Land your helicopter into the winner’s circle

Performing on Paul Murray Live last night, the self declared arbiter of who is a socialist and who is a free enterprise-er, was in her usual “fine” form. In the context of a discussion around a coal powered electricity generator in Queensland, the Hon. Bronwyn Bishop said:

… and it needs to be an undertaking from the Federal Government now. This week to say we’re building one.

The principles of free enterprise say if the private sector will not or cannot do it, then the Government must do it.

There you go, a self identified Liberal Party “conservative” declared that the Federal Government must BUILD a piece of infrastructure that is the responsibility of the Queensland Government.

But, it’s those damned socialists you know. Recall, that the Hon Bron was in Parliament for 29 out of her (now) 74 years is currently living quite comfortably off her pre-2005 Parliamentary pension.  Lord know where she learned about the “principles of free enterprise” because it certainly was not from personal experience.

With Friends Like Bronwyn, Who Needs the ALP.

Follow I Am Spartacus on Twitter at @Ey_am_Spartacus

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27 Responses to Land your helicopter into the winner’s circle

  1. Jannie

    The principles of free enterprise say if the private sector will not or cannot do it, then the Government must do it.

    Where does it say that?

  2. Arky

    The principles of free enterprise say if the private sector will not or cannot do it, then the Government must do it.

    ..
    By that logic, if private enterprise refuses to exhibit canned turds, then the government must fund artists who can their own turds.
    Oh wait…

  3. Garry

    Back in the 60s the state government in NSW built power stations, substations and transmissions lines and got the state up and running. What is wrong with that? Private investment is only interested in financial return for shareholders while government should be interested in the common good and a fair return for all! And because governments are beholding to the electorate price rises of electricity and gas are a very sensitive issue when the asset is government owned – not so when the asset is privatised.

  4. I am Spartacus

    Dear Garry

    Back in the 60s the state government in NSW built power stations, substations and transmissions lines and got the state up and running. What is wrong with that? Private investment is only interested in financial return for shareholders while government should be interested in the common good and a fair return for all! And because governments are beholding to the electorate price rises of electricity and gas are a very sensitive issue when the asset is government owned – not so when the asset is privatised.

    1 – the STATE not FEDERAL government
    2 – there was no private for the State to compete with. Should the Federal Government also build a new bank? Or a new telecommunications company? Oh wait!
    3 – “government should be interested in the common good and a fair return for all”. Which government?

  5. Jannie

    while government should be interested in the common good and a fair return for all!

    Should? Garry that’s the triumph of hope over experience.

  6. Sydney Boy

    You say Bronwyn Bishop doesn’t know what free enterprise is because she spent the last 29 of 74 years in the Senate. So what did she do between leaving school and being elected into the Senate?

  7. I am Spartacus

    Dear Sydney Boy.

    what did she do between leaving school and being elected into the Senate

    From Wikipedia:

    Bishop was educated at Roseville Public School, completing her primary education in 1954. She then attended secondary school at Cremorne Girls High School. Bishop undertook a five-year LL.B. program at the University of Sydney. However, she was deemed ineligible to continue after failing a number of subjects multiple times. Bishop failed a total of 11 subjects over six years. In her first year in 1960, she failed all four core subjects. In 1964, she failed four subjects again and repeated them in 1965, in which she failed three again. The policy of the University of Sydney at the time was that a student was required to show cause why they should be allowed to repeat a subject for a third time, and Bishop was deemed ineligible to continue.

    During her university years, Bishop was not involved in student politics but was a member of the Killara branch of the Young Liberals. After leaving university, Bishop used the subjects she had previous passed to apply for the Solicitors’ Admission Board and was admitted to practice law as a Solicitor in 1967.

    Bishop first worked as an articled clerk and played an acting role as a barrister in the 1960s Australian television program Divorce Court.

    Having formed an ambition to become a politician, she joined the Liberal Party at the age of 17.

    Heavily involved in organised politics, Bishop joined Killara Young Liberals in 1961 and during her association with that branch, she became vice-president. She first became a Liberal Party office-holder in 1973 as president of the Balmoral branch and was later elected as the chairman of the Liberal Party Convention Committee from 1981 to 1985 and as the first female president of the NSW Liberals from 1985–1987.

  8. Marcus

    She also claimed a few months ago that she “did nothing wrong” regarding the helicopter because it was technically within the rules. Someone who equates morality with whatever’s legal isn’t much of a conservative.

  9. candy

    One thing this shows is that B. Bishop was hounded and ridiculed, whereas Ms Hanson-Young… nothing. She is admired for her care for whales, who cares about a sick child on a boat, as long as the communist can watch the whales.
    Her pays leader pays $8 an hour or something for the people who care for his precious children while he jets around increasing his carbon footprint.
    The media has one rule for Greens and one rule for conservatives.

    At the least Ms Bishop would have been a better mother than Ms Hanson-Young, of that I am sure.

