PVO thinks the Liberals are too left-wing

It’s not often that PVO and I agree on economic issues:

But then this week we read all about planned government intervention when it came to the remuneration of bank executives — keeping in mind that, unlike some nations where a version of this has occurred, Australian banks are wholly publicly owned and listed on the stock exchange and haven’t been bailed out by government.

Next it was Malcolm Turnbull sitting down (again) with the heads of energy companies, dictating how they should run their businesses. They were told to write to customers outlining how cheaper prices could be obtained. Remind yourselves this is a Liberal government, in name at least, if not in nature. Yet it wears hypocrisy without a hint of shame when attacking Shorten for being a socialist.

It’s not as though this was the first week we’ve seen a supposedly Liberal government drift towards government intervention in the marketplace. Toying with a new government-owned coal-fired power station as the way of the future isn’t merely economically stupid, it is anathema to what a market liberal party should consider.

Don’t forget the Emissions Reduction Fund is still government policy. Paying companies to reduce emissions rather than using a market mechanism — that sounds a lot like socialism to me. Oh, and don’t forget the much vaunted government enterprise Snowy Hydro 2.0.

Throw in the $22 billion in new taxes outlined in this year’s budget, followed up by a bank levy any anti-capitalist organisation would be proud of (it was Greens policy long before Scott Morrison implemented it), and it’s no wonder traditional supporters of the Liberal Party are looking elsewhere to park their votes.

When stated like that things do really look bleak. Two quibbles.

  1. So-called market mechanisms to address global warming remain socialist tools. Artificial markets remain artificial irrespective of the attempts of socialists to make them markets.
  2. Adam Smith’s test for intervention in the economy is an activity that benefits a great society but cannot be profitably undertaken by the private sector. From recent experience that must include the provision of cheap and reliable electricity. The fact of matter is that Greenist mob intimidation and violence has created a situation where the private sector cannot or will not provide new coal powered power stations. The government having failed to enforce the rule of law is now faced with having to provide the power.
This entry was posted in Economics and economy, Politics. Bookmark the permalink.

31 Responses to PVO thinks the Liberals are too left-wing

  1. Robber Baron

    Labor, Greens, Xenophon and now Liberals and Nationals are the parties of the left. Plenty of room on the right to flourish. Australian Conservatives and PHON have it all to themselves. That’s the greatness of Turnbull, he single-handedly delivered his conservative base to AC and PHON. Greatness or genius, I’m not quite sure which.

  2. Jo Smyth

    Has PVO been asleep for the past 2 years. He writes articles for the Australian. If he took the trouble to read the comments to his biased left wing articles, he would have realised most of his commentators have been telling him this ever since the knife attack.

  3. Diesal

    I am heading back OS to help another nation bring its resources to the market, not really sure what value there is in having a base in Venestralia, it just adds 9 hours to my flights.

  4. Roger

    Adam Smith’s test for intervention in the economy is an activity that benefits a great society but cannot be profitably undertaken by the private sector. From recent experience that must include the provision of cheap and reliable electricity.

    Surely Smith was not envisioning a market where subsidies to renewables and propaganda have distorted the ability of the market to give reliable price signals to prospective investors in coal?

  5. C.L.

    He’s right but insincere.
    Leftists and luvvies in Australia are always concern-trolling the Liberal Party’s small government credentials.

  6. DM of WA

    I might have a bit more sympathy for our captains of industry but for the fact that most of them seem to be fully onboard with globalism, political correctness and all the current progressive social agenda – except when it comes to their own pay packets!

  7. Sinclair Davidson

    Surely Smith was not envisioning a market where subsidies to renewables and propaganda have distorted the ability of the market to give reliable price signals to prospective investors in coal?

    I wouldn’t imagine so. Yet here we are.

  8. Blind Freddie

    Stange observation by PVO. In my world he is way left of liberal.
    Van Interrutus carries his political affiliations through who he interuppts,how much time airrtime given to his favoured guests and how often his outrage points to the left.

  9. Blind Freddie

    Smith couldn’t envisage streetlighting at the flick of a switch as he predated Edisson by over 100 years.
    However, I cant imagine him looking at the increase in the number of coal-fired genetating stations and look at the deminishing number in Australia and commenting “Are they af their ****** heid” in his best Edinburgh accent.

  10. Muddy

    I don’t think that Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives can truly flourish until the Festering Corpse Party is truly done, dusted, and underground. Many people do not know what conservatism truly is, and with the Lieborals still staggering around, maggots dropping off them, and claiming to be soft ‘conservatives’, the Australian Conservatives will have to expend energy and resources in a branding war.

    Our first task needs to be the absolute annihilation of the Liberal Party, so that the Australian Conservatives – or a variation – may rise from the ashes.

  11. Exit Stage Right

    PVO! Who in their right mind would read or watch any drivel put forward by this poor excuse for a journalist? Cannot watch the sycophant on Sky, pass by his crap thoughts in The Oz. Waste of space if he is one of the countries leading journos (someone must think he is good, other than himself).

