Open Forum: August 12, 2017

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1,657 Responses to Open Forum: August 12, 2017

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  1. zyconoclast

    True Grit movie 1969

    True Grit movie 2010

    On a rare occasion, original and remake are both very good movies.

  2. Aldrydd

    Hmmm, a not to shabby 5th…

  3. zyconoclast

    twostix
    #2466112, posted on August 12, 2017 at 12:02 am
    Japans problem is that they had US late 19th century sexual culture forced upon them literally at gun point.
    That married with their own ancient culture metastasized into the revolting suiciding, little gir’s panties sniffing, live abortion that is modern Japanese man.

    So what exactly was that sexual culture?

  4. Fisky

    “Having 250 million Han Chinese in Japans will mean nothing politically for the Japanese people!”.

    This is the exact equivalent to what open borders retards have been saying to the west for 30 years now.

    “So long as they pay taxes and assimilate”

  5. Rabz

    Japans problem is that they …

    … like the Krauts, did not get away with it.

    But their loathsome nondescript “leaders”, unlike the Krauts, weren’t able to flood the place with moozleys.

    #demographicdeathspiral

  6. twostix

    Probably the culture that ended up producing this for it’s children.

  7. Rabz

    the culture that ended up producing this for it’s children

    South Australia is indeed one of the most depraved hellholes to have existed in human history.

    It makes Dante’s Inferno look like a toddlers’ tea party.

    Thankfully, as that image so clearly demonstrates, they are busy extincting themselves.

  8. twostix

    “So long as they pay taxes and assimilate”

    “If they break the Japanese people’s laws, they must simply imprison them all until they stop”

  9. Fisky

    Douglas Murray‏ @DouglasKMurray 4h4 hours ago
    More
    Another diverse boatload of PhD candidates, engineers and doctors storms the beaches of Europe:

    https://twitter.com/DouglasKMurray/status/895945999457280000

  10. Fisky

    “The Japanese police will crack down on Han terrorists with ruthless fury”

    “No to Japan’s fascist police state! Yellow Lives Matter!”

  11. Fisky

    Another few years of open borders in the EU will only harden British attitudes even more.

    New research out has shown that those across Britain, whether having voted Remain or Leave in the EU referendum, is now united behind a full, clean Brexit.

    The London School of Economics and Oxford University have teamed up to conduct a survey of 20,000 people, with BuzzFeed being given details.

    What it shows is quite striking, with 67% preferring no deal to any so-called ‘soft Brexit’ and 68% support a full Brexit over a watered down version still being put forward by some Remoaners.

    BuzzFeed spoke to Professor Sara Hobolt who told them: “Our results imply that Leavers are united in strongly favouring a ‘hard Brexit’ because they are generally more likely to oppose any deal that involves continued freedom of movement of people, jurisdiction of the ECJ, and a very large ‘divorce settlement’.

    “In contrast, Remainers are more divided, with the majority favouring a ‘soft Brexit’, but others favouring aspects of a ‘hard Brexit’. Overall, this means that there is on aggregate higher levels of support for outcomes that resemble the ‘hard Brexit’ position put forward by the government.”

    http://www.westmonster.com/20000-person-poll-shows-leave-and-remain-voters-united-on-proper-brexit/

  12. Fisky

    The worst thing that can happen under a bad Brexit deal is Britain adds another few million Eastern Europeans to its population over 5 years. I don’t think that’s going to break the country.

  13. twostix

    We really need to close our borders, and more importantly our minds, to Britain.

    It’s not anything like what most Australians like to think of it as anymore.

  14. Fisky

    TECH COMPANIES LIKE Facebook and Google that have become essential elements of 21st-century life should be regulated as utilities, top White House adviser Steve Bannon has argued, according to three people who’ve spoken to him about the issue.

    Bannon’s push for treating essential tech platforms as utilities pre-dates the Democratic “Better Deal” that was released this week. “Better Deal,” the branding for Democrats’ political objectives, included planks aimed at breaking up monopolies in a variety of sectors, suggesting that anti-monopoly politics is on the rise on both the right and left.

    Bannon’s basic argument, as he has outlined it to people who’ve spoken with him, is that Facebook and Google have become effectively a necessity in contemporary life. Indeed, there may be something about an online social network or a search engine that lends itself to becoming a natural monopoly, much like a cable company, a water and sewer system, or a railroad. The sources recounted the conversations on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to give the accounts on record, and could face repercussions for doing so.

    Good idea.

  15. Fisky

    Trump should publicly threaten the kill switch on Google, Facebook etc. Smash their stocks for a couple of days and see if their behaviour changes.

  16. twostix

    Google are the Standard Oil of our era, except instead of bringing us delicious oil they’re dead set on bringing us trannies and communism.

    They need to be smashed.

  17. Fisky

    Ryan T. Anderson‏Verified account @RyanTAnd Aug 10
    More
    Replying to @RyanTAnd
    Almost no “fiscally conservative, socially liberal” voters. But sure, build your electoral strategy that way… @WSJopinion @fbuckley

    https://twitter.com/RyanTAnd/status/895651901814915073

  18. srr

    Yeah, the Brits have thrown themselves on the grenade … if their blood and bone and gore doesn’t make us turn the other way, we deserve to be blown up to –

    Tommy Robinson: British Police Think Tweets Are an Emergency
    Rebel Media
    Aug 11, 2017
    Is there a single police force in Britain that doesn’t care more about mean tweets than the victims of FGM? Watch Tommy Robinson of TheRebel.media expose how the police care more about what you’re saying online than real emergencies, including his local force in Bedfordshire.

  19. Fisky

    Good to see another leading liberal, Thomas Frank, coming out for immigration restriction

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/08/the-democratic-case-for-restricting-immigration

  20. srr

    36 But I tell you that men will give an account on the day of judgment for every careless word they have spoken.
    37 For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned.”
    ___

    Supreme Dark Lord 🐸 @voxday
    2,006,754
    ELoE Supreme Dark Lord and bestselling philosopher.
    Lead Editor at Castalia House.
    Game designer.
    #AltRight.
    voxday.blogspot.com

    32:24 15 hours ago
    Google runs from AltRight, but will strike back

    https://www.pscp.tv/voxday/1mrGmmzDdADGy
    ___________

    My Bourgeois Secrets
    The Thinkery
    Aug 11, 2017
    Dun dun dun.

  21. srr

    Donald J. Trump‏Verified account @realDonaldTrump 4h4 hours ago

    Military solutions are now fully in place,locked and loaded,should North Korea act unwisely. Hopefully Kim Jong Un will find another path!

  22. srr

    C.L.
    #2465488, posted on August 11, 2017 at 12:16 pm
    Holy cow. Carl Sagan was a time traveller:

    Not really big calls, given when he made them.
    Chesterton was accurately essaying the fate of a Western world devoid of commitment to moral objectivism in the late 1800s.

    Shut up C.L.

    I mentioned that yonks ago and it got me branded, “USSR”, by all the cat’s Militant Atheist Stasi pets, and none of the ‘good christian’ or ‘catholic’ cats cared to pull them up on it. Nope, y’all were more than happy to feed the lying beast instead of fight it, so ………

  23. OldOzzie

    When operating on Stupid – Repeat

    The Tax Foundation released a new study on the excise tax last week, finding that the 1.5-cent per ounce tax has fallen short of revenue projections, cost jobs, and has forced some Philadelphians to drive outside the city to buy groceries.

    The study finds that the tax is 24 times higher than the Pennsylvania tax rate on beer.

    “Purchases of beer are also now less expensive than nonalcoholic beverages subject to the tax in the city,” according to the study, written by Courtney Shupert and Scott Drenkard. “Empirical evidence from a 2012 journal article suggests that soda taxes can push consumers to alcohol, meaning it is likely the case that consumers are switching to alcoholic beverages as a result of the tax. The paper, aptly titled From Coke to Coors, further shows that switching from soda to beer increases total caloric intake, even as soda taxes are generally aimed at caloric reduction.”

    The Tax Foundation points out that unlike most cities, Philadelphia passed the tax specifically to raise revenue, not to fight obesity. The city even includes diet sodas in its tax, as a way to raise money for pre-kindergarten programs.

    However, less than half of the $39.4 million collected since the tax went into effect on Jan. 1 has gone to education funding.

    “[T]he tax was originally promoted as a vehicle to raise funds for prekindergarten education, but in practice it awards just 49 percent of the soda tax revenues to local pre-K programs,” Shupert and Drenkard write. “Another 20 percent of the soda tax revenues fund government employee benefits or city programs, while the rest of the money will go towards parks, libraries, and community schools.”
    Collections from the soda tax are also well below original projections of $92 million per year, due to tax avoidance.

    Cheers, Philly city council. What a top-notch policy—said by no one.

  24. srr

    Supreme Dark [email protected]

    The cultural war in Silicon Valley

    https://www.pscp.tv/w/1ynJOVrZzMlGR

  25. Ryan T. Anderson‏Verified account @RyanTAnd Aug 10
    More
    Replying to @RyanTAnd
    Almost no “fiscally conservative, socially liberal” voters. But sure, build your electoral strategy that way… @WSJopinion @fbuckley

    That graph is a political bombshell. Memo to AC: your electoral strategy needs to be strongly social conservative and straight down the line fiscally moderate. That is precisely were the majority of the so-called centre right exist and the field is ripe for the picking. If you present a solid platform, they will come.

  26. OldOzzie

    It’s Long Past Time To End All Discrimination Policies And Restore Equal Protection

    Hardly a day goes by without some new identity politics incident that pits members of one group against another group. These incidents are typically manipulated to inflame people’s tribalism, divided along Marxist lines by sex, race, class, and more, into yet another battle of collective wills. Underneath it all, we have a society ostensibly “dedicated to the proposition that all men are equal.” Although such rhetoric still stirs every American’s heart, it is no longer true. In America, both in private and government institutions, some are “more equal than others.”

    The hottest such dispute this week is over a former Google engineer’s internal memo suggesting biological differences between the sexes contribute to their different professional choices. He was fired for “perpetuating gender stereotypes,” which may have been an attempt at legal defense for Google since they have been battling a federal lawsuit alleging sex discrimination against women.

    Back in 1969, Macklin Fleming, a California appeals judge, opposed racial quotas at Yale Law school with a prescient description of the ill effects we’re now seeing:

    No one can be expected to accept an inferior status willingly. The black students, unable to compete on even terms in the study of law, inevitably will seek other means to achieve recognition and self-expression. This is likely to take two forms. First, agitation to change the environment from one in which they are unable to compete to one in which they can.

    …Second, it seems probable that this group will seek personal satisfaction and public recognition by aggressive conduct, which, although ostensibly directed at external injustices and problems, will in fact be primarily motivated by the psychological needs of the members of the group to overcome feelings of inferiority caused by lack of success in their studies. Since the common denominator of the group of students with lower qualifications is one of race this aggressive expression will undoubtedly take the form of racial demands…

  27. srr

    Bill Mitchell‏Verified account @mitchellvii 2h2 hours ago

    Rolling Stone Collects Every Lie About Sebastian Gorka in One Place – Breitbart http://bit.ly/2fxxRBK via @BreitbartNews

  28. srr

    Children of The Devil, The First Murderer, The Father of The Lie …

    Lord of the flies … end scene

  29. OldOzzie

    Google Unveils New Slogan – “War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength.”

    MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA—Tech giant Google rolled out its new company tagline across its myriad internet properties Tuesday, transitioning to the company-wide slogan of “War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength.”

    The slogan, inspired by that of the Party in Google co-founder Sergey Brin’s favorite book 1984, is meant to convey the value the Company places on doublethink, while also instilling in users’ minds that the Company always knows best.

    “We want our new slogan to remind everyone that the Company is watching you, and thoughtcrimes will not be tolerated,” Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced via a Google+ post after the new slogan was unveiled.

    “Google is watching you, and has the ability to turn you into an unperson,” he continued.

    At publishing time, the Company had deployed its police force to arrest a citizen for googling, “How many genders are there?” shortly after firing an employee for questioning whether men and women were different.

    According to sources, both individuals were being sent to Google’s infamous Room 101 to be broken down and rebuilt.

  30. Cold-Hands

    HARRISONBURG, Va. (WSET) — A former staffer with Harrisonburg Votes, a political organization affiliated with the Democratic party, paid to register area voters during the weeks leading up to the 2016 National Election, was sentenced in federal court Tuesday for causing 18 fraudulent Virginia Voter Registration Forms.
    Andrew J. Spieles, 21, of Harrisonburg was sentenced to 100 days in jail.
    The court waived any fees associated with the charges due to an inability to pay the fine, and Spieles will not have to serve any probation following his jail-time.
    He previously pled guilty to one-count of information charging him with knowingly transferring false Virginia Voter Registration Forms.
    According to evidence presented a previous hearing, in July 2016 Spieles’ job was to register as many voters as possible and report them to Democratic headquarters in Harrisonburg.
    In August 2016, Spieles was directed to combine his registration numbers with those of another person because their respective territories overlapped.
    After filling out a registration form for a voter, Spieles entered the information into a computer system used by the Virginia Democratic Party to track information such as name, age, address, and political affiliation.
    Every Thursday, am employee or volunteer hand-delivered the paper copies of the registration forms to the Registrar’s Office in Harrisonburg.
    On August 15, 2016, an employee at the Registrar’s Office contacted law enforcement after another employee in the office recognized a registration form submitted in the name of the deceased father of a Rockingham County judge.

