Which one is it? No snow or record snow

Skiing on Mount Hotham early on Sunday.Don’t you just love it with the online editor (let’s face it, Sunday is a bad day to work) has two completely inconsistent stories cheek-by-jowl.

And so it was this morning with The Age.

The first story had the scary heading: Australia’s ski industry facing ‘terrifying’ future.

The second story was about the record dump of snow on Victoria’s ski fields this weekend.

So take you pick:

Australia’s ski resorts face the prospect of a long downhill run as a warming climate reduces snow depth, cover and duration. The industry’s ability to create artificial snow will also be challenged, scientists say.

Resorts are also going to become more reliant on big snow dumps such as this weekend’s blizzard – after a poor start to the season – as the frequency of smaller, top-up snowfalls diminish.

A snow retreat has been observed for half a century, with rising temperatures rather than reduced precipitation to blame, according to a major CSIRO-Bureau of Meteorology report. Under high greenhouse gas emissions pathway, snow at lower-elevation sites such as Mt Buffalo could all but disappear by 2050.

Warming springs have led to stark impacts at the end of the ski season. Early October snow depths fell 30 per cent during the 2000-13 period compared with 1954-99, a separate study in 2015 found.

Snow is a “threshold variable”. A slight temperature rise can turn snowflakes into rain that washes away, rather than adds to, snow cover.

That’s why all climate projections point in one direction, says Tom Remenyi, a researcher at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre. It’s both “encouraging and terrifying” that observations have matched models, giving researchers confidence about their bleak predictions, he said.

Reduced average snow depth at Spencers Creek in the Snowy MountainsReduced average snow depth at Spencers Creek in the Snowy Mountains.

‘Step change’

“What we’re fearing is that at some point, it’s not going to really snow that much any more. There’s going to be a step change,” Dr Remenyi said.

“The models say the paradigm shift will happen in the next 10-20 years.”

Those blasted in this weekend’s snow storms might wonder if snow will be in short supply, with as much as a metre expected for some resorts.

Sonya Fiddes, a researcher at Melbourne University’s Australian-German Climate and Energy College who led a study on Australian snow trends, says that big dumps will still happen but warmer air and follow-up rains means the snow “probably won’t stick around”.

“The projected trends are for declining rainfall for south-eastern Australia, and an increase in extreme events,” Ms Fiddes said.

Dr Remenyi concurs, noting models point to a 20 per cent drop in precipitation by the end of the century. Alpine summers may collect more rainfall – in fewer, larger events – but other seasons will see a decline.

The Victorian government is preparing a report in the future of alpine communities and the ski industry later this year.

NSW is working with the University of NSW to assess changing climate and snowmaking conditions, with research due out late this year or early 2018.

Industry view

Colin Hackworth, chief executive of the Australian Ski Areas Association, said the $1.5 billion industry has long recognised “if you have no snow, you have no business”. Investments in snowmaking dates from the 1980s.

Popular resorts such as Mt Buller in Victoria have managed to extend operational days from about 100 in the 1970s to 106 in a typical year now, even with less natural snow. Diversification has also brought in “snow tourists”, with many visitors just heading to the mountains to seek the white stuff rather than to ski or snowboard, he says.

“The industry is remarkably resilient,” Mr Hackworth said. “It’s a mature industry but it’s growing every year.”

Nor are resorts denying global warming is serious. Thredbo in NSW recently hosted a Protect Our Winters event “to raise awareness of the impact of climate change on our mountain environment”.

And Vail Resorts, which operates Perisher, calls climate change “one of the most significant challenges facing every country, every business and every person on our planet”. It aims for a zero environmental footprint by 2030.

Challenges, though, are only likely to intensify. Snow guns are becoming less efficient as humidity rises, reduce output of artificial snow by as much as 70 per cent as they ice up, Dr Remenyi said.

New “snow factories” have been introduced to Mt Buller and Mt Selwyn in Victoria, and more are likely. They create ice shavings with longer durability than gun-fired snow.

But warming temperatures will raise costs to maintain artificial snow cover, Dr Remenyi said. A study he helped write on the potential impact of climate change on Victoria’s resorts found that “by 2020- 2030 conditions suitable for snowmaking are projected to decline substantially”.

Compare this story:

Melbourne weather: Hailstorms loom for city as blizzards sweep the ski fields

Brace yourself for bleak weather across the state today.

Hailstorms threaten across Melbourne’s suburbs from late morning and through the afternoon, and blizzards will continue to sweep snow across Victoria’s ski fields.

