‘I’m fine, Tony’s here’

Possibly the most misunderstood person in politics today: Hunter Valley Bushfire: Hunter Valley homes at risk, Tony Abbott joins fire fight.

Tony Abbott has been hailed as a hero after saving a house from ember attack while battling a bushfire burning near his Sydney northern beaches electorate of Warringah.

This afternoon embers from the Beacon Hill bushfire ignited local resident Barry Cafe’s fence.

Mr Cafe told local paper the Manly Daily that it wasn’t every day that a former prime minister saves your home.

“I told everybody, ‘I’m fine, Tony’s here’,” he said.

“He’s a top bloke … We couldn’t do without them (the Rural Fire Service).”

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68 Responses to ‘I’m fine, Tony’s here’

  1. Mak Siccar

    Having met him, albeit briefly, at the Birdsville Races whilst he was Leader of the Opposition, recognising that he made a few bad calls whilst PM whilst suffering a hostile press and Senate, and having read much of what he has said since being deposed from PM, there is no doubt in my mind that he is a top bloke.

  2. duncanm

    I like it just because its going to wind up Malcontent and his mates, if nothing else.

  3. Ubique

    Tony Abbott, lifesaver, firefighter and charity fund raiser, is the outstanding volunteer and community-minded politician in Australia. A top bloke.
    The Laborites only ever volunteer to feather their own nests.

  4. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I’d rather be on a fireground with Tony Abbott, then Bill Shorten or Tony Burke.

  5. HGS

    Not as hopeless PM as those before or after. Perhaps he has learnt?

  6. Bruce of Newcastle

    Possibly the most misunderstood person in politics today

    That is only because he is a conservative who is vilified for being a conservative.
    Trump is likewise vilified.
    Cory Bernardi ditto.
    Anyone who is an actual conservative is lied about and slimed by the media and the Left.

    Hopefully the Australian people will get a brain and wise up to this before the Left takes us down to the socialist hell where the Left always ends up: Venezuela, Cuba, Zimbabwe, Soviet Union, Mao’s China, North Korea, Argentina and etc.
    We are solidly on that track under Mr Turnbull.

  7. The Pugilist

    Cue Sinc: “But what about 18c?”

  8. The Vengeful Ghost of Fiona Watson's Moggie

    What Rabz said.

  9. stackja

    Rabz
    #2497602, posted on September 14, 2017 at 5:06 pm
    Good bloke, hopeless PM.

    Hawke/Keating?

  10. candy

    Anyone who is an actual conservative is lied about and slimed by the media and the Left.

    True. The Left hate conservatives deeply, to the bone, it’s unstoppable.
    Look at Monty’s comments about the firefighting by TA. He just ridicules it, and yet Monty is a nice
    chap, father of young family, but mention Trump, Abbott, Bernardi – and he’s sees red and says very unpleasant thing.
    who can figure this kind of thing.

  11. Vagabond

    The left understands TA all too well. They know he’s the only man who can keep the libs in power. Why do you think they vilify him so much?

  12. zyconoclast

    The left understands TA all too well. They know he’s the only man who can keep the libs in power. Why do you think they vilify him so much?

    He spent too much time being nice and apologizing.
    He should have doubled the winks, eaten an entire onion salad, looked at his watch and tapped his foot.
    He sacked Bernardi for saying the truth about SSM.
    He spent too much time acquiescing to his enemies and turning his back on his allies.

    He should take a few tips from Menzies.

    He was not elected to be a kind Christian man, truant officer, handy man or try and insert Recognition into our Constitution.
    No second chance for Abbott.

  13. Ubique

    Hawke a good bloke? Not in Hazel’s sad experience.

  14. paul

    he is a conservative who is vilified for being a conservative
    And the left, labor, watermelons, etc leave all the hard lifting for others, especially conservatives.
    Those rent seekers just sit back and collect their handouts.

  15. Muddy

    No second chance for Abbott.

    Abso-Fecking-lutely.
    We don’t need a ‘nice bloke.’ We need a berserker to (metaphorically) maim, kill, and make room for someone and something better. Let our future rise from the ashes.

    But first, make ashes. Burn, baby, burn.