    The Registrar’s Office discovered multiple instances of similarly falsified forms when it reviewed additional registrations.
    Some were in the names of deceased individuals while others had incorrect middle names, birth dates, and social security numbers.
    The Registrar’s Office then learned that the individuals named in these forms had not in face submitted the new voter registrations; the assistant registrar’s personal knowledge of the names of some of the individuals named in the falsified documents facilitated the detection of the crime.
    Prosecutors admitted that he prepared the false voter registration forms by obtaining the name, age, and address of individuals from “walk sheets” provided to him by the Virginia Democratic Party, fabricating a birth date based on the ages listed in the walk sheet, and fabricated the social security numbers.
    Spieles admitted that he created all 18 fraudulent forms himself and that no one else participated in the crime.

    He probably would have gotten away with it if the Registrar’s office hadn’t recognised that one name.

  31. OldOzzie

    Trump Thanks Putin for Expelling 750 Diplomats; Former CIA Official Says Deep State ‘Will Kill’ Him

    n this day and age, calling for the death of the President is a totally legitimate form of public discourse.

    Here’s the set up.

    Trump was asked about Putin expelling 750 America diplomats, which he replied, jokingly, thanking the Russian leader for helping him trim payroll expenses. Inappropriate? Maybe. More Trumpism.

    Enter Phil Mudd, ex-deputy director ofthe CIA’s Counterterrorist Center and the FBI’s National Security Branch, who casually said the ‘deep state’, aka permanent government agents who’ve been on the job for 20-30 years, would ‘kill this guy’, referring to the President.

    Jake Tapper tried to help Mudd walk back the comments. But as you saw, Mudd meant what he said and had no discernible reason to use those words in that context other than calling for the assassination of the President.

  32. OldOzzie

    Why Some U.S. Ex-Spies Don’t Buy the Russia Story

    Evidence that undermines the “election hack” narrative should get more attention.

    The Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS) have been investigating the now conventional wisdom that last year’s leaks of Democratic National Committee files were the result of Russian hacks. What they found instead is evidence to the contrary.

    Unlike the “current and former intelligence officials” anonymously quoted in stories about the Trump-Russia scandal, VIPS members actually have names.

    The January assessment of the U.S. intelligence community, which serves as the basis for accusations that Russia hacked the election said, among other things: “We assess with high confidence that Russian military intelligence (General Staff Main Intelligence Directorate or GRU) used the Guccifer 2.0 persona and DCLeaks.com to release U.S. victim data obtained in cyber operations publicly and in exclusives to media outlets and relayed material to WikiLeaks.”

    VIPS instead surmises that, after WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange announced on June 12, 2016 his intention to publish Hillary Clinton-related emails, the DNC rushed to fabricate evidence that it had been hacked by Russia to defuse any potential WikiLeaks disclosures. To this end, the theory goes, the DNC used the Guccifer 2.0 online persona to release mostly harmless DNC data. Guccifer 2.0 was later loosely linked to Russia because of Russian metadata in his files and his use of a Russia-based virtual private network.

    The VIPS theory relies on forensic findings by independent researchers who go by the pseudonyms “Forensicator” and “Adam Carter.” The former found that 1,976 MB of Guccifer’s files were copied from a DNC server on July 5 in just 87 seconds, implying a transfer rate of 22.6 megabytes per second — or, converted to a measure most people use, about 180 megabits per second, a speed not commonly available from U.S. internet providers. Downloading such files this quickly over the internet, especially over a VPN (most hackers would use one), would have been all but impossible because the network infrastructure through which the traffic would have to pass would further slow the traffic. However, as Forensicator has pointed out, the files could have been copied to a thumb drive — something only an insider could have done — at about that speed.

    Adam Carter, the pseudonym for the other analyst, showed that the content of the Guccifer files was at some point cut and pasted into Microsoft Word templates that used the Russian language. Carter laid out all the available evidence and his answers to numerous critics in a long post earlier this month.

    And yet these aren’t good reasons to avoid the discussion of what actually happened at the DNC last year, especially since no intelligence agency actually examined the Democrats’ servers and CrowdStrike, the firm whose conclusions informed much of the intelligence community’s assessment, had obvious conflicts of interest — from being paid by the DNC to co-founder Dmitri Alperovitch’s affiliation with the Atlantic Council, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that has generally viewed Russia as a hostile power.

    One hopes that the numerous investigations into Trump-Russia are based on hard evidence, not easy assumptions. But since these investigations are not transparent at this point, the only way to make sure their attention is still focused on the technical aspects of the suspected Russian hacks and leaks is to present the available evidence, along with any arguments undermining it, to the public.

    Full Article in Bloomberg worth a read

  33. OldOzzie

    Google Has Done a Horrible Thing to Its Employees

    Google’s firing of engineer James Damore for the thought crime of “advancing harmful gender stereotypes” was a dreadful piece of smiley-faced fascism.

    It also creates a terrible atmosphere for your other employees, especially the ones who disagreed with the victim. Twitter feed Pol/News/Forever spread around some tweets by Google employees declaring that they would now be keeping track of colleagues guilty of WrongThink.

    You can almost hear the slavering hatred:

    Colm Buckley: “You know there are certain “alternative views, including different political views” which I do not want people to feel safe to share here… You can believe women or minorities are unqualified all you like — I can’t stop you — but if you say it out loud, then you deserve what’s coming to you. Yes, this is “silencing”. I intend to silence these views... Take your false equivalence and your fake symmetry, and shove them hard up where the sun doesn’t shine.”

    Kim Burchett: “I am considering creating a public-inside-google document of “people who make diversity difficult”…which calls out those googlers who repeatedly made public statements that are unsupportive of diversity… Things I’m still pondering: should inclusion on the list require something resembling a trial? should people be removed after some period of time if they start behaving better?

    Colin Winter: “One of the great things about Google’s internal communication mechanism… is that, as a manager, I can easily go find out if I really want to work with you.”

    Kelly Ellis: (Responding to a colleague who mildly opined that Damore’s original memo was misrepresented and that Damore’s firing validates his notion of the suppression of ideas.) “Your reply…ignores the many women Googlers who have expressed the frustration they feel as a result of this. F*** off. Thanks for using your real name here, though. Makes it easier to update my spreadsheet.”

    Google’s monoculture has turned these employees into snarling, hate-filled, censorious little thought-police who live under the misapprehension that their seething rage is virtue. It reminds me of what happened in the Soviet Union when neighbor turned in neighbor to ensure the regime believed in their loyalty to the Right Ideas.

    This is a terrible thing to do to people who work for you. All Google had to say was, “We disagree with Damore, but we support our employees’ right to speak,” and they would have reaffirmed a culture of tolerance. Instead, they’ve taken an inexcusable action that has twisted the hearts of the people who work for them and turned them into informing drones.

  34. From the latest MWD:

    And this is how ABC TV News Breakfast presenters Virginia Trioli (a same-sex marriage advocate) and Michael Rowland responded to former prime minister Tony Abbott’s intervention in the debate, viz: “If you don’t like same-sex marriage, vote no. If you’re worried about freedom of speech and freedom of expression, vote no. And if you don’t like political correctness, vote no – because this is the best way to stop it in its tracks.” Let’s go to the transcript as Ms Trioli and Mr Rowland criticise Mr Abbott’s statement – without an alternative view being heard:

    Michael Rowland: As Matt Doran, our correspondent, earlier told us this hour that it’s very rare for Tony Abbot to make appearances at what’s known as “The Doors” of Federal Parliament. Only when he’s got something to say and, gee, did he what. Didn’t take questions there so there was no opportunity to ask him, for instance, what the connection is between political correctness and same-sex marriage.

    Virginia Trioli: Or religious freedom and same-sex marriage. As far as we understand that postal plebiscite – no one is putting a question in there on what happens to religious institutions, what happens to people who are members of that faith and want to keep practising that faith. No mention whatsoever. But he’s going wide, Tony Abbott.

    Michael Rowland: He is.

    Virginia Trioli: He’s going really wide on this one and he’s pulling on a big fight.

    Michael Rowland: That’s right, and that’s the point being made by several correspondents of the last half an hour. Katharine Murphy, the political editor for The Guardian says this is what she believes Tony Abbott is doing – Drawing Malcolm Turnbull in before that brawl on same-sex marriage.

    Virginia Trioli: Yeah, that’s right. And dividing the line ideologically, if you like, and morally – who stands on that side and who doesn’t. Which was, as you know, exactly what was in the fearful hearts of so many LGBTI people, if there was going to be a public debate, and fight, and battle about this.

    You have to love the sheer dishonesty of these two. Is TA really “going wide” by stating that those who are opposed to PC should also vote No? Is it really a long bow given the experience in similar Anglophone jurisdictions like Canada, UK, and USA? Can they really not see the connection between PC and SS’M’? And what’s this business about the ‘fearful hearts’ of LGBTI people? No seriously? Do they really imagine that SS’M’ is a non-ideological issue? Can they be that naive? Dear oh dear. I’m inclined to think this is Leftist bluster and dishonesty. It usually always is.

    Sinistra delenda est.

  35. Tom

    Trump can’t stand Connecticut Demorat Dick Blumenthal, a “phony Vietnam con artist” who made up his service record – which inspired today’s brilliant Sean Delonas cartoon.

  36. Mark A

    Tom
    #2466175, posted on August 12, 2017 at 4:05 am

    Trump can’t stand Connecticut Demorat Dick Blumenthal, a “phony Vietnam con artist” who made up his service record – which inspired today’s brilliant Sean Delonas cartoon.

    I find nothing more despicable than making up/falsifying service records, specially relating to combat duty.

  37. Mark A

    scroll
    Will spend the weekend helping my mechanic mothballing my Trabant combie.

    Bought it for $800, a bargain, as I see them going for twice that.
    Don’t expect it to skyrocket but I hope in ten years time it will be worth $8 K.
    Different market here but early Soviet era cars are collectible.
    /scroll

  38. rickw

    This is perfect: Think different/ Not so much.

    Hilarious! I hope they tear themselves to pieces trying to out Stasi each other.

  39. rickw

    Will spend the weekend helping my mechanic mothballing my Trabant combie.

    Looks like fun! As soon as I get my workshop built (permits are the problem, not building it), I need to get onto fixing my sunbeam alpine, need to make a new LH rear inner guard.

  40. Mark A

    That’s not a gun. This is a gun.

    Apparently it could shoot to a distance of 35 Ks? I take it 3.5 would be closer to the truth.

  41. Mark A

    rickw
    #2466183, posted on August 12, 2017 at 5:51 am
    sunbeam alpine, need to make a new LH rear inner guard.

    Lovely cars.
    I enjoy tinkering with machinery of any kind, good luck with it.

    Fiberglass or metal, you thinking of using?

  42. Sydney Boy

    Trump can’t stand Connecticut Demorat Dick Blumenthal, a “phony Vietnam con artist” who made up his service record – which inspired today’s brilliant Sean Delonas cartoon.

    Is that Willem Dafoe from Platoon?

  43. Herodotus

    Danes now vying with Swedes for title of Eloi of the 21st Century.

    Hug a Terrorist Program via Breitbart.

  44. calli

    Zanetti sums up the situation neatly.

    Meanwhile, jowls are wobbling on Sunrise.

  45. Geriatric Mayfly

    Banging asses. Already on the agenda here.

    MOROCCO: 15 Muslim teenagers contract rabies after having sex with a donkey
    Fifteen minors who sexually assaulted a donkey in the small rural town of Sidi Kamel in the communal providence of Sidi Kacem have been treated for rabies infections received from the animal. →
    BNI

  46. srr

    Bill Mitchell‏Verified account @mitchellvii 57m57 minutes ago

    Fascinating how every week begins with “Trump is crazy!” and ends with, “Trump proven right again…”

  47. rickw

    Banging asses. Already on the agenda here.

    And these backward ass fucking lunatics are exactly what Australia needs??!!

  48. rickw

    Fiberglass or metal, you thinking of using?

    Will use metal, need to buy an English Wheel.

  49. A Lurker

    The article by Paul Kelly in today’s Australian newspaper gets to the heart of the SSM matter.
    (I’m not a subscriber, so can’t provide a direct link – however, someone on Facechook has kindly cut&pasted the entire article – so here it is for your reading pleasure. Apologies for the lengthy post, but it is an important article.)

    Rights clash looms in same-sex debate

    Paul Kelly The Australian August 12, 2017

    While the flawed postal vote plebiscite has provoked furious rival responses, the pivotal problem is just emerging — the failure in any draft bill by Coalition or Labor MPs to fully protect religious freedoms once same-sex marriage is legislated.

    This is set to become an explosive issue within the Coalition parties. The alarm has been sounded and if, as expected, the plebiscite returns a “yes” vote, it will be triggered. This will become a serious problem for Malcolm Turnbull and Attorney-General George Brandis.

    Tony Abbott, a number of other prominent Liberals and church leaders will direct much of their campaign against same-sex marriage on to the failure of the parliament to confront the religious freedom issue and exploit public doubts on this front.

    Beyond the campaign lies the great dilemma. The proposition is lethal — that it would constitute a historical betrayal of the values of the Coalition parties if they “backed” a bill post-plebiscite on same-sex marriage that exposed individuals and institutions to retaliation for their beliefs because the government failed to strengthen Australia’s woefully inadequate laws on religious freedom and protection.

    Abbott said if people had fears for their freedom, their right to express the traditional view of marriage without retaliation, they should vote “no”. In tactical terms, this shifts the issue from same-sex marriage, which has majority support, to the trade-off of rights ­involved: winning same-sex marriage at the sacrifice of freedom of conscience, belief and religion.

    The evidence strongly backs Abbott’s claims. Indeed, it is overwhelming as documented in submissions to and in the February 2017 report of the Senate select committee on the draft bill released by Brandis. The further truth is the political class is split on these protections, with the prospect that passage of same-sex marriage will have a second and far more important consequence — an assault on religious freedoms made possible by inadequate laws that will see a major shift in Australian society.