Temperatures in the city will reach no higher than 13 degrees celsius, while Ballarat and Kyneton are unlikely to see double-figure temperatures, with a forecast top of only nine degrees.

Sub-zero temperatures and wild winds  at Mount Buller, Mount Hotham and Falls Creek will see plenty more snow dumped on the ski fields in blizzard conditions.

On Saturday, Mount Hotham Skiing Company’s general manager Belinda Trembath said the resort’s 5000 beds were all booked out, and nearby Dinner Plain had 2500 beds.

She said strong winds could affect how many chair lifts would be open.

“It is minus 2 degrees … the wind is blowing quite strongly, so we could have some challenges with opening our chair lifts up high,” Ms Trembath said.

“We have got 12 of 13 [chair lifts] planned to open, and we’ll see how we go with the winds.”

The bleak midwinter mood will continue into Monday, as Mr Stewart says there will be further showers overnight and into the start of the week.

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59 Responses to Which one is it? No snow or record snow

  1. stackja

    Climate change keeps changing.

  2. Andrew

    The Age is edited?? Who knew?

  3. Dr Fred Lenin

    I think that climate has nothing to do with real facts Judith if the true facts don’t suit ,change them ,don’t worry about how exagerrated your new information is as long as it helps the globalist cause ,none of the other comrades will criticise you ,those who challenge your lies can be discredited as denialist deviationis counter revolutionary saboteurs . We will soon have a CHEKA group to counter these denialists , the then all will be well . Sounds familiar doesn’t it now where have I heard that before ? ,that’s right. The last time the communists tried to rule the world wasn’t it .

  4. The Age contradicts itself?

    I found this article quite amusing: http://www.theage.com.au/technology/consumer-security/reminder-incognito-mode-is-not-as-private-as-you-think-20170804-gxp8eq.html.

    I hadn’t specifically enable a tracking disabler, so installed Privacy Badger, and now the Age is pleading with me to disable tracking protection. 🙂

  5. miltonf

    The SMH and Aged really are zombie outfits now. The Oz seems to be heading in that direction too.

  6. The Oz seems to be heading in that direction too.

    Seems? I think it’s been there for a while now, or at least large parts. That’s why I would never subscribe to any of them, they are all being subverted, if not subverted already.

  7. LGS

    That’s the Left and their cognitive dissonance for you, Judith.
    With them it’s a case of “heads I win, tails you lose!”
    I have seen alarmists say on one hand that climate change will greatly reduce the world’s population, and on the other hand, claim that it will somehow greatly enhance women’s sex-drive, and many more will become prostitutes!

  8. Indigo

    Back the 80s and early 90s we heard all this, that there was no future for Australian ski resorts. Bit like no water in Perth and every one will have to leave. Rhubarb, rhubard etc.

  9. Roger

    “The models say the paradigm shift will happen in the next 10-20 years.”

    Garbage in, garbage out.

  10. egg_

    Back the 80s and early 90s we heard all this, that there was no future for Australian ski resorts.

    Have any climageddons ever come to fruition?

  11. Whether it rains or is a drought, or snows, or is too hot – We’ll all be rooooneded

  12. Herodotus

    Heading to the snowfields this winter? asks our old national broadcaster friend ABC. The snow you see may be machine made because climate change has screwed that pooch.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-05/snowmaking-the-future-in-face-of-climate-change/8752210

  13. Well, we’ve had one of the coldest Winters for some time and when it’s constantly cold, you don’t get a lot of rain. No rain, no snow. If we eliminated so-called global warming, we’d be in an ice age. That would be wonderful, not.

  14. Irreversible

    Judith: one of these is based on a CSIRO report that appears to forecast snow outcomes by projecting trends established in data acquired since 1954. The other is a contemporary story about snowfall.
    Looks like you’ve spent to much time with journalists!

  15. Tel

    It will be fine, if it doesn’t rain.

  16. Jannie

    Is it cognitive dissonance or conscious dissimulation? Its possible for the left to have both no snow and record snow, simultaneously, its just depends on the angle of argument. Global warming results in investment in ski resorts and rising sea levels do not prevent Tim Flannery from investing in waterfront property.

  17. Gorky

    Forgetting about how likely the models are likely to be right, isn’t it little scary that the population can be convinced to support job destroying energy policies so the lucky few who are left (and in the PS) can go skiing?

