Tony Abbott: Daring to Doubt

Here is the full text of his presentation which is extraordinary, especially when you think how almost unique his views are among political leaders. And as long as you may think this excerpt is, you really should go to the link and read it all, or just watch it all.

To a greater or lesser extent, in most Western countries, we can’t keep our borders secure; we can’t keep our industries intact; and we can’t preserve a moral order once taken for granted. Eventually, something will crystalize out of this age of disruption but in the meantime we could be entering a period of national and even civilizational decline.

In Australia, we’ve had ten years of disappointing government. It’s not just the churn of prime ministers that now rivals Italy’s, the internal divisions and the policy confusion that followed a quarter century of strong government under Bob Hawke and John Howard. It’s the institutional malaise. We have the world’s most powerful upper house: a Senate where good government can almost never secure a majority. Our businesses campaign for same sex marriage but not for economic reform. Our biggest company, BHP, the world’s premier miner, lives off the coal industry that it now wants to disown. And our oldest university, Sydney, now boasts that its mission is “unlearning”. . . .

Since the Global Financial Crisis, at least in the West, growth has been slow, wages stagnant, opportunities limited, and economic and cultural disruption unprecedented. Within countries and between them, old pecking orders are changing. Civilizational self-doubt is everywhere; we believe in everyone but ourselves; and everything is taken seriously except that which used to be.

Just a few years ago, history was supposed to have ended in the triumph of the Western liberal order. Yet far from becoming universal, Western values are less and less accepted even in the West itself. We still more or less accept that every human being is born with innate dignity; with rights, certainly, but we’re less sure about the corresponding duties. . . .

Climate change is by no means the sole or even the most significant symptom of the changing interests and values of the West. Still, only societies with high levels of cultural amnesia – that have forgotten the scriptures about man created “in the image and likeness of God” and charged with “subduing the earth and all its creatures” – could have made such a religion out of it.

There’s no certain way to regain cultural self-confidence. The heart of any recovery, though, has to be an honest facing of facts and an insistence upon intellectual rigour. More than ever, the challenge of leadership is to say what you mean and do what you say. The lesson I’ve taken from being in government, and then out of it, is simply to speak my mind. The risk, when people know where you stand, is losing their support. The certainty, when people don’t know where you stand, is losing their respect. . . .

Beware the pronouncement, “the science is settled”. It’s the spirit of the Inquisition, the thought-police down the ages. Almost as bad is the claim that “99 per cent of scientists believe” as if scientific truth is determined by votes rather than facts.

There are laws of physics; there are objective facts; there are moral and ethical truths. But there is almost nothing important where no further enquiry is needed. What the “science is settled” brigade want is to close down investigation by equating questioning with superstition. It’s an aspect of the wider weakening of the Western mind which poses such dangers to the world’s future.

Physics suggests, all other things being equal, that an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would indeed warm the planet. Even so, the atmosphere is an almost infinitely complex mechanism that’s far from fully understood. . . .

Certainly, no big change has accompanied the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration over the past century from roughly 300 to roughly 400 parts per million or from 0.03 to 0.04 per cent.

Contrary to the breathless assertions that climate change is behind every weather event, in Australia, the floods are not bigger, the bushfires are not worse, the droughts are not deeper or longer, and the cyclones are not more severe than they were in the 1800s. Sometimes, they do more damage but that’s because there’s more to destroy, not because their intensity has increased. More than 100 years of photography at Manly Beach in my electorate does not suggest that sea levels have risen despite frequent reports from climate alarmists that this is imminent. . . .

Australia, for instance, has the world’s largest readily available supplies of coal, gas and uranium, yet thanks to a decade of policy based more on green ideology than common sense, we can’t be sure of keeping the lights on this summer; and, in the policy-induced shift from having the world’s lowest power prices to amongst the highest, our manufacturing industry has lost its one, big comparative economic advantage. . . .

Also now apparent is the system instability and the perverse economics that subsidised renewables on a large scale have injected into our power supply. Not only is demand variable but there’s a vast and unpredictable difference between potential and dispatch-able capacity at any one time. Having to turn coal fired power stations up or down as the wind changes makes them much less profitable even though coal remains by far the cheapest source of reliable power.