    Since the postal plebiscite was announced, comments by Abbott, ACT Liberal senator Zed Seselja, Liberal backbencher Andrew Hastie, the Anglican Archbishop of Sydney Glenn Davies and the Moderator General of the Presbyterian Church of Australia, John P Wilson, signal they want to enshrine religious freedom as a core issue in the vote. It is likely this will become a universal position of the Christian churches. It would be remarkable if it did not.

    Nobody should be surprised by these events. It highlights the essential weakness of the same-sex marriage case, a point obvious for years. Despite the insistence of politicians, religious freedom has not been properly addressed and many inadequate bills testify to this. The draft bill released by Brandis, the subject of the February 2017 report by the Senate ­select committee, was not authorised by the cabinet or the partyroom. It has no standing. Yet this bill was assumed to be the model to inform the original plebiscite had it been approved.

    Alarm about this bill and other bills including that proposed by senator Dean Smith, despite the broader guarantees surrounding the same-sex marriage ceremony Brandis and Smith drafted, is obvious from the submissions made to the Senate committee.

    Its chairman, South Australian Liberal David Fawcett, tells ­Inquirer: “My concern is that if we don’t get this right, if this issue is just put into the too-hard basket, then we will be left with inadequate state anti-discrimination laws and there will be action taken against individuals because there is inadequate protection for ­religious freedom.”

    In his foreword to the report Fawcett says: “If Australia is to remain a plural, tolerant society where different views are valued and legal, legislators much recognise that this change will require careful, simultaneous consideration of a wide range of specialist areas of law as opposed to the common perception that it ­involves just a few words in one act of parliament.”

    The Turnbull government has ignored the spirit or letter of this advice. Hastie identified this flaw when he said to this paper during the week: “Will people, churches, schools, charitable organisations and businesses be protected if they hold to the common view of marriage?” The Senate committee report shows they will not. This issue goes far beyond the ceremony itself to wider society.

    Saying the Smith bill is defective, Hastie says it “only offered protections to individuals involved in the conduct of weddings” and, as a result, “failed to grasp the far-reaching significance of redefining marriage”.

    This is the core point. It is the challenge the Coalition will abandon only at the price of betraying the principles basic to its life since the inception of these parties. Will Turnbull before the next election face the prospect of believers in traditional marriage being penalised or intimidated because his government refused to provide legal protections? If so, how will conservative voters react?

    The irony is that Smith agrees religious protections are inadequate and should be addressed. He tells Inquirer: “I think there is legitimacy to a broad discussion of religious freedom in Australia.”

    But Smith doesn’t want this to interfere with his bill or the passing of same-sex marriage. He wants this as a separate discussion.

    Brandis makes no secret of the approach he took as A-G. His focus was on the same-sex marriage bill itself and he was ambitious in pushing the boundaries against much LGBTI sentiment to ensure that marriage celebrants as well as ministers of religion can refuse to solemnise marriages. Smith also pushed the boundaries with these provisions.

    But this ignores the real problem, which far transcends protections around weddings as such. The current law leaves wide open many avenues of intimidation against individuals, schools, charities, businesses, adoption agencies and civic ­organisations. This includes consumer boycotts promoted by ­social media and even commercial boycotts against other commercial entities.

    The Senate committee after reviewing the landscape said: “Overall the evidence supports the need for current protections for religious freedom to be enhanced. This would most appropriately be achieved through the inclusion of ‘religious belief’ in federal anti-discrimination law.”

    Incredibly, this was the view of the whole committee. Many bodies supported this recommendation in their submissions. Human Rights commissioner Ed Santow said: “You could have a stand-alone statute that specifically dealt with freedom of religion or you could expand the Racial Discrimination Act.” Even the Australian Human Rights Commission agrees there should be a specific protection in federal law protecting religious belief.

    Yet nothing has been done. Of course, this is a big project. The Turnbull government should have tied such measures to the same-sex marriage issue from the start, an omission it will regret. Because it is proposing to legislate same-sex marriage before Christmas if the plebiscite is passed, the signal is that the government intends to do nothing, or give an extremely low priority to any further religious protection concerns.

    Equally significant, there is no plan within the government if the plebiscite is carried for the cabinet or partyroom to consider any planned private member’s bill that would be the subject of a free vote. Inquirer has been told there would be informal “consultations” over such a bill. That’s all. How satisfactory is this?

    It raises a core issue: will the cabinet and partyroom tolerate a situation where their government paves the way for such a historic social change simultaneous with a manifest failure to properly provide for protections in relation to conscience, belief and religion? What would this reveal about the values of the Liberal Party in 2017 or its sense of blind panic about getting same-sex marriage off the political agenda?

    University of Sydney law professor Patrick Parkinson welcomes the protections for ministers of religion and for marriage celebrants but says this is far from sufficient. “In certain sections of the community, there is now deep hatred expressed for people of faith,” he says.

    “Provisions are required to protect people from discrimination on account of whatever views they may hold about marriage, whether they are opposed to same-sex marriage or in favour of it.”

    He says it must be made lawful for any person or entity to express an opinion that accords with a religious or conscientious belief about marriage. He advocates laws to protect people or entities in relation to employment, contracting, academic, trade or professional qualification, accommo­dation, education and adminis­tration of commonwealth laws and programs.

    Institute for Civil Society executive director Mark Sneddon summarises his views based on his submission to the Senate committee: “I am extremely concerned about the lack of legal protection across this country in terms of freedom of conscience, belief and religion for people who support traditional marriage.

    “These protections are far less than those for people who support same-sex marriage. Yet it is those who support traditional marriage who are more susceptible to ­actions … from government bodies and commercial ­organisations.

    “Where persons hold the traditional view of marriage not on grounds of religious belief, they have no protection under federal, state and territory anti-discrimination laws or the Fair Work Act. If they hold the traditional view of marriage on the grounds of ­religious belief they have no protection under federal anti-discrimination law, no protection under NSW or South Australian anti-discrimination laws and some protection under the anti-discrimination laws of the other states or territories but only for individuals and not organisations.”

    The Senate committee was provided with examples of prejudicial treatment of people and institutions because they support traditional marriage. Provided by the Institute for Civil Society, it is a long and startling list.

    There was the closure of all Catholic adoption agencies in England and Wales or the transfer of their operations to secular entities because their charitable status was removed due to their position and practices on same-sex marriage.

    There was the intimidation of Trinity Western University in British Columbia, a Canadian Christian university, in which the province’s teachers board refused accreditation to its graduates on grounds they might discriminate against LGBTI students, a decision reversed by the Supreme Court of Canada after years of litigation.

    But when Trinity Western applied to open a law school, Canadian legal institutions including the Canadian Bar Association and a number of provincial law societies voted not to accredit its graduates because they had signed a required university covenant to abstain from sex unless it was between a husband and wife.

    The attitude of large corporates is a major concern. Last year ­numerous US companies threatened to boycott the state of Georgia after legislation was tabled seeking to expand religious freedom exceptions in relation to same-sex marriage. The companies included Disney, Intel, Coca-Cola and Unilever. Disney said: “We will plan to take our business elsewhere should any legislation allowing discriminatory practices be signed into state law.”

    Given the support Australian companies have offered same-sex marriage, any idea they would not pursue this cause against religious freedom seems forlorn. Indeed, it is hard to find any statement of meaningful support for religious freedom and belief from a senior Australian corporate executive on this issue, a telling omission.

    At home there was huge pressure for the sacking by IBM of Mark Allaby and by Macquarie University of Steven Chavura unless they resigned from other bodies perceived to oppose same-sex marriage. A boycott was imposed by hotels against Coopers Brewing because it sponsored the Bible Society, which ran a video not against same-sex marriage but one that put both sides of the debate.

    In the US, Chick-fil-A, a sandwich franchise, was subject to consumer boycotts and government and commercial retaliation when a senior executive supported traditional marriage. Brendan Eich, co-founder of Mozilla Corporation, known for its browser Firefox, triggered a consumer boycott because he had supported an anti-gay marriage position. He was forced to step down.

    In Sydney the Mercure Hotel, which was hosting an event of various Christian groups to form a strategy against same-sex marriage, was threatened with violent protests such that staff safety could not be guaranteed. It had to cancel the event, an example of how easily the technique of intimidation can deliver. The most celebrated domestic case is the decision by Tasmania’s Anti-Discrimination Commissioner that the Catholic Archbishop of Hobart, Julian Porteous, had a case to answer for distributing a book in schools defending traditional marriage.

    The evidence and examples rebuff the lazy response from politicians that this is not a serious issue. Referring to the overseas examples, Sneddon says: “I cannot see why these more extreme actions taken … in North America would not also be taken here.”

    The Senate committee report corrects a near universal misconception repeated in this debate: that same-sex marriage is an established human right. This was disposed of in many submissions notably by Mark Fowler, from Neumann & Turnour lawyers.

    In international law, the right to marry is contained in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. This provision does not extend to same-sex marriage, an issue tested in the ruling Joslin v New Zealand. This position has been affirmed by the ­European Court of Human Rights in its rulings that there is no such right to same-sex marriage.

    Such a right is typically claimed in polemical debate but its legal ­viability does not hold up. The Senate committee accepts this view, saying “under current human rights instruments and juris­prudence there have been no decisions to date that oblige Australia to legislate for same-sex marriage”. By contrast — and ironically — freedom of religion is one of the few non-derogable rights in the ICCPR.

    Parkinson says: “While the case in international human rights law for saying that same-sex marriage is a human right is very weak, the case for protecting religious freedom, and in particular freedom of conscience, is quite overwhelming. There have been numerous bills introduced in parliament to enact same-sex marriage over the last few years and what has been common to most of them has been a minimalist protection for freedom of conscience.”

    The plebiscite idea originated with Peter Dutton. Its implementation via the Bureau of Statistics came from Brandis. But it will occur only with the approval of the High Court and nobody can second-guess that outcome. Smith is right when he says his bill has more protections than anything likely to come from a Labor government. But this cannot gainsay the gaping hole left in this pivotal area of our national life and values.

    For years the typical response from politicians to the religious freedom issue has been patronising and dismissive, buttressed by the claim that religious ministers would be protected. Any notion that will suffice is ludicrous.

    The resistance falls into three categories: those who care only about achieving same-sex marriage; those who think protection around the ceremony is the only issue that matters; and those, like the champions of progressive ideology, who see this social change as an integral step in driving religion from the public square.

    Illustration: Eric Lobbecke

  50. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    leftism is a mental illness

  51. srr

    This is a terrible thing to do to people who work for you. All Google had to say was, “We disagree with Damore, but we support our employees’ right to speak,” and they would have reaffirmed a culture of tolerance. Instead, they’ve taken an inexcusable action that has twisted the hearts of the people who work for them and turned them into informing drones.

    Those hearts were already twisted.

    Now they’re just out and proud, and elevated in power, like young Brown Shirts who became SS.

  52. John Constantine

    Their left wheel out ‘weekend at Pauls’ the waxen and as embalmed as Stalin, ex-pm keating to attack Trump.

    Lost on their left that championed every foul mouthed and abusive keating rant is the irony.

    “Paul Keating has warned that North Korea will never abandon its nuclear weapon program and that this new reality will have to be addressed in the same way as the west sought to contain the former Soviet Union.

    The former prime minister, one of Australia’s most-respected foreign policy thinkers and a strong advocate for a more independent foreign policy, has disagreed strongly with the language and approach being taken the US President Donald Trump towards the rogue state”


    “When the former Labor prime minister Paul Keating said that “two blokes and a cocker spaniel” don’t make a family he was being typically brutal and unfair. ”

    Their left, it is all about the damage done by swinging the weapon, not the weapon itself.

    The cocker spaniel line slips away from the legacy of keating as if gillard herself said had said the line as she rejected gay marriage.

  53. John Constantine

    The wit of keating.

    “Laurie Oakes [is] a cane toad.”

    https://www.crikey.com.au/2008/08/07/keating-the-greatest-hits-so-far/

    When the left do it, nobody says it is unpresidential.

    Imagine if the Great Abbottbeast, or Pell had said
    “Two blokes and a cocker spaniel aren’t a family”.

  54. Google runs from AltRight, but will strike back

    Google, Facebook and YouTube are the new axis of evil. They have all turned into the Stasi.

    One look at the Google staff and their bios and their treatment of a dissenting staff member and you realise that they are all SJWs with the power to track political enemies and destroy their lives, and are set on being everything George Orwell warned us about.

    Once their AI bots are developed to seek and destroy, the Left will have undreamed of powers of censorship, identification and oppression. They will certainly regain the upper hand.

    I have no intention of going off grid, but I most certainly am prepared with stronger anonymity for such scenarios as it is likely to become unsafe to continue under existing names. Any actual political activism now demands it.

  55. srr

    Bill Mitchell Retweeted
    Joel Fischer 🇺🇸‏ @JoelFischerNYC 2h2 hours ago

    The left want
    Demean your value
    Dispose your dreams
    Discredit your imagination
    Deframe your abilities &
    Disbelieve your opinion
    #BigGovSucks
    [and now, Click & Listen to two and quarter minutes of Charlie Kirk -]
    https://twitter.com/JoelFischerNYC/status/896100819593973761

  56. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Some of that diversity leftoids love to devour
    The man who brought down the house of Ibrahim

  57. rickw

    Sydney Airport muslim security officer ratio was around 2/8, surprisingly low today.

  58. Shut up C.L.

    I mentioned that yonks ago and it got me branded, “USSR”, by all the cat’s Militant Atheist Stasi pets, and none of the ‘good christian’ or ‘catholic’ cats cared to pull them up on it. Nope, y’all were more than happy to feed the lying beast instead of fight it, so ………

    More cat flinging.