  18. True Aussie

    Only old people still read newspapers and none of us younger people care what they think since they are responsible for ruining this country. When the boomers die off so too will the newspaper industry. Good riddance to both.

  19. Only old people still read newspapers and none of us younger people care what they think since they are responsible for ruining this country. When the boomers die off so too will the newspaper industry. Good riddance to both.

    Be careful what you wish for, the unintended consequences can be very disappointing. And let me remind you, old age and treachery will always beat youth and exuberance.

  20. Helen

    No snow or record snow? It’s both. Look at the graph. The trend line is down (climate) , but the snow falling annually goes up and down, sometimes in large jumps (weather).

    It’s not ‘cognitive dissonance or conscious dissimulation’, it’s reality, the difference between short-term fluctuations and long-term trends. The economists who blog here should be quite familiar with this sort of statistical graph.

  21. Waz

    Nothing to do in particular with Judith’s amusing post, however I was idling googling about Tesla cars today and wanted to know the cost of charging one and thought it might be of interest to anyone who read Judith’s post. Basically a Tesla Model S uses on average 90 kWh to travel 500 kms (though it can be quite a lot higher if you’re lead-footed like me). The cost of a kWh in SA is currently about 47c using government published average retail rates. So the Tesla charge is going to set you back about $42.3. If you have a reasonably modern mid-size petrol car you can expect to get about 7 l/100kms and you’d use about 35 l to travel 500 kms. Average ULP costs in SA are currently about $1.26/l so it will cost you $44.10 for the 500 kms. Basically FA difference between the two. So to all those out there thinking they’re so clever buying Tesla’s, you’re kidding yourself in SA. Further, Tesla have now changed their policy and said only 3 free charges a year for the new Model 3. Obviously they too have seen the writing on the wall.

  22. Marcus Classis

    But Judith, being a leftist means one is able to hold multiple entirely contradictory views simultaneously and not even notice that they are contradictory. Or even rational.

    They can do this as they are bears of very little brain, and they can explain it too: “because shutup.”

  23. Wayne Hickman

    Is Dr. Remenyi related to Tim Flannery ? , one says no snow , one says no rain ,can anyone out there tell me if either one is telling the truth ?.

  24. Bruce of Newcastle

    No snow or record snow? It’s both. Look at the graph. The trend line is down (climate) , but the snow falling annually goes up and down, sometimes in large jumps (weather).

    If you were to draw a trend line for the last 30 or so years it would be flat. You can see that from the data.

    The data for NH snowcover is the same. Flat since about 1995, which is consistent with the global ‘pause’ in temperatures. And which is not consistent with the rise in pCO2 over that period.

    The NH is more affected by the AMO, but the data in the Spencers Creek graph is consistent with solar activity which peaked in the early part of this new millennium. Now that has reversed course as has the global cycle of which the AMO is one aspect. No surprise we’ve been seeing better snow conditions lately. In the US and Canada the higher ski resorts have been open in July.

  25. MJ

    Good on you, Judith, The morons have been forecasting no snow for some years.

    If we look at history, there’s always a kick up from the beginning of August, sometimes large, sometimes small, but always constistent

    Snow for many years despite us all keeping our homes heated.

  26. herodotus

    Thanks Bruce, you are a beacon of sense in a stupid world.

  27. chrisl

    Surely the modelling would outweigh the reality?

  28. John L

    Newermind The Age they are irrelevant. It’s CSIRO and BOM, they are a complete joke and should be disbanded. Just think that we are paying “scientists” to study how to make snow.
    Hey Mal and Bill, how about setting a rescue package to save the falling “snow-skiing industry” with a complete redundancy package.
    The Aboriginal industry should also be included in the package. Didgeridoo could either freeze up or crack up due to extensive moisture according to CSIRO study!

  29. Somewhere on god’s green earth, Rugby Skier is resisting vomiting in his mouth.

    Any serious Australian skier knows there has never been good snow in Australia. Twenty years ago i heard that in twenty years’ time there’d be no snow in Australia. And Australia has some of the most variable snow on earth.

    I call bullshit.

  30. Rob MW

    I really hard to enthusiastic about the cold, although cutting up dead trees to get warm is a pleasure, particularly as it is one less place for them sneaky snakes to hide in and to say nothing about how it pisses the envirowankers off no end. Apart from that I really don’t give a shit if those frightened ski resorts go belly-up either through above average warmth or a fucking avalanche, I kind’a don’t care.

  31. Habib

    That recalcitrant weather just refuses to do what the CSIRO wants it to.

