, when her stupid commentary is subject to criticism, her only rebuttal is effectively that all criticism is racist.

    If this is islams best and brightest, they should forget about debating and stick to blowing shit up and stabbing people.

  39. Bruce of Newcastle

    It’s actually the Palestinians that have rejected three Israeli offers of a Palestinian State, in the past twenty years, but we won’t confuse Comrade Carr with the truth, will we.

    They’re still at it. Monday:

    What Hamas Wants

    Illusions in the Middle East die hard. However, with the publication of Hamas’ new political document, there shouldn’t be any doubt about the motives of this Muslim Brotherhood organization. The western press continues to assert that Hamas is “moderating” its views, but the document itself offers a different picture.

    The main points of the new political document are:
    1. Reliance on Islam as the sole source of authority;
    2. Denial of the Jewish right to self-determination in the Land of Israel;
    3. Conferral of a sacred Islamic character on all of Palestine;
    4. An armed struggle to liberate Palestine is legitimate and must continue.

    Maybe someone should ask Bob what he thinks of Hamas’ new document advocating Israel being swept into the Mediterranean Sea?

    Btw, if a real election was held in the West Bank today Hamas would probably win.

  40. Bruce of Newcastle

    It’s actually the Palestinians that have rejected three Israeli offers of a Palestinian State, in the past twenty years, but we won’t confuse Comrade Carr with the truth, will we.

    They’re still at it. Monday:

    What Hamas Wants

    Illusions in the Middle East die hard. However, with the publication of Hamas’ new political document, there shouldn’t be any doubt about the motives of this Muslim Brotherhood organization. The western press continues to assert that Hamas is “moderating” its views, but the document itself offers a different picture.

    The main points of the new political document are:
    1. Reliance on Islam as the sole source of authority;
    2. Denial of the J_wish right to self-determination in the Land of Israel;
    3. Conferral of a sacred Islamic character on all of Palestine;
    4. An armed struggle to liberate Palestine is legitimate and must continue.

    Maybe someone should ask Bob what he thinks of Hamas’ new document advocating Israel being swept into the Mediterranean Sea?

    Btw, if a real election was held in the West Bank today Hamas would probably win.

  41. rickw

    Yes, Putin openly insulted Trump and now Trump will kiss his ring like the tinpot dictator of a client state always does.

    Given this part prediction / part fake news by rakemaster, my bet is that Putin will be doing the ring kissing.

  42. john constantine

    The banks are gonna get super bank taxes coming at them anyway.

    The big crony banks need the big crony unions and the corrupt crony political class onside to abort the looming disruption in financial services.

    Living in rural vicco gives first hand glimpse at how even profitable bank branches are shut down and replaced with robot-in-the-wall banks and artificial intelligence software online banks.

    [ helps to get the diversity quotas up, when rural branches staffed with non-diversity people can be disposed of, and jobs shifted to city call centers.]

    Once this is perfected in rural Australia, we see it shifting into the cities, use the robot bank, or queue for the one human teller in the branch.

    The big banks are going to have to pay a high price to keep the banking oligopoly going, once the only barrier to competition is the federal government too big to fail backing of the existing system.

    Blockchain and banking software packages and dirt cheap robot-hole-in-the-wall banks could see Mcdonalds ‘branch out’ into financial services with ease.

    “would you like fries with that transaction?”.

    Bank branches open all hours with clean dunnies and cheeseburgers, how can the Social Justice godless commies of the current banking oligopoly compete?.

  43. Nick

    Ironic that YAM is so traumatised she’s moving to the UK. She can meet some real, traumatised people, kids too.

  44. John64

    Dumb as a fencepost, the Sea Dugong goes on ABC radio and digs an even deeper hole for herself (via The Oz):

    Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young has told the ABC to “cry me a river” after a high-profile presenter accused her of “reverse racism” for describing critics of her taxpayer-funded whale watching trip with her daughter as “grumpy old white men”.

    The South Australian senator has been dogged by controversy after The Australian on Monday revealed she and her daughter took an overnight trip to the Great Australian Bight in September to “see the whales” at a cost to taxpayers of $3874.23.

    She defiantly declared yesterday she had no regrets about the trip and had no choice but to take her 11 year-old daughter, who she said was “sick” at the time.

    She sparked a further backlash among voters by telling Sky News on Tuesday her critics were “grumpy old white men deciding what is best for my family”.

    The senator did not breach any parliamentary travel rules.