    You’re being obtuse. You were labelled USSR because of your Putin mania at the time, and you know it.

    Playing the victim here is futile.

  59. rickw

    leftism is a mental illness

    Yep.

  60. Senile Old Guy

    Bannon’s basic argument, as he has outlined it to people who’ve spoken with him, is that Facebook and Google have become effectively a necessity in contemporary life.

    Well, that is BS. I do not use Facebook and there are alternatives to Google. If both were shut down today, there would be alternatives running tomorrow.

  61. C.L.

    New militant leftist movement in Europe calls tourist numbers (of white people) “invasion.”
    European tourism prompts locals to declare ‘enough is enough’ as visitor numbers grow.

    It’s been another boom year and in 2017 many locals in the favourite spots around Europe have said enough.

    It started in Barcelona, where quiet neighbourhoods were transformed by tourists arriving to take up residence in rental flats, many of them through AirBnB — driving up rents and forcing locals out.

    Protest signs on the street read “this isn’t tourism, it’s an invasion” — in English of course so the tourists wouldn’t miss the point.

    A protest group, Arran, released video footage with a punchy music track, of its attack on an open-top tour bus, slashing its tires and splashing it with graffiti.

    Passengers thought they had been caught up in a terrorist attack.

  62. srr

    24 TIMES CITIZENS USED GUNS TO SAVE LIVES IN LAST SIX WEEKS

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/08/11/24-times-citizens-used-guns-to-save-lives/

    And that’s why we can’t have nice things …

  63. Geriatric Mayfly

    Melania cops it from the fat, the sad and the ugly over her choice of shoes. I am sure she will take heed and start clomping around in Doc Martens just to appease these unkempt hags.

    Newsweek, though, uses psychologists and feminist critics to slam Melania for wearing the stilettos since they reinforce all the female traditions feminists despise: Appearance-consciousness and sexiness.
    “In terms of the human example, we tend to find the defining characteristics of the opposite sex attractive,” Morris wrote. “High heels function in a similar way. Males respond to the characteristic way a woman walks, i.e., the movement of the female pelvis: High heels just exaggerate the femaleness of the walk. So to deconstruct why Trump women wear high heels: They are just buying into traditional binary views of male and female.” Fisher is in the camp that believes heels detract from women’s power, and shouldn’t be worn at work. “When women wear high heels at work, they send sexual signals that should be avoided if they want to be taken seriously.”

  64. C.L.

    Mainstream gay author and his web fan base fantasising about Prince George:

    Row erupts over PinkNews article about Prince George, four, being a ‘gay icon’ with a politician branding its publication ‘outrageous and sick’.

    ‘Prince George has become a gay icon overnight. The monarch-to-be has always been cute and well-dressed, but one day before his fourth birthday, a photo of him excitedly holding his face changed everything.’

  65. hzhousewife

    Did a quick straw poll of 5 blokes this morning, all think that Ian Narev of the CBA should have fallen on his sword, or been firmly pushed. What made my day though, as the discussion continued on to energy matters , was that two of the group had seen Ian Plimer last week on Outsiders and one of the blokes had a Jordan Petersen video saved on his phone !!
    I haven’t come across anyone all week who has openly declared that they will vote for SSM. The people who bring up the topic are against SSM. Plenty of people saw the Hunch/Dastardly kiss and were pretty much disgusted.

  66. Shy Ted

    I long ago found Google’ behavior to be offensive so moved over to Bing. Can’t find anything I want of course but that’s not the point.

  67. Senile Old Guy

    The ABC, now allowed to be partisan, continues the SSM push (with our money):

    As chairman of the Australian Republican Movement almost two decades ago, Mr Turnbull was up against Mr Abbott who led Australians for Constitutional Monarchy with the encouragement of then-PM Mr Howard. Like same-sex marriage now, polls at the time variously suggested an Australian republic either had majority support or at the very least more support than opposition. But the Yes vote lost in the 1999 republic referendum, as republicans splintered over the preferred model and in the face of what Yes campaign director Greg Barns ruefully regards as simplistic and misleading claims.

    Mr Barns said this week that if the same-sex marriage advocates split like the republicans did in 1999, they face a similar fate. “They will lose if there’s disunity and if they fail to counter what has already started to be an outrageous fear and scare campaign with blatant lies,” Mr Barns told The Australian Financial Review.

    And that is a blatant lie. There has been no “outrageous fear and scare campaign” except from the SSM backers. So this is a blatant lie. And it will only get worse. The SSM backers always complain about abuse but are the first to actually abuse anyone. This is partly (or mainly) because SSM is a leftist cause and they routinely abuse people and lie. And resort to violence.

    As I wrote a few days ago, I was initially in favour of SSM but I am now opposed because of the complete and utter intolerance of most involved.

  68. srr

    Biological engineering: The good, the bad, and the ugly
    Rebel Media
    Aug 11, 2017
    Jay Fayza of TheRebel.media explains how a new form of biological engineering called CRISPR may impact human society.

  69. OldOzzie

    University of Sydney law professor Patrick Parkinson welcomes the protections for ministers of religion and for marriage celebrants but says this is far from sufficient. “In certain sections of the community, there is now deep hatred expressed for people of faith,” he says.

    ABC, Labor, Greens

  70. I long ago found Google’ behavior to be offensive so moved over to Bing. Can’t find anything I want of course but that’s not the point.

    Hahahaha!!! Hilarious 🙂

  71. Sydney Boy

    Old Ozzie –

    As I wrote a few days ago, I was initially in favour of SSM but I am now opposed because of the complete and utter intolerance of most involved.

    I think many are with you. How much will the passing of same-sex marriage legislation affect me? Probably bugger-all. I personally believe the government shouldn’t be telling anyone who they can and can’t marry – that is up to them and their church / religion. But like you, the lies and offence spouted by the left and the same-sex marriage advocates has turned me right off. I will be voting NO.

  72. hzhousewife

    ‘Prince George has become a gay icon overnight. The monarch-to-be has always been cute and well-dressed, but one day before his fourth birthday, a photo of him excitedly holding his face changed everything.’

    Not that Kate and Wills will ever see the above, but if they ever did I’d like to think that they would immediately remove the children from public eye as much as possible, until they are 21.

  73. OldOzzie

    Shy Ted
    #2466213, posted on August 12, 2017 at 8:14 am
    I long ago found Google’ behavior to be offensive so moved over to Bing. Can’t find anything I want of course but that’s not the point.

    Ted

    I use DuckDuckGo on my Android Mobile with AdBlock Browser (Excellent), but unfortunately, when I tried it on iMac it was missing some features I needed from the “Evil” Google Chrome, so use DuckDuckGo in Safari on iMac, and Google Chrome with AdBlocker on when I need specific things that work on Google Chrome – wish AdBlocker had a browser that worked on iMac.

  74. Lady Nilk, Iron Bogan

    Top 100?

  75. OldOzzie

    Sydney Boy
    #2466220, posted on August 12, 2017 at 8:23 am
    Old Ozzie –

    As I wrote a few days ago, I was initially in favour of SSM but I am now opposed because of the complete and utter intolerance of most involved.

    I agree with the statement but attribution goes to

    Senile Old Guy
    #2466214, posted on August 12, 2017 at 8:16 am
    The ABC, now allowed to be partisan, continues the SSM push (with our money):

  76. John Constantine

    Australia was one of the few countries in the world where homosexuals could walk the streets with complete protection and safety, as it should be.

    Now the legal system backs away from fully punishing Apex Predators who attack gays, but to paraphrase waleed, more gay men die slipping on bathmats than are bashed by Apex Predators.

    Today however, we see that the left cast aside the safety and protection that was the rare gift of old, obsolete Australia to our homosexual citizens, and place the loudest, most Stalinist gays into a bully pulpit to be used as weapons to cast down obsolete Australia as a clinging outpost of Christendom standing against a seething sea of Stalinism.

  77. John Constantine

    How come every society that has recently moved to gay marriage legislation is now targeted by the left to be toppled and replaced with totalitarin rule?.

    It is almost as if homosexuals are actually despised by the left and only used as disposable weapons of Revolution.

  78. Geriatric Mayfly

    Too much text for those not blessed with patience. Can some golf enthusiast explain in one word the gist of Kudelka’s scrawlings in today’s Oz?

  79. OldOzzie

    The Mental Self-Oppression of ‘Intersectional’ Racial Identity

    There are plenty of problems with the culture of victimhood, but one of them is that when people start identifying themselves and others primarily as members of victim (or oppressor) groups, it doesn’t stop there. What happens next is that the victim groups start being sorted out according to a perceived hierarchy of victimhood – which group’s members are the bigger victims?

    People who belong to multiple victim groups, moreover, set about claiming extra victim points (see “intersectionality”). And members of each victim group start splitting that group up into smaller groups, based on the premise that the group is actually, on further reflection, composed of several sub-groups, some of which are even more victimized than others.

    Once begun, of course, this process has no natural end: the sub-groups split into sub-sub-groups and so on, so that eventually you arrive at the point where you’re back to the individual. Only instead of having an individual identity based on your own distinctive virtues, failings, interests, personality traits, and so on, you’ve got an identity that’s nothing but a checklist of all the groups you belong to – a checklist that determines your precise spot on the grievance ladder in relation to everybody else.

    On August 2, a writer named Nico Dacumos ran a piece entitled “Should Light-Skinned People of Color Voluntarily Exclude Ourselves from People of Color Spaces?” His argument: “light-skinned or white-passing” people of color (POC) “get all the cool stuff that Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) get,” including “[r]ichly artistic cultures,” “[a]ncient and powerful cultural and spiritual practices,” and so on, without having to experience such POC problems as high rates of incarceration, extrajudicial murder, and low self-esteem.

    Dacumos wants us to know that he, as a light-skinned person of color (LSPOC), is deeply sensitive to this problem and has given it extensive thought. His conclusion: LSPOC should not be “entitled to be in all BIPOC spaces all the time.” What exactly does he mean by BIPOC spaces? All he says by way of explanation is to speak (approvingly) of “BIPOC divest[ing] from white institutions and ways of being and [seeking] self-determination and independence instead.” Presumably he’s talking about the kind of self-segregation practiced by college student groups that ban membership by, for example, whites or males. Obviously he thinks that’s terrific.

    Well, terrific for BIPOC, anyway. One thing he makes clear is that, as far as he’s concerned, “it’s okay for BIPOC to gather but not okay for white people to form their own separate groups.”

  80. Fergus

    It’s called “using”.

  81. srr

    The Beer Whisperer
    #2466205, posted on August 12, 2017 at 8:04 am

    Shut up C.L.

    I mentioned that yonks ago and it got me branded, “USSR”, by all the cat’s Militant Atheist Stasi pets, and none of the ‘good christian’ or ‘catholic’ cats cared to pull them up on it. Nope, y’all were more than happy to feed the lying beast instead of fight it, so ………

    More cat flinging.

    You’re being obtuse. You were labelled USSR because of your Putin mania at the time, and you know it.

    Playing the victim here is futile.

    Oh shut up to, you lying Google-esque drunk … and no smilie for you you either …

    I mentioned what Chesterton said and backed it up with the facts … then all you lying cowards even stopped posting your beloved “People’s Cube” links because it exposed the Anti-Eastern Christian Mania behind your bullshitting attacks on me … and that’ll teach me for having called out Google for what it is, all those years ago, when to do so automatically had one labeled a, ‘paranoid conspiracy nutter who didn’t understand anything about who computers or the internet work‘, by everyone, not only today’s cats still desperately shilling for Google & Co.

    Oh but do keep telling yourselves all that is unrelated and that you are right and I am wrong … it makes my job so much easier, and more fun 🙂

  82. Haidee

    Melania’s shoes are quite nice; but tall women don’t need to wear their really high heels to official functions and absolutely tower over little Asian men and women. And the various princesses and duchesses do the same.
    Jerry wears flats when she’s with Rupert. It must be a relief, in a way.

  83. Baldrick

    Haidee
    #2466237, posted on August 12, 2017 at 8:38 am

    Piss off troll

  84. Paul Kelly above:

    The Senate committee report corrects a near universal misconception repeated in this debate: that same-sex marriage is an established human right. This was disposed of in many submissions notably by Mark Fowler, from Neumann & Turnour lawyers.

    In international law, the right to marry is contained in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. This provision does not extend to same-sex marriage, an issue tested in the ruling Joslin v New Zealand. This position has been affirmed by the ­European Court of Human Rights in its rulings that there is no such right to same-sex marriage.

    Isn’t this telling? The ICCPR states:

    Article 23

    1. The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

    2. The right of men and women of marriageable age to marry and to found a family shall be recognized.

    So, the covenant clearly declares that marriage is a union between the sexes, and that it is a union that has the power of founding a family. It cannot be a union of the same sex, then, because such a union can never ‘found a family’. Consequently, talking about same-sex ‘marriage’ is both oxymoronic as well as begging the question. The question under consideration in the marriage redefinition debate being, whether a union of the same sex can constitute marriage? Given the above, clearly not.

  85. Tom

    Dinesh D’Souza is knocking them dead in America promoting his book exposing the links between American progressives and fascism:

    Dinesh D’Souza‏Verified account @DineshDSouza 5m5 minutes ago
    After bloviating about fascism for months notice how @billmaher , @maddow & @HardballChris have gone dead silent in response to my book.

    Dinesh D’Souza‏Verified account @DineshDSouza 24m24 minutes ago

    “We’re socialists…enemies of today’s capitalist system of exploitation & we’re determined to destroy it”–Bernie, 2017? No, Hitler, 1927.