    It’s a very long list, but the CSIRO is up there with the ABC/SBS as the greatest waste of money and insult to intelligence provided by government.

  32. rugbyskier

    Somewhere on god’s green earth, Rugby Skier is resisting vomiting in his mouth.

    Actually I was driving out of Thredbo in a blizzard, with some of the heaviest snow I have seen there. This season has seen all that you see as an Australian skier, with cold dry weather, light snowfall, rain, ice and blizzards all in 6 weeks.

  33. Gorky

    Look at the graph. The trend line is down (climate) , but the snow falling annually goes up and down,
    And the trend is not only too small to be significant, the smaller amplitude with time suggests that the negative trend might be due to solely better measurements with time.
    You’re not that good at data analysis, Helen.

  34. Art Vandelay

    That recalcitrant weather just refuses to do what the CSIRO wants it to.

    The CSIRO and other climate bedwetters have been predicting loss of snow for ages. They don’t seem to be terribly good at forecasting.

  35. Helen

    To Bruce and Gorky. Yes, the slope of the trend line will depend on the length of time over which you graph it. Using the same data, you can select one period to get a steep trend line, or another to get a flat trend line. This selectivity, by both sides, has been a problem in the overall global warming debate.
    To Gorky: I did not claim the trend was significant. I don’t think you can assess significance on the graph alone – the question would be compared to what. I agree that better measurements with time could influence the trend.
    Those comments do not, however, invalidate the point I was making, that there is a distinction between overall long-term trend and short-term fluctuations, something that people seem to get confused about. Leaving aside the pros and cons of global warming, the distinction applies to mundane weather. You’ll get a similar pattern if you graph daily maximum temperatures through summer-autumn or spring -summer: the overall trend will be cooling in the first case, as we go into winter, and warming in the second, as we go into summer, but the daily temperatures will spike up and down. The last two weeks where I live is a case in point – some extreme spikes, 27 degrees one day last week, 10 degrees yesterday, but the trend at the moment is pretty flat – it’s the middle of winter.
    This pattern, short-term fluctuations v. long-term trends, is independent of the kind of data (ie not just climate/weather) – look at the stock market’s daily (hourly!) fluctuations v. trends; there’s even a specific field, trend-line analysis.

  36. Helen

    (Cont.)
    So, yes, it’s possible to have a very high snowfall within a warming trend, or a very low snowfall (or none in some seasons) within a cooling trend. I haven’t used the word ‘record high’ here because that’s dependent on the length of the period measurements have been taken. On the graph, the high peak around 1980 would be a ‘record’ if you only had data back to 1970, but it’s about the same as the earlier high peaks.
    On the question of better recent measurements, I’m not familiar with the changes in techniques used in snow-fall measurements, but there are other ways to measure changes in snow – you could compare the change in extent of winter snow cover over time using aerial imagery. For the mid-20th century we just have occasional snap-shots when air photo runs were taken, but with satellite imagery we’re building up a substantial database, so from now on we’ll be able to get accurate measurements of changes in snowfall as measured by snow cover.

  37. Shane

    Helen ,not sure if you are on the side of the angels here or not ,or just merely sitting on a rather uncomfortable ideological fence.
    “But the word has been passed about ,” worldwide that BOM data has been tampered with to fit an agenda.

    https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2017/08/02/australia-weather-experts-falsify-climate-change/

    So why not give these lying statisticians with an ideological agenda, the flick , & look at other ,more accurate models with a track record ,like for example ,that of Piers Corbyn with his own ‘on the nose prediction of rivers of moisture in the atmosphere ‘ back in the end of 2010 & beginning of 2011 ,due to that radiant sphere, other wise known as the Sun interacting with our own Moon.
    But then maybe you were not confronted with the actual reality of living in Brisbane at that time.

  38. OldOzzie

    egg_
    #2460829, posted on August 6, 2017 at 4:46 pm
    Back the 80s and early 90s we heard all this, that there was no future for Australian ski resorts.

    Have any climageddons ever come to fruition?

    So why has Vail Purchased Perisher?

    James Packer sells Perisher ski resort to US company Vail Resorts

    US-based Vail Resorts has bought Australia’s Perisher ski resort for $176.6 million from James Packer subsidiary, Murray Publishers and Transfield Corporate.

    The deal includes the resort areas of Perisher Valley, Smiggin Holes, Blue Cow and Guthega. Also included are the ski school, lodging, food and beverage and retail/rental and transportation operations.