    This morning, during her weekly appearance on an ABC radio panel alongside fellow SA senators Penny Wong and Simon Birmingham, she was challenged over the racist nature of her comments by host David Bevan.

    “That’s an interesting choice of words — ‘grumpy old white men’ — by her,” Bevan told listeners of Adelaide’s top-rating breakfast radio show.

    “Why the language? Why are you talking about grumpy old white men?

    “You wouldn’t put up with that language if somebody was talking about an old grumpy black man, would you?

    “You hear this language (about white men) a lot. We heard it when we went to a conference in Sydney in the ABC where they were talking about old pale males — this is a reverse racism, it’s getting around, isn’t it?”

    But a defiant Senator Hanson-Young was immediately dismissive, saying “oh, cry me a river, I mean, seriously.

    “When you have got some big bloke standing up telling people how to be a mother, what’s good for my daughter, I am not going to stand there and take it, and I am going to hit back, and that’s what I did.”

    Bevan responded: “And you hit back using racial terms”.

    Senator Hanson-Young said, “these people who want to complain and tell me what is good for my daughter, how to look after her and what my job is as a mother and how I manage that as a senator, I am not going to take it.

    “I am not going to resile from doing my job as a senator … and hearing men like Cory Bernardi tell me how to be a mother, how to manage my family affairs.”

    Labor Senator Penny Wong, who was on the ABC panel with Senator Hanson-Young, said the term “grumpy old white men” was “not the language I would use”.

    “A public figure would not use that language,” Senator Wong said.

    “I have made clear over many years in public life that I do not use language around race in the way you’ve just described.”

    But pressed as to why she would make the “personal decision” not to use such language, Senator Wong repeatedly refused to provide an explanation, telling Bevan, “I am not getting into this”.

    Senator Birmingham, who also was on the ABC radio panel, said he would not use the racially charged language chosen by Senator Hanson-Young.

    “My approach is always to deal with issues before us, do it in a straight way,” he said.

    “I don’t really think age or colour or gender or sex or sexuality or religion or any of those matters are really relevant points.”

    Senator Hanson-Young this morning on ABC radio also appeared to change her story, claiming she wasn’t on a “whale-watching” trip, despite posting photos of herself and her daughter undertaking a whale watching tour and telling The Australian on Sunday that the “whole point” of the trip was “see the whales”.

    The senator, who wants a ban on oil and gas exploration in the Bight, said she had a range of meetings with stakeholders over two days.

    “I did see the whales at the head of the Bight, invited on there by the local indigenous people, they were lobbying me for money to build a new eco-tourism hub … there was no whale watching holiday,” she said.

    On Monday, Senator Hanson-Young had a fiery exchange with FIVEaa radio presenter Mike Smithson after he said her explanation for taking her ill 11-year-old daughter on the trip “doesn’t wash with me”.

    The senator has refused to say when her daughter’s almost $1000 in airfares, charged to the taxpayer, were booked.

    The whales are invited by indiginees?

  45. Andreas

    Yes, Putin openly insulted Trump and now Trump will kiss his ring like the tinpot dictator of a client state always does. One wonders which classified secret Trump will blurt out this time. It is all ground work to lift sanctions, that is the end game.

    So Putin wants sanctions lifted, but it’s Trump who will be kissing Putin’s ring. Can anyone work this out?

  46. incoherent rambler

    Tim Blair – AFL diversity manager, unrequested sudden-onset unconsciousness inducer and Prime Ministerial pal …

  47. rickw

    So Putin wants sanctions lifted, but it’s Trump who will be kissing Putin’s ring. Can anyone work this out?

    No.

    You need a very special lens to make any sense of it.

  48. Snoopy

    The senator did not breach any parliamentary travel rules.

    If the whale watching boat carried the sprog beyond SA’s three mile territorial limit, I reckon it’s arguable that she did.

  49. Nick

    When you have got some big bloke standing up telling people how to be a mother, what’s good for my daughter, I am not going to stand there and take it, and I am going to hit back, and that’s what I did.”

    Imagine a male daring to talk about ‘hitting back’ at say some of Clam Fords’ ‘advice’?

  50. OldOzzie

    Hydra
    #2432495, posted on July 5, 2017 at 11:23 am
    Hey all

    I’ve just applied to leave drab Melbourne for a 12-24 month secondment to Houston to work on an oil and gas contract.