  86. .

    srr
    #2466155, posted on August 12, 2017 at 1:41 am
    C.L.
    #2465488, posted on August 11, 2017 at 12:16 pm
    Holy cow. Carl Sagan was a time traveller:

    Not really big calls, given when he made them.
    Chesterton was accurately essaying the fate of a Western world devoid of commitment to moral objectivism in the late 1800s.

    Shut up C.L.

    I mentioned that yonks ago and it got me branded, “USSR”, by all the cat’s Militant Atheist Stasi pets, and none of the ‘good christian’ or ‘catholic’ cats cared to pull them up on it. Nope, y’all were more than happy to feed the lying beast instead of fight it, so ………

    Haha!

    Yep, the Lad ain’t a true conservative. Instead, we want to hear about what porn sites Sargon of McCarthy humps his left hand to each night.

  87. John Constantine

    Population Justice.

    “The letter concluded by explaining the Fair Start family planning model. It read: “Rather than having a third or more children, families consider forgoing another child and taking part of the substantial resources saved to help a different family plan a fair start in life for their child. The point is simply this: Family planning should be child-centred, and the Fair Start model is a serious move towards ensuring all children get the equal opportunities in life they deserve. And that they do so in a healthy, safe, and greener environment.”

    http://www.msn.com/en-au/entertainment/celebrity/why-prince-william-and-kate-are-being-urged-not-to-have-third-baby-by-childrens-organisation-%E2%80%93-read-the-open-letter/ar-AAp7SdD?ocid=AARDHP

  88. Fergus

    Fair skinned Aboriginals were discriminated against and that is originally why the children were taken in to care.
    Saw this book the other day so it must still be happening
    https://www.magabala.com/fair-skin-black-fella.html

    Also read an interview some time ago where a young white Aboriginal doctor said he felt hurt when other Aboriginals didn’t believe his authenticity.

  89. srr

    BREAKING: Judge orders State Dept. to search for Benghazi emails
    Judicial Watch
    1 Day ago

  90. .

    It cannot be a union of the same sex, then, because such a union can never ‘found a family’. Consequently, talking about same-sex ‘marriage’ is both oxymoronic as well as begging the question. The question under consideration in the marriage redefinition debate being, whether a union of the same sex can constitute marriage? Given the above, clearly not.

    That may be conservative, what the authors intended and so on but it is still interstitial legislation.

  91. I applaud USSR’s attempt to cosplay as Wowbagger the Infinitely Prolonged.

  92. srr

    Chris Farrell on “Lou Dobbs Tonight”: ‘Benghazi is not going away.’
    Judicial Watch
    9,239 views 8 hours ago

  93. srr

    Judge Orders State Dept to Search Clinton Aide Emails
    Judicial Watch
    4 hours ago

  94. Bruce of Newcastle

    Jerry wears flats when she’s with Rupert.

    She’s 6 feet tall.

    Diplomatic intimidation is a useful thing for a leader, especially with countries like China who have chips on their shoulders.

  95. rickw

    My favourite from srr’s CCW link, one for the LGBTQWERTies:

    On July 25, Breitbart News reported that a DeKalb County, Georgia, homeowner shot and killed a male home invasion suspect who was dressed like a woman. The suspect died on the scene. WSB-TV reported that the suspect “broke into the house wearing a wig and had arched eyebrows.” DeKalb County Police Lt. Lonzy Robertson said, “The homeowner gave him a warning. The suspect continued to approach him at which time the homeowner fired one shot.” Robertson made it clear that the homeowner acted in self-defense.

  96. OldOzzie

    Part 1
    Tony Abbott’s RET, emissions policies made energy policy a farce

    Tony Abbott may have seen the light on energy policy since ceasing to be prime minister. But when he had the top job, he made two fatal mistakes.

    The first was to agree to the renewable energy target being renegotiated rather than ditched or paused. The second was to agree to the emissions reduction targets of 26 per cent to 28 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030 as part of our commitment to the Paris climate agreement.

    What was he thinking? He may claim he acted on the basis of dodgy advice — and there was an overabundance of it at the time (and still is) — but he was warned on both matters. He decided to go with the flow. Take the decision to lower the RET from the ludicrous target of 41,000 gigawatt hours to be sourced from renewable energy by 2020 (I’m just talking large-scale here) to 33,000GWh. This was complete madness given the costs that additional intermittency imposes on the entire system.

    But sneaky modellers with an agenda to push were able to get away with the laughable prediction that wholesale energy prices would fall with this reworked RET, compared with its abolition.

    To reach this absurd conclusion, the modellers assumed all the existing fossil-fuel generators would continue to operate until at least 2040. That is, there would be no retirement of reliable baseload electricity in that entire period.

    Just think about it: the wholesale price of electricity was going to fall because of the increased supply of subsidised renewables but loss-making coal-fired power stations were just going to keep chugging along. Even a frazzled prime minister should have been able to see through this ruse, let alone an environment minister with more time on his hands.

    And here’s a bit of the folklore peddled by the rent-seeking renewables sector: that the cost of renewable energy has fallen so much that it is cheaper than coal. If that is true, the RET should be terminated immediately because the sector no longer needs the implicit subsidy of about $80 a tonne of CO2.

    But again, think about it. Why is the cost of renewable energy falling so quickly? Is it because the cost of all that steel and engineering in those vast wind turbines is declining at a rapid rate? To be sure, the new turbines are getting bigger and more efficient but the strength of the objections to their location also is growing. This aspect of wind energy extension has to be taken into account when estimating the cost of renewables.

    And while there may be more technology breakthroughs with large-scale solar, and all that cheap Chinese manufacturing helps, there is often an underestimate of the maintenance associated with solar — in particular, the need for the panels to be kept clean.

    The best estimates point to annual falls of 1 per cent and 3.5 per cent respectively in the cost of wind and solar. But these figures do not take into account the cost of backup, which we are led to believe will be a required part of all new renewable energy offerings.

    This condition will lead to a doubling or trebling of the cost of renewables, given that wind works only when the wind blows (and not too hard), and solar when the sun shines. Be aware that there is a lot of lobbying behind the scenes by the renewable energy sector to water down this requirement.

  97. Shelley

    Important point from Paul Kelly’s article above that also says so much about modern corporate Australia and their propensity to get on the SJW bandwagon in favour of focusing on their core business.

    Given the support Australian companies have offered same-sex marriage, any idea they would not pursue this cause against religious freedom seems forlorn. Indeed, it is hard to find any statement of meaningful support for religious freedom and belief from a senior Australian corporate executive on this issue, a telling omission.

  98. OldOzzie

    Part 2 – Tony Abbott’s RET, emissions policies made energy policy a farce

    So, what has happened since the RET was renegotiated in 2015? The wholesale price of electricity has doubled from $60 a megawatt hour to $120. With the closure of the Northern and Hazelwood coal-fired power stations, high-priced gas is increasingly the marginal fuel that is setting the price.

    Needless to say, the remaining coal-fired power stations are making thumping profits — the Queensland government-owned plants are swimming in dough as they game the system to return obscene dividends to the state government — as are the renewable energy players.

    Is it any surprise that households and businesses are feeling the pressure from higher electricity prices? Note that electricity costs as a proportion of household budgets and business expenses have never been this high in Australia. South Australia has the highest retail electricity prices in the world, with some of the other states not far behind.

    Rather than confront the real reasons behind this disaster, both present and impending, all the Turnbull government can do is faff around with marginal issues. Yes, it is a pity that so much gas is being exported. But under the RET, gas plays no part.

    And does anyone really think that a ban on gas exports — imposed by a Coalition government, no less — will really put downward pressure on domestic gas prices in any timeframe other the short term?

    The message is: don’t bother to explore and exploit because the government is intent on reducing gas prices. (Hey, maybe the government should put export bans on beef, wheat, wool, sugar, iron ore and so on — think of the lower domestic prices we could enjoy!)

    Jawboning the states to remove their moratoriums on gas explor­ation has been completely ineffective, and bullying the electricity retailers will have a marginal effect at best. In fact, the loss of scope for retailers to hedge forward electricity prices, given the greater penetration of renewables, means the quality of retail offerings will deteriorate across time, irrespective of any regulatory action imposed by the government.

    This brings me to the nonsensical decision of the Abbott government to promise an excessively high emissions reductions target as part of our Paris Agreement commitment. No doubt the internationalists at the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade were telling the prime minister we had to do our bit and hold our head high in the UN community.

    The trouble for Australia is that 26 per cent to 28 per cent emissions reduction is actually 50 per cent to 52 per cent in per capita terms. With our population growth being more than three times higher than the average in developed countries, we voluntarily have agreed to putting a burdensome yoke around our collective neck.

    And here’s another thing: we tend to take these sorts of commitments seriously and accurately measure our emissions. Plenty of countries signed up to the Paris Agreement simply for the money. There is also evidence of widespread rorting of the measurement of emissions, including by Russia and China, both of which are substantial emitters.

    To those who argue the solution to our energy problems is the clean energy target, my response is: you have to be joking. The CET is just the RET by another name.

    And even if the emissions intensity benchmark is nominally set to include clean coal — note that 1600 clean coal electricity plants are being built around the world — the key parameter is the emissions reduction target.

    There will be no private investment in clean coal in this country under a CET unless the emissions reduction target is scaled back. When Malcolm Turnbull points out that coal will feature in electricity generation for years to come, all he is saying is that existing plants will continue to operate and some may even reach their true physical end of life. But there will be no new investment in coal-fired electricity.

    Let’s face it: energy policy is a farce in this country. It makes other countries look like paragons of common sense. The US is swimming in cheap shale gas and has reduced its emissions without any intrusive government dictates, aside from some loony and ineffective measures by some of the states.

    Germany is building a large brown-coal-fired electricity power plant and has deferred the withdrawal of brown coal to a later date. Denmark has gone cold on wind power, having recently cancelled a large offshore project. Britain is building a new nuclear power plant.

    By contrast, Australia seems hellbent on sending all our energy-intensive industry broke as well as imposing ever higher energy bills on households. There has to be a better way.

  99. Roger

    Serial idiot Bernard Salt in the Oz thinks it’s a good thing that the number of non-English speakers is on the rise in Australia and we should learn more foreign languages to be more welcoming.

  100. Lady Nilk, Iron Bogan

    Andrew J. Spieles, 21, of Harrisonburg was sentenced to 100 days in jail.
    The court waived any fees associated with the charges due to an inability to pay the fine, and Spieles will not have to serve any probation following his jail-time.
    He previously pled guilty to one-count of information charging him with knowingly transferring false Virginia Voter Registration Forms.

    Bolding mine.

    So because he can’t afford to pay the fine it’s waived? What sort of a deterrent is that? No doubt if he was getting out the vote for the Republicans he would have had a rather different outcome.

  101. Roger

    Indeed, it is hard to find any statement of meaningful support for religious freedom and belief from a senior Australian corporate executive on this issue, a telling omission.

    Big corporates do very well out of statism.

    Take your custom elsewhere where possible.

  102. rickw

    Also read an interview some time ago where a young white Aboriginal doctor said he felt hurt when other Aboriginals didn’t believe his authenticity.

    They’re the most racist people in Australia, closely followed by those of Asian extraction.

  103. Geriatric Mayfly

    Bernard Salt would be one of those progressives who, when buying a house, would ask the agent (sotto voce) if there were any whites next door.

  104. Sparkx

    Geriatric Mayfly
    #2466232, posted on August 12, 2017 at 8:36 am
    Too much text for those not blessed with patience. Can some golf enthusiast explain in one word the gist of Kudelka’s scrawlings in today’s Oz?

    Glad I wasn’t the only one GM. Talk about a dog’s breakfast.

  105. Fergus

    Have been told Defence recruiting is being done differently because future wars will be fought with screens and computers. Don’t have to be fit to operate a computer.
    “And if the computers go down?”
    “Then it’s already too late”, was the reply.

  106. srr

    /pol/ News Forever‏ @polNewsForever 4h4 hours ago
    /pol/ News Forever Retweeted Baked Alaska™

    First Airbnb, now Uber.
    It’s now becoming common for people on the Right to be wrongly insulted, discriminated against, and denied service.

    /pol/ News Forever Retweeted
    Baked Alaska™‏Verified account @bakedalaska 7h7 hours ago

    Kicked out of my @Uber for being “racist” , I was literally sleeping in the backseat.
    https://twitter.com/polNewsForever/status/896088327790645248

  107. .

    You’re a jerk SRR, a complete kneebiter.

  108. srr

    😆 …

    /pol/ News Forever‏ @polNewsForever 6h6 hours ago

    Google CEO Pichai cancels an all-hands meeting about the #GoogleMemo; some employees worry they can’t speak out. Wonder why they think that?

    https://twitter.com/polNewsForever/status/896047762348941315

  109. .

    You loon SRR, you’re taking delight in Google copping shit from this, it only happened after they fired an employee for nothing.

    You used to reckon google had taken over your computer. You have a mental illness and an axe to grind.

  110. srr

    /pol/ News Forever‏ @polNewsForever 5h5 hours ago

    2017 was the year that Leftists finally embraced the fact that science opposes their ideas of gender, race, and everything else.

    https://twitter.com/polNewsForever/status/896065750745530368
    ..
    #FakeNews CNN is now so badly infected by Trump Derangement Syndrome that they think North Korea could beat the United States military.

    https://twitter.com/polNewsForever/status/896069885167452161
    ..
    Looks like Sen. Coons never read Sun Tzu’s “The Art of War.”

    Don’t worry, President Trump has.

    Never take military advice from democrats.

    https://twitter.com/polNewsForever/status/896073713510002688

  111. OldOzzie

    AUSTRAC case: How drug syndicates turned Commonwealth Bank into a money pump

    One man with a car was laundering more than $650,000 a day on a meandering route through Commonwealth Bank branches in 2015, part of $1.5 million that drug syndicates were moving through CBA accounts each day.

