Monday Forum: September 11, 2017

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1,422 Responses to Monday Forum: September 11, 2017

  1. True Aussie

    A Harvard-educated sociology professor named Crystal Fleming – whose areas of expertise include “critical race theory” and “mindfulness and spirituality”

    Defund. All. Universities.

  2. Fisky

    Malcolm Turnbull has been ­accused of handing a “blank cheque” to the parliament after the government declared it would not move to provide religious protections before the same-sex-­marriage survey is finalised…

    Finance Minister Mathias Cormann, who is also acting Special Minister of State with responsibility for the postal survey, said the government would hand responsibility over the final shape of any bill to the parliament…

    “We have said that in the case of a positive outcome from this Australian marriage law postal survey, the government will facilitate consideration by the parliament of a private members’ bill to change the law to allow same-sex couples to marry. A private members’ bill by definition is a matter for the parliament, not for the government. The form that such a bill will ultimately take will be a matter for the parliament, not the government.”

    Australian Conservatives senator Cory Bernardi said the decision to relinquish control over the final shape of any bill was like giving a “blank cheque” to the parliament and fraught with danger.

    This is absurd. How can we possibly vote “Yes” if we don’t have a clue what the actual law is going to be???

  3. OldOzzie

    vr
    #2495846, posted on September 12, 2017 at 6:42 pm
    I have a question for the business savy Cats. What was the rationale for the privatisation of the land titles department in NSW?

    We, the NSW Taxpayers get to pay loads, and you can be sure there is no restriction on ramping up fees for Joe Public so Private Company can rip NSW Taxpayers off

    Thanks Liberals another own Goal

    The Berejiklian government has announced it will lease the state’s 150-year-old land titles registry to Hastings Funds Management and First State Super, after accepting their bid of $2.6 billion.

    Premier Gladys Berejiklian, flanked by Treasurer Dominic Perrottet, said the 35-year concession of Land and Property Information (LPI) would lead to better customer service and a “massive” infrastructure boost.

    “This consortia brings to the table more efficient practices and better outcomes for customers … and not only will the integrity of the title system be maintained but it will be actually enhanced by new provisions,” she said.

    The government endured months of criticism from peak bodies such as the Law Council of Australia, Law Society of NSW, Real Estate Institute of NSW and Institution of Surveyors, who questioned why it would privatise an efficient and reliable asset that generated $130 million profit a year.

    RELATED ARTICLES
    The public sell-off that’s a step too far
    ‘Mr Probity’: the ethics adviser scrutinising the land titles sell-off
    Opposition Leader Luke Foley said NSW got a dud deal because the LPI monopoly could generate $2.6 billion in profit in 20 years, which could help pay for schools and hospitals.

    “There’s a long-term loss to the state here … because we won’t have that annual revenue stream; it will be removed for a one-off injection paying for stadiums,” he said.

    Of the proceeds, $1 billion will be spent on upgrading Parramatta and ANZ stadiums and refurbishing Allianz Stadium, and $1.6 billion will be deposited into Restart NSW fund. About a third will be spent in regional areas.

    The government has entered into a binding agreement with Australian Registry Investments (ARI), which is 80 per cent owned by Australian investors (including Hastings and First State) and 20 per cent by RBS Pension Trustee in London.

    The Hastings-First State consortium beat three rival bidders: Macquarie’s Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets (MIRA) with Link Group, Canadian infrastructure giant Borealis with Computershare, and The Carlyle Group.

    Fairfax Media revealed The Carlyle Group had set up entities to potentially house LPI that were ultimately owned by a company in the Cayman Islands.

    Hastings and First State have now gained the “first mover advantage” and are in pole position to grab other land titles registries across Australia.

    It is advised by Advara, a partially privatised subsidiary of the Western Australian government, that harbours strong ambitions to roll out its “next-generation, scalable, cloud-based, land registry platform”.

    South Australia is in the midst of selling off its registry. However, the Labor-run Victorian, Queensland and Northern Territory governments have told Fairfax Media they have no plans to follow suit.

    The NSW government said there would be no need for title insurance as titles would continue to be guaranteed, price rises for regulated products would be capped at CPI, and the Registrar General would have stronger powers.

    “Combined with the tight regulatory framework we have established, the investment, innovation and experience ARI will bring mean citizens can expect a better experience,” Mr Perrottet said.

    Ms Berejiklian said the government consulted with and appreciated working with stakeholders, and their concerns had been “laid to rest”.

    The Law Society continues to oppose the privatisation, saying there was a lack of consultation and transparency.

    John Cunningham, president of the REINSW, said he was disappointed that a “sacrosanct” asset was now in private hands and rejected suggestions their concerns were addressed.

    “They didn’t, that’s why … all other property-related bodies were opposed to it, they felt they weren’t listened to,” he said.

    Michael Green, president of the Institution of Surveyors, said it was not consulted.

    “Right from the very start [early 2016], in our meetings with Treasury officials, we were told what was happening and there was no room for discussion,” he said.

    Andrew Day, chief executive of Hastings, said it recognised the critical role LPI plays in supporting the proper functioning of the real estate market.

    “We have a shared focus on maintaining data security and reliability, and investing in new and innovative ways to provide land titling and registry services,” he said.

    The government said there were safeguards, including step-in and termination rights if something goes wrong.

    Security of title will remain unchanged as the government will continue to guarantee title and operate the Torrens Assurance Fund, which compensates landowners who suffer a loss due to fraud or error on the register.

    The transition to the new operator is expected to be finalised over the coming months.

    The Hastings-First State consortium has received approval from Commonwealth regulators including the Australian Taxation Office, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and the Foreign Investment Review Board.

    Mitchel Hanlon, a surveyor and president of the Tamworth branch of the NSW Liberal Party, said he believed the government had underpriced LPI and questioned his party membership.

    Labor, the Greens, and the Shooters Fishers and Farmers parties all voted against the legislation enabling the transaction. It went through last September with the vote of Christian Democrats leader Fred Nile.

    A spokesperson for Greens MP Justin Field said: “The Greens oppose the land titles sale and will watch closely to make sure its private owners meet the requirements of the concession legislation.”

    The Public Service Association said the lease was “the most appalling fire sale decision”.

    The Concerned Titles Group, consisting of title, surveying and legal experts, said those who value their financial security and personal data should be worried.

    “[It] will no longer be maintained and managed locally in NSW hands, but let out to entities potentially outside our jurisdiction, to manage for their own financial advantage, not ours,” it said.

  4. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ‘The flaggellator and the triangles, on the other hand, are correctors which teach the dusky culprit that the way of transgressors is hard ; the translation of the precept he best understands, is that which leaves him with a sore back…

    As opposed to being speared in the thigh, or whistlecocked, indeed.

  5. Nick

    #2495795, posted on September 12, 2017 at 5:41 pm

    Isn’t Alan Jones our spokesman for irritable bowel syndrome ?

    It’s not Graham Richardson, that’s for sure.

  6. Baldrick

    This is absurd. How can we possibly vote “Yes” if we don’t have a clue what the actual law is going to be???

    Because of some brainfart about Love being Love and not a box of rocks.

  7. test pattern

    ‘who to believe, Testesplatter or the department of mining?’

    That’s easy. Me.

    Wonder why NNTT’s 1 September Native Title determination hasn’t been put up on their website yet? Maybe worried about section 31? Jeez DME and State Solicitor are useless.

  8. Fisky

    I am left with the inescapable conclusion that m0nty supports political violence (including common assault, assault with a deadly weapon, grievous bodily harm, and even murder) as long as it is perpretated by the political left. However, he lacks the moral courage to state this. At least Blair Cottrell is brave enough to state his positions publicly, m0nty is not so brave.

    m0nty is on record as supporting political violence – he was fully on board with the “punch a nazi” campaign, knowing full well that practically anyone is a nazi according to the Left. M0nty even accused Brexit supporters of being “fascist”, and we all know what fascists need…

  9. Boambee John

    test pattern at 1707

    resources stolen from the Pilbara’s indigenous peoples.

    The Pilbara’s indigenous peoples had between 20,000 and 80,000 years, depending on whom you believe, to identify the minerals found in the region, work out what could be done with them, mine and process them, and move into the Iron Age. They failed to do that. No sympathy.

  10. rickw

    This is absurd. How can we possibly vote “Yes” if we don’t have a clue what the actual law is going to be???

    Trust them!!!

    Absolutely fucking not! NO!

  11. BrettW

    Money well spent since his job involves taking on the thugs and extortionists of the CFMEU. Compare to say a Human Rights Commissioner.

    OldOzzie
    #2495848, posted on September 12, 2017 at 6:43 pm
    And you wonder where our taxes go

    According to the Remuneration Tribunal, Mr Hadgkiss receives a taxpayer-funded salary of $426,160 a year.

  12. Bruce of Newcastle

    Easy money.

    US national debt tops $20T for first time in history

    According to data released Monday, the total national debt climbed about $318 billion to $20.162 trillion as of Friday, the same day President Donald Trump signed a bill suspending the debt ceiling and allowing the federal borrowing limit to extend until Dec. 8. The deal Trump signed, which also allocated more than $15 billion in disaster aid for Hurricane Harvey, was passed 316-90 in a House vote; all opposed to the measure were Republicans.

    If a guy worked to pay it off at $10/hour he’d take a billion years.

  13. Makka

    And this Yankee in WA would undoubtably agree with u

    Testicles, who gives a rats what some Yank in WA might think? I stated facts. At the time of Discovery, abos hadn’t even made a wheel. Despite sitting on the biggest iron ore reserves on the planet, hadn’t even fashioned up a billy tin to boil water. In what, 60,000 years of thriving flourishing life here. Facts.

  14. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The Pilbara’s indigenous peoples had between 20,000 and 80,000 years, depending on whom you believe, to identify the minerals found in the region, work out what could be done with them, mine and process them, and move into the Iron Ag

    Can you “steal” something that the “original owners” didn’t know that they owned in the first place? Inquiring minds want to know.

  15. rickw

    Some kind of push to make SSM known to children, as they puzzle over the 2 men in the pictures and who they are etc, and acceptable to the elderly.

    Kids aren’t tuned in to mental illness, they’ll conclude that they’re brothers, like they did with the homo renovators.

  16. cohenite

    No. I’ve told u before it’s fraccing. ‘Fracking’ is how it’s detractors, of which I’m not one, have stigmatised it.

    Good for you; tell us more about yourself; I’m eager to know.

  17. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Tim Wilson printing, using his Government allowance, 15,000 colouring books featuring himself and his gay partner sure ranks up there in the self indulgence.

    Tim is one of those free marketeers who has never earnt one cent in his life outside of the Canberra bubble.

    He’s an absolute tax hoover now he’s got his snout in the trough.

  18. Mother Lode

    Is Testes complaining that we should get the spelling right and call him a ‘fuccing dicchead’?

  19. Nick

    Tim, His ‘spouse’ and their cocker is one thing, there’s something seriously wrong about someone who produces thousands of colouring in books depicting themself.

  20. test pattern

    ‘Inquiring minds want to know’

    That couldn’t be u then cokebottle. Remember the last time u tried that one how u emabarassed urself with conspiracy theories about mail on the Gascoyne?

  21. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    That couldn’t be u then cokebottle. Remember the last time u tried that one how u emabarassed urself with conspiracy theories about mail on the Gascoyne?

    Bullshit. Show me where I’m supposed to have embarrassed myself.

    Oh, and “cokebottle” was a white man, pretending to be Aboriginal. There’s only one Aboriginal wannabee on this site, and it ain’t me.

  22. Andreas

    m0nty is on record as supporting political violence – he was fully on board with the “punch a nazi” campaign, knowing full well that practically anyone is a nazi according to the Left. M0nty even accused Brexit supporters of being “fascist”, and we all know what fascists need…

    If we go by m0nty’s definitions World War II was Nazi-Fascists versus Nazi-Fascists.

  23. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Tim, His ‘spouse’ and their cocker is one thing, there’s something seriously wrong about someone who produces thousands of colouring in books depicting themself.

    I would draw dicks on them, but that might be their intention.

  24. zyconoclast

    France Adopts Law That Uses Informants To Monitor Private Conversations For “Hate Speech”

    The French Government, led by Emmanuel Macron, adopted a law on the 5th of August 2017 punishing non-public “provocations, insults & slander” against those who are (or not) part of a certain group based on their supposed race, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, etc. This unprecedented measure relies on tips that inform and extract private conversations and exchanges. If found guilty, the accused can face prison, heavy fines, or “re-education”.

  25. Baldrick

    Tim, His ‘spouse’ and their cocker is one thing, there’s something seriously wrong about someone who produces thousands of colouring in books depicting themself.

    Nick, let me add … and then giving it to children.

  26. test pattern

    ‘Easy money’

    #how_to-fool_the_public_101

    Laughing all the way as Beament tries to pull the wool over Wyatt’s royalty hike.

    Why did AMEC headhunt Allanah Mac’s old advisor as new CEO? Not to lobby? Nah couldn’t be. Because we all know McGowans gonna be around for a fair while so they need a Labor tart to play handies.. Gosh could it be that everyone knew what was coming and lobbied furiously til an acceptable hike was reached?

    Regis, a producer represented by AMEC, had an after tax profit of 138mill. U think a coupla mill r gonna stop them expanding? Heh.

    Still, amec will have to put on a political show, after all they demand huge membership fees. lol

  27. Rabz

    there’s something seriously wrong about someone who produces thousands of colouring in books depicting themself

    I’m surprised Wilson was able to stop watching videos of himself for the time required to commission the colouring in books.

    Nonetheless, I’m sure the target markets of school kiddies and oldies will indeed be thrilled. Might even stimulate demand for some of that good ol’ fashioned euthanasia.

  28. zyconoclast

    Tim, His ‘spouse’ and their cocker is one thing, there’s something seriously wrong about someone who produces thousands of colouring in books depicting themself.
    Nick, let me add … and then giving it to children.

    I posted this morning that Tim didn’t want to miss out on the Safe Schools action.

  29. Gab

    France Adopts Law That Uses Informants To Monitor Private Conversations For “Hate Speech”

    The French Government, led by Emmanuel Macron, adopted a law on the 5th of August 2017 punishing non-public “provocations, insults & slander” against those who are (or not) part of a certain group based on their supposed race, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, etc. This unprecedented measure relies on tips that inform and extract private conversations and exchanges. If found guilty, the accused can face prison, heavy fines, or “re-education”.

    Following a long tradition spanning Stalin, Mao and Hitler. Just never seen in the Western world as law before today.

    Presage of things to come.

  30. Boambee John

    Andreas at 1919

    If we go by m0nty’s definitions World War II was Nazi-Fascists versus Nazi-Fascists.

    Or perhaps Nazi-Fascists versus Fascist-Nazis?

  31. Mother Lode

    Zyconoclast,

    Those fashions remind me of an episode of South Park.

  32. Nick

    Agree, Balders.

    I would draw dicks on them, but that might be their intention.

    Hahahahaahhaha. That’s what Tim does too!

  33. zyconoclast

    4 Television Productions That Show How British Media Is “Blackwashing” History

    The recent years have seen a sharp rise of the historical facts that the British media voluntarily distorts to depict them as more inclusive and politically correct. The recent outbursts of liberals online accusing experts of “whitewashing” history are in fact a projection to divert our attention from the mainstream media of Britain trying to falsely portray Ancient and Medieval Britain as being “ethnically diverse”. Here are a few examples of clear historical manipulation.