A market that’s driven by subsidies rather than by economics always fails. Subsidy begets subsidy until the system collapses into absurdity. In Australia’s case, having subsidised renewables, allegedly to save the planet; we’re now faced with subsidising coal, just to keep the lights on. . . .

In the longer term, we need less theology and more common sense about emissions reduction. It matters but not more than everything else. As Clive James has suggested in a celebrated recent essay, we need to get back to evidence based policy rather than “policy based evidence”.

Even if reducing emissions really is necessary to save the planet, our effort, however Herculean, is barely-better-than-futile; because Australia’s total annual emissions are exceeded by just the annual increase in China’s.

There’s a veneer of rational calculation to emissions reduction but underneath it’s about “doing the right thing”. Environmentalism has managed to combine a post-socialist instinct for big government with a post-Christian nostalgia for making sacrifices in a good cause. Primitive people once killed goats to appease the volcano gods. We’re more sophisticated now but are still sacrificing our industries and our living standards to the climate gods to little more effect.

So far, climate change policy has generated new taxes, new subsidies and new restrictions in rich countries; and new demands for more aid from poor countries. But for the really big emitters, China and India, it’s a first world problem. Between them, they’re building or planning more than 800 new coal-fired power stations – often using Australian coal – with emissions, on average, 30 per cent lower than from our own ageing generators.

Unsurprisingly, the recipients of climate change subsidies and climate change research grants think action is very urgent indeed. As for the general public, of course saving the planet counts – until the bills come in and then the humbug detector is switched on. . . .

I’m reminded of the story of a man randomly throwing pieces of paper from the window of a train. Eventually his companion asked him why he did it. It keeps the elephants down, he said. “But there are no elephants here”, his companion replied. “Precisely; it’s a very successful method”.

A tendency to fear catastrophe is ingrained in the human psyche. Looking at the climate record over millions of years, one day it will probably come; whatever we do today won’t stop it, and when it comes, it will have little to do with the carbon dioxide emissions of mankind.

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190 Responses to Tony Abbott: Daring to Doubt

  1. Kurt

    What a breath fresh air. If you pardon the pun.

  2. Irreversible

    The man is totally full of crap. He had his chance, with the full support of his party, as PM do act. He did nothing at all. Zip. In fact the things he now wants to undo were his own doing. It is way past time for him to get into the workforce and off the foghorn circuit.

  3. sfw

    Why did Abbotts courage and commonsense disappear completely when he was PM, I don’t think he realises how badly he let the nation down by not standing firm on the things that he said he believed in.

    I just don’t know that if he did regain the PM job that he wouldn’t just disappear into another pile of jellybacked letdowns and giving in.

  4. sfw

    Irreversible, I don’t think he had the full backing of his party, from day one some of the slimeballs were out to get him. Pity he wasn’t more like Trump and used his victory to impose his will on a reluctant party. He either didn’t have the courage or didn’t really believe that what he said wastrue.

  5. Uh oh

    To give him credit I think he now realizes that he should have backed himself, been a bit more aggressive and stopped trying to half-please everyone. Too late now unfortunately.

  6. anonandon

    With respect Irreversible, so what? Does that make everything he says wrong?

  7. I got to the bit about

    “More than ever, the challenge of leadership is
    to say what you mean and do what you say”.

    Then I remembered who was saying it.
    Then I threw up in my mouth.

    Hypocrisy, thine name is Abbott.

  8. Bron

    It is an excellent lecture and it is disappointing to see Cats carping and complaining about the fellow instead of taking this seriously.

  9. sfw

    The only thing that Abbott could that could give him a second chance is not the mealy mouthed sentiment of “I could have done things better” but a complete self abasement of how much he fucked up his chance and naming and shaming the pricks who worked to undo him from day one and a rapprochement with Bernardi or some sort of agreement with the Aus Conservatives.

    Nothing less will do.

  10. Neenee

    Australians gave Bob Menzies a second chance and most were happy with the outcome. I feel that Tony Abbott will also be better the second time around.

  11. Bron

    Why don’t you armchair generals pretend the lecture was written by your favorite statesman… Whitlam perhaps… read it through and judge it on its merits and not waste our time with your endless cynical views about Abbott’s past performance.

  12. stackja

    TA was supported by who, in his first term? MT? JB?
    Where are the other voices? Even those who are for change are not getting heard or are not speaking. Why?

  13. It is an excellent lecture and it is disappointing to see Cats carping and complaining about the fellow instead of taking this seriously.

    Why should we take this bloke seriously?
    We did that once already, and he spat in our face.

    I feel that Tony Abbott will also be better the second time around.

    How? He got elected the first time with the second biggest HoR majority in the history Australian federal parliaments, and yet wouldn’t do what he got elected to do. He didn’t even try.

    If by some bizarre miracle he ended up leading the Liberals into government again, it would be with a paper-thin majority, and very little chance of doing anything meaningful anyway.

    Unless, of course, he took a leaf out Turdbull’s playbook, and started implementing Labor’s policies. On past performance that’s always a very real possibility.

  14. Bron

    It doesn’t actually matter whether he spat in your face, memoryvault.

    Read the lecture. In several places he discusses political realities frankly, far more frankly that any most politicians. Short of him cutting his wrists in your front room in atonement… he is actually addressing the politics of the climate change scam. This makes Abbott’s contribution about 1000 times more useful than yours.

  15. read it through and judge it on its merits and not waste our time with your endless cynical views about Abbott’s past performance.

    Yeah, we should start judging politicians by their words, rather than their deeds.
    Like:

    “There will be no carbon tax under a government I lead”

  16. he is actually addressing the politics of the climate change scam.
    This makes Abbott’s contribution about 1000 times more useful than yours.

    How? He was addressing a roomful of true (un)believers as a rejected, has-been backbencher, with SFA coverage by the media, and zero filtration down to the general public. How is that “contribution” more useful than any other lone voice in the wilderness? I reached more people with my 1990 book “The Green Hoax Effect” (70,000 plus copies sold).

    Now let’s imagine Abbott as PM had taken a year off from dressing in lycra and riding bicycles in charity events, and posing with blokes fighting bushfires, and camping out in remote Aboriginal communities, and had instead spent that time giving the above address in primary and secondary schools right around Australia. With a special, personal, written invite from the PM, to parents, to attend. With information packs on “climate change” handed out at the end.

  17. stackja

    memoryvault
    #2528636, posted on October 20, 2017 at 5:24 pm

    Who do you want leading Australia?
    MT? BS?

  18. zyconoclast

    Why did Abbotts courage and commonsense disappear completely when he was PM, I don’t think he realises how badly he let the nation down by not standing firm on the things that he said he believed in.

    I don’t care what he believed in, he was elected to do what the voters wanted and he didn’t.

    There won’t be a Two Time Tony.

  19. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker) Gray

    Who do I want leading Australia? Someone other than the poor selection we are offered! Leyonhelme doesn’t have the numbers, and everyone else seems same-oh, same-oh.

  20. Barry 1963

    All these sweeping ideas are rubbish. The people want sound and efficient administration. That’s all.

  21. stackja

    zyconoclast
    #2528654, posted on October 20, 2017 at 5:43 pm
    Why did Abbotts courage and commonsense disappear completely when he was PM, I don’t think he realises how badly he let the nation down by not standing firm on the things that he said he believed in.

    I don’t care what he believed in, he was elected to do what the voters wanted and he didn’t.

    There won’t be a Two Time Tony.

    So you support MT/BS?

  22. Empty Vessel

    Unfortunately a lot of the comments above are accurate: taken in isolation it’s an excellent speech, but TA as PM was just another jellybacked polly who tried in vain to appease people (in particular the media) who hated him. So his policy legacy is negligible. I’d need to hear a speech from him acknowledging where he went wrong, before considering giving him a second go.

    Trump set a new paradigm: the media are rude to you? Be ruder back. Biased? Get stuck into them on it. It’s untidy and unpresidential, but better than grovelling to people who will never treat you fairly. Too many pollies in what they think is the “sensible” centre-right are just adrift and being forever dragged left. TA may have the spine to do it, but he’d need to tell us plainly.

  23. Who do you want leading Australia?
    MT? BS?

    The Tweedle Dum or Tweedle Dee Alternative?
    You actually think it would make a difference, Stackja?