  16. Robbo

    Community service as a volunteer firefighter. Abbott does what Turnbull would not ever think of doing. Speaks volumes about their respective merits. One gives for no reward, the other does nothing unless there is something in it for him.

  17. Warty

    Steve Kates is a naughty, naughty boy. Did he think his provocative little snippet would be restricted to fire fighting responses? I think not.
    No Steve, Tony is foolishly attempting to put out a far greater conflagration, and one involving the Turnbull government. May Tony thank his lucky stars he was stabbed many times in the back yet lived to pick himself up from the blood-stained forum floor, because he may well have presided over a cuck conservative government himself, and then where would he have been.
    He survived to rethink some of his more stupid policies like the RET that is threatening to draw the Coalition into the maelstrom in their midst. Ironically he looks more like the leader he was in opposition, when the Christopher Pynes and the Paynes and Sinodinoses and f’wit Brandises were already plotting to do him in. His only mistake is to stay with a party that needs to be dispatched forthwith and allowed to die its unnatural death.

  18. Sfw

    Why didn’t he just ask them to ‘take one for the team’ ? He asked his most loyal supporters to instead of fighting that battle.

  19. Robber Baron

    The back bench will seek Abbott out with caps in hand begging him to lead them once again. But first they will lose this election and burn through two other light-weight leaders. Then they will turn to him like they did Howard to save them.

    Stupidity and arrogance is a Liberal party trait. The political cycle must go full circle and Abbott crops up from time to time reminding the party that he is the best politician in the parliament.

  20. Fulcrum

    Tony was and is a leader of men and a team plsyer .Some think that setttling for less
    was the way to go.

    At least he has the satisfaction of significantly reducing the numbers of asylum seekers from a watery grave.

  21. Chris M

    The media are comprised of fembots and limp wristed betas, Tony terrifies them.

  22. Oh come on

    Cue Sinc: “But what about 18c?”

    Not just Sinc. Tone really screwed the pooch with that one. It was so emblematic of the flawed Abbott PMship. Threw an issue extremely close to the hearts of his core supporters under the bus to appease some Islamic slime with his “team Australia” crap which they promptly threw back in his face. Abbott broke a key promise over 18C and received *nothing* for it in return.

    The Abbott PMship saw so much political capital squandered for very little. His 18C backdown gets bandied about a lot because it’s such a neat encapsulation of this.

    Abbott does indeed seem like a genuinely decent individual – something that is truly rare in federal politics. But he really wasn’t much of a PM.

  23. Oh come on

    No second chance for Abbott – Abbott was the Liberal Party’s last chance!

  24. Jo Smyth

    Listening to Tony Abbott on the radio, the impression is there, he is just waiting for the moment.

  25. Leo G

    Good bloke, hopeless PM.

    PM is a hopeless position. A de facto HoS with no constitutional job description. Often empowered by fickle “bedwetters” and thereafter hostage to their insecurities.

  26. whyisitso

    What a wanker this bloke is. He wags attendance from his day job to play up to the gallery by doing something useful like fighting deliberately-lit bushfires, saving people’s houses. This is even worse then eating a raw onion or looking at his watch.

  27. overburdened

    Again I preface my remarks with the caution that opinions are like arses. Mr Abbott is what Australia used to be. He is a committed servant of the community and the Nation who honourably represents the motto Factum Non Dictum. He is out there doing the work. It’s instructional to go to a Men’s Shed to get a taste of the life we have lost. Old blokes hated by apparently everyone voluntarily doing projects, giving people (including the younger mates and females as the remit expands with the need for people to find a sense of purpose and inclusion) sage advice and careful guidance because they think they should give back, after giving all their lives.
    One of the foundation rules of the Fabianist Socialist rule book is to make no concession to the enemy. This explains to sane people why they can’t understand the vitriol and hate. It’s because it is part of the plan.
    It was for the reason that good people are not perfect that the institutions of Government have developed to ensure continuity. If not for this, Whitlam would have totally F33ked the place. The danger is the stacking of Government agencies when the Leftists are in power, and the rules that don’t allow for correction in the Public Service at Federal and State level.
    For all his flaws Mr Abbott is a more honourable man than most politicians, and all of the Leftists, combined. The Country is buggered.