    Hoping to learn what they in Texas and Trump are doing right to bring it back to Australia. It’s potentially my foot in the door in the energy sector.

    And to watch Victoria burn while I’m away.

    Wish me luck!

    Hydra,

    you will enjoy Texas,

    Dallas Fort Worth (Go to the Book Depository), Houston, San Antonio with The Alamo Mission and River Walk, Austin are enjoyable

    with favourite memory, long weekend drive across Texas from San Antonio to El Paso, then Denver via backroads and the mountains of New Mexico, after the plains of Texas

    always enjoyed Texas and as one of my mates who lived there said

    “it was not so much the shotguns and rifles racked in the back of pick ups, that worried me, but those with M60s”

    About 28,690 machine guns are registered in Texas

  51. Nick

    The senator, who wants a ban on oil and gas exploration in the Bight, said she had a range of meetings with stakeholders over two days.

    “I did see the whales at the head of the Bight, invited on there by the local indigenous people, they were lobbying me for money to build a new eco-tourism hub … there was no whale watching holiday,” she said.

    A decent journalist would find out when tickets were booked and what the itinerary actually was.

  52. incoherent rambler

    If the whale watching boat carried the sprog beyond SA’s three mile territorial limit

    Where are those heavily armed submarines when you need them?

  53. Arky

    The end of mainstream media cannot be far off.
    But I wonder if anyone has thought about the consequences of this for mainstream political parties?
    Trump victorious is the first real indication of what may be a complete revolution.
    As Uber has done to the taxi industry.
    Online is now where everyone resides.
    TV broadcast programming designed to keep the attention of the lowest common denominator has been replaced by a myriad of online shows with audiences in the millions with the time to dedicate to interviews, opinions and analysis and the ability to direct audiences to further viewing and reading resources that allow an intelligent audience to check the information given.
    The political parties have relied for so long on their traditional relationship with big media providers I think their current absurd situation of complete denial as the curtain is pulled back reflects that they just don’t know how to respond and build a relationship with the new breed of online journalists who will inevitably replace old media.
    The first party that goes completely with online will clean up.
    You don’t need people to hand out how to vote cards if you attract and engage with your voters online.
    You can sign them up for pre- poll voting and automate much of that side of things.
    Meanwhile you get onto as many online programs and expose yourself as Jordan Peterson has.
    But in order to do this you need to be:
    1. Hard working and conscientious.
    2. Across all the policy and issues people actually care about.
    3. Genuinely likeable and responsible.
    ..
    I just don’t think many of the current crop of politicians and have it in them.
    We must await the arrival of the new politician.

  54. rickw


    I’ve just applied to leave drab Melbourne for a 12-24 month secondment to Houston to work on an oil and gas contract.

    Lucky Bastard!

    The only downside to Houston is the hot and steamy weather. You need to buy a gun a month while there, and provide range reports!

  55. stackja

    Nick
    #2432518, posted on July 5, 2017 at 11:51 am
    The senator, who wants a ban on oil and gas exploration in the Bight, said she had a range of meetings with stakeholders over two days.

    “I did see the whales at the head of the Bight, invited on there by the local indigenous people, they were lobbying me for money to build a new eco-tourism hub … there was no whale watching holiday,” she said.

    A decent journalist would find out when tickets were booked and what the itinerary actually was.

    ‘A decent journalist’ oxymoron?

  56. Stimpson J. Cat

    Yes, Putin openly insulted Trump and now Trump will kiss his ring like the tinpot dictator of a client state always does. One wonders which classified secret Trump will blurt out this time. It is all ground work to lift sanctions, that is the end game.

    Malmo Monty this is 4D chess not 4D donuts.
    Settle down.

  57. stackja

    IDW20032
    Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology
    Western Australia Regional Office
    TOP PRIORITY FOR IMMEDIATE BROADCAST

    SEVERE WEATHER WARNING
    for DAMAGING WINDS
    For people in parts of the
    South West district.
    Issued at 6:15 am Wednesday, 5 July 2017.
    Weather Situation:
    A strong cold front is passing over the southwest of Western Ausralia.
    DAMAGING WINDS with gusts to 100 kilometres per hour are possible during Wednesday morning and could cause DAMAGE TO HOMES AND PROPERTY over mainly exposed coastal parts of the South West district including Cape Leeuwin and Cape Natualiste.
    Winds should ease by late Wednesday morning, although cold, gusty and showery conditions will continue for the remainder of Wednesday.
    Locations which may be affected include Margaret River, Augusta, Dunsborough and Windy Harbour.
    A wind gust to 93 kilometres per hour was recorded at Cape Naturaliste at 5.56am Wednesday morning.

