James Paterson in The Spectator

Writing in the Spectator Australia, Senator the Hon. James Paterson argues:

Don’t Change the Senate.

So says Senator Paterson:

But not even this is sufficient grounds to uproot our bicameral parliamentary system, which has enabled us to create one of the world’s most prosperous and free societies.

It could be said that our “prosperous and free” society exists despite rather than because of our bicameral system.

Rule of law.  Freedom of speech.  Freedom of association.  Separation of powers.  Entrepreneurship.  These are the things that gave Australia freedom and prosperity and not a bicameral parliamentary system.  And these are the same things that too many, including Senator Paterson’s parliamentary colleagues, are trying to use the bicameral system to diminish.

Without rule of law, freedom of speech, freedom of association, separation of powers and entrepreneurship we have the Supreme Soviet or the Supreme People’s Assembly.  And if we don’t change our direction, that is where we will end up.

Mind you this is where some Senators, hint hint, probably want Australia to end up.

Follow I Am Spartacus on Twitter at @Ey_am_Spartacus

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26 Responses to James Paterson in The Spectator

  1. One look at his profile says it all. Another young’un that is still wet behind the ears and who has no understanding or possibly interest in history. Since when did the Liberal Party become the party of ‘feelings’?

  2. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    But not even this is sufficient grounds to uproot our bicameral parliamentary system, which has enabled us to create one of the world’s most prosperous and free societies.

    Our parliamentary system has created a dollar of real wealth.

    It has destroyed trillions of it though.

  3. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    *hasn’t.

  4. H B Bear

    So Senator Patterson says don’t change the Senate. Well he would say that wouldn’t he.

    The Senate is part of the problem. As is the Federation, the High Court, compulsory voting, COAG, and a bunch of other stuff.

  5. True Aussie

    Time for direct democracy

  6. Gowest

    The senate voted 53 – 5 against removing RET showing that most want to increase our power prices. So much for the house of state review!

  7. Mak Siccar

    Egad! Your hint, hint should have come with a serious trigger warning!

  8. Warty

    Bemused was obviously offering a criticism when he asked ‘Since when did the Liberal Party become the party of’ feelings?’ I would suggest it is becoming increasingly a ‘party of feelings as it becomes more and more a ‘Labor lite’ party.

  9. max

    A majority of the voters of Venezuela are thieves. They have tried to vote themselves prosperity through the welfare state.
    This preference for theft by the ballot box has now blown up in their faces.

    To imagine that theft produces any other result is to imagine that (1) dishonesty is the best policy, (2) thieves win in the long run, and (3) private property is theft.

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2016/06/gary-north/magnificent-well-deserved-economic-collapse/

    how about us, are we thieves as well:

    government schooling
    medicare
    Social security
    central banking
    fractional reserve banking
    fiat currency
    progressive tax system
    1 900 000 government employees

  10. JohnA

    Warty, the two major parties in every voting jurisdiction will eventually look very much like each other.

    They have all embraced the marketing approach of buying votes, and since they are all after the same bloc of the populace (the middle 80%) they will eventually find a lot of similar ways to reach them.

  11. Norman Church

    How about we restore the Federation? Devolution and subsidiarity are my home boys.

  12. Habib

    I’m for changing it as you would a shitty nappy. The resemblance is remarkable. Any lingering prosperity has been despite these malfeasant, time-serving blind mullet in the fetid swamp of democracy for display purposes.

  13. egg_

    Well he would say that wouldn’t he.

    Always back ‘Self Interest’ for a place.

  14. Rayvic

    “Without rule of law, freedom of speech, freedom of association, separation of powers and entrepreneurship we have the Supreme Soviet or the Supreme People’s Assembly.  And if we don’t change our direction, that is where we will end up.”

    That is indeed where we will end up if SSM is legalised. Besides the Senator hinted, there are Liberal, Labor and other senators who want Australia to end up there.

  15. Rayvic

    Attorney-General Brandis is a senator who appears intent on Australia ending up there if SSM is legalised.

  16. alexnoaholdmate

    Don’t change the Senate, then.

    But introduce a convention – such as exists in the UK, Canada, most Commonwealth countries – that the unrepresentative Senate (only half of whom were elected at the most recent ballot) will not block legislation that was a clear part of the election manifesto of the party that just won.

    You can win in a landslide and have the overwhelming mandate of the people, and still not be able to do what you were elected to do because enough Senators are left over from the previous election to stop you.

    That is the major flaw in our political system. It has to end.

  17. Combine Dave

    True Aussie
    #2495821, posted on September 12, 2017 at 6:20 pm
    Time for direct democracy

    Correct.

  18. Rob

    Australia has become ungovernable and it is not just the ugly and feral Senate driving that horror scenario.
    Blame the PC banks using lending restrictions to usurp the government’s role in deciding mining industry and social policy.
    Blame corporations like Qantus for bullying the public on issues like SSM.
    Blame unrestrained law breaking, hostile, and unruly, activist mobs.
    Blame the viciousness of social media – given respect it doesn’t deserve.
    Blame a dumbed down society – so ignorant and badly let down by the fourth estate.
    Most of all, blame Turnbull, desperate to become PM but with absolutely no idea how to do the job.

  19. harrys on the boat

    The main reason I no longer am a member of the IPA. Sickening to see so many of the IPA alumni become natural bedfellows of the Liberal Party. A joke and a disgrace. And here’s Paterson shilling for big government whilst sucking on the taxpayer teat. It’s fucking embarrassing.

  20. H B Bear

    It’s fucking embarrassing.

    Exactly. Whores.

  21. struth

    Paterson is nothing to write home about.

    A career politician.

    Ignore.

  22. A joke and a disgrace. And here’s *Paterson shilling for big government …

    The senate, has voted for every bad federal law, and there are many, that exists.

    To paraphrase the King of Id, “the senate needs to reform itself or someone else will do it for them”. And none too gently. The Australian constitution needs additions that are pretty close to the US first and second amendments. The senate is a disgrace.

    *Patterson is just another liberty thief. His position on the Liberal senate ticket is another reason to never vote Liberal again.

  23. PoliticoNT

    The main reason I no longer am a member of the IPA. Sickening to see so many of the IPA alumni become natural bedfellows of the Liberal Party. A joke and a disgrace. And here’s Paterson shilling for big government whilst sucking on the taxpayer teat. It’s fucking embarrassing.

    Harry – I stopped renewing my membership three years ago. Asked why I responded, ‘because winning the moral argument isn’t enough, if you lot aren’t prepared to start taking hard action I’ll direct my money elsewhere.’ Patterson is just another young, corporate, cut-from-the-template politician. A time serving nobody who’ll occasionally come out with (what he thinks) is a bit of considered political analysis.

    But, he has (like his stable mate Wilson) – no passion, no capacity to communicate with urgency, no understanding of the rank anger and disgust the majority have with our political class. Their ignorance is extraordinary. What Spartacus has written is simple and straightforward and it casts Patterson and his ilk into complete disrepute.

  24. old bloke

    The problem with the Senate is that it doesn’t do what it was intended to do, i.e., represent the State’s interests. The Senate always votes along party lines, individual Senators will always put their State’s interests in second place, if they even consider them at all.

    I don’t know how this can be resolved, perhaps the Senators should be selected by state governments for limited terms.

  25. Rod

    Senator Patterson isn’t “the Hon.” yet. He has to be a cabinet minister first.

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