  28. Shy Ted

    ABC 7.30 interviews multi-award winning comedian (not enne) Hanna Gadsby. She’s that funny I was cutting my wrists after a few minutes. The Macquarie Dictionary is going to have to redefine “comedy” like they did with misogyny. I very stupidly youtubed her and now there’s blood all over the keyboard. Naturally it was really an interview about SSM and I can now confirm there are at least 3 genders, male, female and Hanna Gaddsby. We pay for this.

  29. a happy little debunker

    Shy Ted,

    Hannah learned her craft amidst the terrible Tasmanian ordeal of the legalising male homosexual practices.

    Such was the vitriol – she personally suffered (in not being a man nor ever undertaking male homosexual practices), that she built her career, her persona, her life around those formative events.

    Like other great fictional representations (like Jack Sparrow, Willy Wonka and Pee Wee Herman) she stands out in her value for entertainment.

  30. Anto

    True character is truly underrated in our leaders today. Undoubtedly because the majority don’t have it, nor do they respect it (and, in fact, journalists and their ilk sneer at it).

    A shame, because the attitude of the people and the leaders they elected was what allowed us to rise above the previous feudal and third world life of pre-WWII society. People forget how absolutely dirt poor the vast majority of Australians were, as recently as the late-1940’s and 50’s.

    We have no monopoly, nor god-given right to our lifestyles.

  31. closeapproximation

    Howard was widely hated but thrived in the end. I hope Abbott does too, learning from mistakes like Howard did.

    Abbott stuffed up not only 18c but also tge budget; alienated his base and his opponents, and it was an inconsistent mess.

    However, he exceeeded expectations on border protection and for this he should get much kudos.

  32. Fleeced

    Tonyseems decent enough but he has one fatal flaw. He wants to be liked.

    Oh, everybody wants to be liked, I guess – especially politicians – but he wants to be liked by exactly the wrong people. He rants about the dangers that will be ushered in along with SSM, and he’s not wrong, but they pale in comparison to his own backdown on 18C. Indeed, many of the dangers will be helped along by it – it won’t be long before 18C is broadened (I suppose it already has been “temporarily”).

    This clown backed down on the most important change we needed to make – and I’m not sure if/when we’ll get another chance. He made other mistakes too, but they all stemmed from the one flaw: wanting the wrong people to like him. He talked tough before he became PM, but when he got the job, displayed all the confidence of a teenage girl at a new school, trying to impress the “mean girls” of Australian politics.

  33. Norman Church

    Was it Warren Mundine who said that, if you really hate Tony Abbott, you really shouldn’t meet him? Exactly the reverse for Kevni IIRC

    I was one who wrote to then PM with a complaint about the s18c climb down suggesting that he would come to regret his capitulation to the Velvet Fascists. And I think the squandering of the once in a generation chancechance to reshape and resize government after Rudd and Gillard was a national tragedy.

    However, and Abbott still seems a marked improvement on those who have preceded and succeeded him.

    I know he is hated by those who take their cues from ‘polite’ society and the MSM but I no longer think that that matters. Trump has once again show that the usual suspects will go bananas over any non leftist leader. And there is a silent majority that is just waiting for a sign that it is finally open season on the cultural Marxism and virtue signalling BS.

    Heck, I would like Mr Abbott to return as PM just to see the bodies crushed at the ABC fainting couches. Let’s face it, he couldn’t do worse than the current PM and his Diet Labor Party.

  34. Oh come on

    Oh, everybody wants to be liked, I guess – especially politicians

    No, they couldn’t give a rat’s arse about being liked. Being re-elected – now that’s what politicians want. Often being liked and being re-elected go hand-in-hand, so it may seem as though they are concerned about being liked. That’s not it, though.

    However, I think you are right in that Abbott genuinely does want to be liked. I suspect there is also a part of him that is genuinely bewildered as to why he isn’t liked.

  35. Oh come on

    And speaking of unforgivable Abbott fumbles, does anyone even remember TURC? A once-in-a-generation opportunity to neuter the noxious unions, squandered. Back in 2013, would anyone have thought it possible to play such a strong hand so unbelievably badly?