  34. JC

    You tell us, Rabz. You were hunting around and found the pic.

  35. test pattern

    ‘Show me where I’m supposed to have embarrassed myself’

    Oh alright then cokebottle

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2463349, posted on August 9, 2017 at 1:57 pm
    memoryvault
    #2462828, posted on August 8, 2017 at 9:03 pm

    A coloured man with heart so brave
    Volunteered to get the mail
    He swam the raging rivers wild
    Les Dingo was his name.

    I’m intrigued, Testes.
    Why, in 1966, was the mail to Carnarvon being delivered from the north?

    Also reposted from last night. Inquiring minds still want to know, Testes.’

    From the north?! From the north?!

    And not for the first time. u idiot cokebottle

  36. Atoms for Peace

    I hope those colouring books aren’t being distributed in aged care facilities. Some of the residents are quite adept at poo painting.

  37. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    This unprecedented measure relies on tips that inform and extract private conversations and exchanges.

    Robespierre rides again in France.

  38. vr
    #2495846, posted on September 12, 2017 at 6:42 pm
    I have a question for the business savy Cats. What was the rationale for the privatisation of the land titles department in NSW?

    It was the State department most likely to deliver big bucks to the state coffers.
    Lots of people willing to pay for land title information well into the future ensures a willing buyer of the department and its monopoly services.
    An associated but lesser factor was the department’s advanced technology which can be sold to other states (I think) and developing counties.

  39. rickw

    (Safe for work)
    Must see to be believed.

    Rampant mental illness, they’re hysterical.

  40. lotocoti

    Look, mØnty can’t criticise AntiFa.
    That would make him a crypto-fascist.
    In need of a good punching.

  41. test pattern

    ‘Can you “steal” something that the “original owners” didn’t know that they owned in the first place? ‘

    Oh the bigoting. Just too easy. Add water and bigotfood and watch them grow.

    If u didn’t already exist cokebottle I’d have to get a white south african conman on parole to invent u.

  42. Rabz

    JC – I couldn’t post the Breitbart pic and had to find another.

  43. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    That fashion item (can’t say frock or dress or even wrap) was decorated with female external genitalia, i.e. vulvas, not vaginas. Plump little pink satin pincushion vulvas. Aaaaargh.
    These people are certifiable lunatics.

  44. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Snap, RickW.

  45. JC

    Rabz
    #2495911, posted on September 12, 2017 at 7:43 pm

    JC – I couldn’t post the Breitbart pic and had to find another.

    lol
    She’s actually got a hairy arse. Take another looksee as you can see the follicles.

  46. rickw

    Oh the bigoting. Just too easy. Add water and bigotfood and watch them grow.

    You do realise that no one gives a fuck about any of the shit you go on about?

    It’s hard for anyone to get worked up over the worlds “oldest” and most backward culture.

  47. rickw

    She’s actually got a hairy arse. Take another looksee as you can see the follicles.

    There’s fuzz everywhere back there!

  48. candy

    Nick, let me add … and then giving it to children.

    That was my first thought. Shades of Safe Schools. Trying to influence children subtly.

    Who gives children you’ve never met pictures of yourself and partner.

  49. Nick

    Nick, let me add … and then giving it to children.

    His next book will be one of those pull out and pop up books. Guess what he has in mind

  50. Myrddin Seren

    Hurricane Irma: Pope Francis condemns climate change sceptics

    I particularly dislike this bit – I have zero responsibility to accept ‘opinions’ I disagree with, which are based on some spurious scientific or moral authority.

    “All of us have a responsibility. All of us. Some small, some big. A moral responsibility, to accept opinions, or make decisions. I think it is not something to joke about.”

    He then quoted a phrase from the Old Testament: “Man is stupid, a stubborn, blind man.”

    “Those who deny it (climate change) should go to the scientists and ask them,” the Pope said. “They are very clear, very precise.”

    Snark alert:

    Judging by the photo – I am scoring the fight:

    Popemobile: 1

    Argentinian Marxist: 0

    The Lord works in mysterious ways……..

  51. rickw

    Who gives children you’ve never met pictures of yourself and partner.

    That is a fucking freak show of the highest order right there.

    Pedo and Homo are way to close to each other, this “kids” colouring book makes that point, the last thing anyone would think of doing save someone with an unhealthy interest in children.

  52. cohenite

    zyconoclast

    #2495886, posted on September 12, 2017 at 7:20 pm

    Photos: Designer Celebrates [email protected] at New York Fashion Week

    (Safe for work)
    Must see to be believed.

    If they’re vaginas I don’t know what I’ve been looking at.

  53. Myrddin Seren

    Who gives children you’ve never met pictures of yourself and partner.

    “If you see us in the streets, don’t hesitate to come up and pat our little furries”

  54. Chris

    It’s hard for anyone to get worked up over the worlds “oldest” and most backward culture.

    Actually its kinda cute. Just watch ‘The Gods Must be Crazy’!

  55. Makka

    Pedo and Homo are way to close to each other, this “kids” colouring book makes that point, the last thing anyone would think of doing save someone with an unhealthy interest in children.

    Quite right. What it also demonstrates is a complete ignorance of what normal parents consider suitable for their kids to be gifted from strangers. Because they are queer, they have clue of this natural hetero parental protection mechanism

    “See kiddies, we might be poofters but we really are just normal people”.

    Could be interpreted as a form of grooming.

  56. test pattern

    ‘It’s hard for anyone to get worked up over the worlds “oldest” and most backward culture.’

    u’ve just spent 2 hours and 40 minute doing just that. not hard to stir bigots up.

  57. MsDolittle

    A colouring book for pugs would have been a better idea.

  58. ‘It’s hard for anyone to get worked up over the worlds “oldest” and most backward culture.’

    u’ve just spent 2 hours and 40 minute doing just that. not hard to stir bigots up.

    As opposed to you spending 4 weeks boosting the creds of a people that couldn’t grasp the concept of the wheel or written language.

  59. MsDolittle

    pull out and pop up

    Gawd!

  60. rickw

    u’ve just spent 2 hours and 40 minute doing just that. not hard to stir bigots up.

    Nope, you’re on scroll by, I only caught the last couple when the shite got shoulder to shoulder.

  61. MsDolittle

    Shades of Safe Schools.

    Yep. Exactly Candy.

  62. test pattern

    Just watch ‘The Gods Must be Crazy’!

    or read the joburg star.

  63. rickw

    Leaving Guam, no Nork Nukes to report back on!

    Next stop Saipan.

  64. I wonder when you lot are going to twig that Benjamin Law is deliberately trolling you. I don’t hear much from you about Yassmin Abdel-Magied here any more, you dropped here after it became obvious that she was enjoying the attention. I think some of you have started to get it with Law, others will catch up.

    On the whole, I treat this as a positive development. Annoying as it is to have to be bothered by such inanities dominating social media and MSM from both sides, it teaches the right a lesson about their outrageous outrage machine.

    Luckily, as silly as the discourse is, normal people don’t pay attention to wingnut pundits or the trolls who are now trolling them. It’s an elitist conversation, not much to do with regular voters. They want someone to fix the NBN.

  65. Geriatric Mayfly

    Parliament builds border fence
    Work begins on 2.6m high security fence in Canberra, described by one MP who voted for it as “not Parliament’s finest hour”.

    The Fence of Peace. Bollards are sooooooo yesterday. And who, might I ask, has brought us to the point where an MP says it’s not Parliament’s finest hour?

  66. Muddy

    EMP Danger?
    My apologies for the length of the cut n’ paste…

    Center for Security Policy President Frank Gaffney discussed the North Korean nuclear missile crisis with SiriusXM host Alex Marlow on Wednesday’s Breitbart News Daily.

    Gaffney said “it may or may not be true today” that North Korea can launch a nuclear warhead with intercontinental range, “but it’s for sure the case that that’s imminent, if not actually true now.”

    “The problem is, of course, that when you have that kind of capability in the hands of this kind of regime, it does pose a mortal threat to the United States,” he warned. “I am of course concerned that even one of their less-powerful atomic weapons could be used to destroy a city or devastate part of our country.”

    “The really worrying thing, which Kim Jong-un has now made explicit, is the distinct possibility long warned about by me, and members of our Secure the Grid Coalition – Jim Woolsey, former director of Central Intelligence; Newt Gingrich, former Speaker of the House; Ted Cruz, senator; and many others – is an electromagnetic pulse attack,” he said.

    Gaffney said such an attack “could conceivably be unleashed on us at any time, perhaps by a nuclear weapon, maybe not even a thermonuclear weapon but an atomic weapon on one of their satellites from a vantage point in space that would rain down immense amounts of electromagnetic energy that would destroy – not just damage, not just turn off temporarily, but destroy – large parts of America’s absolutely vital electric grid.”

    “The consequences of that could be truly nation-ending,” he said. “This not hyperbole. This is the result of a whole series, 11 at least, of studies that the United States government has performed over the years, that if the grid goes down – it could be because of sabotage, it could be cyberattack, it could be because of solar storms of a very intense kind, but electromagnetic pulse man-induced through these nuclear weapons is one of the ways most efficiently to take out America.”

    “If Kim Jong-un has that capability, I believe that is indeed an existential threat to America and to its people. We have to be clear about that, and we’ve got to be about the business of protecting this vital, critical infrastructure immediately,” he urged.

    Gaffney explained that EMP attacks involve “interaction between what’s called gamma rays that are unleashed by a nuclear weapon in space, and the upper atmosphere, which results in intense electromagnetic energy being unleashed.”

    “Everything in line-of-sight of that detonation will be exposed to three phases of pulse,” he continued. “A very short phase, which can fry electronic devices, microcircuits, and the sort. The second phase is a medium length. It’s kind of like lightning. We’ve done a pretty good job of protecting our assets against that. The third is the long wave phase, and that can be transmitted into things we really care about, like high voltage transformers critical to the functioning of the grid or generators for that matter, through the high-voltage power lines that go across this country. They serve as perfect antenna for this kind of pulse.”

    “Some people poo-poo this. The most serious, the most competent, the most informed group in the country on electromagnetic pulse and the threats that it poses has been in business since the early 2000s, the Congressional EMP Threat Commission. I urge every one of your listeners to just go look at this commission’s work,” he said.

    “If you understand the physics of this, and the United States military, by the way, has understood the physics of this since the early 1960s, you realize this is no joke. This is no drill. This is no exaggeration. This is truly, as I say, a mortal threat to our country. We know what to do to protect our grid. That commission has been recommending action on this for about 15 years. We have to get about it because the country – and truly, tens if not hundreds of millions of Americans’ lives – are on the line,” Gaffney said.

    “Nuclear war of the kind that we’ve worried about in the past, particularly from the Russians, now the Chinese, cannot be dismissed. In fact, both of those countries are expending enormous amounts of money to build not only new nuclear weapons and delivery systems, including hypersonic and maneuvering weapons that are designed to defeat what limited missile defenses we have at the moment,” he pointed out.

    “So it’s not to say that is not a problem. It’s a problem that is actually getting worse, even though we choose to avert our gaze from it. Barack Obama was insistent we were going to rid the world of nuclear weapons, starting with ours. We pretended that the Russians and the Chinese and so on didn’t matter, even the Iranians, who we’ve now helped move a ‘great leap forward,’ if I can use that expression, towards the bomb,” he said.

    “But the thing about EMP is, as I say, conceivably a single nuclear weapon detonated in space high over the United States could do the job of an enormous nuclear laydown,” Gaffney warned. “That just means it’s that much easier. The trouble is, this isn’t just speculation. Kim Jong-un, in his remarks accompanying the announcement about this H-bomb, explicitly has threatened the United States with a devastating electromagnetic pulse attack. We ignore this at our extreme peril.

  67. rickw

    ….. They want someone to fix the NBN.

    How many hours did you spend penning this sedative?

  68. test pattern
    #2495944, posted on September 12, 2017 at 8:13 pm

    ‘boosting the creds’

    natch..

    BBBWWWWAAAAAhahahahahahahahahahaha

    *cough*aaaahahahahahahaha*shit i can’t breathe*hahahahahahaha

  69. candy

    It’s an elitist conversation, not much to do with regular voters. They want someone to fix the NBN.

    Monty, I take it you are embarrassed by this fellow, and the description he gave of what he considered normal homosexual activity at times, which is very tawdry.
    I’ve never heard of such things, it certainly is an eye-opener to a different world.

  70. vr

    It was the State department most likely to deliver big bucks to the state coffers.
    Lots of people willing to pay for land title information well into the future ensures a willing buyer of the department and its monopoly services.
    An associated but lesser factor was the department’s advanced technology which can be sold to other states (I think) and developing counties.

    Thanks, old school! But, why is land title info of interest to others. I don’t pay attention to this area. Trying to figure out how much more new owners can squeeze out (other than higher fees and licensing the tech).

  71. test pattern

    ‘don’t hear much from you about Yassmin Abdel-Magied here any more’

    The metaphorical rape gang are cruising for new targets ….

  72. rickw

    “Some people poo-poo this. The most serious, the most competent, the most informed group in the country on electromagnetic pulse and the threats that it poses has been in business since the early 2000s, the Congressional EMP Threat Commission. I urge every one of your listeners to just go look at this commission’s work,” he said.

    It would be rare for any commission to conclude that its area of investigation was a negligible or non issue.

    If the issue is so serious why haven’t they been hardening infrastructure like crazy?

  73. OldOzzie

    For Cats with crap knees and need somewhere to sit when travelling and no seats

    Mine has just arrived and great to sit on, folds easily to fit in backpack (less than small folded mini umbrella) and can be used as walking stick.

    Wife, dubious, but son-in-law thinks great.

    Designed and made in Denmark

    Worldwide Shipping – Lifetime Guarantee – 30 Days Return Policy

    https://sitpack.com/

  74. Mark from Melbourne

    JC
    #2495742, posted on September 12, 2017 at 4:17 pm

    One of the classic moments of the 16 campaign. Get a load of Bill’s facial expression.

    Followed by, most regularly now, a YouTube vid which ells me it is unavailable.

    Not to go the full srr, but are my settings somehow stuffed? I see that message more often than not these days from links here (and elsewhere).

  75. calli

    I’ve never heard of such things, it certainly is an eye-opener to a different world.

    Neither had I.

    If only the No-ers would shut up.

    But please, Yes people, do keep talking. And threatening. It will work.

  76. Makka

    and the description he gave of what he considered normal homosexual activity at times, which is very tawdry.

    mUnty of course supports this deviant behaviour to the point where kids are forced to be educated in it while attending the nations schools.

  77. Fisky

    Gahahahahahahahaha! Good old Lyin’ Ted Cruz has been caught liking porn on Twitter. Here’s the screenshot!! Get over here Ant and explain what’s going on.

    https://twitter.com/KrangTNelson/status/907463916988575744

    Lyin’ Ted. LAAAAAYIN’ TED! Bible high, he puts it down and then he laaaaaays!

  78. Fisky

    ROFL!

    Sexuall Posts 😈‏ @SexuallPosts 5h5 hours ago
    More
    Replying to @magicbulletrecs @tedcruz
    Thanks for watching ted!

  79. vr, every single land/house/apartment sale in NSW is dependent on very precise map definitions of the property being sold and purchased.
    There is a hell of a lot of money tied up in correct identification of the “title” (ownership).