  12. RobK

    Smith may have recognised the RET as some sort of feudal robber baron scheme of days past.

  13. Delta A

    I am heading back OS to help another nation bring its resources to the market, not really sure what value there is in having a base in Venestralia, it just adds 9 hours to my flights.

    Ouch!

  14. Siltstone

    The pathway to Turnbulls Potential Greatness* appears on a sharp decline.

    *Trade Mark: Sinc

  15. JohnA

    They were told to write to customers outlining how cheaper prices could be obtained.

    I don’t know what to make of their reaction to the jaw-jaw of the glass-jawed PM, though.

    The first suggestion I heard was that the energy companies would offer monthly billing instead of quarterly (electricity) or bi-monthly (gas) as “a means of reducing the stress of energy bills on the household budget”.

    Did the PM’s pep-talk go something like this?

    PM: “Look guys, the electors are stupid. They put us back in power, right?”
    Energy Guys: “Yeah, we know. They don’t all take advantage of the crazy retail deals, either.”
    PM: “So just make it look good. We are keeping the RET so YOU know, and WE know, that actual prices are not going to be reduced. But I bet if the bills didn’t look so big, the sheep would not pick it. OK?”
    PM: “So, go get ’em, boys”

  16. max

    antiwar conservative

    modern man’s commitment to the messianic state begins with his commitment to war, not socialism.

    when you look at the chart first war double taxes and second war double taxes again — welcome socialism

    At the time of Federation Australia’s tax to GDP ratio was around 5 per cent.

    the introduction of the federal income tax in 1915, which was used to fund Australia’s war effort.

    Between the two World Wars, government expenditure and tax revenues grew significantly and by the beginning of the Second World War, Australia’s tax take was over 11 per cent of GDP.

    In 1942, income taxation was consolidated by the federal government to increase revenue as a war-time measure.

    By the end of the Second World War, taxation revenue had grown to over 22 per cent of GDP.

    http://archive.treasury.gov.au/documents/1156/HTML/docshell.asp?URL=01_Brief_History.asp

  17. Combine Dave

    If Turnbull can open up a few coal power plants to provide the proles with cheap power against his better (read socialist) instincts on global warming then he will have achieved greatness.

  18. don coyote

    Gresham’s 2nd Law: Bad energy drives out good energy from the market.

  19. Combine Dave

    don coyote
    #2486806, posted on September 3, 2017 at 6:39 am
    Gresham’s 2nd Law: Bad energy drives out good energy from the market.

    Only by government fiat!

  20. Baldrick

    Remember, it was the Stupid.Fucking.Liberals pollster Mark Textor who gave the game away:

    “The qualitative evidence is they don’t matter. The sum of a more centrist approach outweighs any alleged marginal loss of so-called base voters.”

  21. Rabz

    “The qualitative evidence is they don’t matter. The sum of a more centrist approach outweighs any alleged marginal loss of so-called base voters.”

    LOL – and wasn’t that demonstrated beyond any doubt at the last election/sarc off/

  22. Rabz

    As for PvO, one of the few simple pleasures I have in life is bashing him in the comments section of his pieces.(which, needless to say, I never read in the first place).

  23. Rufus

    Van Wrongselen will never change.

    HELE power plants a sensible step. Power industry captured by the filth. To get started will need some sort of govt intervention to undo the previous rounds of govt intervention . Need to keep looters out of the construction and operation (Unions) so needs to be at arms length from govt once started.

  24. Rufus

    Probably best not to build the power plants (or any federal infrastructure) in the socialist Green/Labor states (Victoria and its client states SA and Tasmania).

    Harsh I know, especially if you live in one of those states but I implore you, take a dispassionate look at the situation in those poor afflicted locations.

  25. egg_

    “The qualitative evidence is they don’t matter. The sum of a more centrist approach outweighs any alleged marginal loss of so-called base voters.”

    Liked a sucked lolly – all that’s left is the ‘centre’ – till it also dissolves.

  26. Habib

    What’s it say about these window-licking O2 burglars when a pinko cretin like PvO calls them commies?

  27. Habib

    &RB, PHON are socialists. Big government/statist welfare addicts, and authoritarian to boot. Not as deadshitty as the LNP, but close. And Hanson is an incoherent pillock. LDP and AC are our only hope, and a thinner one than a boarding-house bedsheet.

  28. Chris

    What’s it say about these window-licking O2 burglars when a pinko cretin like PvO calls them commies?

    I think it means that the cretin is enjoying the idea of a Liberal Government being smashed into opposition by its own voter base, and wants to make good and sure.

  29. Chris

    Sorry, I mis-spelled cretin.
    PINKO cretin I should say.

  30. H B Bear

    “The qualitative evidence is they don’t matter. The sum of a more centrist approach outweighs any alleged marginal loss of so-called base voters.”

    Can Lord Waffleworth get the Lieborals primary vote down to something beginning with a “2”? C’mon Waffles Julia could do it – so can you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *