The words speak for themselves

In today’s AFR, is the Australian Financial Review Magazine Power edition – Who’s got it, who’s lost it and who’s behind the scenes.

On the last page are some quotes on “What power means to me”.  This is what Kevid Rudd is said to have said:

Power has never really interested me all that much.  In fact, in the 2562 or so days since I was viciously stabbed in the back by my own party (2563 if you count the night of the initial betrayal), it’s really not something I’ve given much thought to.  But if pushed to think back on my days as prime minister, I’d say it was my ability to relate to ordinary Australians that, ipso facto, made me influential.  There’s nothing quite as powerful as being able to share an anecdote about a sauce bottle with some bogans at a barbecue, and then effortlessly translate that same anecdote into a range of languages for more sophisticated audiences.  It’s about being open-minded to.  People say I was difficult to work with, but I never found that.

On the money baby.  Ipso facto baybo.

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36 Responses to The words speak for themselves

  1. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    “Power has never really interested me all that much.”

    … and there I will leave it. He’s lying before even beginning his run up – a life relentlessly driven by the need for revenge for never, ever being selected in the Nambour High schoolyard cricket team.

  2. candy

    There’s nothing quite as powerful as being able to share an anecdote about a sauce bottle

    I have no doubt that is fake. AFR joking or they just made it up. Journalists do just make stuff up these days.

  3. Entropy

    This just has to be a pisstake.

  4. Dave in Marybrook

    Hilarious.
    My wife’s cousin’s partner was a staffer for the Emperor, and came over for a visit a year or two after Et Tu Julia rolled him. I knew that she was a deep left insider, and I wasn’t ungracious, but I had to ask, surely from within the office she’d seen the rhetorical inconsistency, the plastic chumminess, the legendary temper and unsustainable ego?
    She replied, completely believably, that all of them in the office thought he was fine and were stunned that these unfair allegations of nastiness kept coming up like some sort of justification.
    It’s good to hear again from the old Kevin. We need to keep his ilk and his rise to power in our memory- it was barely a decade ago.

  5. closeapproximation

    Fair shake of the programmatic specificity!

  6. Spelling mistake, alliteration, gratuitous use of Latin, self beclownment, the focus on trivia – it’s all too manufactured.
    Pisstake, as Entropy said.

  7. Up The Workers!

    Got it in a nutshell…without too much ‘detailed programmatic specificity’.

    Micturition duly purloined!

  8. H B Bear

    The AFR “Power Issue” is a Fauxfaxian circle jerk of epic proportions. This has to be a a piss-take, even for a narcissistic defective like KRudd.

  9. Megan

    To quote the immortal McEnroe…you cannot be serious!!!!!!

  10. Up The Workers!

    On the other hand, there is the mendicant State of South Australia’s Jay Weatherdill.

    Power is of absolutely zero interest to him – he just bought himself a Musk Battery in a great big carpet-bag.

    Bryant & Mays and Eveready shares are tipped to skyrocket in the land of Snowtown bank-vault barrels, Sarah Halfwit-Bung and Penny Wong.

  11. Biota

    People say I was difficult to work with, but I never found that.
    Narcissism in a sentence. Hilarious.

  12. billie

    Kev, maaaate, we’ve missed you, good times eh?

    ah ha ha ha

    unbelievable, you wonder if the left ever actually listen to themselves objectively (rhetorical Q, requires no answer)

  13. Bear Necessities

    Just as Bruce Willis’s character in the sixth sense doesn’t know he is dead, Kevin Rudd doesn’t know he is a ……………

  14. Oh come on

    In fact, in the 2562 or so days since I was viciously stabbed in the back by my own party (2563 if you count the night of the initial betrayal)

    This whole thing has got to be a pisstake written by a Gillard fan. The above passage puts it beyond any doubt.

  15. kc

    That hastoe be made up….surely. Not even Krudd would say that with a straight face, would he?

  16. Penguinite

    What no “programmatic Specificity”?

  17. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    with some Bogans

    You weren’t sharing anything, Kev, it’s that’s the way you speak about people in their absence.
    That term has programmatic specificity. You use it guardedly and cautiously, often when joking but never in a description about some group’s awfulness. That is very ABC talk.

    I often say here I was taught to drive by ‘the Bogan boys’. That is true, and they would not be offended at me saying that. Firstly, I was an insider, and secondly, I wasn’t slinging off at them. Given the state of their cars, I learned some really fancy techniques of maintaining control. They knew that and were proud of it and their interesting vehicles. So was I.

  18. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    ..oops… if not it’s

  19. Terry

    “Journalists do just make stuff up these days.”