  80. test pattern

    Lookin’ good ..

    ‘BuzzFeed is proud to introduce Pretty For An Aboriginal — the new podcast hosted by Nakkiah Lui and Miranda Tapsell that’s set to rock traditional perceptions of Indigenous Australia and challenge rigid mindsets of what women of colour can and cannot do.’

    https://mumbrella.com.au/buzzfeed-launch-new-podcast-pretty-aboriginal-470939

  81. Boambee John

    m0nty at 2013

    WTF?? This is your best excuse??

  82. OldOzzie

    ‘Marketing con’ fears as Elon Musk’s SA battery costs remain secret

    A contract between US tech billionaire Elon Musk and the South Australian government for the world’s largest lithium-ion battery hides the cost and key details, fuelling claims the deal is a “marketing con”.

    The contract says the grid-­connected battery facility is to be commissioned and operational by December 1.

    “The facility will provide ser­vices to maintain power system security, integrity and stability for the South Australian electricity network, prevent certain load shedding events, provide supply during critical peak periods and participate in ancillary services and wholesale electricity markets,” the contract says.

    The contract value is “not disclosed” and the contract is “not disclosed in full as it contains confidential business information”.

    Mr Musk’s company Tesla won a public tender in July from about 90 other bidders. It will build a 100-megawatt battery to store energy from French renewable company Neoen’s Hornsdale Wind Farm near Jamestown, 230km north of Adelaide.

    Mr Musk won the contract after promising to build the giant battery in 100 days or it would be free. Although the contract start date is listed as July 6, the “100 days or it’s free” pledge starts only once a grid interconnection agreement has been signed.

    The opposition said it was outrageous the state government could disclose what it paid Origin for gas, Caltex for fuel and Qantas for air travel, but could not say how much it was paying a foreign billionaire for a battery.

    “With every passing day Labor’s secret deal sounds more like a marketing con than a genuine plan to deal with South Australia’s electricity problems,” Liberal deputy leader Vickie Chapman said. “Jay Weatherill needs to be honest with the people of South Australia about how much public money he is handing over to a foreign billionaire.

    “The last time the government was being this secretive about a contract it was the Gillman land deal. That ended up being investigated by the Independent Commissioner Against Corruption.”

    It is understood specific financial and technical details of the contract have been kept commercial-in-confidence at the request of Neoen and Tesla. The cost is estimated at about $50 million.

    Tesla will not comment, but will make a “milestone” announcement at the site on September 29.

    Sources said Neoen, Tesla and the government were negotiating with the Australian Energy Market Operator and private transmission company ElectraNet for approval of the connection agreement as soon as possible.

    Construction has started at the site and the batteries are being shipped to South Australia.

    A government spokesman said the project would stabilise the wind-reliant grid and add competition to reduce prices.

    “Instead of criticising aspects of the plan that AEMO says will improve grid security, (Opposition Leader) Steven Marshall should announce his own energy policies, rather than keep them ­secret,” the spokesman said.

    On Tuesday, a fleet of generators that arrived in South Australia from Europe at the weekend were awaiting installation at two sites as part of the Weatherill government’s plan to prevent blackouts this summer ahead of the March state election.

    The state government further delayed its Energy Security Target to January 1, 2020, after criticism from companies including Tesla. The target requires retailers to source 36 per cent of the state’s electricity needs from gas gener­ators and other synchronous power sources.

  83. vr

    Old School — Wouldn’t this be the case in other states as well? Is it just the land titles office in NSW the most accurate/efficient at processing the information?

  84. OldOzzie

    GRAHAM RICHARDSON
    Left in the dark on power station as blackouts loom

    How is it possible for AGL and the government to continue to hold meetings and leave us in the dark about what, if anything, they agreed on?

    After the first meeting a few weeks ago, the government claimed progress in keeping Liddell power station open, but was considerably undermined by AGL chief executive Andy Vesey tweeting his company’s determination to close Liddell in 2022 as previously announced.

    The government must always have known it was asking a great deal of AGL, which has spent very large sums on an expensive television advertising campaign to boast about its presumably immutable position to get out of coal and clean up the planet.

    Those advertisements fail to declare that Bayswater power station, gulping up megatonnes of coal every day and spewing out the very stuff AGL pretends to despise, as its other coal-fired assets continue to produce profits multiplied by the price rises to be engendered by the closure of Liddell.

    AGL could be said to be advantaged by closing Liddell, so it should be no shock it is playing cat and mouse with Malcolm Turnbull and Energy Minister Josh ­Frydenberg.

    Are we to believe Vesey will take to his board a recommendation to extend the life of Liddell and argue passionately for it in the national interest? Or will Vesey simply walk in, table the letter containing the government’s wishes, and sit mute while the board sticks to its guns and refuses to budge.

    Australia doesn’t have time to play games on energy supply or pricing. We need to see a plan that can guarantee supply and push down prices.

    The clock is ticking on blackouts for this summer. It is too late to get our supply stable enough to avoid blackouts for the next few months, but there is a real urgency to ensure that what is ­likely to happen this summer never happens again.

    With Labor having dealt itself out of a place at the table, Turnbull and Frydenberg are the only ones who might save us. Given his ­record and standing in the polls, total reliance on the Prime Minister seems like a bet I would never place.

    The Prime Minister’s efforts will matter little if he doesn’t put federal money where his mouth is.

    No bank will finance a new operator for Liddell so any potential buyer will need government subsidies or guarantees.

    If AGL decided to keep Liddell open itself, you can be sure it will have its hand out as well. Our big-four protected, cosseted banks will once again wimp out on supporting the national interest.

    When will we get some competition in the banking sector? Live in hope, die in despair on that one!

    It is somewhat ironic that a Liberal government so accustomed to being the champion of free enterprise should be the instrument by which a company is being urged to reverse a decision made by the duly elected board.

    In a contest ­between AGL’s profit and the ­future of millions of Australians, there is no doubt where the decision goes. The AGL board should give some thought to that one. And please Prime Minister, put a note taker in the room at your next meeting with AGL and type up the notes. If you release them, we can all decide who is telling the truth about these slippery discussions.

  85. Westie woman

    Oldozzie

    That sit pack thingie looks like it would be a good weapon in times of need!

    I’m now looking at getting one. .

  86. Makka

    the new podcast hosted by Nakkiah Lui and Miranda Tapsell that’s set to rock traditional perceptions of Indigenous Australia and challenge rigid mindsets of what women of colour can and cannot do.’

    Only if they find a way to get out of the violence of the rancid indig communities.

  87. OldOzzie

    AGL’s Andy Vesey advised by lieutenants with reliable power connections – Liberal Incestuous

    When you scratch the surface, it’s really no surprise to see AGL boss Andy Vesey turn up in the nation’s capital this week brimming with confidence for his meeting with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg.

    Vesey, in the top office for almost three years, is surrounded by operatives well versed in the conservative dark arts as the PM seeks to bully the company into changing its plan to close the coal-fired Liddell power station in 2022 and keep it running for at least another five years.

    Or at least flog it to someone who will.

    Vesey’s boss of stakeholder relations is Lisa Harrington, who is a long-term, former senior adviser to former NSW Liberal premier and now NAB exec Mike Baird.

    And in Canberra on Monday, muscling through the media scrum with Vesey, was her lieutenant Tony Chappel, a former ministerial chief of staff also in the Baird government.

    Chappel is a former Young Liberal leader who harbours representative ambitions — in 2015 he was a candidate for preselection in one of the safest Liberal seats in the land, that of Ku-ring-gai in NSW on Sydney’s upper north shore held by former premier Barry O’Farrell.

    That race was won by silk Alister Henskens SC who now holds the seat.

    Andy Vesey left his meeting with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull having agreed to speak to his fellow directors on the AGL board about Liddell. Vesey’s contemporaries are no strangers to dealing with political and corporate controversy.

    His chair — at least for another two weeks — is Jerry Maycock, who knows a bit about struggling assets via his former role as chair of collapsed mining and steel group Arrium.

    Taking over from Maycock in a fortnight is ex Broadspectrum (nee Transfield Services) boss Graeme Hunt, who as Australia’s detention centre operator didn’t mind ruffling feathers.

    His former chair Diane Smith Gander is also on the AGL board, along with Aussie Post chair John Stanhope, who’s just dealt with the Ahmed Fahour pay controversy and exit, as well as navigating the appointment of new CEO Christine Holgate to the government-owned enterprise.

    From The Comments

    – These people are ripping us off. We’re the ones paying the highest price in the world for unreliable power, while they line their coffers. It’s a scam.

    – So AGL is not just full of lefties then.

    – Very interesting, Tony Chappel certainly sounds like one of those new regressive Liberals that Turnbull loves to surround himself with!

    From The Australian on 8 Sept

    “The head of government relations with energy giant AGL is a graduate of Al Gore’s climate-change leadership program whose move to the corporate world last year follows a quest to “change the system from within”.

    Tony Chappel is part of AGL’s executive team responsible for engaging with federal and state governments and local communities as the nation’s largest coal-fired power producer.”

    – These people are just gaming the system and Turnbull is just playing along.

    Who is he governing for? Certainly not the average taxpaying Australian.

    – Are there any people in big business not aligned with a political party? Conflict of interest.

  88. Snoopy

    ‘BuzzFeed is proud to introduce Pretty For An Aboriginal — the new podcast hosted by Nakkiah Lui and Miranda Tapsell that’s set to rock traditional perceptions of Indigenous Australia and challenge rigid mindsets of what women of colour can and cannot do.’

    A podcast? So that means audio only from the South Hedland jetty, right?

  89. Rabz

    Comment from the Ted Cruz twatter feed:

    Ted, this is worse than the time you killed all those people

    What monstrous incident could the commenter be referring to?

  90. test pattern

    Halimah Yakob will be Singapore’s first female President

    ‘In this election, for the first time, candidates to become Singapore’s president could only come from one racial group: Malays…Critics charge that the new rules are a way for the government to stage-manage the election and prevent opponents from running.’

    http://edition.cnn.com/2017/09/11/asia/singapore-race-presidential-election/index.html

  91. Muddy

    If the issue is so serious why haven’t they been hardening infrastructure like crazy?
    Barack Obama? Gerbil worming is more important? Gays in the military?

    I don’t know what to believe about this; whether EMP is a legitimate threat. I’ve stated previously that science is not my forte.

    The security of the electrical grid, however, is certainly something to take seriously. Think of the potential economic damage alone. What a great way for some group who wants attention, to actually get it, without the risk of resorting to armed force.

  92. OldOzzie

    Westie woman
    #2495968, posted on September 12, 2017 at 8:45 pm
    Oldozzie

    That sit pack thingie looks like it would be a good weapon in times of need!

    I’m now looking at getting one. .

    Really impressed with it, as with age and falling apart. and being unable to stand on the spot for more than 2 minutes, it is really great, should have ordered the strap on cushion (though pretty comfortable as is) plus extra tips which I will do soon.

    Long Test coming up, but really pleased so far – good walking stick assist for going down stairs.

  93. Joe

    OldOzzie:

    – Are there any people in big business not aligned with a political party? Conflict of interest.

    Where do you think the unions learnt their game from. Watching big business.

    Big Business + Big Unions + Big Government = Big Corruption.

  94. OldOzzie

    Construction of Parliament House security fence begins

    Tasmanian Liberal senator Eric Abetz has defended the necessity of the security fence being erected around Parliament House in Canberra after Labor MP Brian Mitchell, who voted for it, suggested it was “not parliament’s finest hour”.

    The Department of Parliamentary Services on Tuesday revealed the project was not expected to be completed until June 2018, despite months of work which since May has seen about 20 mature eucalypts ripped out, the lawn dug up, temporary fences erected, and several prefabricated steel fence panels of the 2.6 metre high fence lifted into place by a crane yesterday afternoon.

    Greens Senator Lee Rhiannon has previously slammed the fence as “an authoritarian ‘Fortress Australia’ approach”, while crossbench Senator Derryn Hinch last week spoke out against the removal of trees.

    Senator Abetz said Parliament House was sadly a target for terrorists.

    “In an ideal world, I’d prefer not to have such a fence but the simple reality is that security comes first,” Senator Abetz said.

    “We’ve seen attacks at and around the Parliaments of Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States and we know of a terror plot to attack the building from 2014.

    “I would simply say to my colleagues that prioritising aesthetics over security is unwise and very risky not only for parliamentarians but for all who visit and work in Parliament House.”

    Mr Mitchell criticised the fence on Twitter but conceded he voted for it.

    “Presiding officers took the view under advice it was necessary — many were not happy but we let it through so must wear it,” Mr Mitchell tweeted.

    The fence is part of a $126m security overhaul implemented by the government following a damning 2014 Parliament House security report which found the building had no lockdown procedure and terrorists could gain direct access to window­s of parliament and shoot at MPs.

    Veteran press gallery journalist Michelle Grattan decried the fence as “appalling” on Twitter.

    From The Comments

    – Abject craven cowards all, not one of these (expletive deleted) parliamentary (expletives) have ever in their whole lives faced the facts of unwanted undesirables entering in to our country and for the most part bludging on the welfare system paid for by we taxpayers. Shame, shame, and more shame.

    – Sad. Embarrassing. Timid. … and just what I expect from what passes for leadership in this country.

    – We have to stand shoulder to shoulder, and they get $120 million fence.

    – What is appalling is that all that was necessary to prevent the need for a fence was a sensible immigration policy. When will we ever learn?

    The sad reality is, one day that fence will serve its purpose…..This is where Australia has gotten to thanks to members of such a “peaceful” minority

    Wouldn’t it be far more realistic to grab the intruders, or transgressors, take them to court and and charge them? The handing down of a meaningful penalty would send a much stronger message than hiding behind an ugly fence.

    Hiding your face won’t stop bullies, and that is all the Govt. is doing.

    After all who is running this State? The Government or vandals?

  95. Geriatric Mayfly

    For Cats with crap knees and need somewhere to sit when travelling and no seats

    A jolly fine shooting stick. Wot! Wot!

  96. test pattern

    ‘audio only from the South Hedland jetty’

    A flirtatious moon hid behind the black hijab of gathering wet season cloud as the sweetlip snapper started to bite. Suddenly I felt a sweetlip nibbling my squid…

    ‘Andrew?’ I asked shyly
    ‘No it’s Karl. Karl, Queen of the Desert.’
    ‘Welcome to Port Irony Karl Queen of the Desert, what brings u here?’
    ‘Andrew’
    ‘And what brought him here?’
    ‘Jaquie’
    ‘So – let me get this right – we’re all here because of – Jaquie?’

  97. Westie woman

    OldOzzie

    Thanks for posting this – we go to a few music festivals and sometimes we just can’t bring our camping chairs with us – and standing for hours is painful for me (even though I’m only 29 *see Ace of Spades where everyone is 29*

    I’m ordering one tonight!

  98. OldOzzie

    Westie woman
    #2495981, posted on September 12, 2017 at 9:00 pm
    OldOzzie

    Thanks for posting this – we go to a few music festivals and sometimes we just can’t bring our camping chairs with us – and standing for hours is painful for me (even though I’m only 29 *see Ace of Spades where everyone is 29*

    I’m ordering one tonight!

    you won’t regret it

    as the web site says

    Same size as 50 cl can and weighs 0,6 kg/1,32 lbs. – it is really cmpact
    Made of glass fiber reinforced polycarbonate
    Height adjustable to fit all sizes
    Good for back and blood flow
    Comes with one interchangeable anti-slip rubber foot.

  99. Top Ender

    Work begins on 2.6m high security fence in Canberra

    I trust security fences around our workplaces are starting up tomorrow too?

  100. Stimpson J. Cat

    This is absurd. How can we possibly vote “Yes” if we don’t have a clue what the actual law is going to be???

    Ha ha!
    The secret is we were never going to!

  101. Stimpson J. Cat

    No. I’ve told u before it’s fraccing.

    This is the way it is spelt by the Traditional Owners, who invented it 2 million years ago.
    Show some Goddamned respect.

  102. Muddy

    Top Ender

    #2495984, posted on September 12, 2017 at 9:06 pm

    Work begins on 2.6m high security fence in Canberra

    I trust security fences around our workplaces are starting up tomorrow too?

    The scum have their bollards. Ungrateful filth.

  103. Fisky

    I can see OldOzzie has clocked on for his shift at the Putinist Troll Crankery!

  104. Stimpson J. Cat

    Tim, His ‘spouse’ and their cocker is one thing, there’s something seriously wrong about someone who produces thousands of colouring in books depicting themself.

    No f$cking comment.

  105. Geriatric Mayfly

    Made of glass fiber reinforced polycarbonate
    Height adjustable to fit all sizes
    Good for back and blood flow
    Comes with one interchangeable anti-slip rubber foot.

    Does the supporting pole work underwater? Since my laminectomy, standing in some trout infested water waiting for one to rise, can become an occasion of pain and suffering. Maybe I could flick through Isaac Walton’s learnéd tome, The Complete Angler, while at ease on this device.

  106. Stimpson J. Cat

    What monstrous incident could the commenter be referring to?

    Everyone calls him the Zodiac.

  107. Stimpson J. Cat

    Pretty For An Aboriginal — the new podcast hosted by Nakkiah Lui and Miranda Tapsell that’s set to rock traditional perceptions of Indigenous Australia and challenge rigid mindsets of what women of colour can and cannot do.

    A job would be a start.

  108. vr – NSW appears to have the most efficient system and handles the most data of all states and territories.

  109. test pattern

    ‘This is the way it is spelt by the Traditional Owners, who invented it 2 million years ago’

    Yes! Marathon bigoting! Four hours already!

    I’m Robson T Pattern, let’s go EXTREMIST FISHING!

  110. OldOzzie

    Fisky
    #2495988, posted on September 12, 2017 at 9:13 pm
    I can see OldOzzie has clocked on for his shift at the Putinist Troll Crankery!

    Fisky to quote Manuel – “Que?”

  111. Andrew

    ANZ Bank chief executive Shayne Elliott

    Never trust a Shayne.

    Or a Tiina.

    Or a Brettt.

    Or Darrylll.

    Or Cherrrryl.

    Or a fucking Ddennnisss

  112. Geriatric Mayfly

    let’s go EXTREMIST FISHING!

    Only if you bring the Sitpak.

  113. OldOzzie

    Geriatric Mayfly
    #2495990, posted on September 12, 2017 at 9:15 pm
    Made of glass fiber reinforced polycarbonate
    Height adjustable to fit all sizes
    Good for back and blood flow
    Comes with one interchangeable anti-slip rubber foot.

    Does the supporting pole work underwater? Since my laminectomy, standing in some trout infested water waiting for one to rise, can become an occasion of pain and suffering. Maybe I could flick through Isaac Walton’s learnéd tome, The Complete Angler, while at ease on this device.

    Geriatric Mayfly – Definitely would work on both fresh and salt water – cannot see anything to rust on it

    Actually will suggest to a Trout Fishing Mate of Mine – Good Idea there

  114. Makka

    Yes! Marathon bigoting! Four hours already!

    When faced with the abo facts, the old gin jockey cries ; bigot! Too convenient, Testicles.

  115. test pattern

    ‘Only if you bring the Sitpak.’

    OK boss! Crack a coldie I’ve got bigotfish to fry ..

    Withnell and I

    ‘Mr. Withnell went on to explain the details of what is virtually the slave system of the North-West. The black servant, it is true, enters into bondage voluntarily, and affixes ” his mark ” to the agreement in the presence of a magistrate, who must be satisfied that the boy or girl is not acting under coercion, but
    having signed, the native is not to be distinguished from a slave. He gets no wages, very little clothing, and works as long as his master chooses to order… The police, under the direction of the magisterial ” protectors,” have a good deal to do in chasing runaway servants, and attempting, without much success, to estrange the dark-skinned Desdemona from the pale face. A trooper discovering a liaison is virtuously moved to carry the girl to the presence of the protector, or some other justice, but he is on a fool’s errand.
    She cannot be kept in gaol all her life, and the moment she is let out of confinement she makes her way back to the objedt of her affections. There are far more half-caste children born every year than full-blooded blacks.

    At Withnell’s station,..the housemaids and nurses of the establishment are arrayed in the full glory of the costume that is the pride of a swarthy dasmel’s heart. The trusted Abigail of the mistress of a pastoral property is always gorgeously conspicuous in a flaming red etticoat, a man’s grey woollen shirt, with the tails falling exposed to the knees, and a light-coloured wideawake, or bushman’s hat, ornamented with a cock’s feather. This loose attire, which allows free play of the little supple figure, is not at all unbecoming to a willowy daughter of the woods..’

    https://archive.org/stream/myfourthtourinwe00calv/myfourthtourinwe00calv_djvu.txt

  116. Crossie

    Troy Bramston having a meltdown on Paul Murray Live. Poor boy, afraid of Bronwyn Bishop.

  117. test pattern

    ‘the old gin jockey cries ; bigot’

    Oh. I see ur more of a James Brunton Stephens sorta guy ..

    Most unaesthetical of things terrestrial,
    Hadst thou indeed an origin celestial?—
    Thy lineaments are positively bestial!

    Yet thou my sister art, the clergy tell me;
    Though, truth to state, thy brutish looks compel me
    To hope these parsons merely want to sell me.

    A hundred times and more I’ve heard and read it;
    But if Saint Paul himself came down and said it,
    Upon my soul I could not give it credit.

    “God’s image cut in ebony,” says someone..

    https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/to-a-black-gin/

  118. Crossie

    All this agonising over Liddell Power Station. Malcolm should make AGL an offer they cannot refuse. Since they are shutting it down anyway buy it or nationalise it, AGL’s choice.

    I would offer them $1 for it.

  119. Old Ozzie;

    Australia doesn’t have time to play games on energy supply or pricing. We need to see a plan that can guarantee supply and push down prices.

    What the Australian voting class needs is a good hard dose of eco reality. And it looks like the hammer is coming down this summer.
    The Brick Wall of Reality is looming and all those who want to live in harmony with nature are going to find out that nature doesn’t give a damn about their Greenie virtue signalling.

  120. Jo Smyth

    Fighting galore on Paul Murray.

  121. Crossie

    The real threat to power companies would be to cut off renewable subsidies completely and use that money to build new coal or gas power stations.

    Troy going hysterical again, accusing Bronwyn of going socialist. Who knew the Labor guy cared so much about capitalism.

  122. egg_

    What the Australian voting class needs is a good hard dose of eco reality. And it looks like the hammer is coming down this summer.
    The Brick Wall of Reality is looming and all those who want to live in harmony with nature are going to find out that nature doesn’t give a damn about their Greenie virtue signalling.

    Blackouts in Sydney & Mal’s @rse is grass.

  123. Crossie

    What the Australian voting class needs is a good hard dose of eco reality. And it looks like the hammer is coming down this summer.
    The Brick Wall of Reality is looming and all those who want to live in harmony with nature are going to find out that nature doesn’t give a damn about their Greenie virtue signalling.

    Poor Australian voters did not bring this on their heads, 10% of the electorate that are green voters and and the Trojan horses backsides in parliament did this to the country with invaluable assistance from our media.

  124. Crossie

    The fence around Parliament House is not to prevent terrorist attacks but to keep voters out and away from that herd of pigs inside.

  125. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Onya, Bronnie. Very well done on Paul Murray against two Labor spruikers shouting ‘business, business demands it’ about governmental carpetbagging enormous billions of dollars into the ready pockets of ruinables.

  126. egg_

    The fence around Parliament House is not to prevent terrorist attacks but to keep voters out and away from that herd of pigs inside.

    How long til they get Dalek bollards and a moat?

  127. Crossie

    I may have been a bit harsh calling the occupants of the well padded seats in our Parliament pigs and horses backsides but there are so few MPs or senators who are even passable let alone great or honourable.

  128. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Oh dear. A ‘National Redress Scheme’ for victims of child sexual abuse. Who is to pay? Much of this happened long ago.
    And yet, still there not even recognition of the fact that every night aboriginal children in remote communities are subject to extraordinary levels of sexual abuse by adults in their own families.

    Bronwyn now picking up on the issue of justice for people abused today.

  129. C.L.

    The Turnbull government today legislated to ban two-stroke mowers, whipper-snippers and outboards.

  130. feelthebern

    Really weird seeing that Hugh McDermott on PM Live.
    I thought he’d still be hiding in shame after being found out wearing medals that he was not entitled to wear.
    Another disgusting member of the Liars party who thought he wouldn’t be found out.

  131. max

    ABC Radio today played a female Olympian talking about how embarrassed she felt that Australia hadn’t yet brought in SSM.

    The rest of the civilised world marches under the rainbow flag it seems and our poor Aussie athletes blush and cringe because we are a nation of backward hicks.

    So vote Yes. Every other country has.

    But, hang on. Fact check, please.

    Only 17 of the 193 member states of the UN allow for same-sex marriage, and a court imposed only one of those. Wardle and Durham point out that 47 nations have constitutional provisions enshrining man-woman marriage, and more are coming.

    Twelve national and international tribunals in eleven countries have explicitly upheld male-female marriage as consistent with human rights. These include some of the jurisdictions with the earliest and strongest LGBT protections in the world. They are hardly backwoods courts or bastions of bigotry.

    The courts and tribunals that have upheld man-woman marriage against claims of discrimination include the European Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, along with national courts in Germany, Austria, France, Spain, Finland, Italy, Ireland, Chile, and Colombia.

    The professors chide Koh for only referencing two of these many decisions upholding man-woman marriage. They say, “Particularly notable is the repeated refusal by the European Court of Human Rights to mandate same-sex marriage,” and, “the European Court’s Grand Chamber declined to recognize a fundamental right to same-sex marriage.”

    link

  132. egg_

    The Turnbull government today legislated to ban two-stroke mowers, whipper-snippers and outboards

    Where’s Baaananaby on this?
    MIA?

  133. Snoopy

    The Turnbull government today legislated to ban two-stroke mowers, whipper-snippers and outboards.

    Get in a stock of piano wire before its banned.

  134. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Poor Australian voters did not bring this on their heads, 10% of the electorate that are green voters and and the Trojan horses backsides in parliament did this to the country with invaluable assistance from our media.

    Alan Jones tonight on Sky quoted some astounding figures about the number of people in each State who have been cut off by the power companies. It is many, many thousands in each State. There was some mention of a fund available for assistance, and this has happened even despite these assistances. I know it in my own extended family where if we didn’t pay, they too would be cut off.

    So people tonight in Australia are using candles for lighting and eating sandwiches because they can’t cook, and where it is cold they are sitting under blankets to keep warm. Welcome to the eighteenth century, without the wood stoves and the wood supply. Peta Credlin very shocked about it, and about what she has just seen and heard on her tour to some key areas in Australia. Very shocked and purse-lipped angry about it, as was Alan Jones, interviewing Terry McCann, who predicted it all long ago.

    My solution. Five new and modern coal-fired power stations, under government mandate, NOW.

    Now, the Senate have passed the two-stroke and tractor tax, ready to grow and grow and grow. PHON and Aust Cons apparently the only opposition to this. Voted on the voices.

  135. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    And, of course, no more funds to the Clean Energy Carpetbaggers.
    Use the savings to fund the power stations. Bring in some Chinese to do the job.
    They’ve had plenty of practice with quick builds on coal-fired power.

  136. Crossie

    Wow, now Rowan Dean going off on some Labor guy and union apologist.

    Fireworks on Paul Murray all evening. Is it full moon tonight?

  137. BrettW

    Seems to be a lot of Aboriginal history being put up here thanks to Test Pattern.

    Useless trivia. The Aboriginal flag was only created in 1971.

  138. val majkus

    The Turnbull government today legislated to ban two-stroke mowers, whipper-snippers and outboards.

    where’s the constitutional jurisdiction?

  139. egg_

    We are about 5 years past the point of no return to a stable, affordable power system.

    From previous, who are the technical @rsehats advising the pollies?

  140. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Might have to start an All-Girls Rowan Dean Appreciation Society too; he just did a great job on union trough-feasting. Doesn’t quite have the elan and devastating end-point delivery of Ross Cameron, initiated by the Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius, that set the Hot Chix heart’s aflutter but he is a trooper in any debate, forceful and direct.

  141. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Seems to be a lot of Aboriginal history being put up here thanks to Test Pattern.

    A lot of Aboriginal “oral history” is simply “stories that my Nanna told me”, modified where and when considered necessary.

  142. Go Rowan Dean!
    “Cancel every bit of climate change ideology” on PML Overtime.
    I repeat myself from a couple of days ago – if the Australian Conservatives stood in every electorate in Australia on Lizzie’s policy (My solution. Five new and modern coal-fired power stations, under government mandate, NOW.) they would possibly win the next Federal Election.

  143. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Yep. He’s good on climate change ideology, ‘because it is pointless’. You’re ‘being played as mugs’, and ‘Australians don’t want any more of this crap’. Hairy jumping around saying dat is what I was sayin’.*

    * Hairy helped fund the 2014 IPA ‘Climate Change: the Facts’ and has been spruiking the 2017 one too.

  144. hzhousewife

    From previous, who are the technical @rsehats advising the pollies?

    I imagine the true tech guys were sidelined years ago by the stategists who smelled the subsidies, and won’t allow anyone remotely techie anywhere near a politician. And pollies certainly don’t go looking for advice, they sit and wait for it to come to them.

  145. notafan

    Book shop bans no voters.

    So much for Christian bakers,

    The yes campaign keeps on giving.


    Obviously making more money than they needed.

  146. Motelier

    egg_

    The technical @rsehats as you describe them would prolly have a lot of difficulty reading this.

    Apologies if it has been posted, but all cats should read this so you are armed with knowledge next time some lefty spruikes 100% solar.

  147. Stimpson J. Cat

    From previous, who are the technical @rsehats advising the pollies?

    I think you’ll find they are actually pink p$ssyhats if you look closely.

  148. egg_

    I imagine the true tech guys were sidelined years ago by the strategists* who smelled the subsidies, and won’t allow anyone remotely techie anywhere near a politician.

    +1

    *Sellout ‘yes’ men in their midst.

  149. BrettW

    Daily Mail story about their Facebook poll on SSM. Majority indicate voting yes. However bear in mind FB shows your FB account name so hardly surprising not too many willing to indicate a No voter.

    However the comments below the article are far more on the No side (where your identity would be more hidden than FB).

    Unfortunately for the non activist gays the over the top actions / comments of people like :
    Benjamin Law and his comments about hate f … ing
    The guy who started the campaign against the Chinese Dr lady
    The false accusations outside Brisbane church last week
    The threats to the Sydney hotel last year due to hosting religious leaders meeting

    are what many are noticing and will have created more No voters and not created one Yes voter who was not already going to vote Yes.