    If I had my druthers, right now I’d rather see a takeover by a benevolent dictator with military backing. Despite the very real dangers, I see it as the only way out of where are now.

    We are way past the point of a political solution.

  24. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Tony has been reading the Cat.

  25. calli

    If I had my druthers, right now I’d rather see a takeover by a benevolent dictator with military backing. Despite the very real dangers, I see it as the only way out of where are now.

    I’m curious. Can you name a benevolent dictator who hasn’t become a tyrant?

  26. Sean

    The senate have hamstrung the government so he’s right on that front.

  27. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I’m curious. Can you name a benevolent dictator who hasn’t become a tyrant?

    What’s the difference to that and fabian marxist’s death by a thousand cuts?

  28. I’m curious. Can you name a benevolent dictator who hasn’t become a tyrant?

    Not off the top of my head. That’s why I wrote “despite the very real dangers . . .”
    But hope springs eternal. Ted Mack is still alive. He may have some ideas.

  29. stackja

    utopia
    noun
    an imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect.

    Today we know Sir Thomas More primarily as the author of Utopia, and as one of the more famous martyrs of Henry VIII’s reign.

  30. Oh come on

    Too late, Too Late Tony.

    Sorry, wish it weren’t so. Really wish it weren’t. Where were you during the Abbott PMship? And who was that idiot dead-ringer of you, you know, that Team Australia plonker who seemed to obtain immense pleasure from alienating his base in doomed leftist outreach programmes?

  31. calli

    Thanks, MV. I doubt such a person exists. Temptation will always creep in.

    I expect TA was tempted to take the easy path and this is where he’s found himself – distrusted by just about everyone. A lot of the comments on this thread remind me of brides jilted at the altar.

    So how does one win back trust after a failure? And that failure aided and abetted by his own party. The speech is a start, though I’m not convinced.

    Although the horrid antics of his middle child are softening my heart somewhat.

  32. calli

    expect = suspect

    I blame a nice Hewittson rosé.

  33. mareeS

    We had a beer with him a few years ago on a rainy afternoon in Gloucester, while he was on the pollie pedal.

    I had been a fan, and having met him, I will always be a fan.

    This man stands out above a very mediocre political bunch.

    The rest should be ashamed of themselves and apologise to us out here in voterland.

  34. TheSemiMentalBloke

    Well I thought it was a brilliant speech full of commonsense. Menzies and Howard were better second time around and I believe it will be the same with Abbott.

  35. calli

    And his sister. I understand what it’s like to have strong Christian views and have an agitating, gloves off sibling. Loyalty and love are stretched to gossamer fineness.

  36. I doubt such a person exists. Temptation will always creep in.

    They exist, Calli.

  37. This man stands out above a very mediocre political bunch.

    So, he was in his lycra cycling shorts and had a package that would even please Jackie Lambie.
    What’s that got to do with politics?

  38. calli

    I know about Ted Mack, MV. I’m a Lower North Shore girl at heart.

    He didn’t have a chance at dictatorship though. And he would be tempted. Everyone is.

  39. Sydney Boy

    I’m curious. Can you name a benevolent dictator who hasn’t become a tyrant?

    Lee Kuan Yew

  40. And he would be tempted.

    He retired from politics – twice – to avoid receiving million dollar plus pensions. Plus perks.
    That’s a lot of temptation he turned his back on.

  41. calli

    Sydney Boy, this isn’t my question, but The Beloved’s.

    How wealthy was Lee Kwan Yew when he died?

  42. Tel

    I’m curious. Can you name a benevolent dictator who hasn’t become a tyrant?

    Elizabeth the First was popular… unless you happened to be Irish.

  43. mareeS

    We have worked on political campaigns and have written some good speeches for people, but I just love that Abbott writes his own stuff, and is so lucid,. He will be back, whatever the efforts of Mark Riley at 7 and the ABC.

  44. He will be back, whatever the efforts of Mark Riley at 7 and the ABC.

    You’re probably right.
    He will be drafted, like Kevin Rudd, to “try and save some of the furniture”, when Lord Waffleworth announces his retirement, effective immediately, six weeks out from the next election.

  45. egg_

    Winning!