    Transaction details in the 583-page statement of claim lodged by AUSTRAC against CBA last week for failing to report suspicious transactions provide almost a minute by minute account of how six syndicates manipulated the CBA deposit system, reaching its height on June 30, 2015.

    The most graphic account came just after one o’clock that day when a computer alert pinged and a CBA manager hurried outside to catch a glimpse of the man who had haunted his branch for months.

    CBA customers had been shovelling huge sums of cash through the Intelligent Deposit Machines outside the doors of the Leichhardt Marketplace branch, in Sydney’s inner west.

    What the worried branch manager didn’t know was that in reality it was just one man, Yuen Hong Fung , using up to 29 false identities, to launder money made from methamphetamine sales to accounts in Hong Kong.

    The manager’s intervention on June 30, 2015, accosting the burly middle aged figure working on one of his IDMs, would force a rare hiccup in the money laundering operation.

    “This is crazy!” the branch manager, who has never been identified, told his superiors.

    On a deadline

    Fung, interrupted in mid-transaction, aborted his latest deposit and hurried to his car. He understood about getaways – he had been deported three times for fraud since he arrived in Australia on a student visa, and still managed to visit Australia 34 times using false passports.

    But Fung on June 30 was a man on a deadline, so he needed to backtrack quickly to the Mascot branch to deposit the rest of the funds from the Leichhardt mix-up.

    All up, Fung deposited $670,420 that day as he went from branch to branch on a magical mystery tour of Sydney, in the process inserting about 13,000 bank notes into the IDMs, mostly $50 notes.

    That was only part of the drug money flooding into CBA branches that day.

    What emerges from the legal case that AUSTRAC lodged against CBA last week for failure to report suspicious transactions is a picture of a giant money machine.

    Unlike the banking industry, the drug business runs seven days a week, 365 days a year, pumping out money.

    All up on June 30 two years ago six drug syndicates banked $1.5 million at CBA branches, almost all of it in Sydney.

    The accounts used by Fung had been set up by Kha Weng Foong, a Malaysian who specialised in false ID. In 2009 he was part of a syndicate producing fake credit cards that milked $7 million from Australian retailers. By 2014 Foong had graduated to drug money.

    Foong began opening CBA accounts online in false names in December 2015 using fake drivers’ licences (all with his picture). He averaged three new accounts a month. And Fung began filling them with $50,000 a day, using different branches each time.

    Manager with a problem

    On May 28, 2015 the Leichhardt manager realised he had a problem.

    “This morning we had an error in our IDM saying it was full,” he reported to the bank.

    “This is very unusual for our branch so I looked up the report and saw that there was 2 accounts used to make multiple deposits each just short of $50K in each account.

    “Upon further investigation it appears that both accounts/profiles have been established through internet banking. I have looked through the transactions and it looks like each profile has deposited then transferred overseas at least $1Mil over the last month or so.”

    That same day Fung deposited $457,980 as he bounced from Elizabeth Street in the City, Market City, Broadway, Chippendale, Surry Hills and Paddington. At Leichhardt he made the last deposit into the wrong account, and with the machine full he had to go on to Ashfield to correct it.

    Fung had hit the Leichhardt branch 12 times by June 30 when the Leichardt manager sent a report to CBA group security headed “Urgent!!!”

    “We have had people coming in and depositing about 5 times into account with $50 notes … [each] just short of $10,000.00. Then that night there is a transfer sent to China for just short of $50K.

    “The person who is making the deposit would clearly know the process as sometimes they deposit into all different accounts until the ATM is full then leave.

    “Today at about 1:05 the ATM alarm triggered. I approached the client to see if he needed any assistance. He said he was fine.

    “I believe that there should be another security measure in place as this is crazy. If you review these peoples accounts they have sent millions and millions overseas!! I am emailing to find out what we should do.”
    Police pounce

    That night, June 30, at the request of the Australian Federal Police the CBA blocked 19 of Foong’s accounts. It stopped the flow of drug money for five days. And then it resumed through 11 new accounts Foong had set up, this time using false Anglo names like Ronald Brown, Luke Shaw and Richard Whippy.

    But Fung and Foong avoided Leichhardt until August 20 when he deposited $50,000. The manager sent off another alert: “A customer came into the branch to deposit through the IDM doing multiple transactions setting our alarms off three times due to the amount of cash he deposited.

    “The description given of the customer was ‘Male who was tall with black hair of Asian background’.”

    Four days later, AFP officers arrested Fung and Foong at the Eastgardens branch where they had just deposited $49,700. This was on top of another $414,400 that Fung had already deposited that day at Market City, Elizabeth Street, Ashfield, Paddington and Mascot, and police found another $200,000 cash in Foong’s car (along with 16 fake driving licences).

    Despite Fung’s arrest, $404,450 of the funds banked that day were transferred to Kong Kong. And Fung had another $520,000 in his home, ready for the next day’s laundry.

    Fung had laundered $21 million in nine months but it was all a surprise for him. He told police someone called Johnny had given him the money in his home and asked him to hold it. What bank accounts?

  112. .

    One man with a car was laundering more than $650,000 a day

    That is eye popping. That is like a small multinational corporation. At least 160 mn in profit each year.

  113. Roger

    he had been deported three times for fraud since he arrived in Australia on a student visa, and still managed to visit Australia 34 times using false passports.

    I’ve often wondered how some people get into the country.

  114. Haidee

    Trump can tower, all he wants. Good for the mighty President. More of it!
    But women don’t need to, in my humble opinion.

    .

    More good info from srr

    .

    Iron that tea-towel first!
    Wipe up
    And only then, do you get to lick the envelope glue.

  115. .

    “Richard Whippy” – is that revenge for flappy dickey? Me so solly!

  116. notafan

    How many languages should each of us learn Bernard?

    And which ones, Arabic, Urdu, Pashto, Hindi, Tagalog, Mandarin perhaps?

    What a silly little man.

    Actually more Anglo celtic bank and government employees understanding certain language s ( while pretending not to) would be a very good thing.

  117. That may be conservative, what the authors intended and so on but it is still interstitial legislation.

    No, no, it was no more ‘conservative’ in 1949 than it is in 2017. And what relevance does your last claim have? I wasn’t claiming that the covenant is authoritative federally, but that it clearly represents what is marriage.

  118. OldOzzie

    Property is AUSTRAC’s money-laundering blindspot

    A loophole for laundering vast amounts of cash into the nation’s property market has been exposed by the Commonwealth Bank of Australia’s money laundering scandal, according to security experts.

    Stolen identities and illicit bank accounts used in the CBA scam to transfer money out of Australia are also the hallmarks of a sophisticated global network used to launder huge amounts into residential and commercial real estate, they claim.

    The CBA action is also revealing regulators deep reliance on banks for intelligence on transfers of large amounts of money between accounts, which can result in cash transactions going unnoticed, they claim.

    George Brandis, federal attorney-general, is expected to make an “imminent” announcement about boosting powers and resources of Austrac, the government agency that combats money laundering, according to a department spokesman.

    But it is expected to fall short of extending existing laws to cover real estate agents.

    “I believe the case for reform is compelling,” said Malcolm Shackell, a forensic crime specialist and partner with global consultancy PwC. “Australia is under pressure from international agencies to broaden the scope of its regulations to cover industries outside of financial services, including real estate agents, jewellers, accountants and, potentially, conveyancing lawyers.”

    The government has to balance tighter controls with rising costs for business, he added.

    Malcolm Gunning, president of the Real Estate Institute of Australia, also supports tougher financial scrutiny of buyers but wants it done in conjunction with the Australian Taxation Office and Austrac when property deals are settled.

    Proposals to check at the point of sale, such as an auction, would be impractical and difficult to police, he said.

    Under existing law, real estate agents and other businesses involved in buying and selling real estate do not need to identify where the money comes from or who is paying.

    The law does not require real estate agents, lawyers, accountants or any other person involved in the deal to identify the beneficial owner of the deal. A beneficial owner enjoys the benefits of ownership though title is in another name, such as a company.

    The Black Economy Taskforce is warning identity fraud is “systemically undermining” the nation’s financial system and is expected to call for a new approach in its pending final report.

    The scale of the problem has been highlighted by an alleged perpetrator of the CBA scam using 11 false identities to transfer tens-of-millions of dollars out of Australia, according to court documents.

    Security specialists claim large amounts of money can be transferred into fraudulent bank accounts created with stolen identities purchased on the ‘DarkWeb’, which is like an eBay for criminals.

    “Lenders have abrogated their responsibility to know and identify their client,” said Geoff Stockton, chief executive of PRM Group, a risk management specialist. “People are taking advantage of being able to open an account, borrow and transfer cash from behind a computer.”

    Real estate agents report unprecedented numbers of overseas’ buyers of residential and commercial property in Melbourne and Sydney paying cash, typically transferring payments from a local account.

    Asians were last year the biggest investors in Australia, spending about $47 billion largely on residential and commercial property, according to the Foreign Investment Review Board.

    An estimated 70 per cent of Chinese buyers pay in cash, according to Transparency International, an international non-government organisation targeting corruption.

  119. Tom

    From the excellent sportshounds.com.au — recently launched by some of the biggest names in sports journalism — today’s cartoon by (88-year-old) Geoff Hook.

  120. H B Bear

    Impossible to see how heads cannot roll at the CBA.

  121. Bruce of Newcastle

    Have been told Defence recruiting is being done differently because future wars will be fought with screens and computers. Don’t have to be fit to operate a computer.

    That’s going to be totally awesome next time the ADF has to deploy to the Solomons or East Timor.
    Lady infantry soldiers are going to be really excellent for intimidating the local boyos into good behaviour.

  122. srr

    Idiot Dot, or not such an idiot – campaigns for babies and children to be legally bought and sold on the open market, and still has a whole mess of ‘names’ keen to join him in lying about me to try to protect Google and other International Militant Atheist Cabals … depends who cover Dot is working to slip … 😉 😆

  123. OldOzzie

    notafan
    #2466279, posted on August 12, 2017 at 9:14 am
    How many languages should each of us learn Bernard?

    And which ones, Arabic, Urdu, Pashto, Hindi, Tagalog, Mandarin perhaps?

    What a silly little man.

    The joy is being in France at a Hotel Check-in watching and hearing some Swedish people ahead of us say to the check-in personnel

    “Please speak English, we do not speak French’

  124. John Constantine

    Police recruiting is being done differently, as future policing will be done with technology, to prevent crime by preventing the wrongthinking that comes before crime.

    The obsolete deplorable police model of directly intervening in a crime while it is underway is outdated.

    The State controlled, artificial intelligence run robot transport pod that will replace cars will be impossible to use for crime.

    The State controlled artificial intelligence run robot personal interaction device that will replace phones and personal computers will be impossible to use for crime.

    The internet of things run, robot smart electricity meter controlled personal dwelling pod that will replace houses will be unable to be used as a crime scene.

    Just need wymynsys polycys that can spend all day social engineering, while the robot artificial intelligence monitors all citizens in real time for the brain pattern spikes that betray the thoughtcrimes even before the prole itself is aware of the offence.

  125. Shelley

    Just musing as I am browsing the web. I’m interested to hear from other Cat commentators. When you read about ‘the Left’ or think that is ‘the Left’ at work, what do you visualize as the Left? For me it is an entity that consists of politicians, organisations such as the UN, despots and dictators, Hollywood types and at times associates or even friends/family. But who make up that quantity of leftists that are the ‘murky unknowns’. One thing that puzzles me is how Antifa are of the left, yet they are on a different plane to politicians and ‘celebrities’, and are seemingly railing against them. But they are all of the Left. I guess it is the victim totem pole.

    Also I come across many people who I would not consider to be of the Left per se, but they say or support things that are straight from the Left’s playbook. I often think these are the people who have been brainwashed or just parroting something – and the ones that with a little logical debate can be woken up.

    Anyway, just some musings and I would be interested in other thoughts.

  126. Roger

    And which ones, Arabic, Urdu, Pashto, Hindi, Tagalog, Mandarin perhaps?

    He thinks Mandarin should be compulsory, for starters.

  127. H B Bear

    Serial idiot Bernard Salt in the Oz thinks it’s a good thing that the number of non-English speakers is on the rise in Australia and we should learn more foreign languages to be more welcoming.

    Salt’s schtick is wearing very thin. Whimsical nostalgia, occasional demographic insights and inter-generational trolling is about it. Language isn’t the problem, one politico-religion and culture is. And Salt and others refuse to name it.

  128. notafan

    Fung and Foong had fun with us didn’t they.

    What a joke passport control must be for a man to be able to enter the country so many times on a false passport.

    I especially loved how CBA respected the right of the customer so much they gave them 30 days notice that the account was being closed.

    I’m sure AFP were thrilled too.

  129. Lady Nilk, Iron Bogan

    Newsweek, though, uses psychologists and feminist critics to slam Melania for wearing the stilettos since they reinforce all the female traditions feminists despise: Appearance-consciousness and sexiness.
    “In terms of the human example, we tend to find the defining characteristics of the opposite sex attractive,” Morris wrote. “High heels function in a similar way. Males respond to the characteristic way a woman walks, i.e., the movement of the female pelvis: High heels just exaggerate the femaleness of the walk. So to deconstruct why Trump women wear high heels: They are just buying into traditional binary views of male and female.” Fisher is in the camp that believes heels detract from women’s power, and shouldn’t be worn at work. “When women wear high heels at work, they send sexual signals that should be avoided if they want to be taken seriously.”

    I can’t speak for the Trump women, but I loved to wear stilettos because I like the way I look in them. Most of the time I’m in steel caps or sneakers, so if I’m going out you’d better believe that I’m going to be wearing heels.

    I used to live in them, and as for the idiots that say women are crippled by them, I beg to differ. When I wore them every day I used to run for the tram up Bourke Street. Also, Ginger Rogers.

    Being seen as “sexy” or “desirable” by men was a bonus. I wore them for me.

    These days, I rarely dress up for social occasions, so while I still wear heels, they are not stilettos. Doesn’t stop my mates from laughing about stripper heels, though. 😀

    Miserable, sour, bitter hags Feminists really should lighten up and focus on cheering themselves up rather than working towards misery for everybody

  130. calli

    Shelley, I think of this. A great, undifferentiated lump of tyranny.

    With one difference. No resistance, however puny, is altogether futile. 🙂

  131. .

    SRR if you really cared about ‘da children’ you’d see that removing them from remote Aboriginal communities for a token fee would be the best thing for them.

    It would also prove they don’t give a shit about them. They couldn’t claim they were stolen.

    What we’re doing now is giving the adults money and they abandon their kids. That is objectively worse.

    Pretty funny for someone that posts hundreds of links each week and never has an original thought, that you don’t understand the idea of saying something provocative to prove a point about related issues.

    Nope, we’re much better off for hearing how you’re the only real conservative here and we’re all better off hearing about Sargon of the Basement’s masturbation habits.

    Classy.

  132. Roger

    Language isn’t the problem, one politico-religion and culture is. And Salt and others refuse to name it.

    If our ruling class weren’t cultural relativists we wouldn’t have the problem of Islam in Australia.

  133. notafan

    I assume Bernard is fluent?

    Besides which as long as the next generation go to school here that language problem is fixed, particularly considering the academic aspirations of the Australian Chinese community.

    Arabic speakers, not so much.

  134. rickw

    That’s going to be totally awesome next time the ADF has to deploy to the Solomons or East Timor.
    Lady infantry soldiers are going to be really excellent for intimidating the local boyos into good behaviour.

    I was wondering when the last “technology” war was fought, WWII?

    It’s been all pretty gritty, basic, boots on the ground stuff since then.

  135. rickw

    SRR if you really cared about ‘da children’ you’d see that removing them from remote Aboriginal communities for a token fee would be the best thing for them.

    Dot, not everything should be boiled down to an economic transaction FFS. The children should be out of there, period.

  136. Robert Mc

    Also, Ginger Rogers.

    Competitive standard ballroom dancers are on the balls of their feet almost all of the time, not on their heels.

  137. H B Bear

    The Liars tried to roll out the whole Asian language thing during the R-G-R dark ages. When you are echoing Liar policy ideas from this period, you really need to have a look at yourself or join The Ponds Institute.

  138. Nick

    Miserable, sour, bitter hags Feminists really should lighten up and focus on cheering themselves up rather than working towards misery for everybody

    True, but being miserable is what makes them happiest.

  139. notafan

    Because then they would be bred for sale.

    We know that already from the baby bonus lump sum tragedy.

  140. srr

    Dot Loves –

    Google

    Open Borders

    Maintaining Lists For The Stasi

    Buying and Selling Babies and Children.

  141. H B Bear

    Thanks Grogooglery, Queen of the Desert.

  142. Robert Mc

    The Trivago chick wears daggy, black ankle boots.

  143. Snoopy

    Fung and Foong are regarded as heroes by some here. Let’s not forget that.

  144. notafan

    All our children should be trained in Mandarin and coding.

    World ☮️ guaranteed.

    Thanks Labor!

  145. Muddy

    And if the computers go down?”
    “Then it’s already too late”, was the reply.

    If E.M.P. (Electro-Magnetic Pulse) weapons are not just science fiction, we’re very, very stuffed. (No more microwaving those 2-minute noodles).

  146. .

    They worked real jobs Snoopy. I think Fung and Foong are less morally culpable than Tim Flannery and Clive Hamilton.

  147. Tom

    Googleory switches sock puppets. One of the avian’s two will be along shortly as well.

  148. egg_

    The Liars tried to roll out the whole Asian language thing during the R-G-R dark ages.

    What’s Mandarin for ‘ratfvcked’?

  149. Haidee

    There’s lots of people whom I don’t consider to be “of the Left per se”,
    and some of them have asked: ‘what do you mean by the Left?”
    The concerning thing is, they do exactly that – parrot

    Bernard Salt is a truly boring individual. People roll their eyes, behind his back

  150. .

    Could there be a central coastian Bird-Septimus connection?

    Woy Woy is a dirty, dirty place.

  151. Shelley

    Thanks Calli, great visual representation.

  152. OldOzzie

    For Lady Nilk, Iron Bogan, Calli and Cat Ladies who like High Heels

    Holly Tapp sings Lovefool | The Voice Australia 2014

    Watch, Listen and Enjoy

    and as Kylie Minogue said

    She also, as Kylie points out, navigates a set of stairs in some seriously high heels so is basically ready for world domination.

    PS

    This was bad either – Frank & Holly Sing House Of The Rising Sun | The Voice Australia 2014

  153. .

    WTF is this ASMR shit?

    Ikea. WTF man?

  154. OldOzzie

    This wasn’t bad either – finger slip correct

  155. Geriatric Mayfly

    True, but being miserable is what makes them happiest.

    Two other ingredients to attain true feminist bliss. Having a treasure trove of ‘issues’ and being possessed by a bagful of others which provoke a strident anti prefix.

  156. egg_

    Grogooglery, Queen of the Desert.

    Nurse!

  157. MsDolittle

    Have I awoken in some alternate universe? A good news Christian story makes the front page in the Oz. I should quit whilst ahead.

  158. twostix

    Have been told Defence recruiting is being done differently because future wars will be fought with screens and computers. Don’t have to be fit to operate a computer.

    They said the same thing about machinery.

    WW1 and 2 demonstrated how correct they were and why we should definately believe them this time.

  159. .

    Hmm yes nota there is always a moral hazard angle. What if less children are born into those societies than you bring into them?

  160. Makka

    Leftie ranga bint on ALPBC somehow connects the poofter plebiscite with the Norks maniacal nuclear deathwish. Says that young people are very wowwied because [shock!] they’ve never seen this before. That’s because they (most) are so fkn precious they can’t imagine anything bad happening to them.

  161. Muddy

    My point from above being that the security of our electrical grid is more of a concern than ballistic missiles from Pudgy.

  162. Roger

    Salt also notes perceptively – he’s a demographer, you know – that our non-Anglophone new chums tend to live in “enclaves” in our larger cities.

    Apparently the word “ghetto” carries too many pejorative undertones.

    Roll on the Balkanisation of Australia, a “nation of nations”.

  163. OldOzzie

    No wind or solar powered aluminium smelter anywhere in the world? Could be a message in that.


    Matt Howell, the CEO of Tomago Aluminium Smelter, told a few home truths on ABC radio Monday.

    To paraphrase in my own words:

    1. Aluminium Smelters gobble electrons for breakfast. His smelter uses 10% of the entire electricity supply of the most populous state in Australia (NSW).

    2. If power goes out without warning for more than three hours, the smelter pot lines freeze, permanently. The company goes to the wall.

    3. The largest battery in the world would keep their smelter going for all of 8 minutes. There is a good reason there are no solar or wind powered aluminium smelters anywhere in the world.

    4. The government can ‘t let the market solve anything whilst it is simultaneously destroying the free market by propping up the market failures at the same time.

    5. Electricity pricing has suddenly got very ugly. Their electricity bill may now be subject to price spikes where it could cost them $4 million just to keep one pot line running during that spike. It is as if suddenly gas stations only sold $400 per Litre petrol. (Which would be $1800/per gallon). What he doesn’t say, but which logically follows from that, is that heavy industry in most of Australia can no longer get reliable electricity at an affordable price, even with forward contracts. Cry, scream, run with your factory.

    6. In Australia, if we achieve “zero coal” we will also achieve “zero heavy manufacturing”.

    7. If we want heavy industry, we need a HELE Coal plant. There are hundreds being built around the world, and we are selling our coal to them. How crazy are we?

    Howell makes some great points. It’s good to see an ABC presenter willing to let the evil capitalists speak. Well done Matt Wordsworth. I found something worth listening to on the ABC this year.

  164. twostix

    Kelly like The Aus are desperate for fag marriage and know Abbott’s comments and the christian persecution angle are potent.

    They’re concern trolling to disarm “myes myes we really care about religious freedom, everyone has the right to be a bigot, we’ll definately do something about that after the postal vote comes back as yes”.

    Don’t fall for it.

  165. calli

    I love high heels but can’t wear them. A titanium knee will do that.

    👠👠👠

  166. egg_

    If E.M.P. (Electro-Magnetic Pulse) weapons are not just science fiction

    I wonder how many food tasters Kim Jong-un has to replace each week?
    Presumably the yanks are exploring every option post Sadam Hussein?

  167. Makka

    Again on the ALPBC; a postal vote for all Australians over 18 is a terrible poll compared to a few polls taken by leftist gaynazi greenslime organisations in inner Balmain , Newtown ,Bondi coffee shops confirming SSM is absolutely overwhelmingly demanded by all Australia. “It’s ( the postal plebiscite) isn’t even really a poll, is it?”

    If it come back No? “We’ll have to have a very look at what went wrong because something would have gone horribly wrong, because EVERYone wants SSM”.

    I wish these fkheads could be rounded up and sent to NorK where Trump could deal with them and Kim in a oner.

  168. C.L.

    So, the covenant clearly declares that marriage is a union between the sexes …

    Of course.
    As I’ve said before, homosexual “marriage” bumped the Beach Boys from the top of the list of Stuff White Folks Like years ago.
    No support in Africa. No support in the Middle East. Virtually no support in Asia or South America or the Sub-Continent. Zero support from Aborigines, Maoris, Islanders or Native Americans.
    Supporters of SS”M” are the most visceral, dogmatic racists on earth today.

  169. C.L.

    Yes, folks.
    This “man” was, until recently, in charge of the Australian “Army.”

  170. Roger

    What he doesn’t say, but which logically follows from that, is that heavy industry in most of Australia can no longer get reliable electricity at an affordable price, even with forward contracts.

    For the Prog-Left, de-industrialisation is a feature not a bug of the current energy policy.

  171. John Constantine

    When all the metal smelters of the world exported to run in corrupt countries where they pay bribes to Despots, dictators and demagogues to be protected from/by the State, this will be Climate Justice, and a start on the West paying war reparations to the cartels of their transnational Climate Injustice League.

  172. Haidee

    Very cute. I think he’s wearing those kitten heels.

  173. twostix

    If the postal vote comes back no and the current government pass it anyway it will never have the veneer of legitimacy they desire and will drive them more crazy than they already are.

  174. Nick

    Hey Ms. D, good to see ya back.

  175. C.L.

    Speaking of Australian military “leaders,” Peter Leahy calls for Australia to surrender to North Korea.

    “It’s going to look bloody ugly.

    “I think it would move very quickly to an exchange of artillery.”

    Thanks Professor (for a professor he now is).

  176. Makka

    If the postal vote comes back no and the current government pass it anyway it will never have the veneer of legitimacy they desire and will drive them more crazy than they already are.

    If the postal vote comes back NO and Turdball allows a vote on the floor of the House that gets up, Cory’s coffers will be overflowing with new membership fees and the end of the Libs will have been successfully achieved.

  177. herodotus

    “We are reaping the results of a multi-decade effort by the communist and socialist left.  Leftists have finally dominated and transformed the Democratic Party – into something vicious and dangerous to our republic. 
    Obama openly boasted that radicalized and mostly non-white Millennials will soon give leftists a permanent majority.  Our Constitution and two-party system were to be thrown in the dustbin of history.  When Trump destroyed their plans by winning the 2016 election, hard-left Democrats weren’t willing to give up power.  The niceties of democracy, where the voters get to chose their leaders, do not fit the communist credo Obama and his inner circle were raised on.
    As I wrote previously, Obama’s entire innermost circle were children of communists.  That does not happen by coincidence. ”

    Read more: http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/08/russian_collusion_in_democrat_inner_circle.html#ixzz4pUiHVQKr

  178. Muddy

    Presumably the yanks are exploring every option post Sadam Hussein?

    I think the only certainty is that the satellite imagery photo interpretation analysts will be working overtime.

  179. egg_

    missiles from Pudgy.

    Fat boy slim Kim?

  180. Lady Nilk, Iron Bogan

    Also, Ginger Rogers.

    Competitive standard ballroom dancers are on the balls of their feet almost all of the time, not on their heels.

    Ginger is an example of a woman not being held back by her footwear. Whether she has her weight on the balls of her feet or her heels is not the issue. The issue is women who like their shoes being nagged by the sensible shoe brigade. It’s petty and tiresome, and they should focus on more important things.

    Like which personal pronoun they’re going to sook about today.

  181. srr

    rickw
    #2466303, posted on August 12, 2017 at 9:29 am

    SRR if you really cared about ‘da children’ you’d see that removing them from remote Aboriginal communities for a token fee would be the best thing for them.

    Dot, not everything should be boiled down to an economic transaction FFS. The children should be out of there, period.

    Plus Dot, well known for his verballing and bald faced lies, also believes that no one will remember that I was one of only very few on the side of one man who was being effective in fixing what’s killing aboriginal kids; who the majority of cats joined Tony Abbott and Co. in ripping to shreds.

    Oh and yes, Sargon does not pay for on line p0rn.

    People who are into baby rape on demand, do pay for it, and it’s a massive business.

    So massive that there is is also a massive business in supplying babies for baby rape p0rn.

    But Dot and Co. will also lie that that industry doesn’t exist; too yucky or something, people would stop it … like they stop ‘Comprehensive Sexual Education’ being pushed on toddlers around the world by the UN; like they stop the creation of future Planned Parenthood Abortion Customers; like they stop Full Term ‘abortion’; like they stop the production, harvesting and sale to order of baby parts to biotech companies …

  182. .