    Lets not even mention the Canberra “traffic accident”.

    People like Ian Thorpe and Dr Phelps should be suggesting activists tone it down as they are damaging their cause and losing it votes.

    Either way the result and subsequent Parliamentary response is going to be very interesting.

  150. egg_

    Motelier
    #2496040, posted on September 12, 2017 at 10:37 pm

    Worked with a Novacastrian Grigoryesque Mechanical Engineer in a coal mining OEM who predicted in 2011 that coal would only be around for another decade (he was close to retirement, so didn’t give a damn) – I told him that all the Labor State Govts would fall like dominoes – which they did, as did the Fed.

  151. zyconoclast

    Carpe Jugulum
    #2495934, posted on September 12, 2017 at 8:07 pm
    ‘It’s hard for anyone to get worked up over the worlds “oldest” and most backward culture.’
    u’ve just spent 2 hours and 40 minute doing just that. not hard to stir bigots up.
    As opposed to you spending 4 weeks boosting the creds of a people that couldn’t grasp the concept of the wheel or written language.

    Carpe
    how smart are the “indigenous” Ainu Japanese?
    Do they have the same problems as other natives?

  152. BrettW

    From Notafans link

    “In light of yesterday’s post we would like to remind everyone that Sticky has always been a political queer artists space. In this sense we have always reserved the right to eject anyone we feel may be harmful to our patrons or the shop itself.

    “We are not the thought police, you can think and say whatever you want but we do not have to tolerate you or welcome you into our space. We are a shop made up of extremely dedicated volunteers and we will always do what we can to keep our community safe.”

    Imagine the horror if a Christian baker or florist said the same about Yes voters. Is the store going to come under the new legislation relating to the vote ?

    The store should have been a bit more positive and said something like when you make a purchase and indicate a yes voter we will give you a small discount or whatever.

    It is clearly a store not many No voter types are likely to frequent.

  153. zyconoclast

    Useless trivia. The Aboriginal flag was only created in 1971.

    Not so useless trivia: only a few years before the smoking ceremony.

  154. zyconoclast

    The Turnbull government today legislated to ban two-stroke mowers, whipper-snippers and outboards.
    where’s the constitutional jurisdiction?

    Most would be imported. Think incandescent light bulbs.

  155. egg_

    Snowy Hydro 2.0 not enough to replace coal from Hazelwood: Abbott

    The closure of Hazelwood is proof that VIC Libs & the Turncoat Coalition Team are a bunch of cucks.
    What say you, Kroger?

  156. GerardO

    Believe me, if all those endearing young charms,
    That I gaze on so fondly today,
    Were to suddenly leave you upflight in the night
    Just like fairy gifts up in the sky.

  157. egg_

    There’s only one Aboriginal wannabee on this site, and it ain’t me.

    Not another Bob Katter Brother Clayton Bigbsy wannabe?

  158. The Drum on religious freedom worth a look. Paul Kelly and the Prof. guy very good.

    Naturally the religious panellist is bi-sexual female priest who is in favour of SSM. So just your normal religious thinking.

  159. Fisky

    The CATO Institute loves the Leftist media!

    David Boaz‏
    @David_Boaz

    In Defense of the Mainstream Media https://www.cato.org/blog/defense-mainstream-media … via @CatoInstitute

  160. Where is the IPA and CIS on SS’M’? They purport to being stalwart defenders of Western civilization and limited government, so I expect a full-throated defense of marriage and family from the depredations of state.

  161. C.L.

    So then: the Liberals tried to jail Andrew Bolt and Bill Leak, banned light-bulbs, banned guns, banned two-stroke engines, introduced warrantless police raids on citizens’ homes, officially supported the destruction of marriage, banned power stations, speed-limited mobility scooters, banned cheaper cars, supported Marxist/pedoph1le “safe schools” program, defended burkas, introduced regulations banning free speech for real marriage supporters, celebrated Ramadan and worked assiduously to undermine a Republican president.

    But they want us to support them because Labor Would Be Worse.

  162. Fisky

    Where is the IPA and CIS on SS’M’? They purport to being stalwart defenders of Western civilization and limited government, so I expect a full-throated defense of marriage and family from the depredations of state.

    The IPA want leftist-style gay marriage, with Catholic priests forced to marry gay couples, free speech restrictions, bakers in prison, etc etc.

    Never trust the IPA!

  163. Stimpson J. Cat

    Serious Question:

    What is more Gay, actually being Gay, or Libertarianism?
    Anyone?

  164. srr

    Blair Cottrell 🇦🇺‏ @blaircottrell89 11h11 hours ago
    Blair Cottrell 🇦🇺 Retweeted The Age

    I was just convicted of ‘vilifying’ Muslims over Facebook – The government doesn’t even need a victim or complaint to charge & convict you.

    The AgeVerified account @theage

    #BREAKING Emergency laws to ban vilification, intimidation and threats in same-sex marriage campaign brought in http://ow.ly/Y3xK30f5enH

  165. Q&A: Never mind same-sex marriage, should we keep marriage at all?

    When Senator Seselja raised the rights of parents over their children’s education, for example the right to withdraw their children from gender education classes, Ms Michaeli argued the “core family as we know it” is “the least safe place for children” and helps perpetuate domestic violence.

    “The custody, this total custody that we have in this structure of marriage which still gives men domination, complete domination over their children and too often over their women … is a part of the ongoing hurt in children,” she said.

    Senator Seselja disagreed vehemently that the family is inherently unsafe, and insisted he was very aware of the issues around domestic violence.

    “Apparently not,” Ms Michaeli said to applause from the audience.

    What sort of audience applauds and approves the unsubstantiated claim that the natural family is the least safe place for children? Seriously, what sort of audience applauds this claim when it is uttered by a someone without substantiation and accompanied by a shit-eating grin?

  166. Andrew

    But they want us to support them because Labor Would Be Worse.

    Does anyone seriously dispute that the SLF would be worse though?

  167. Tintarella di Luna

    Thanks Tom for those political vignettes each day…..

  168. Tintarella di Luna

    Paul Kelly’s article on SSM in today’s Oz

    Deception on freedom of religion key to SSM Yes case

    With the Yes case positioned to win the postal plebiscite, it is more important than ever the misleading and false claims of its advocates — that there is no religious issue at stake — be confronted and the ramifications put on the table.

    These claims are made by senior Coalition and Labor politicians. Indeed, it seems they think rejection of the religious argument is fundamental to the success of their campaign. This is alarming because it implies the Yes case depends on persuading the public of a false proposition.

    The government and parliament, despite years of emotional debate, declined to address the wider religious freedom question. The political class engaged instead in a great pretence: that the only such issue concerned the wedding ceremony and protections in the Marriage Act for clergy and celebrants, an extremely narrow view of religious freedom.

    Given legalisation of same-sex marriage means the laws of the state and laws of most religions will be brought into direct conflict over society’s most essential institution, the one certainty is ongoing legal and political trench warfare over the balance between acceptance of the same-sex marriage norm and the scope for freedom of belief and religion.

    There is a litany of examples from the overseas experience. Fatuous remarks that “the world hasn’t come to an end” in countries that have legislated same-sex marriage are just that — and designed to deceive.

    Having refused to confront the issue the advocates of the Yes case now get agitated and self-righteous when it has become an issue in the plebiscite. This was inevitable. While some aspects of the No case are obnoxious, its warnings about religious freedoms risks are entirely valid. What matters is that the many highly intelligent political champions of the Yes case are trapped: they are selling a shoddy intellectual bill of goods and many of them know it.

    The first point is that religious freedom guarantees in this country are inadequate. This was agreed and documented in February’s Senate select committee report. Unlike many Western nations, Australia has no statutory expression of a stand-alone right to religious freedom. There are far greater legal protections in relation to sexual orientation than in relation to religious belief.

    This is an anomaly given that under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights freedom of religion is an inviolable right. The risk now is our parliament undermining Australia’s commitment to the ICCPR.

    Evidence presented to the Senate committee shows that statutory protection of religious belief is weak both in federal law and a number of states. It mainly exists as “exemptions” from anti-discrimination law. The Anglican Diocese of Sydney made the obvious point to the committee that this failed to treat freedom of belief and religion as a fundamental human right. Marriage Alliance said: “We submit that religious freedom is a fundamental human right (and) that framing a debate in terms of exemptions misunderstands this fact.”

    There was strong support in submissions for parliament to leg­islate to enshrine religious guarantees as a protected attribute in federal anti-discrimination law. This is the pivotal point. The committee unanimously agreed there was a “need to enhance current protections for religious freedom”. The Human Rights Law Centre said: “Religious freedom should be protected in law. Indeed, we are on record in a number of inquiries supporting the addition of religious belief to protections under federal anti-discrimination law.”

    Committee chairman Liberal David Fawcett warned that “if Australia is to remain a plural, tolerant society where different views are valued and legal” then such action on religious freedom is essential. What was the reaction of the Turnbull government and Labor to the Senate report?

    It varied between disregard and contempt. The reason is apparent — politics. Labor has abandoned any interest in addressing the inadequacy of religious protection laws with its embrace of the LGBTI cause. As for the Coalition, the story is the weakness of its conservative caucus. The deeper point is the churches are vulnerable and the politicians know it.

    The lamentable situation was summarised by the University of Sydney’s Patrick Parkinson: “There have been numerous bills introduced into parliament to enact same-sex marriage over the last few years and what has been common to most of them has been a minimalist protection for freedom of conscience.”

    The second core conclusion is that this battle over rights will continue after same-sex marriage is legislated. In Denmark the Lutheran Church has had its rights restricted. The Swedish PM has said priests should no more be allowed to refuse to marry same-sex couples than medical professionals should be exempt from abortion procedures. The Speaker of the British House of Commons says “proper equal marriage” won’t happen until the churches are compelled to obey by law. Australian Greens formally say they want the religious exemptions in anti-discrimination law to be wound back. Many in the ALP left have the same view.

    We are being put on notice. You would have to be politically blind to deny the reality (an option many politicians have deliberately chosen). The post-same-sex marriage battle is already under way. This is because while many people genuinely see same-sex marriage as an issue of non-discrimination, this was never its essence. It is an ideological cause seeking fundamental changes in Western society, laws and norms. It will continue apace after the law is changed.

    Marriage equality is an ideology and ideologies, by nature, do not settle for compromise victories. As Benjamin Law says in Quarterly Essay: Moral Panic 101: “It might be stating the obvious but same-sex marriage is far from the final frontier in the battle against homophobia.” The struggle will continue — in schools and in institutions. Law says the two biggest LGBTI issues are Safe Schools and same-sex marriage.

    He says Safe Schools is “supposed to discomfort people” by up-ending how we see gender and sexuality. He talks about exploding accepted norms with queer theory, inviting “people to reconsider why anyone should be obliged to identify as female or male at all”. The aim is to introduce Safe Schools across the country and make it compulsory.

    The pretence by Yes case politicians that the plebiscite has no consequences for the Safe Schools program treats us like fools. Legislation of same-sex marriage will tilt the scales decisively in this struggle between sexual rights and religious freedom. This legal and cultural change will influence decision-makers everywhere — public servants, corporates, media and educational institutions.

    The churches will remain a prime target and the fact their protections are weak makes them highly vulnerable once the assault gains momentum.

    The Yes case bases its campaign on human rights but misses the exquisite irony that you cannot cherry-pick human rights and keep your integrity. As Parkinson said, consistency of principle means those who justify their campaign on human rights need to give proper consideration to how rights can be balanced.

    That hasn’t happened in Australia, not even remotely. Every sign is Australia will legalise same-sex marriage devoid of any serious attention to religious freedom issues and, as a result, religious protections will be exposed and sacrificed.

    The politicians are doing this because they think they can get away with it. They are entitled to that judgment. What they are not entitled to is a gross deception. The assurances they give on religious protection are worthless — their inaction proves that. People, regardless of how it affects their vote, need to know the reality.

  169. Undecided voters call for legal protections to accompany vote:

    A third of all Australian voters say they are undecided over whether to allow gay marriage in a national poll that signals the issue of legal protections for religion and freedom of speech could determine Malcolm Turnbull’s postal plebiscite.

    A national poll of 4,000 people commissioned by the Australian Christian Lobby suggests that 61 per cent would likely vote Yes with protections for children, freedom of speech and freedom of religion.

    But, in an indication the No campaign could be influencing voters, the Yes vote tanked to just 17 per cent when people were presented with a scenario in which gay marriage was unaccompanied by legal protections.

    In this situation, the number of people prepared to change their vote to No doubled, while 29 per cent of respondents said they were undecided.

    The ACL poll, conducted by research firm Sexton marketing and research — the Nationals preferred polling company — mirrors previous polling finding that a majority of Australians back gay marriage with support ranging from 58-72 per cent in favour.

    It also suggests the issue of appropriate legal protections for schools that teach traditional marriage, service providers that cater to marriage ceremonies and individuals who continue to defend traditional marriage could prove to be a potential sleeper issue and generate a significant swing vote.

    Bill Shorten yesterday said Labor wanted to “make sure that people are protected from hurtful speech” because members of the LGBTIQ community had become a “talking point” in “discussions they thought were done and dusted”.

    The Opposition Leader argued the debate was not about broader issues or the knock-on consequences of gay marriage, dismissing the arguments of the No campaign as “a whole lot of other distractions”.

    “We don’t have a 1950s definition of a family, whatever one thinks of that definition. Families come in all shapes and sizes,” he said. “There is one question on the survey. Do you support same-sex couples being able to get married?”

    This is terrible news for the Yes case. Re Shorten, what a turd of a man,completely unfit for office. Apparently, the idea of the family being founded by natural parents is a quaint idea of the 1950s.

  170. Fergus

    The Conversation has a few articles today which may be of interest to Cats.
    https://theconversation.com/au

  171. Gab

    The Turnbull government today legislated to ban two-stroke mowers, whipper-snippers and outboards.

    W.T.F ?

    turnbull is insane.

  172. Motelier

    turnbull is insane.

    Prolly,

    But this could just be another light bulb moment.

    And Labor would be worse?

  173. hzhousewife

    Seems to me that all tiers of government are hell-bent on criminalising all of us. I have an idea. Since we are all criminals (or soon will be), how about we round up all elected members and prvoide them with one domestic location far away from we rabble, where they can happily exist within all their own rules. Lets call it a SuperMax, where they can be deprived of lawnmowers and cigars and cholesterol for their own good. Meanwhile, we banned and persecuted plebians can try to get along in our own way in the rest of the country.

  174. Bruce of Newcastle

    Oh joy.

    Mount Piper power plant closure feared after court ruling

    EnergyAustralia has warned it could be forced to shut one of the nation’s newest and most ­efficient black-coal-fired power stations supplying up to 1.2 million customers in NSW, following a Court of Appeal decision it claims has threatened its only supply of coal to the plant.

    The potential closure would take up to 1400 megawatts out of the energy market, or the equivalent of 15 per cent of electricity supply to the NSW system.

    The Australian has confirmed with EnergyAustralia executives that the prospect of a forced shutdown of the Mount Piper power station in central-western NSW, which has an operational life to 2042, was a “real risk” following legal action launched by green ­activist group 4nature against planning consent for an extension of the Springvale mine owned by Centennial Coal.