  36. Faye

    Now we know what a bunch of snowflakes Tony Abbott and Peta Credlin had to put up with. The best Liberals left of their own accord after the assassination choosing not to serve under Turnbull. Then Turnbull in his rush to win an election in his own right lost 15 seats among whom were very good people. What’s left are an array of bedwetters, lefties, gays and the brand new Liberals who won seats and consequently are only loyal to Turnbull. Then, of course there are the poor suffering conservatives. The purge is complete. Watching Question Time (rarely), I can’t get over how Turnbull and his Ministers are always smiling and joshing when discussing the many serious problems facing Australia, such as energy prices. Turnbull because of his constant smile whilst having a go at Shorten and Labor makes the whole thing a joke. I want Abbott back to cut Shorten and Labor into little pieces.

  37. Mark A

    Faye
    #2497932, posted on September 15, 2017 at 12:34 am
    I want Abbott back to cut Shorten and Labor into little pieces.

    Maybe it would make you feel better but that’s not the point.

    He had the chance at governing and blew it. He has a serious personalty fault, he is not a strong leader and wants to be liked by the wrong side.

    Just as his obsession of doing a fortnight long stint every year with aborigines up north, and his firefighting escapades, it makes him popular with a segment of the population, but that is not his job.

    Good man, good politician, maybe, but not foreman material.

  38. egg_

    This clown backed down on the most important change we needed to make – and I’m not sure if/when we’ll get another chance. He made other mistakes too, but they all stemmed from the one flaw: wanting the wrong people to like him. He talked tough before he became PM, but when he got the job, displayed all the confidence of a teenage girl at a new school, trying to impress the “mean girls” of Australian politics.

    Nailed it – and piss poor choice of Credlin to help lead – from a bunker, FFS?
    May as well have run the white flag up the pole from the beginning, hiding from the Press from day one.
    Credlin’s new found friends have short memories, now that she;s judging from the sidelines.

  39. I am the Walras, Equilibrate, and Price-Take

    Oh come on
    #2497865, posted on September 14, 2017 at 11:01 pm
    And speaking of unforgivable Abbott fumbles, does anyone even remember TURC? A once-in-a-generation opportunity to neuter the noxious unions, squandered. Back in 2013, would anyone have thought it possible to play such a strong hand so unbelievably badly?

    Makes a grown man cry, at the squandering of such an opportunity.

  40. mareeS

    We met TA at Gloucester one rainy cold afternoon when he and the Pollie Pedal team pulled in wringing wet at the roundabout pub. He was brilliant, just able to have a beer and a laugh and a chat. What a man.

  41. Mark A

    mareeS
    #2497991, posted on September 15, 2017 at 6:39 am

    We met TA at Gloucester one rainy cold afternoon when he and the Pollie Pedal team pulled in wringing wet at the roundabout pub. He was brilliant, just able to have a beer and a laugh and a chat. What a man.

    Nobody denies his human qualities. We bemoan his failure as PM.

  42. NormaP

    As an Abbott fan, my favourite letter to the ed in today’s Oz is:

    Unhappy anniversary

    As Malcolm Turnbull marks two years in office, it is an unhappy anniversary. During his innings, brand Liberal has been harmed, the support base divided, 14 lower house seats and three upper seats have been lost, while support for Pauline Hanson’s One Nation and Australian Conservatives has gone up. Turnbull has not whacked a leadership six on any front. And he has failed to harness a productive relationship with his predecessor in the interests of the team.

    That Turnbull has now led the Coalition for its longest, lowest period of primary vote support in Newspoll history, a repeat of the Leigh Sales question is called for: “What was the point of knifing Tony Abbott?”

    Mandy Macmillan, Singleton, NSW

  43. Spring is coming

    I recall a moment when a friend of a friend dropped into conversation a sledge against TA on the assumption everyone in the room was on the same page as her. I took issue with the comment and the assumption. Crickets. She looked at me like I had just stepped off the alien mothership.

    It’s all been a little awkward since then.

  44. notaluvvie

    Where are the stories and photos of Turnbull, Shorten, Gillard, Rudd and muslimics in muslimic garb just to name a few, out fighting bush fires? Nope, some of those are/were too busy giving our money and freedoms away while others just take and destroy them.