    ABS and AEC insisting that 16 year olds don’t get to “vote”. They need to re-read s 93 (4) of the CEA.

    This isn’t an election, so the Ministerial direction defines electors as enrolled, like s 93 (3) does.

    You cannot simply pass a law and insist “no but we meant something else because we did not read the section we were relying on in full, plus we can pick and choose heads of power as it suits…”.

    It would be great if it got kyboshed and we got a true plebiscite, run at the next election for little cost.

  183. C.L.

    Incidentally, my prediction is that North Korea would be smashed to the point of being disabled within 24 hours of a war breaking out. Maybe less than 24 hours. They are about as militarily formidable as David Morrison.

  184. .

    Oh and yes, Sargon does not pay for on line p0rn.

    The more you know.

  185. H B Bear

    Nurse!

    Grey Nurse actually.

  186. srr

    Google is Breaking Down
    No Bullshit

  187. Haidee

    “. . . as militarily formidable as David . . .”
    ha,ha,ha

  188. C.L.

    At the invitation of Fairfax, Suharto butler Paul Keating leaves his newspaper cutting collection to solve the North Korean crisis:

    Paul Keating: North Korea could collapse if it gives up nuclear weapons.

    Paul Keating has warned that North Korea will never abandon its nuclear weapon program and that this new reality will have to be addressed in the same way as the west sought to contain the former Soviet Union.

    The former prime minister, one of Australia’s most-respected foreign policy thinkers and a strong advocate for a more independent foreign policy, has disagreed strongly with the language and approach being taken by the US President Donald Trump towards the rogue state.

  189. Makka

    Maybe less than 24 hours.

    You wouldn’t be able to drop a line in the seas around the NorK peninsula without hitting a US boomer hull I expect.

  190. Geriatric Mayfly

    Incidentally, my prediction is that North Korea would be smashed to the point of being disabled within 24 hours of a war breaking out. Maybe less than 24 hours.

    And the war will continue for 24 years on ABC/SBS, as the “horror” and ”suffering” and “war crimes” of it all are rolled out.
    Did anyone think of the li’ll chillun?

  191. .

    Paul Keating has warned that North Korea will never abandon its nuclear weapon program and that this new reality will have to be addressed in the same way as the west sought to contain the former Soviet Union.

    I have signed into law a bill from Congress that outlaws North Korea forever. Bombing will commence in five minutes.

  192. srr

    Right Angle – Should We Break Up Tech Monopolies? 08/10/17
    BillWhittleChannel

    Aug 11, 2017
    Google is huge in social media… too big?

    Watch the Right Angle team tackle this question.

  193. Gab

    C

    policy, has disagreed strongly with the language and approach being taken by the US President Donald Trump towards the rogue State

    But no condemnation for the language and approach being taken by the “rogue state”, of course.

  194. one old bruce

    “Teaching Fat Studies: From Conception to Reception
    Patti Lou Watkins , Amy E. Farrell & Andrea Doyle Hugmeyer
    Pages 180-194 | Published online: 08 Jun 2012

    Download citation http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21604851.2012.649232

    Full Article Figures & data References Citations Metrics Reprints & Permissions Get access

    Abstract

    The field of fat studies has undergone tremendous growth in recent years…” boom-tish!

  195. Rabz

    “When women wear high heels at work, they send sexual signals that should be avoided if they want to be taken seriously.”

    If that statement was written by a feminayzee (and presumably it was) it is simply patently absurd and hypocritical, a variation of the “don’t wear short skirts when drunk if you don’t want to be raped”.

    Insane, these people are. Barking bloody mad.

  196. Geriatric Mayfly

    #2466232, posted on August 12, 2017 at 8:36 am

    Too much text for those not blessed with patience. Can some golf enthusiast explain in one word the gist of Kudelka’s scrawlings in today’s Oz?

    It is, I believe, a (cough) side-splitting parody on the Kim Jong Phat Phuc’s claims to have played golf only once but scored eight holes-in-one.
    The conclusion is that Trump and the Phat-Phuc’s are peas in a pod in the megalomania stakes.
    Of course, that is where their ABC is going too.

  197. Mike of Marion

    Has a batch of USAF C-17s landed at YBAS yet with a load of anti-missile launch trucks and weapons?

  198. “When women wear high heels at work, they send sexual signals that should be avoided if they want to be taken seriously.”

    Some women wear heels because they are short-arses.

  199. hzhousewife

    Serial idiot Bernard Salt in the Oz thinks it’s a good thing that the number of non-English speakers is on the rise in Australia and we should learn more foreign languages to be more welcoming.

    Wonder how his Saturday morning arabic class is going?

  200. Gab

    Love it when shoes are the topic 👡👠👢

  201. Geriatric Mayfly

    America “Locked and loaded.”

    No doubt about The Trumpinator, he gets straight to the point. How many teleprompter screens would die of fatigue, before Obambi ever arrived at something as succinct as this?

  202. Rabz

    Grate. Now I’ve got to head off and deal with the incompetent dago cockheads who fucked up my blue slip paperwork over three months ago.

    What sort of imbecile can’t even transcribe a frigging VIN correctly?

  203. Kelly like The Aus are desperate for fag marriage and know Abbott’s comments and the christian persecution angle are potent.

    They’re concern trolling to disarm “myes myes we really care about religious freedom, everyone has the right to be a bigot, we’ll definately do something about that after the postal vote comes back as yes”.

    Don’t fall for it.

    Indeed. The whole idea that redefining marriage by government fiat is separable from it’s consequences and that the latter can be quarantined by conscience legislation is risible. Further, the fact that such a change would require this sort of legislation should highlight the problem with marriage redefinition itself.

  204. overburdened

    Straw poll- pick any house in any street in any town in the Country at random, knock on the door and you will generally find an Ozzie family with conservative values. They don’t have much of an opinion on homos except that they aren’t quite right, don’t want the place swamped with people that are destructive to their way of life and don’t like the idea of bludgers getting stuff for nothing (with a lil blind spot about their own welfare churn if they have one). Of course these people are out of step and throwbacks who are bigots and deserve purging. Problem is there are so many of them and they are the ones that keep the wheels turning by providing value through gainful employment. They are also too busy with their own lives and are too ignorant and/or disinterested to be actively involved in campaigning to save themselves, and passively allow themselves to be progressively diminished economically and culturally. Just saying. Gotta go to catch up on the Home and Away/ Masterchef/ rerun before the footy starts.

  205. notafan

    Hmm yes nota there is always a moral hazard angle. What if less children are born into those societies than you bring into them?

    I was specifically referring to what happened in Aboriginal communities.

    You a duffer sometimes dot, how many times have some of us suggested taxing families as a single entity. getting rid of the suckhole child care benefit, and giving tax deductions to families instead, as well as reducing taxation?

    I don’t want to import low iq inbreds to replace the children the current breeding generation are not having.

  206. Haidee

    Some women do wear high heels because they’re short-arses
    Everyone wants to be taller. Well, nearly everyone

  207. Jessie

    Lordy lordy

    In Engwish…………….
    The international experts reporting on rabies provide 136 pages of evidence-based ………………. may need some updating and a pictorial health promoting pamphlet.

    Horses and donkeys get aggressive and bite ferociously when they are rabid. Cattle and buffaloes do not bite when they are rabid, but precautions should be taken while examining sick animals that are salivating.

    These FAQs are an attempt to provide accepted and evidence-based answers to common questions about thedisease. Although efforts have been made to include all possible situations, the reader is advised that these FAQsare by no means exhaustive and they may need to consult an infectious disease/rabies expert in situations where their doubts are not addressed.
    These FAQs are presented in two sections. The first section provides information for the general public. The second section gives advice to health providers on dealing with
    wounds from potentially rabid animals
    , and the administration of anti-rabies vaccines.

    Licks to wounds or grazed and broken skin, or to the lining of the mouth and nose, can also transmit the disease.

    Source: Frequently Asked Questions on Rabies (WHO)
    Photos of <5year olds only Photo credit: WHO Indonesia/Budhi Chandra

  208. JC

    Rabz

    High heels combined with a tight skirt and tight top office wear looks superb on decent looking females. I reckon it helps productivity as it gives dudes a testosterone boost thereby making them work harder. It’s the single reason I’d have a sprinkling of decent looking females in any office. It helps the work flow.

  209. notafan

    I was one of only very few on the side of one man who was being effective in fixing what’s killing aboriginal kids;

    Who was that?

  210. Muddy

    Why advertise you are going to attack a target (Guam) and forfeit the element of surprise? It’s hubris/brinkmanship.

    I think it possible there may be a limited conflict, but North Korea will not be wiped out. I’d be surprised if the U.S. has that much firepower remaining after the Obama-enema.

  211. JC

    Some women wear heels because they are short-arses.

    High heels and long thin legs is godly. It’s the reason God put females on earth. As we found out from Yahoo and now Google… not for much else.

  212. Carpe Jugulum

    Serial idiot Bernard Salt in the Oz thinks it’s a good thing that the number of non-English speakers is on the rise in Australia and we should learn more foreign languages to be more welcoming.

    Here at home it is expected you learn the local language

  213. Geriatric Mayfly

    If the NO plebiscite manages to succeed, by what percentage margin must it win to satisfy the homo marriage agitators. Similarly, if the YES vote makes it, by what margin must it win to gratify the homo marriage agitators.

  214. JC

    Why advertise you are going to attack a target (Guam) and forfeit the element of surprise? It’s hubris/brinkmanship.

    I think it possible there may be a limited conflict, but North Korea will not be wiped out. I’d be surprised if the U.S. has that much firepower remaining after the Obama-enema.

    My humble prediction is that China gets rid of the fat little fuck soon enough. The Chicoms aren’t going to cause their economy to collapse by 50% because of him. There’s a bullet with his name on it.

  215. .

    Hmm yes nota there is always a moral hazard angle. What if less children are born into those societies than you bring into them?

    I was specifically referring to what happened in Aboriginal communities.

    So was I.

  216. Mike of Marion

    One of Norway’s greatest singers.

    Sissel Kyrkjebo in 1998.

    An angelic voice

  217. Empire GTHO Phase III

    High heels combined with a tight skirt and tight top office wear looks superb on decent looking females. I reckon it helps productivity as it gives dudes a testosterone boost thereby making them work harder. It’s the single reason I’d have a sprinkling of decent looking females in any office. It helps the work flow.

    I have emperical evidence to support your hypothesis, JC.

    I’m saving it for future use on a diversity deluded HR despot.

  218. Jessie

    And the next Lordy Lordy

    Fergus @ 8.50

    Fair skinned Aboriginals were discriminated against and that is originally why the children were taken in to care.
    Saw this book the other day so it must still be happening
    https://www.magabala.com/fair-skin-black-fella.html

    Author here:
    Renee Fogarty

  219. notafan

    Then your comment ‘What if less children are born into those societies than you bring into them?’ is even less comprehesible/

  220. .

    What if fewer kiddies are born into those communities than those you take out of them?

    It is a utilitarian question.

    Sorry about before. Receiving latest firmware upgrade from Google masters.

  221. Geriatric Mayfly

    Ah! Hah! Just as I suspected. Those Moroccan teenagers, now infected after pleasuring an ass, turned its head around for a kiss.

    Horses and donkeys get aggressive and bite ferociously when they are rabid.

  222. notafan

    So you can take more children out of a community than is in it thus have negative numbers of children?

  223. JC

    I read an hypothesis about the wretched PC stuff that’s occurring in the West… Stuff like white privilege, accusations of racism and the equality bullshit.

    The good sacking is an example.

    The writer reckons it’s eerily similar to the Chinese Cultural Revolution, which was meant to cause people to hate themselves and feel ashamed. It’s a Maoist inspired Cultural Revolution.

  224. Lady Nilk, Iron Bogan

    So the problems in Venezuela are all the fault of Saudi Arabia fixing oil prices.

    Venezuela is sinking ever deeper into a political and economic calamity. Inflation is above 700% and GDP is more than a third below 2013 levels. The country with the world’s largest proven oil reserves is now the world’s most indebted country – no other nation has a larger public external debt as a share of GDP or of exports. Living standards have truly collapsed.

    Many factors have contributed to Venezuela’s current crisis including mismanagement of oil wealth by former president Hugo Chavez and the current leader, Nicolás Maduro, and criminality, lawlessness and the black market.

    While all of these have undoubtedly had a part to play, the falling price of oil is the most significant factor. However the connection between this and an economic crisis in South America is not as obvious. What’s going on in Venezuela is the unintended consequence of Saudi Arabia’s policy of keeping oil prices deliberately low for political reasons.

    Not once does the s-word get a mention.

  225. Oh shut up to, you lying Google-esque drunk … and no smilie for you you either …

    Hahahaha!! Fortunately I rather like cats.

  226. Anne

    They don’t have much of an opinion on homos except that they aren’t quite right, don’t want the place swamped with people that are destructive to their way of life and don’t like the idea of bludgers getting stuff for nothing…

    Good comment by Overburdened at 10:40am.

    Sexual perversity and nonsense TV programming is modern day Bread and Circuses. It’s all propaganda designed to distract young people from the truth. That is – working out the real politics of Government Power and CONTROL over their lives and property.

    Yes, older people have those views but they tend to be apathetic (probably the Statins!) and are less inclined to complain, let alone take to the streets with torches.

    There’s no hope. The NWO is coming. Just one more crisis.

    We are all at risk of our children.

  227. P

    Competitive standard ballroom dancers are on the balls of their feet almost all of the time, not on their heels.

    Who cares if they look and dance like this.

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