    Windmills?

  58. Stimpson J. Cat

    “I did see the whales at the head of the Bight, invited on there by the local indigenous people

    Whales are aboriginal?

  59. john constantine

    Whale watching is one thing, but the hanson-young trip to the Mediterranean to save refugees and help them enter Europe by the boatload seems even dodgier.

    Every time the senator gets on a boat, it triggers hysterical hatred of stale, pale males, must be something to do with the gentle rocking reminding her that her Daddy never bought her a Pony.

  60. Roger

    Ironic that YAM is so traumatised she’s moving to the UK.

    Londonistan.

    In the end she took Abetz’s advice.

  61. Stimpson J. Cat

    Look at the number of comments per thread.

    No that’s srr.

  62. rickw

    The end of mainstream media cannot be far off.

    It’s completely redundant, people don’t need them to “filter” their information anymore. On the scene reporting will be all via citizen journalists, with their phones and uploads. Politicians will need to be directly communicating with voters, which means that most of the political establishment is rooted, liars and fraudsters won’t stand a snowflakes chance.

  63. H B Bear

    Anyone looking to bury Sarah Hyphen-Seapatrol needs to keep digging and find out when and by whom the kid’s aeroplane tickets were bought. The old white male shit is just smoke.

  64. stackja

    rickw
    #2432530, posted on July 5, 2017 at 11:59 am
    The end of mainstream media cannot be far off.

    It’s completely redundant, people don’t need them to “filter” their information anymore. On the scene reporting will be all via citizen journalists, with their phones and uploads. Politicians will need to be directly communicating with voters, which means that most of the political establishment is rooted, liars and fraudsters won’t stand a snowflakes chance.

    Reuter revolutionised information sharing in 1850s. Now Internet!

  65. Arky

    A other thing about online that I don’t think has been articulated is this:
    In the past media companies decided which content from overseas we saw.
    Now we can view Canadian, American and English politicians and journalists responding to events as they unfold.
    Much of the unrest in people’s minds about the current regime is this: they can see how the narrative is the same everywhere.
    This is disturbing.
    Because you know these people couldn’t have thought the whole story up on their own. They aren’t that bright. And what’s the chance they would respond almost word for word the same as another politician oceans away?
    So they discussed and colluded on how to sell their shit and destructive policies to us.

  66. Stimpson J. Cat

    Anyone looking to bury Sarah Hyphen-Seapatrol needs to keep digging

    We’re going to need a bigger shovel.

  67. Haidee

    Politicians will need to be “likeable” and directly communicate with voters? Our newish MP is likeable, I will admit. Sort of charming, out and about. Until I remember that he smoothly thanked us for our earlier support. No. Wrong. Never supported him.

  68. vr

    The case against Cardinal Pell from First Things Magazine and it is not a hatchet job.

    George Cardinal Pell was charged last week with multiple counts of sexual abuse of children. He currently resides in Rome, tasked with cleaning up the Vatican finances. In the coming weeks he will fly to his native Australia, where he vows to fight all charges. His successor in the see of Sydney, Archbishop Anthony Fisher, advises letting the justice system take its course.

    Australian civil authorities have yet to announce the number and nature of the offenses with which Pell is charged. But allegations against Pell have been accumulating for years. He stands publicly accused of complicity in a sex abuse coverup in the diocese of Ballarat in the 1970s and early 1980s; complicity in a sex abuse coverup in the archdiocese of Melbourne in the late 1980s and 1990s; and various counts of child molestation, assault, and indecent exposure, from 1961 through 1997.

    In recent decades, child sex abuse cases have notably arisen from, and elicited, public hysteria. They have created poor conditions for the operation of the justice system. Ludicrous prosecutions and unjust convictions have resulted, far too numerous to count as the cost of doing business. In Australia, public hysteria concerning Pell is already extreme. Here is Louise Milligan’s florid book, written “from the complainants’ point of view.” Its publication was advanced from July to May, presumably to influence the deliberations of the civil authorities. Once Pell had been charged, its publisher removed it from local bookshops to avoid influencing the deliberations of jury members. But its claims have already been broadcast throughout the Australian media. Archbishop Fisher’s repose in the justice system may prove mistaken.