    The resort is on a lease till 2048 with a 20-year option to review.

    Under the deal, Perisher’s Freedom Pass, which goes up for sale this week at $749, will now include access to Vail resorts with unlimited skiing at a range of US ski fields – including Breckenridge in Colorado, Park City and Canyons in Utah and Heavenly, Northstar and Kirkwood in the California and Nevada – subject to traditional holiday restrictions.

    Could be because

    Australia’s not-so Snowy Mountains: Why Vail bought a ski resort Down Under

  39. Bruce of Newcastle

    This pattern, short-term fluctuations v. long-term trends, is independent of the kind of data

    Helen – That is true. However the long term trends don’t have to be linear.

    For example HadCRUT global temperature data and the AMO and PDO all do better with a sinusoidal trendline fitted to them. The NH snow data that I linked is indeed the satellite dataset you referred to, and it would likewise benefit from such a non-linear regression line too, although there’s only enough data for a half cycle so far.

    If you detrend the HadCRUT data you get this graph. You can see immediately that about 0.3 C of the temperature rise over the model validation period during the 20thC is an artefact, since the start of the period was at the bottom of the cycle and the end of it was at the top of the following cycle. This isn’t acknowledged by the consensus climate science community, and the ensemble climate models don’t reproduce or include the cycle – which alone would nearly halve derived ECS if they did.

  40. Bruce of Newcastle

    Oops, sorry, the second link should be to this graph from Scafetta 2010 in JASTP. You can see for yourself the same cycle pretty well using the Woodfortrees graphing function, although it doesn’t have the ability to include a non-linear regression line.

  41. J.H.

    …. AND don’t forget that the Australian Bureau of Meteorology was caught Fictionalizing raw temperature data.

    The BoM was deliberately editing out record low temperatures with an automatic filter on their digital temperature recording stations. Jo Nova has Jennifer Marohasy’s expose’ of the whole sordid affair.

  42. Spring is near

    Remember folks, Big Al was in town last week and fired up the Enviro worriers. Expect a new wave of this bulldust over the next 6-12 months.

  43. Gorky

    Helen, did you notice the graph doesn’t show this years record. With it included, a linear trend (which isn’t justified) will not predict the end of snow in the near future like one article says.

  44. Gorky

    “There’s going to be a step change,” Dr Remenyi said
    Looks like he knew the data showed a step change rather than a linear trend.

  45. Rabz

    Actually I was driving out of Thredbo in a blizzard, with some of the heaviest snow I have seen there

    I was almost trapped in a blizzard in the Alpine National Park back around the turn of the century when I left my sister’s place at Jindabyne on the way to Mosquebourne. Had the top down as well. No chains, so I had to execute a blind three point turn to get the hell out of there.

    Scary stuff.

  46. Rabz

    No snow evah again, Grate Barrier Reef dead, buried and cremated, hottest years evah, etc, etc, etc.

    Horse manure piled up in mounds.

  47. Helen

    Shane: I’m not on any side.
    Bruce: Thanks for that, interesting graphs. I wish I had another life to go into the stats in detail, but without access to all the data and big number crunching machines… Most of us individuals can’t possibly be on top of the complexity of the data and the stats, with all the issues, including comparative measurements, not to mention trying to get a single figure (!) for global temperatures, for such a complex system as the atmosphere. I think this is why both sides tend to cherry-pick what suits their argument. (I work in a related field but have been attending occasional climate workshops since about 2000.)
    JH: I’m cautious of Marohasy’s work (not to mention Flannery’s!). I found problems some years back in an analysis she did, where I had personal knowledge of database. .

  48. mh

    I remember listening to Michael Smith when he was broadcasting on Brisbane’s 4bc radio chatting to then Greens leader Bob Brown. Brown said that he had just flown over the Australian Alps and managed to see and photograph snow, which may never happen again.

  49. David Brewer

    It’s both “encouraging and terrifying” that observations have matched models, giving researchers confidence about their bleak predictions, he said.

    But observations always match models that are being constantly tweaked in order to match observations.

    The test is to go back to the models used 30 years ago, and see how they turned out. As I recall, they then confidently predicted the end of snow and the Australian skiing industry by 2000.

    Bruce is right that the trend since 1982 (the lowest year) is flat; moreover the graph does not show the last 3 years, of which two (2014 and 2016) were well above the trend line; see data here:
    http://www.snowyhydro.com.au/our-energy/water/inflows/snow-depths-calculator/

  50. OldOzzie

    ‘Thundersnow’ brings heavy falls to ski resorts

    NSW and Victorian ski resorts are revelling after a pair of “thundersnow” storms crossed Australia’s alps on Sunday and early Monday morning bringing a massive dump.