    Aunty has resorted to Trump666 style ridiculing of AbbottSatan666 – confirmation they’ve lost the argument on the ruinables farce.

    But, but… France!
    Shove it!

  46. Baldrick

    Yes, Tony Abbott was useless as PM, but remember the cockhead Stupid.Fucking.Liberals he had to work with:
    Julie Bishop, Malcolm Turnbull, Joe Hockey, Scott Morrison, George Brandis, Mitch Fifield, Josh Frydenberg, Greg Hunt, Christopher Pyne …
    I could go on but I’m already feeling nauseous.

  47. NB

    I’m not so sure it is too late for TA. A commenter above mentions Menzies’ comeback.
    This speech was really good. If TA can continue on that path, well who knows? The choices otherwise are pretty dismal. With Trump’s example of answering back to the loving left and its grafted media, TA might make some headway through the sludge.

  48. Herodotus

    Dictators who didn’t become tyrants?
    Tricky distinction, but two who were called by both pejoratives did in the long run hand over their countries in reasonable to good shape after their necessarily strict correction period – Pinochet and Franco.

  49. jupes

    Yes, Tony Abbott was useless as PM, but remember the cockhead Stupid.Fucking.Liberals he had to work with:

    And if he comes back as leader guess who he has to work with?

    Vote Australian Conservatives or leave the country.

  50. Herodotus

    Quite so, Baldrick.
    Many seem to forget or gloss over that sordid fact.

  51. In reading his speech I have this nagging doubt that he is just having a quid each way without a total commitment to one point of view. He seems to say what we all want to hear from a politician then tempers his statements by backing away. This is very similar to what he in fact did as PM backing away from policies brought to the election plus strange actions based on religion and an absence of ticker. Had he sacked Brandis over 18c he may have won some friends but his denial of the islamic problem in Australia,his support for a ridiculous ppl and a disgraceful attitude toward age pensioners showed just how stupid the liberals had become. I love the way he talks now but it is all too late and really does a leopard change his spots?

  52. Baldrick

    And if he comes back as leader guess who he has to work with?
    Vote Australian Conservatives or leave the country.

    Amen to that.

  53. Yes, Tony Abbott was useless as PM, but remember the cockhead Stupid.Fucking.Liberals he had to work with:

    Maybe, Baldrick. But it might have helped if he hadn’t handed his bitterest opponent the ABC to use as a mouthpiece against him, appointed a stupid fat fvck who only made it into parliament as a mistake, as his Treasurer, named a card-carrying SJW Greenie as his Environment Minister, and given Education to a mincing, bi-sexual cross dresser.

  54. Long after Turnbull runs away like a squealing piglet, Abbott will be the last man standing. And Nikki Savva and PvO will be still be writing the same article about him.

  55. Baldrick

    Okay, I’m over my bout of nausea …
    Kelly O’Dwyer, Nigel Scullion, Susan Ley, Michael Keenan, Michaelia Cash, Steven Ciobo, Simon Birmingham, Fiona Nash, Arthur Sinodinos …

    On second thoughts.

  56. min

    A lot of Cats wanting perfection. Hate to be one of your kids.

  57. This speech was really good. If TA can continue on that path, well who knows?

    But we DO know.
    It’s the same “vote for me, I’ll get things done”, BS he was spouting to get elected in the first place.
    Once elected he turned his back on the whole lot, and p1ssed all over the electorate instead.
    What on earth makes you think a re-run would be any different?

  58. Baldrick

    Maybe, Baldrick. But it might have helped if he hadn’t handed his bitterest opponent the ABC to use as a mouthpiece against him …

    That’s what I’m saying MV. What other choices were there?
    The Stupid.Fucking.Liberal.Party is full of cockheads.

  59. Arnost

    Abbott proves that he as IMMENSE value in Australian politics. He gives voice to issues that no one else does.

    To all of you purists who were disappointed (like me) with his performance in the PM role. Sunk cost / water under bridge / bye-gones. I suggest you LOOK FORWARD! If you can’t accept him as was in the PAST, fair enough. But he is clearly not that past Abbott. Accept him for what he is now, and if you can, acknowledge what he may be. We have no Trump in the wings! There is no one else.

    Burning the Abbott of today may be a Pyrrhic victory.