  45. lily

    ‘Wow’
    Posts today, are they coming from Labor and Getup?
    The name Abbott sure brings out the haters.

  46. notafan

    I’d have TA back in a heartbeat.

  47. Faye

    They flicked Abbott for Turnbull. The result?

  48. EvilElvis

    Tony. Had no support, no senate and maybe went softly on a few issues thinking he had time to sort them out. Time was cut short.

    Conservative? I’m not sure he is. Mind you not many people know what one is nowadays.

  49. Lysander

    Name the last PM who cut the ABC budget.

    **crickets**

    Yeah he had plenty of faults but as Nota said, I’d have him back in a heartbeat; meeting with Trump and Geert, in a Catholic Church with Pell and Lyle Shelton. They’d be discussing the scrapping of the RET, opening more coal power stations, increasing fracking, constitutional changes to enshrine Australia Day and normal marriage into the Constitution… 🙂

  50. old bloke

    Warty
    #2497702, posted on September 14, 2017 at 7:15 pm

    He survived to rethink some of his more stupid policies like the RET that is threatening to draw the Coalition into the maelstrom in their midst.

    Warty, Abbott wanted to get rid of the Climate Commission, Carbon Tax and the RET. He got rid of the first two (with Clive Palmer’s support), but Palmer wanted to retain the RET so Abbott failed there. This wasn’t Abbott’s fault, he did try but was blocked in the Senate.

    Oh come on
    #2497865, posted on September 14, 2017 at 11:01 pm

    And speaking of unforgivable Abbott fumbles, does anyone even remember TURC? A once-in-a-generation opportunity to neuter the noxious unions, squandered.

    It wasn’t Abbott who squandered the TURC outcomes, it was his successor who thought it was beneath him to even mention the TURC in the last elections. Remember that it was Abbott who established the Royal Commission, and if he was still leading the Liberal Party at the 2015 election, he would have made great use of its findings.

    Abbott had his failings, nevertheless he was a much better Prime Minister than many before him, and the one who succeed him.

  51. Mother Lode

    I think Abbott did probably as well as might be expected considering the hand he was dealt.

    A party literally dripping with wets, someone waiting to pounce on anything that can be twisted to discredit him with the electorate (Mick Trumble, take a bow), a hostile media (and that is all of them with semi-exception of the fickle, vacillating Paywallian) and the far too often overlooked timid, playing possum business community.

    The business community (which contains high profile people breathtakingly derelict in their duty to shareholders) who remained strangely silent when Labor ran up their various scary scenarios that would accrue from any repair of the budget.

    He was just one man.

    What do you think he could have done differently that would have simply led to an earlier, more splendid and glorious assassination.

    And if you think we need a Trump – if Trump had had to go the Republican party the way a PM must, attending to their petty whims and always be mindful that he holds office only at their mean self-serving pleasure, then we would be hearing about how Paul Ryan called President-Elect Killary to congratulate her on her victory.

    There are many more people who are far more culpable than Abbott.

    The conservative vote was (and is) complacent, The Liberal party actively undermining the conservative agenda, the press baying like infertile mules they are, and conservative groups always conveniently looking the other way.

    And why even talk about 18C? No one in the offering was going to do anything about it – not Labor, not the Greens, not Malcolm, so if you think he never intended to do anything that just puts him at the same level as the others. It can hardly be a reason to prefer Trumble, for example.

    And Abbott did raise the issue – until the Liberal party scuppered it (take a bow George Brandis).

    And, to be brutally honest, there is a cruel harsh calculus involved. For most voters s18C was a remote issue. They weren’t likely to be the targets and what was happening occurred at a great distance. Far more proximate concerns were jobs and the economy (which people take very personally because they see it as a proxy for taxes).

    Abbott did do all we might have wanted, but it is just peevishness to dump all, or even most, of the blame on him.

  52. Mother Lode

    What do you think he could have done differently that would not have simply led to an earlier, more splendid and glorious assassination.

  53. Mother Lode

    Abbott did not do all we might have wanted, but it is just peevishness to dump all, or even most, of the blame on him.

  54. Vicki

    Of course Tony Abbott is a top bloke. Anyone who has spent any (non political) time with him will almost always tell you that.