  10. miltonf

    Seems to me Spartacus that the National Competition Policy reforms of the 90s which were meant to give us cheaper power allowed Canberra to start meddling in what was a state responsibility. So it’s had the OPPOSITE effect. I agree that private enterprise is generally superior to government action but what ElCom, SEC, ETSA, SEQEB etc provided was ok and vastly superior to the dog’s breakfast we have now. I wonder if John Howard’s RET was only possible due to the NCP reforms?

  11. miltonf

    I used to think BB was quite good. May be she hung around too long.

  12. Sydney Boy

    I can’t believe she managed to fail so many subjects that she was ineligible to gain a degree – but was still admitted as a solicitor. Ridiculous. But I agree with Candy, the media were all over BB but for SHY’s whale-watching adventure … sound of crickets.

  13. miltonf

    No enemies left Sydney Boy. But BB should have been smart enough to know that.

  14. struth

    I can’t believe she managed to fail so many subjects that she was ineligible to gain a degree but was still admitted as a solicitor

    I heard she could suck a basket ball through a garden hose when she was younger.

  15. a reader

    I listened to that show just now. I’m sure she was talking about the state government not the feds.

  16. Habib

    Indicitive of what sort of a conservative/liberal the old bat is, is her complete ignorance of what helicopters are for.

  17. Habib

    And because governments are beholding to the electorate price rises of electricity and gas are a very sensitive issue when the asset is government owned – not so when the asset is privatised.

    That has worked a treat with stamp duty, rego, fees, charges, levys……………christ on a bike, these people are out there, and are allowed to vote.

  18. iampeter

    Back in the 60s the state government in NSW built power stations, substations and transmissions lines and got the state up and running.

    Sorry Garry but that’s neither accurate nor even physically possible since the government can’t build anything without first taxing the wealth from the private citizens who actually DO built everything. Electricity generation in Australia was always initially private but the state always muscled in on it.

    So a more accurate statement would be: Back in the 60’s the state government in NSW continued its policy of meddling in the energy industry, resulting in needlessly costly, delayed and micro managed, power stations, substations and transmission line projects, greatly delaying getting the state up and running.

    Private investment is only interested in financial return for shareholders

    Correct. This is also another way of saying “private industry will produce the best possible product for the best possible price, resulting in win/win deals for everyone”.

    while government should be interested in the common good and a fair return for all!

    Right, which is another way of saying “government interest in arbitrarily determined “common good” results in misallocation of scarce resources resulting in lose/lose deals for everyone”.

    Basically it’s all the exact other way around.

  19. Warty

    This is the first time I’ve ever heard someone call our Bronwyn a socialist.

  20. min

    Pollies just don’t understand business or how to make a quid. Frydenberg said that govt was not stopping private enterprise building new power stations. I certainly would not be wanting to put in billions to retrofit Hazlewood for example without guarantees that another govt could close it down anytime it chose. Or Andrews could slap on coal royalties like he did to Energie

  21. Diogenes

    Electricity generation in Australia was always initially private but the state always muscled in on it.

    For NSW at least true.

    The Hunter Valley got its first electricity from colliery power stations at Richmond Main, Hebburn and Cockle Creek. Newcastle from the now long gone Zara St (NSW Tramways) .

    Sydney had Rozelle(aka Balmain) & Bunnerong operated by the Sydney City Council

  22. Tel

    This is the first time I’ve ever heard someone call our Bronwyn a socialist.

    It’s not that she is a socialist, it’s just that she has been living and working under the shadow of the One Ring for so long that her perspective is messed up. She no longer can see how things look from the outside looking in, which is why she made a mistake with the helicopter ride.

    Some bureaucrat lackey points to a helicopter, Bronwyn thinks, “Oh that’s convenient” and jumps right in, asks no questions. In any private company where employees have to spend their own money first and then make the claim back to a ridiculously tightarse accounts department, one glance at a helicopter would immediately get the reaction, “Holy crap! How much does that cost?!?”

    This is the problem with Canberra, even people who start out sensible gradually get consumed by it. Take a look at Barnaby Joyce… he used to be deadset opposed to debt. His favourite saying was, “If you don’t manage debt, then debt will manage you.” That’s what is happening to Australia and Joyce is sitting on his backside watching.

  23. Peter

    “Lord know where she learned about the “principles of free enterprise” because it certainly was not from personal experience.”

    I think I now understand the problem. People like her believe that “free enterprise” means that it REALLY should be “free”. She is a new economic genius – everything is free. Nothing costs anything if the government provides it.

  24. Slightly off topic. On the weekend I went on a tour of the Liddell coal mine outside of Singleton.
    Fantastic.
    The scale blew me away. A three story high excavator, D11 bulldozer, 200m deep hole, huge earthmoving trucks, 4 ton tyres – wow.
    I was more excited than my 4 year old grandson!
    My ignorance about coalmining was washed away too.

  25. JohnA

    Sydney Boy #2439206, posted on July 12, 2017, at 8:44 pm

    I can’t believe she managed to fail so many subjects that she was ineligible to gain a degree – but was still admitted as a solicitor. Ridiculous.

    No, the CV then says she became an articled clerk. That is, she worked/studied her way through the legal system the old way.

    But the rest of it says she still doesn’t know a damn thing about private enterprise and running your own business/life.

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