  69. Mother Lode

    Maybe someone should ask Bob what he thinks of Hamas’ new document advocating Israel being swept into the Mediterranean Sea?

    The grand statesman will patiently explain to you that the Israelis must compromise.

    If wiping out their entire population will stop the Palestinians from killing people, then the price of peace is worth it.

  70. Top Ender

    I did see the whales at the head of the Bight, invited on there by the local indigenous people

    One presumes the whales, like dolphins and dugongs, were a food source. Not exactly protecting them, then?

  71. Mother Lode

    So Putin wants sanctions lifted, but it’s Trump who will be kissing Putin’s ring. Can anyone work this out?

    No.

    You need a very special lens to make any sense of it.

    Sometimes it just takes a rake.

  72. Gab

    jupes
    #2432464, posted on July 5, 2017 at 10:41 am

    Arthur Sinodinos, British Prime Minister Theresa May and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, share his position, Mr Turnbull said.

    Turnbull’s pathetic appeal to authority proves he has no argument let alone a substantial point.

  73. Stimpson J. Cat

    Milo’s book is hilarious.
    “My motto is laughter and war.
    Keep reading and you’ll find out how you can become as terrifying to the forces of political correctness and social justice as I am.
    And you won’t even have to turn gay. ”

    “In my mastery of trolling, I am surpassed by one man President Donald J. Trump.
    Like me, Daddy, as I like to call him, only went after deserving targets: the media, Hillary and Bill Clinton, the disabled, and political correctness.”

    “We’re supposed to pretend it’s totally believable Try could pilot the Millennium Falcon with greater skill than Han Solo. Never mind the fact that she learns the Face in like, half a day.”

    “If you are reading this and you’re in college, or you recently graduated, you can lay the blame squarely at your parents generation for handing culture to the regressive lunatics and SJWs. The previous generation of conservatives failed completely in their attempts to save academia, the media and the arts. ”

    “Because of their intellectual pedigree in the angry, victim-centric doctrine of Cultural Marxism, the Left is committed to defending a worldview which arranges women, minorities, and gay’s in a league table of oppression, with straight white men as the eternal oppressors at the top of the list, followed by gay white men, followed by straight white women, all the way down to paraplegic black immigrant Muslim transsexuals at the very bottom. Straight white men are the new “bourgeoisie “, the group oppressing everyone else.”

  74. Baldrick

    Best of luck Hydra. Let us know how you get on.

  75. H B Bear

    I did see the whales at the head of the Bight, invited on there by the local indigenous people

    Not content with Hindmarsh Island and secret womens business, Mainland Tasmania now throws up the whale that went to Canberra dreaming.

  76. max

    From the First Thingsreview of Milligan’s book on Cardinal Pell:

    But the dazzling proliferation of claimants and allegations is common in spurious sex abuse cases. Arnold Friedman had over a dozen accusers. The McMartin Preschool case generated 321 charges from forty-one children. We now know that every charge was a lie and every child was a liar. Yet today, with the children now well into their thirties, many of them still insist that their charges were true. In Wenatchee, Washington, in 1994, forty-three adults were arrested on 29,726 counts of sex abuse alleged by sixty children, aged nine to thirteen. In 1995, every last charge was dropped.

  77. C.L.

    Its publication was advanced from July to May, presumably to influence the deliberations of the civil authorities.

    Which indicates Victoria Police briefed Milligan, the purpose being to pervert the course of justice.

  78. The Deplorable Barking Toad

    new fred up

  79. johanna

    Old Ozzie, I am scrolling by. Your posts are way too long and the random bolding makes them difficult to read.

    Your heart is in the right place, but your method is a cat of another colour.

  80. .

    ou know how the gerbillers are bullshitting about China now taking on the mantle of climate leadership (doncha love that). It’s actually true that China is talking on a leadership role in the energy field. The fuckers are building 700 coal plants in the next decade!

    What’s that, 20 times our capacity? These carbin pwice treaties can go shit in their hats.

  81. .

    “You saw an example of that – which most Australians would have found inconceivable – with Apple refusing to assist in unlocking a mobile phone that had belonged to one of the San Bernardino terrorists.”

    So without the NSA and not being the controlling party of Echelon, Carnivore and Prism, we’re more of a police state.

    Yeah, take that Trump. A Pacific Island Belgium ruled by a fascist aristocracy doesn’t approve of your bill of rights.

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