    Who is group 4nature? How are they funded? These green ferals seem to breed faster than rabbits.
    Maybe we should hook them up to bicycles to power the NSW grid instead of Mt Piper and Liddell.

  175. OldOzzie

    To quote from the Comments

    Put these green court judges and 4 nature activists up in the stands and allow the general public into the courtroom to ask the questions ! We have had enough!

    Mount Piper power plant closure feared after court ruling

    EnergyAustralia has warned it could be forced to shut one of the nation’s newest and most ­efficient black-coal-fired power stations supplying up to 1.2 million customers in NSW, following a Court of Appeal decision it claims has threatened its only supply of coal to the plant.

    The potential closure would take up to 1400 megawatts out of the energy market, or the equivalent of 15 per cent of electricity supply to the NSW system.

    The Australian has confirmed with EnergyAustralia executives that the prospect of a forced shutdown of the Mount Piper power station in central-western NSW, which has an operational life to 2042, was a “real risk” following legal action launched by green ­activist group 4nature against planning consent for an extension of the Springvale mine owned by Centennial Coal.

    The uncertainty is believed ­already to be having an impact on power prices. EnergyAustralia, which also operates Yallourn in Victoria, is unable to sell two-year contracts to commercial customers. It is now stockpiling coal at the Mount Piper site as a contingency over the insecurity of supply from Springvale.

    EnergyAustralia chairman Graham Bradley told The Australian that the company was now in a “diabolical” position which if unresolved could affect supply to more than one million customers in NSW. “It is an appalling situation,” Mr Bradley said. “It’s the newest clean-coal station in NSW and perhaps the whole nation. It would be a tragedy for it to be out of operation for want of coal supply.

    “There are around one million residential customers relying on Mount Piper output to provide them with power … if we were to shut we do not have the back-up.

    “We are in a diabolically compromised commercial position; unexpectedly so.”

    Mr Bradley said the problem was the state planning system which had proven to be “dysfunctional” for some time when it came to significant projects.

    “(But) I am confident at the end of the day that the state government has emergency powers to put a stay of execution on any ­adverse outcome,” he said.

    Lithgow coalminers told The Australian their livelihoods were being threatened by an increasing push away from non-renewable energy sources.

    Lithgow councillor Ronald Smith, 58, has been working as a coalminer for 26 years. His sons Ben and Luke are also coalminers.

    “What concerns me the most is the rising cost of power and the uncertainty of jobs within our area,” Mr Smith said. “We have already lost so many mining jobs and we see pensioners every day that have got to turn the stove on to heat their house because power is so dear. It’s a sad state of affairs.”

    Between 200 and 300 jobs are at risk at the Mount Piper station.

    While recent attention has been focused on Malcolm Turnbull’s intervention to try to extend the life of AGL’s Liddell coal-fired plant in the Hunter Valley, the ­potential loss of generation at Mount Piper has escaped the ­federal government’s attention despite the potential for a shock to the electricity market.

    The Australian Energy Market Operator, in its report to government last week, warned there was already a 1000 megawatt shortfall across Victoria and NSW.

    The NSW Court of Appeal last month ruled in favour of 4nature, which had opposed a decision by the NSW government in 2015 to extend the life of the Springvale colliery for a further 13 years, on the basis that it would contaminate water catchments in the Blue Mountains. The court found that the original consent granted by the Land and Environment Court was invalid. A further hearing is now required to consider orders in relation to the finding, which could ­determine the future of the mine, and as a consequence the Mount Piper power station.

    The head of EnergyAustralia’s energy business, Mark Collette, said closure of Mount Piper would be a disaster for NSW power supply. “It … is critical to system ­reliability, especially during peak periods,” Mr Collette said.

    “Closing it would have a drastic impact on energy system ­reliability and affordability, and hundreds of direct and indirect jobs in and around Lithgow.

    “In the past, there were six mines able to supply coal to Mount Piper; now it’s one, and it’s under threat of closing.”

    Mr Collette said EnergyAustralia had invited the Prime Minister to Mount Piper “so he can understand first-hand the difficulty involved in getting reliable service from existing coal plants and in securing coal supply”. “Certainly, we’d welcome the government’s support in addressing coal supply at Mount Piper,” he said.

    Both Centennial Coal and ­EnergyAustralia said reports of an approach by Chinese investors to expand Mount Piper based on a 2010 approval by the NSW government to build two more turbines were ridiculous. “It’s mind-boggling to be asked about expansions to existing power stations or new coal projects when we have struggled to ­secure coal supply for the plant we already have at Mount Piper,” Mr Collette said.

    Centennial Coal warned that the issue was now time-critical. Unless it was resolved by the end of this month, the company would have to consider its options in terms of the future of the mine. Centennial executive general manager, external affairs, Katie Brassil, said: “It is a train wreck waiting to happen. It is serious and if there was ever a time for a government to show political leadership to ensure energy security and reliability, this would be it.

    “The mine and Mount Piper’s futures are intrinsically linked.”

    NSW Energy Minister Don Harwin would not say what action was available to the government in the event of an adverse decision and said the government was waiting the outcome of the court hearings. “The Mount Piper power station is currently operating as it should,” he said. “The NSW government is monitoring the court hearing.”

    Summed up in The Comments

    Lunatics are in control. Treason is occurring and the dopey majority is voting for it.

  176. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray resigns after fifth child sex-abuse allegation

    As Iowahawk reminds us, a Gay Democrat who campaigned to lower the age of consent to 15.

  177. srr

    EXCLUSIVE — CATHOLIC SCHOLARS: ‘BANNON’S COMMENTS GAVE CARDINAL DOLAN HEARTBURN BECAUSE BANNON’S RIGHT’

    “Bannon’s comments gave Cardinal [Dolan] heartburn because Bannon’s right,” Dr. Christopher Manion, a Catholic writer and Knight of Malta with over 50 years experience in Latin American issues tells me.
    Eyebrows — mostly those of Charlie Rose — were raised when the Breitbart News Executive Chairman was heard to utter criticisms of Catholic leaders on the subject of immigration and the Deferred Action on Childhood Migrants.

    Dr. Manion expands: “The Catholic Catechism (N. 2241.2) says that immigration policy belongs with ‘political authorities’, not bishops. Good Catholics can disagree with bishops on immigration, and Bannon does.

    “Cardinal Dolan says he’s insulted because Bannon mentions money. Well, the bishops get a billion dollars a year from the federal government. That’s real money, even in D.C., and if the bishops think they’re getting it because they’re such good guys – well, they’re the only folks in Washington who are.”

    The issue hasn’t escaped the attention of one of the major players in the immigration debate which also happens to be a majority Catholic nation: Poland.

    Marek Jan Chodakiewicz — a Polish-American historian who served a 5-year term on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council — appears to concur with Dr. Manion.

    “The Catholic leaders lead no more, except to repeat the mantras of their counterparts elsewhere in the West. Meanwhile, the grassroots see clearly where koombaya theories, e.g. open borders, lead to,” Chodakiewicz tells Breitbart London.

    Poland is perhaps one of the most relevant countries in this debate, as Scott Greer at the Daily Caller elucidated in the immediate aftermath of Bannon’s comments.

    The Christian nation has robustly and roundly rejected the European Union’s demands for the country to take tens of thousands of migrants — Muslim migrants.

    This is where the difference between the argument in the U.S. and the Poles comes in. Could the approach be as simple as a realization that immigrants could fill the pews of U.S. Catholic Churches in decline?

    “Today the bishops’ number one issue is not abortion – it’s amnesty for illegal aliens,” says Dr. Manion. “Here again, Bannon embarrasses them.

    “The Pew Trust says that thirty million Catholics have left the pews. Who’s going to fill them? Archbishop José Gómez of Los Angeles, the bishops’ point man on amnesty, is blunt: Hispanics should fill them. Most are Catholic and hold “deep conservative values,” he says. Apparently the Americans who oppose amnesty are selfish racists. One bishop actually calls them ‘Pharisees and hypocrites’.”

    “America’s Catholic bishops want what Gómez calls ‘the Next America’ – a Hispanic one”.

    It’s likely this is another — including the monetary elements mentioned earlier — constituent factor behind the bishops’ support for DACA, and the opposition to the economic nationalism and strong border policies espoused by Bannon.

    But there’s another part of this not-so-holy trinity. Politics, of course.

    “Look, the bishops expected Hillary to win,” explains Dr. Manion. “Obama gave them hundreds of millions a year to care for immigrants and illegals and refugees, and Hillary would have kept the party going. With Trump, a drop in illegals and refugees means a drop in funding, it’s that simple”.

    Chodakiewicz sheds light on how these issues play out not just in the United States, but in Europe too.

    “The Church globally is in disarray; let your communications be yeah, yeah, nay, nay seems no longer to apply. That is a global trend.

    “[The] good news is that in Poland at the grass roots, the parish clergy stays true to the mission. It believes in One, Holy, Catholic Church. And so do its followers. Therefore there is no way they will agree to what they see as the primacy of relativistic liberalism [and] a Muslim invasion to dominate Christendom.

    “So in their churches they continue to preach the Truth. The priests, nuns, and their spiritual cares comment widely upon the pathologies afflicting the West, including Marxism-Lesbianism and, yes, Muslim migrants. Most Poles want neither.”

    He’s right. Even Polish Muslims (Tatars) who have been in the country since the 14th century roundly reject the idea of mass migration.

    According to the Public Religion Research Institute, while 77 percent of Hispanic Catholics favor a route to citizenship for illegal immigrants, a lower 55 percent of white Catholics believe the same.

    Add this to the news that 64 per cent of white Catholics believe “American culture and way of life has changed for the worse since 1950s, while 62 per cent of Latino Catholics say American culture has changed for the better since the 1950s,” and you start to see the Church’s problem.

    They are dealing with a congregation that is fundamentally fissured, and it’s almost like they’re having to choose which group to side with, and which group to lecture and/or alienate.

    Cardinal Dolan’s response to Stephen K. Bannon — that his remarks were “insulting” — was an obvious attempt to dodge the wider issue.

    As Dr. Manion says: “…Cardinal Dolan’s remark… carefully does not deny what Bannon said. In fact, Dolan admitted the silence to the Wall Street Journal – he said bishops had “laryngitis” on the magisterial teaching.

    “Bannon is exactly right,” he says. “The immigration crusade is not ‘magisterial’ – and the bishops don’t preach what is magisterial”.

    More at –
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/09/12/exclusive-latin-america-expert-bannons-comments-gave-cardinal-dolan-heartburn-bannons-right/

  178. Herodotus

    Erdogan to Europe: ” be nice to us or your terrorist problem might worsen.”
    And: Turkey purchasing an air defence system from Russia.
    Are they expecting a peck o’ trouble?

  179. Baldrick

    C.L.
    #2496073, posted on September 13, 2017 at 12:34 am
    So then: the Liberals tried to jail Andrew Bolt and Bill Leak, banned light-bulbs, banned guns, banned two-stroke engines, introduced warrantless police raids on citizens’ homes, officially supported the destruction of marriage, banned power stations, speed-limited mobility scooters, banned cheaper cars, supported Marxist/pedoph1le “safe schools” program, defended burkas, introduced regulations banning free speech for real marriage supporters, celebrated Ramadan and worked assiduously to undermine a Republican president.
    But they want us to support them because Labor Would Be Worse.

    … and then they say, trust us to implement religious protections after the homosexual marriage vote.
    Vote No.

  180. John Constantine

    The removal of all non European Union emission standard trucks from the roads, and their replacement with compliant machines that run red hot in Australia’s summers is bad.

    The requirement for new harvesters to run red hot, to comply with international conventions is worse.

    Now we have the opening where the State can require every engine on an Australian farm to run so hot the exhaust glows, because some quisling crony Vichy collaborator has signed an international surrender document.

  181. OldOzzie

    Tony Abbott fuels push from backbench against clean energy target

    Malcolm Turnbull is facing a backbench push to stop a clean energy target being embraced as government policy, after former prime minister Tony Abbott fired a warning shot on the political risk of adding the new scheme to existing subsidies for renewable power.

    The Prime Minister yesterday played down the need for the target as he attacked Labor over energy prices and reliability, putting a priority on affordable power rather than cuts to carbon emissions.

    A solid group has formed within the Coalition party room to oppose a clean energy target out of concern it would push up prices and weaken the security of supply because it would favour renewables over coal or gas generators. The substantial minority is opposed to a clean energy target of any kind and appears unlikely to be satisfied by a scheme that offers small financial incentives for gas-fired power or the most advanced coal-fired power stations.

    Mr Turnbull and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg have scaled back talk of a clean energy target while urging power company AGL to keep running its Liddell coal power station beyond its scheduled closure in 2022.

    In a pointed intervention yesterday, Mr Abbott welcomed the talks with AGL on extending Liddell but warned against adding the clean energy target to the existing renewable energy target, which decrees that 23.5 per cent of electricity comes from renewables by 2020.

    “If we graft a CET on top of the existing RET, that will be a difficult position to sustain,” Mr Abbott told the party room.

    He later told The Australian that the nation had enough renewable energy in the system and should build new coal power stations because existing plans, such as the expansion of the Snowy Hydro scheme, would not be enough to make up for the closure of the Hazelwood coal power station in Victoria earlier this year.

    “We are already slated under the RET to effectively double the amount of wind power in three years,” Mr Abbott said. “We would be better off saying no more subsidises for renewables.

    “The Snowy Hydro 2.0 if it takes place will scarcely replace Hazelwood. Obviously we have to keep Liddell in the system.”

    Mr Abbott said it was inevitable the government would have to fund new coal.

    “The government will have to do it. The same way we are doing Snowy 2.0 we will have to do a new coal-fired power station,” Mr Abbott said.

    One MP estimated a slim majority of the Coalition might reluctantly accept a clean energy target, the central recommendation in a report in June from Chief Scientist Alan Finkel, but a group of determined opponents would never vote for the idea.

    AGL chief executive Andy Vesey has promised to respond to the government in 90 days with a decision on whether the company can extend the life of Liddell, sell it to another operator or build alternative energy generation to avoid a shortfall in 2022.

    At this stage, the company’s preferred plan is to shut down the coal-fired power station and build a combination of renewables with gas-fired generators alongside to meet periods of peak demand.

    Mr Vesey has backed the idea of a clean energy target but some MPs expect AGL to develop a plan for Liddell without knowing whether the government will embrace the new scheme or not, leaving a cloud over the market. The government’s position is that it needs to know the outlook for baseload power before deciding on the clean energy target.

    Bill Shorten seized on this uncertainty in parliament yesterday to challenge Mr Turnbull on the policy.

    “How can the government expect industry to decide on new generators if the government can’t even decide on a clean energy target?” the Opposition Leader asked.

    Mr Turnbull said the target was “under consideration” but he emphasised the need to have reliable power rather then talking up renewables.

    “We need to ensure that the energy market design provides a suitable framework for investment that doesn’t simply get new generation, it gets generation of the right kind,” he said. “Because you have to keep the lights on and you have to ensure that people can afford to pay to keep the lights on, and that is where Labor has failed.”

    Mr Frydenberg and Labor MP Joel Fitzgibbon yesterday clashed in a corridor over the government’s negotiations with AGL. Mr Fitzgibbon opened the exchange, accusing Mr Frydenberg of misrepresenting the outcome of talks with AGL about keeping the Liddell coal station open after 2022. Mr Frydenberg said Mr Fitzgibbon, the member for Hunter where Liddell is located, was defending the “big energy companies who are making big profits off the back of Australian families”.