  60. OneWorldGovernment

    memoryvault
    #2528665, posted on October 20, 2017 at 5:55 pm

    The Tweedle Dum or Tweedle Dee Alternative?
    You actually think it would make a difference, Stackja?

    If I had my druthers, right now I’d rather see a takeover by a benevolent dictator with military backing. Despite the very real dangers, I see it as the only way out of where are now.

    We are way past the point of a political solution.

    memoryvault

    sometimes I get the anger that you feel.

    I am the most Benign Dictator that the world has ever created!

    Not benevolent.

    Benign.

  61. I am the most Benign Dictator that the world has ever created!

    I’ll happily settle for benign, OWG.
    When are you available to start?

  62. Bron

    We are past learning the details of this scam… anyone who is interested knows all about it now. What is now needed is politicians who are prepared to stick their necks out and speak, inevitably getting abuse and violent aggression from all directions, even including Cats. At the political level this was never anything but a huge wedge issue, designed to split the rational Liberals from the bedwetters. A giant cynical leftie scam. And a shockingly successful one, too. We were suckered.

    Trump is having a go, God bless him, and Toby has and is offering the most credible push back at the political level in Australia.

  63. Phill

    Object all you like, but I think Tony is the best available at present. He only needs to realise that the left exists to be stepped on, not to be engaged with.

  64. GerardO

    Maybe he could read this out at Pell’s trial.

  65. Entropy

    OWG, you could not possibly be as benign a dictator as moi.

    Huugghhhhahha, hugghashha higghhhuuaaaaa!
    (Pinky in corner of mouth)

  66. OneWorldGovernment

    memoryvault
    #2528724, posted on October 20, 2017 at 7:23 pm

    I am the most Benign Dictator that the world has ever created!

    I’ll happily settle for benign, OWG.
    When are you available to start?

    LOL

    I’ve already started and been at work for some time.

  67. Rayvic

    ‘How? He got elected the first time with the second biggest HoR majority in the history Australian federal parliaments, and yet wouldn’t do what he got elected to do. He didn’t even try. ”

    Some cats have short memories, and are warmists at heart. He got rid of the carbon tax, one of the main reasons he got elected.

    Now, the politically correct wheeler-dealer who knifed Abbott in the back, is conning everybody by ‘promising’ to reduce electricity prices and to improve supply reliability by upping installation of high-cost, uncontrollable, unreliable renewables by 50%. Given his apparent inability to recover from the long string of poor polls, perhaps MT would do us a favour by resigning after losing the next election, accompanied by ousting of his PC colleagues and followed, hopefully, by reform of the Liberal Party.

  68. That’s what I’m saying MV. What other choices were there?

    Baldrick, the whole point of “leadership” is getting people to do what YOU want done, not letting them do what they want to do. You appoint somebody to a position and you TELL them what you expect from them. If they fail to deliver you replace them. Simples.

    Abbott basically appointed a bunch of immature turds to his Ministry, then let them run riot like kids in a lolly shop, pushing their favourite hobbyhorses, with little regard for the agenda they were elected to implement. Hunt should have been keel-hauled when he failed to intervene in the Chris Turney Antarctic disaster. Pyne should have been catapulted back to the back bench as soon as the truth of Safe Schools came out. And so on.

    It’s not rocket science.

  69. Baldrick

    It’s not rocket science.

    No, it’s not rocket science MV, but it is politics.

  70. calli

    Herodotus
    #2528705, posted on October 20, 2017 at 6:50 pm
    Dictators who didn’t become tyrants?
    Tricky distinction, but two who were called by both pejoratives did in the long run hand over their countries in reasonable to good shape after their necessarily strict correction period – Pinochet and Franco.

    Had to go cook dinner. But…Yikes!

    You first, Hero. I’ll hide and watch.

  71. He got rid of the carbon tax, one of the main reasons he got elected.

    Oh sh1t! Wow! I forgot. He “got rid” of a temporary tax introduced by Gillard to get the Greens onside in implementing an ETS, as envisaged by Howard in 2007, to be effective from July 1, 2015, and replaced it with an ETS effective from July 1, 2016, a year later than as intended by Howard in 2007. In other words, he delivered exactly what had been intended for nearly a decade, only 12 months late.