    Skiers on the Victorian Alps are enjoying the best conditions this season thanks in part to the rare weather phenomenon — thundersnow, when a snowstorm is accompanied by thunder and lightning.

    Mt Hotham spokesman Karl Gray said the thundersnow yesterday afternoon forced the resort to close down for a while amid concerns about potential lightning.

    “But there weren’t any issues, it just snowed heavily,” he said. “It was a cracker of a storm.”

    He said the resort received more than 80cm of snow since Friday, with 49cm from 9am Sunday.

    “It’s good quality snow, the temperature is staying really low at Hotham,” Mr Gray said.

    Mt Buller’s Rhylla Morgan said she had worked in the alps for the past nine years and this was one of the longest snow storms she had experienced.

    “We’ve had almost a week of snowfalls,” she said.

    “This storm started on Thursday and it’s now Monday. It hasn’t backed off in between, that’s why we’re seeing such beautiful snow depths at all the resorts.”

    Bureau of Meteorology senior forecaster Dean Stewart said the region could receive another 5cm of snow today.

    He said the next couple of days will only hold a slight chance of snow but there was another front predicted for Thursday.

    In the NSW resort of Thredbo, about 45cms of snow has fallen in 24 hours, with winds gusting above 130km/h.

    “WOW. There’s no other word to describe it. The Blizzard of Oz Day 4 is here and it’s the storm that just keeps giving — we’ve woken to a massive 40cm of fresh snow up the top, with 20cm at midstation and a beautiful 15cm blanketing the village…and it’s still snowing! It’s all light, dry, fluffy powder and today is going to be the day of the season!,’’ says Thredbo’s weather report.

    Over at Perisher, 40cms of fresh snow has fallen. “We have woken up to a winter wonderland, with 30cm of new snow overnight and 40cm over the last 24 hours, taking the overall storm total to 90cm and counting since last Thursday!’’ the Perisher weather report boasts.

    “The flakes are still falling to set us up with the perfect Monday, so what are you waiting for? Come and check out our four resort areas and be the first to make those fresh white turns through the soft pow!’’

  51. yarpos

    Hannam is Fairfax’s resident climate hysteric. His articles are always shrill. I dont think the Grinch in him could stand to see all those people heading off to enjoy the snow, so he just had try and spoil the party with a bit more doom saying.

  52. Gorky

    Helen, seriously? That “busted” plot is not even close to why someone like recently retired professors in climate science and atmospheric physics are sceptics ie. Lindzen, Judith Curry, Bill Gray
    Its difficult to type on a phone but some of the below became sceptics after 2000 when your supposed sceptic saw the light.
    Judith Curry, Riy Spencer

  53. Mec Goudron

    I don’t see any inconsistency between these two reports – can someone explain why weather extremes can’t produce short-term record snow while snow falls are declining long-term?

    Or have I missed something?

  54. Jim

    “The first story had the scary heading: Australia’s ski industry facing ‘terrifying’ future. The second story was about the record dump of snow on Victoria’s ski fields this weekend.”

    I’m sure one story was showing a trend on a chart, and the other one was trending on social media. But these stories are consistent with climate science and modelling, so I’m not sure why so many people are having a hard time grasping the fact we have had a good snow season.

  55. stackja

    Fire Weather Warning
    for the Eucla fire weather district
    Issued at 12:17 am WST on Wednesday 9 August 2017.
    Weather Situation
    Fresh to strong and gusty northwesterly winds are expected across the southeast of WA on Wednesday.

    For the rest of Wednesday 9 August:
    Severe Fire Danger is forecast for the following fire weather district:
    Eucla

    Warning to Sheep Graziers
    for the Central West, Lower West, South West, South Coastal, South East Coastal, Great Southern and Central Wheat Belt forecast districts
    Issued at 3:49 am WST on Wednesday 9 August 2017.
    Sheep graziers are warned that cold temperatures, rain and showers and westerly winds are expected during Wednesday. Areas likely to be affected include the Central West, Lower West, South West, South Coastal, South East Coastal, Great Southern and Central Wheat Belt forecast districts. There is a risk of losses of lambs and sheep exposed to these conditions.

  56. Sam Vandegeer

    Sounds like more flannel from Tim. Perhaps he’s taken a job as Age online editor!

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