    From The Comments

    Everyday hundreds of Australians take the time to post comments online here at the Australian in hope of catching the attention of politcians in Canberra. It would appear that none of them read or heed words written by ordinary people. If they bothered they would feel the despair that is a reality in the world that exists outside the Canberra collective. A despair that underlies normal conversation at thousands of barbeques throughout the country. People are totally bewildered as to how a hugely resource rich country could have an energy crisis. They are realising that the pretty green dream with all those lovely, elegant wind mills is in fact, a nightmare which manifests itself every quarter in their power bill. When Tony Abbott and Craig Kelly cut through the rot and talk commonsense, the average punter dares to hope that the Liberal Party just might snap out its Turnbull induced coma and recall Abbott before it all truly goes to hell in a handbasket. Anyway, that’s what they would do if they bothered to read the comments in the Oz.

  182. OldOzzie

    World building new coal plants faster than it shuts them

    Nations around the world are building coal-fired power plants at a faster rate than those being ­decommissioned. The plants under construction reflect a 10 per cent increase to the total global generation powered by coal.

    New electricity generated by coal-fired plants will outstrip that which was retired in 2015 and 2016 by a factor of five.

    With Australia facing a policy crisis over energy security and the winding back of reliance on coal, construction of new coal-fired power plants was increasing in at least 35 countries, according to data analysis supplied to the ­Nationals by the federal parliamentary library. China has 299 new coal generation units under construction, followed by India which is building 132. Australia’s closest neighbour, Indo­nesia, was planning a further 32.

    Nuclear countries, including Japan and South Africa, were also increasing their exposure to coal-powered investment, with 21 new plants between them. Vietnam was building 34.

    The data was requested by ­Nationals senator and party whip John Williams, who has argued that the carbon emissions produced by the new plants worldwide would eclipse Australia’s total carbon emission profile.

    “We don’t have a tent over Australia … emissions are going up around the world because of these generators being built,” ­Senator Williams told The Australian. “We are bowing down to the green agenda which will make no difference to the world’s ­emissions.

    “It makes no sense. We will de-industrialise Australia and let everything be manufactured overseas with higher emissions.”

    The parliamentary library paper showed that 321 gigawatts of new generation would come from coal plants under construction globally. In 2015 and 2016, total coal generation retired amounted to 64 gigawatts.

    Worldwide, the paper showed, there were currently 5973 units of coal-fired power generation. There are often multiple power-generating units within a power station. The number of new units under construction totalled 621.

    It would take until 2057 for Australia’s 16 remaining coal-fired power stations to reach the end of their working life, with four slated to shut in the next decade.

    The executive director of the Australia Institute, Ben Oquist, said projected coal plants — those planned but not yet under construction — were in fact in decline.

    “The reality is the number of coal plants projected continues to fall,” Mr Oquist said. “Furthermore, the percentage of the ­energy mix made up by coal is in steady decline.

    “In modern advanced economies, coal is in steep decline.”

    According to the International Energy Outlook 2016, Mr Oquist said, China and India alone ­accounted for 69 per cent of the projected worldwide increase in coal-fired generation, while OECD nations continued to ­reduce their reliance on coal-fired electricity generation. He said 18 per cent of planned new coal power plants would never be built, meaning 369GW of projects stood to be cancelled.

    The IEA forecasts coal’s share of world energy will fall from 41 to 28 per cent by 2040.

    “Australia’s Paris targets will require removing coal power stations,” Mr Oquist said.

    “Building new ones would ­require a Trumpesque repudiation of those ­international commitments.

    “Emissions cannot be cut by building new power stations. The renewables boom is unstoppable and is going to lead to lower prices for consumers.”

    From The Comments


    Greens don’t want reliable and affordable power because they don’t want to work. They want to have a good life living off the taxes of other hard working Australians.

  183. cohenite

    Bruce of Newcastle

    #2496125, posted on September 13, 2017 at 6:40 am

    Oh joy.

    Mount Piper power plant closure feared after court ruling

    Got my Energy Australia electricity bill yesterday: a 45% increase; and now this Pt Piper @#$%^&!

    I read earlier about turdballs’ Hydro 2 and that similar schemes are already up at Wivenhoe at 500 MW capacity and another dam at 750 MW which are not used because they are uneconomic.

    Do you or anyone else know the other dam?

  184. John Constantine

    Emission standards require fuel injection systems running with zero tolerance, and demand exhaust temperatures that are insane when placed in tinder dry Australian grasslands in the Australian summer fire season.

    But some fuckwit got to fly to Paris and sign the surrender document.

  185. Fergus

    hzhousewife
    “criminalising all of us”
    Well, we’ve built this country before as criminals so the bs had better not think we can’t do it again.

  186. Tom

    FMD. Crooked launched her book tour on the 9/11 anniversary! My Tweet of the day (although it’s actually from yesterday):

    Kellyanne Conway‏Verified account
    @KellyannePolls
    Today: the 16th anniversary of 9-11; the nation is helping Harvey & Irma hurricane survivors & Hillary is talking about Hillary.

  187. Siltstone

    biggest pumped hydro is Tumut 3, circa 600MW

  188. John Constantine

    Price optimisation means that they will demand you pay the highest price they think you will tolerate.

    Big data harvest means they are getting better at determining your ‘squeak point’.

    When your electricity bill is loaded with a fifty percent penalty because you didn’t ring and demand a better deal, when your insurance is loaded with a compliance penalty because you didn’t get another quote, when the turnfailure coalition team hands Australia over to Stalin, these are all examples of big data determining the exact limit of your ‘squeak point’ and exactly how much price optimisation they can get you to go along with before they have to make an effort to lube you up.

  189. min

    Where does no coal Joel who was pushing an energy hub in the Hunter by replacing coal with gas in 5 years time get the gas? Will labor states suddenly allow gas exploration again?.

  190. It may have gone without passing yesterday, but John III Sobieski and his Winged Hussars routed the Ottoman’s Siege of Vienna. Huzzah!

  191. cohenite

    Siltstone

    #2496162, posted on September 13, 2017 at 7:54 am

    biggest pumped hydro is Tumut 3, circa 600MW

    That’s the one; thanks.

  192. Myrddin Seren

    Erdogan to Europe: ” be nice to us or your terrorist problem might worsen.”

    And: Turkey purchasing an air defence system from Russia.

    Are they expecting a peck o’ trouble?

    Two things spring to mind.

    Establishment of a de facto Turkish Protectorate in northern Syria. With an anti aircraft defense.

    And making sure all those nukes at Incirlik aren’t going anywhere.

  193. OldOzzie

    Doomed politics of your power bills

    A few weeks ago, the Prime Minister said more than two million Australian families and small businesses could save 25 per cent by changing energy plans or retailers. At a meeting with the heads of Australia’s major energy retailers, Malcolm Turnbull demanded that they write to customers informing them of better deals. Maybe the letter is in the mail.

    I rang my energy provider a few days ago and asked a very obliging woman in AGL’s call centre how I could reduce my power bill. She immediately offered a 24 per cent discount. No new contract, just pay on time please. I inquired whether lots of people were asking for a better deal from AGL. She said not so many. People didn’t think to ask, she said, and they weren’t always told of new discounted deals. The woman said she was sad for older customers who were really feeling the pinch of steep electricity prices. Not to mention the poor, regardless of age, people trying to stay in business, even grow their business and employ more people. In fact, all of us are paying for a monumental policy failure in a country with abundant supplies of cheap and reliable energy.

    Headlines about AGL boss Andy Vesey being a “victim” in the government’s power blame game don’t wash. As Scott Morrison likes to say, cry me a river. When Australia’s largest energy supplier offers a 24 per cent cut to your power bill only when a customer asks for a discount, it says something about how AGL prices power and how it treats customers. It says it’s charging more than it needs to, because it can. So who’s the victim?

    AGL is doing nicely out of the country’s energy mess and that means Vesey, the chief executive, is probably doing very nicely too. Last week AGL share prices rose 2.4 per cent after Ord Minnett analysts pointed to a report by the Australian Energy Market Operator warning of the risk of blackouts and baseload shortfalls when demand peaks this summer. As The Australian reported, the AEMO’s conclusion was this would lead to higher and more volatile prices.

    “We see AGL Energy as the biggest beneficiary of higher wholesale prices,” the broker said. AGL’s commitment to close down the Liddell coal-fired power plant in NSW’s Hunter Valley will only add to baseload shortfalls and price volatility. That’s a win-win for AGL and too bad for customers left with skyrocketing power bills.

    So who’s to blame for this policy mess? And how do we fix it? In the words of Khal Drogo, the buff war lord in Game of Thrones, these are questions for wise men with skinny arms. But I’ll give it a go. Australia’s competitive advantage as a country with cheap, reliable energy has been sacrificed not just by hipster corporates like those at AGL who employ proteges of GetUp! and Al Gore’s climate-change leadership program.

    In a rare show of bipartisanship, both Labor and the Coalition have allowed the politics of ­climate change to distort sensible energy policy. The only difference between the two major parties is one of degree, with Labor pushing a higher renewable energy target than the Coalition. In both cases, the climate tail is wagging the energy dog, with RETs and subsidies rendering investment in coal unviable, leading to gaps in baseload power, grid instability, blackouts and that insufferably high power bill on your kitchen bench. If renewables made economic sense without subsidies, the industry would thrive without an RET and without driving up energy ­prices. It’s hard to imagine a policy more certain to kill jobs and industry and drive investment offshore.

    As an election strategy, “Blackout Bill” becomes a potent political weapon but only if the Turnbull government can admit that higher electricity prices are driven by twin policy demons: the RET and renewables subsidies. It will take some political and policy courage to walk away from both.

    Consider the arguments the Turnbull government could then make. For starters, it takes a special kind of stupid for Bill Shorten to stick with Labor’s 50 per cent RET after the failed experiment in South Australia, where green policies produce the world’s highest power prices and regularly leave South Australians in the dark.

    Shorten could be the gift that keeps on giving. His claim last week that past privatisations have caused the current electricity ­crisis was quickly exposed as daft. Not just because the claim was backed up by economic dinosaurs who double as Labor’s paymasters within the union movement, but because smarter Labor minds spotted a leader with no genuine reform credentials, let alone ­convictions.

    Former NSW Labor treasurer Michael Costa pointed out that the Keating government started electricity market reforms and said that Shorten sounded more and more like a left-wing socialist ideologue whose 50 per cent RET was a betrayal of blue-collar ­workers.

    Freed from the RET and subsidies for renewables, the Turnbull government could point with greater force to the AEMO’s recent report warning that there is an “increasing and unacceptable risk” that the market won’t provide enough power to meet ­demand over the next two summers. With the closure of coal-fired power stations in SA and Victoria, and next in NSW with AGL committed to shutting down the Liddell plant in the Hunter Valley by 2022, baseload power capacity shrinks further.

    Alas, politics has reached a tipping point when it takes the ­Nationals to demand an end to subsidies. At their federal conference last weekend, the Nationals voted to phase out subsidies for renewables over five years and to ­reject the Finkel report’s proposed clean energy target of 42 per cent by 2030. Without the constraints of cabinet, former resources minister Matt Canavan was right to say “we’ve taken all the subsidies away from our farming sector and now the biggest protection racket is in our renewable energy sector”. As Malcolm Roberts said last Friday, scrap the RET and see how quickly the AGL boss likes coal again.

    Barnaby Joyce told ABC radio on Monday we have to keep shelling out subsidies for renewables “to comply with our international agreements”. If doffing our cap to an international agreement that is neither binding nor enforceable did no harm, we might endure it. But the RET and renewables subsidies hit us in two ways: striking our hip pocket with higher electricity bills and, even before our money makes it into our wallet, through taxes spent on subsidies that drive higher power bills.

    If the Turnbull government provides subsidies to keep Liddell open past 2022, it will be a case of the government giveth and then taketh away, by demanding discounted power bills from energy retailers and handing out subsidies to a coalmine to “fix” a problem caused by subsidies to renewables.

    While the Turnbull government and Labor tussle over which party’s RET is less of a job-killer and a price-hiker, ring your energy provider and shop around. Minimising your energy bill is not just good financial sense, it’s become a moral imperative, kind of like minimising tax. As Kerry Packer once said to a panel of cowering Canberra politicians, “you’re not spending it that well that we should be donating extra”.

    From The Comments

    The real culprits – Labor and the Greens secret deal for Gillard to get in.

    NDIS , NBN, RET. Anyone see a pattern of uncosted policy failure here?

    Meanwhile, in the clever country, both are in with another chance to really break the place up at the next election. They have plenty in the press willing to help them get started.

  194. egg_

    Post the AGL Liddel backhander, Martin Trumble is pushing for RET subsidies for Clean Coal (and clean underpants!)

  195. Geriatric Mayfly

    biggest pumped hydro is Tumut 3, circa 600MW

    Is that after subtracting the amount of electrickery needed to pump the water back into storage?

  196. John Constantine

    Senate committee into the Australian cattle industry has been foiled and fobbed off at every opportunity.

    the cattle processing industry is exactly as crony and corrupt as all other australian industries, like building and electricityand…..

    Crony corruption and craven compliance is institutionalised, everybody getting involved eventually has to go along to get along, or get thrown overboard if they threaten to rock the boat.

    Senate committee in frustration has suggested getting rid of the cattle council as that is all they can do without taking the mafia head on.

  197. OldOzzie

    We must put the CET in the Not For Implementation file

    The Turnbull government would be completely bonkers to commit to a clean energy target. Such an intervention is simply a dressed-up version of the renewable ­energy target that has so distorted our electricity system that all we can now purchase is high-priced, unreliable power.

    Don’t believe all the drivel about a CET allowing clean coal or gas. It is much less about the benchmark that is set — CO2 per megawatt hour — than about the emissions reduction target.

    Under the Finkel model, we will move from 22 per cent renew­ables in 2020 to 42 per cent in 2030. Virtually all new ­investment will be in unreliable ­renewables.

    But, you say, the cost of renewables is coming down and there is scope for the intermittent nature of renewable energy to be resolved through back-up solutions, including gas peaking (expensive), pumped hydro (inefficient) and untested batteries.

    While one accepted recommendations of the Finkel ­review is to require renewable ­energy companies to provide full back-up, there has been no progress on how this can be implemented in the context of the RET or CET.

    Wind farms happily continue to bid into the electricity market knowing someone else will pick up the tab when the wind don’t blow.

    Here’s the real rub: if renewable energy is now cheaper than coal and gas, and the back-up requirement can be made to stick, there’s no need for a RET or a CET or any other cute acronym. The market will sort it out.

    Doubting Thomases and Thomasinas may ask: will it? Will the renewable ­energy rent-seekers go away ­quietly and forgo their beloved RET or CET and the billions of dollars funnelled their way through the Clean Energy Fin­ance Corporation, the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and the rivers of gold handed out by state and territory governments. When you have right on your side — saving the planet — you are unlikely to give up that easily.

    Don’t get me wrong. I’m not commercially naive on these matters. As government policy stands, a new, long-living clean-coal plant is unbankable in this country. Ditto most gas-fired plants. Without some sort of government backing, these reliable forms of electricity generation will simply fade from the scene over time.

    I don’t believe AGL’s estimates of the levelised costs of different forms of generation; they are there principally to serve the company’s courageous shift of ­direction.