    He was also a damn successful leader of the Opposition when this country desperately needed one. He also stepped forward to try to counteract the stupidities that were being put about by Global Warming activists.

    But I defy anyone to claim that he was a great – or even adequate PM. He was bloody woeful. He equivocated on important issues to such a degree that his supporters winched every time he appeared on current affairs TV segments.

    You cannot be all things to all voters. Abbott seems to have thought that it what a wise statesman does.

    You must continue to stand for what you said you do in order to earn the trust of the general public. Abbott failed to do that. And it was a great pity.

  55. Mother Lode

    So, Vicki, what would you have done?

    And don’t rattle off the ideal results, but the nitty-gritty of getting things through.

    Make sure you take into account Trumble, Bishop, the rest of the wets, and the media that innervates the wets and gives them loudspeaker.

  56. Rabz

    Anyone here care to defend Abbott’s decision to make the Green Windbag of Wentworth the minister for the ALPBC and the National Brontosaurus Network?

    What a top move that was.

  57. Mother Lode

    Well, he couldn’t dump him, or send him to the back bench.

    I would guess he hoped Trumble would busy himself in a portfolio he claimed to no about (NBN).

    I doubt anyone was ready for just how brazenly Trumble would use the ABC to market himself.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing, but did anyone predict how Trumble would end up performing there?

    Abbott wasn’t infallible, I just doubt there was anyone better.

    And the situation has not improved.

  58. Chris

    Anyone here care to defend Abbott’s decision to make the Green Windbag of Wentworth the minister for the ALPBC and the National Brontosaurus Network?

    What a top move that was.

    Not me. Should have backbenched the bastard for his apparently useless efforts to reign in the swines. Of course, it soon became clear he was feeding them dirt and playing pattycake under the table, not sorting them out.

  59. Mother Lode

    Should have backbenched the bastard for his apparently useless efforts to reign in the swines.

    And Abbott would have been rolled sooner. Turnbull would be indignant at his being relegated to such a position.

    The whole party is a stinking corpse covered in weeping sores, life long since leeched out, wan, creaking and crawling with vermin. That is why it is probably easier to let it die and start again with a better class of people.

  60. Tim Neilson

    Well, he couldn’t dump him, or send him to the back bench.

    Maybe not straight away, but he should have done it the moment the self-promoting blancmange started overtly gnawing at the foundations (i.e. about three nanoseconds after Abbott officially took over).

  61. Tim Neilson

    Turnbull would be indignant at his being relegated to such a position.

    Oh, come on ML – you’re usually a beacon of sanity!

    Turnbull was indignant that the whole party didn’t dutifully follow him off the cliff, electorally, policy-wise and principle-wise. His rage at being dumped as leader was so incandescent that being punted to the back bench could have made only “climate change” levels of difference to the heat of his fury.

    The only reason to give him a Shadow Cabinet position for the few nanoseconds it took him to display disloyalty would have been so that the proven disloyalty could be thrown in the faces of any of the wets who had sufficient spine to protest about the puffed up poseur being demoted as far as it was possible to do before preselection time.

  62. Mother Lode

    And Maolcolm would have just said “Gosh darned it. Ya got me.”

    Knowing what we know now I think, unless he could find something that he could use to publicly and fully humiliate Trumble, Abbott was fated to be knifed by him. The pompous old fop only had one thought on his mind since he lost leadership, and his heart still clung the baseless belief in his own manifest destiny.

    But, even if he did drop a bombshell of some sort, Maol, the party, and the MSM would have smothered it and then started some new confected campaign against Abbott.

    As I say, the problem is far wider and deeper than a single man can hope to prevail against.

  63. lily

    Check out the comparison between accomplished jobs done by Abbott compared to Turnbull’s effort listed on Bolt today.
    A lot of people swallowed the fake media news on Abbott hook line and sinker.

  64. Crossie

    His only mistake is to stay with a party that needs to be dispatched forthwith and allowed to die its unnatural death.

    Where could he go? He couldn’t establish his own party, Bernardi and Hanson beat him to it.

    He can’t very well join either of them since he wronged both of them.

    I would still have him as prime minister rather than the perfumed ponce Malcolm or the bovver boy Bill.

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