    How would we know what Journalists do these days.

    I believe the last of them disappeared a few years ago. Last seen doing an investigative piece on the Tasmanian Tiger.

    “Journalist” has about as much meaning as “Climate Scientist” and “Public Servant” these days.

    Accurate descriptions would demand “Propagandist”, “Charlatan” and “Parasite” as replacements.

  20. calli

    Spelling mistake, alliteration, gratuitous use of Latin, self beclownment, the focus on trivia – it’s all too manufactured.
    Pisstake, as Entropy said.

    Chuckle. Is our favourite Cat journo wearing a Kevni skinsuit?

  21. Crossie

    Oh, come on, this has got to be a parody.

    On the other hand maybe not. I remember the images of Kev at the 2020 shindig where he was sitting crossed legged on the floor with his hand picked luminaries enthusiastically drawing on butcher’s paper and planning His Majestic future.

  22. Bill

    Hate to admit it of the Fauxfacts press – but that really is good.

  23. alexnoaholdmate

    The sign of good satire is that you can’t be sure whether it’s genuine or not.

    This is good satire – if it IS satire…

  24. Tim Neilson

    Dave in Marybrook
    #2516059, posted on October 6, 2017 at 9:10 am

    That’s interesting. It’s only the second time I’ve heard about anyone who had actually met KRudd and had a good word to say about him. The other one was a star struck leftist who had met him only briefly in public at an official function so I had dismissed that one.
    But I have met a lot of people (who weren’t partisan anti-Labor BTW) who had to deal with him and couldn’t stand him.
    Strange that there can be such a divergence in perceptions.

  25. Tim Neilson

    Dave in Marybrook
    #2516059, posted on October 6, 2017 at 9:10 am

    PS I had heard that staff turnover in KRudd’s office was at revolving door levels – again a strange dichotomy.

  26. Pedro the Ignorant

    The sign of good satire is that you can’t be sure whether it’s genuine or not.

    Fully concur. The sad part is that it is entirely believable that the Milky Bar Kid actually said all this drivel.

  27. Speedbox

    Nah, somebody’s taking the piss.

    Rudd was a narcissist lunatic but even that comment is beyond him.

  28. Rob MW

    Rudd’s turn of the Australian vernacular is about as empty as the mining tax, fucked up as embellishing the President of the United States and as bruised as Turnbull holding an old ute out to piss.

  29. NB

    Dave in Marybrook
    #2516059, posted on October 6, 2017 at 9:10 am
    ‘all of them in the office thought he was fine and were stunned that these unfair allegations of nastiness kept coming up like some sort of justification.’

    Tim Neilson
    #2516226, posted on October 6, 2017 at 12:25 pm
    ‘I have met a lot of people (who weren’t partisan anti-Labor BTW) who had to deal with him and couldn’t stand him.
    Strange that there can be such a divergence in perceptions.’

    Tim Neilson
    #2516230, posted on October 6, 2017 at 12:26 pm
    ‘PS I had heard that staff turnover in KRudd’s office was at revolving door levels – again a strange dichotomy.’

    How interesting. It would be fascinating to know what really went on. Could it be that left ideologues got their noses put out of joint by Rudd? That the party ran to Gillard, a most extraordinary choice, suggests this.
    In any case, the quoted para has to be fiction. It is too perfectly perverse. As alexnoaholdmate says (#2516217, posted on October 6, 2017 at 12:17 pm) the best satire may seem genuine.

  30. Leo G

    People say I was difficult to work with, but I never found that.

    In other (Rudd) words, finding a working reality is going a bridge too far by not going far enough.

  31. He should have mentioned that he remains a committed Fiscal Conservative.

  32. Bob in Castlemaine

    Was that actually 2562 days, 8 hours, 43 minutes and 3 seconds? But apparently it’s “really not something I’ve given much thought to.” really?

  33. J.H.

    Kevin Rudd quote: “People say I was difficult to work with, but I never found that.”

    Fair shake of th’ sauce bottle Kev, but you’re as thick as a fukin’ brick mate.

  34. Tel

    “Journalist” has about as much meaning as “Climate Scientist” and “Public Servant” these days.

    “Journalist” is a rare example of a single-word oxymoron.

    It’s not even like they keep a journal.

  35. Dave in Marybrook

    Tim and NB-
    I seem to recall she might not of been permanent insider, but working on something to do with Asian engagement fulfillment specificity after her time with DFAT in Thailand- so she was more of the Summit-Listening Tour mob that Rudd gathered to himself and probably hammed it up for.
    And they loved him for it. After all, he bought a lot of Canberrans a job for what might have looked like the eternal golden age.

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