    But note that when it comes to investment in coal-fired electricity overseas, things are going gangbusters. Japan has no problem finding private investors to fund coal-fired power stations. They are also being built in China, other parts of Asia, in Germany and in Africa. (Thirty new nuclear plants are also being built in China.)

    We are pretty much Robinson Crusoe, the stupid version, when it comes to turning our back on coal for generating electricity, particularly as we have some of the largest reserves in the world.

    So what should government do? The first thing to ­acknowledge is electricity ­accounts for just one-third of all emissions. Leave it alone now. It has done enough. Take away the subsidies and handouts. (It may need to consider support for new dispatchable power ­because of the state we are in.)

    Second, the direct action plan, contrary to criticisms of left-leaning commentators (who weirdly think direct grants to renewable energy players are great), has worked well as a low-cost form of abatement — the best thing previous environment minister Greg Hunt achieved during his tenure.

    So direct action could be extended as long as the government remains stubborn in its commitment to Paris, with the extremely high per capita emissions ­reduction targets it has agreed to.

    Third, we would be better served if we were to buy verified international carbon credits. They are cheap (one-tenth of the abatement cost of the RET) and can be booked as part of our commitment. It’s all very well saying the mess we are in is the result of poor government policy in the past — it’s not due to Tony Abbott, by the way, who at least made some effort to improve matters — but we are where we are. Perhaps if we had opted for a cap-and-trade scheme and it had been carefully designed and we didn’t have the RET, we would be in less of a pickle now.

    Bear in mind these schemes have generally been a disaster overseas — subject to fraud and rorting, ineffective at reducing emissions because of the over-­allocation of credits — and there is every reason to think we would have fallen into the same traps.

    It’s critical the CET is put in the Not For Implementation file.

    From The Comments

    How can a nation’s political system be certifiably mad??????

  198. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    Why is our coal good for the world but not for us?

    When he encountered Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg in a parliamentary corridor yesterday, Labor’s Joel Fitzgibbon tried to score a point or two in the energy debate. As ALP spokesman for regions and the member for Hunter, Mr Fitzgibbon was keen to point out that 94 per cent of the Hunter Valley’s coal was exported. His rhetorical intent was to demonstrate that the closure of the Liddell power station would not seriously dent the valley’s economy. But with a moment’s consideration his statistic highlights the illogical self-harm of the nation’s power settings. Under present policies we are happy to export 388 million tonnes of coal annually to fuel cheap and reliable energy in other countries while forcing the closure of coal-fired generators here in favour of unreliable, and therefore expensive, renewable energy. How could policymakers congratulate themselves for overseeing the closure of Liddell, creating a supply shortage, pushing up prices and cutting coal use by only 1 per cent of what we export?

    The global statistics reported by Simon Benson in our pages today show consumers in many foreign countries are benefiting from affordable energy supplied by Australian coal while we deliberately rob ourselves of the same economic advantage. And there can be no environmental gain; global carbon emissions are rising by amounts that dwarf the trifling reductions achieved by our costly policies. We are imposing economic burdens and exporting jobs and emissions. All pain, no gain.

    The closure of South Australia’s Northern power station and Victoria’s Hazelwood have hurt consumers, and the mothballing of NSW’s Liddell would make a bad situation worse. Yet while we are closing coal-fired stations China has a further 299 under construction. They will add about seven times our present total of coal-fired power. India has an extra 132 coal plants under way and Indonesia had 32. Japan is building 10, The Philippines 22, Vietnam 34, South Africa 11 and South Korea is working on nine more. Yet both major parties here are committed to a renewable energy target that makes electricity more expensive and can force baseload generators to close, undermining our security of supply.

    Australia is one of the largest exporters of coal, liquefied natural gas and uranium — the three main sources of reliable baseload power. While this bounty makes our resources sector rich and provides the affordable and secure energy needed by our competitors, we choose to rob ourselves of the same advantage. It is an approach to energy and resource management that only our worst enemies could wish upon us. The partisan politicking on this issue is reaching fever pitch with much focus on the future of just one power station, Liddell. But the problem is much deeper. It is about lowering costs in the sector and encouraging investment in efficient power generation. Propping up a power station here, reserving gas supplies there or expanding a hydro scheme in the mountains is not an energy policy; it is a series of fixes. We know Labor’s planned carbon price and higher RET would make matters worse. We need to see the government’s plan.

  199. Myrddin Seren

    Where does no coal Joel who was pushing an energy hub in the Hunter by replacing coal with gas in 5 years time get the gas? Will labor states suddenly allow gas exploration again?.

    Gift AGL another LNG import terminal, this time at Newcastle, and let them clip the ticket on bringing in gas from Qatar or, irony-upon-irony, the pariah liquified shale gas from the hated United States of Trump.

    Skye Laris isn’t on Team AGL to convince the spineless Coalition to pump up AGL’s profits – that’s what ‘Liberal’ Tony Chappel and what Michael Photios and young Mrs Photios are for.

    Skye is there to get the ALP on side – somehow. Where there is a will, I am sure there is a way.

  200. srr

    dover_beach
    #2496167, posted on September 13, 2017 at 7:59 am

    It may have gone without passing yesterday, but John III Sobieski and his Winged Hussars routed the Ottoman’s Siege of Vienna. Huzzah!

    Polish Winged Hussars & Jan III. Sobieski
    [SLAVIC BADASS OF THE WEEK Ep. 2]

    Slavic Affairs

  201. Myrddin Seren

    Post the AGL Liddel backhander, Martin Trumble is pushing for RET subsidies for Clean Coal (and clean underpants!)

    Please tell me this is quirky humour ?

    Trumble and Freideggburger are not seriously suggesting hitting the baseload coal stations with MORE Large Scale Renewable Energy certificate purchases to subsidise the cost of the LSREs on newer, more efficient plants ( should by some miracle any get started ) ??

    I don’t know what else to say – Trumble has plainly lost his mind and needs to be sectioned for the good of the country. ( Friedeggburger can go back to licking the windows in his office ).

  202. Eyrie

    I guess the two stroke ban will put the kybosh on this Aussie invention:
    https://motorbikewriter.com/aussie-two-stroke-invention/
    Cats might like to write comments to the crony capitalist “Blue sky alliance”:
    Here: http://www.blueskyalliance.com.au/
    I congratulated them on their crony capitalism and for joining in the corruption.

  203. C.L.

    Wow, hey.
    Seattle Democrat mayor resigns after revelations he raped his male cousin for a year.

  204. Rockdoctor

    NSW Parliament could use legislation to get around the Court’s decision even limiting the jurisdiction on the Courts to local residents and not a bunch of ageing hippies from Dulwich Hill but it won’t. Appeal to the High Court? Not likely, say they tried a dodgy way to get round their own regulations that came unstuck, I had to go to Austlii to find the Judges & their backgrounds seem unremarkable except for the ubiquitous support to lefty causes most legal o’s who get to this level have these days. Back to the drawing board I suppose…

  205. OldOzzie

    CUT & PASTE
    GetUp! gets tetchy over The Australian’s frank and fair reportage

    Cut & Paste received a lovely email from GetUp! on Monday night:

    Will you sign on to a massive letter to The Australian, demanding truth in journalism?

    And they’ve got all their favourite Australian front page stories ready. GetUp! email, continued:

    Here are just some of the lies and attacks in The Australian lately …

    This particular complaint from the lefties really intrigued Cut & Paste. The GetUp! email, continued:

    In a classic “red scare” campaign, claiming GetUp took money from a “group linked to Soviets” …

    GetUp! took money from a group that actually had “USSR” in its name. The Australian, August 23:

    The Australia USSR Friendship Association gave GetUp! at least $10,000 in 2006 …

    And never mind all the people the Soviet regime killed through the years. The New York Review of Books, March 10, 2011:

    The total figure (killed in the Soviet Gulags) for the entire Stalinist period is likely between two million and three million.

    GetUp! also does not really understand the basic concept of news. The email sent out on Monday night:

    Writing repeated stories about major donor funding from more than 12 years ago, while refusing to report that 97% of GetUp’s donations are under $100, from everyday people.

    Bloomin’ huge donations from possible future prime ministers is real news. The Australian, August 16:

    Mr Shorten gave about $100,000 of union money, possibly more, to the left-leaning activist group when it launched in 2005.

    Do your worst, GetUp! We’re not scared of holding you to account. The Australian’s editorial, August 16:

    GetUp! is far more than the grassroots movement it purports to be, leaving Mr Shorten with explaining to do about why he backed its extremist agenda …

  206. Rabz

    Friedeggburger can go back to engaging his powerful brain while having a lie down.

  207. notafan

    Since when did doing 13 km over the speed limit mean a $317 ticket in Victoria?

    Been looking at cars with my kid, at least two on the market from tradies who have been done for points but try to get police to invest investigate a theft, hell no.

    Dan Andrews is a complete gouger and vicpol a politized joke, in whom no one I know has any trust.

    I’m so over government at every level.

    If Australias dont kick them out soon we see doomed.

  208. Myrddin Seren

    Gab

    The Turnbull government today legislated to ban two-stroke mowers, whipper-snippers and outboards.

    W.T.F ?

    turnbull is insane.

    Sure starting to look that way.

    Someone here linked to Cory’s interview with Paul Murray on the Aus Con’s Youtube page.

    I thought the key phrase Cory stated was that, amongst a raft of other powered things this legislation could be expanded to ban, it could eventually include diesel generators.

    Ah ha ! If people try to escape the inevitable blackouts and intermittency by installing their own generators, as happens in places like India, Your Government will doubtless move to ban domestic generators – to save the planet, think of the children etc etc.

    You will be made to sit in the dark and cold and you will learn to like it – unless you die off first.

  209. Bruce of Newcastle

    It may have gone without passing yesterday, but John III Sobieski and his Winged Hussars routed the Ottoman’s Siege of Vienna. Huzzah!

    Did not pass without notice:

    Alt-Left Extremists Vandalise Monument to Polish King Who Broke Turkish Siege of Vienna

    Far-left extremists vandalised a monument to former Polish King Jan III Sobieski who broke the Turkish siege of Vienna in 1683 ahead of an event put on by the hipster-right Identitarian movement to celebrate the anniversary of the battle.

    They are certifiable. Surely they know they will be first against the wall when the caliphate comes? Islam is quite careful about removing strategic threats.

  210. Rabz

    Mount Piper power plant closure feared after court ruling

    What’s the bet that somehow, taxpayers are actually footing the bill for this latest greenfilth lawfare against civilisation?

  211. Rabz

    Seattle Democrat mayor resigns after revelations he raped his male cousin for a year.

    I’m guessing 97% of the meeja reports omitted to mention he was a democrat.

  212. stackja

    Trashing Trump: Broadcast coverage of the president now 91% negative, say analysts

    Much of the news media continues to offer coverage which is both hostile and biased against President Trump and his administration. Case in point: a wide-reaching new study from the Media Research Center finds that 91 percent of the recent coverage which aired on ABC, CBS and NBC has been negative.

  213. notafan

    13 yo male cousin when he was, what, nine years older.

    That ought to be a rape charge.

    Let’s see where that goes.

    Murray says not true because ‘estranged’.

    Maybe that is because you raped him, moron.

  214. whose areas of expertise include “critical race theory”

    And that differs from Nazi race theory how?

    You see, “white supremacist racism” is all about “hoarding resources.”

    Mmmmyes, white people went out and captured all the Nikes and locked them up for their personal pleasure.

    What say you, Muttley? Can your wrongology compete with that?

  215. stackja

    Qantas boss Alan Joyce donates $1 million to ‘Yes’ campaign for gay marriage
    Claire Bickers, News Corp Australia Network
    28 minutes ago
    QANTAS boss Alan Joyce

  216. C.L.

    So he thinks gay “marriage” is a left-wing Trojan Horse premised on horse-shit and meant to harm others … Nothing gets past Paul Kelly.

  217. Eyrie

    OK I get how the panels are reflective but I can’t see how they radiate and don’t get warm from conduction.

    https://theconversation.com/how-the-sky-can-help-make-air-conditioners-at-least-20-more-efficient-83455

    Should work in space but then I’d simply use black panels and shade them from the sun. A radiative heat sink at 2.7 degrees Kelvin works fine.

  218. Bruce of N, thank you for the correction.

  219. Myrddin Seren

    Rabz

    Mount Piper power plant closure feared after court ruling

    What’s the bet that somehow, taxpayers are actually footing the bill for this latest greenfilth lawfare against civilisation?

    The swampies are represented by the NSW Environmental Defenders Office.

    And you have already guessed who is paying for the regression of NSW to the pre-steam era:

    State to continue funding NSW Environmental Defender’s Office

    From 2015:

    Attorney-General Gabrielle Upton said state funding for the NSW Environmental Defender’s Office was governed by strict principles and she was not contemplating winding back its public funding.

    The EDO was given $750,000 by the NSW government last financial year, $1.4 million in 2013-14 and another $1.4m in 2012-13.

    The funding principles meant the EDO and other community legal centres were not permitted to use public money for political or social media campaigning.

    “Funding for community legal centres, of which EDO is one, is an important part of what I personally and the government supports,” Ms Upton said. “They do a really important job of representing interests which would not otherwise have a chance before the justice system.”

    Stupid.F**king.Liberals

  220. Rabz

    Ah ha ! If people try to escape the inevitable blackouts and intermittency by installing their own generators, as happens in places like India, Your Government will doubtless move to ban domestic generators – to save the planet, think of the children etc etc.

    How many pollies have shares in candle factories?

  221. I asked above, what sort of audience applauds the unsubstantiated claim that the natural family is the least safe place for children? Seriously, what sort of audience applauds this claim when it is uttered by a someone without substantiation and accompanied by a shit-eating grin?

    If you want to learn something about the country we have become ponder that for a moment.

  222. Rabz

    Myrdds – not to mention that if this vexatious horsehit is clogging up our beloved kangaroo courts, then taxpayers are indeed footing the bill.

  223. Myrddin Seren

    I asked above, what sort of audience applauds the unsubstantiated claim that the natural family is the least safe place for children? Seriously, what sort of audience applauds this claim when it is uttered by a someone without substantiation and accompanied by a shit-eating grin?

    If you want to learn something about the country we have become ponder that for a moment.

    The typical well-balanced Q&A audience that consists of no less than 45% conservative voters ?

  224. and then they (Liberals) say, trust us to implement religious protections after the homosexual marriage vote.
    Vote No.

    As Mark Latham said to Alan Jones today, even this statement is false.
    It will be a private members bill, not a LNP sponsored bill.
    No-one knows who the private member is nor how many members will put up competing bills.
    No-one knows what will be in the bill.

    We are being Pelosied.

  225. Rabz

    Nothing gets past Paul Kelly.

    At least he wasn’t wrong (again).

  226. srr

    TRANSGENDER Is A Mental Disorder, Ben Shapiro Destroys Liberal Media
    Sep 12, 2017
    TRANSGENDER Is A Mental Disorder, Ben Shapiro Destroys Liberal Media Discuss On The Ben Shapiro Show (Audio)

    Excerpts From The Ben Shapiro Show
    http://www.dailywire.com

  227. lotocoti

    Who is group 4nature? How are they funded?

    It costs the average punter ten grand to get a barrister to open a brief and another 10 to step into the Supreme Court (QLD).
    4nature aren’t average.

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