    Perhaps we should worship him as the new Messiah?

  72. PeterPeterum

    Almost unique”

    No it’s not, Steve. It is either unique or it is not. I was taught vey early in my English class (in a Scottish school) that one cannot qualify the word “unique”. Having said that, there is no doubt that Tony Abbott is probably the only politician (Trump included) who has put the arguments against the AGW religion so succinctly and so well. What a man! I am sure that he is anything but delighted with the total hash Turnbull and his Energy Minister have made of their latest attempt to “control” the energy industry.

  73. calli

    On benign dictatorship, Tolkien had it about right…

    Already the Ring tempted him, gnawing at his will and reason. Wild fantasies arose in his mind; and he saw Samwise the Strong, Hero of the Age, striding with a flaming sword across the darkened land, and armies flocking to his call as he marched to the overthrow of Barad-dûr. And then all the clouds rolled away, and the white sun shone, and at his command the vale of Gorgoroth became a garden of flowers and trees and brought forth fruit. He had only to put on the Ring and claim it for his own, and all this could be.”

    It always starts that way.

  74. Neil

    Perhaps we should worship him as the new Messiah?

    perhaps you should resign from your job, enter Parliament and show us how it is done?

  75. Arnost

    Abbott basically appointed a bunch of immature turds to his Ministry, then let them run riot like kids in a lolly shop, pushing their favourite hobbyhorses, with little regard for the agenda they were elected to implement.

    He didn’t have much to work with.

    Given we now know how fucking useless Morrisson is – it is not difficult to surmise that Abbott spent his time stopping the boats. And negotiating with Fat Clive; Al Gore and Parkinson on how to unwind the Carbin tax. With that and the destabilising Maolcom to manage… he in hindsight probably did a solid job.

  76. candy

    TA stopped the boats and ensured border protection, perhaps the most significant policy success in 20 years looking at how the world is going, set up major trade deals, and supported traditional conservative values. Also he brought the current crop to their jobs via the big win in 2013.

    It’s just so weird the Liberals could not tolerate his success and had to knife him. You know, conservatives should never generally forgive them for that, is my opinion. Betrayal should never be rewarded, as it is only sticking together as a team (or whatever group) that we achieve or overcome. Loyalty is a true conservative value.

  77. Arnost

    the Liberals could not tolerate his success and had to knife him. </blockquote

    The media could not tolerate his success and had to knife him… and they poisoned the weak Liberal swampies into Maocolm's bussom.

  78. iampeter

    Oh sh1t! Wow! I forgot. He “got rid” of a temporary tax introduced by Gillard to get the Greens onside in implementing an ETS, as envisaged by Howard in 2007, to be effective from July 1, 2015, and replaced it with an ETS effective from July 1, 2016, a year later than as intended by Howard in 2007. In other words, he delivered exactly what had been intended for nearly a decade, only 12 months late.

    Perhaps we should worship him as the new Messiah?

    You are on fire in this thread MV. Basically +1 to all your posts at this point.

    The only thing I got from this speech is that he has an amazing the lack of self awareness in order to give this speech. How was nobody laughing? How did he manage to keep a straight face lol?

  79. Tom

    A lot of Cats wanting perfection. Hate to be one of your kids.

    Ah, yes, the Rand Paul brigade.

    I totally understand why libertarians like Dot are no longer here. They can’t explain their love of big government — the biggest single to threat to liberty in Australia and the USA.

  80. DM of WA

    Stop blaming Tony Abbott for failing to live up to his promises. Australia is not ruled by the prime minister; the PM is completely dependent on the support the cabinet and the caucus. Abbott never had strong support for his agenda amongst the parliamentary Liberal party and he made too many compromises. However he should not be a scapegoat; the failure should be shared around equally.

    Philosophically the majority of the present day parliamentary Liberal party is left of centre: they believe in big government as much as Labor. They do not believe in the power of individuals and free markets and they are not conservatives. (Even Abbott had way too much faith in big government for my taste.)

    The political centre in Australia has drifted to left and Tony Abbott was the closest thing to a conservative prime minister we in this country are likely to see for a long time.

  81. iampeter

    Abbott proves that he as IMMENSE value in Australian politics. He gives voice to issues that no one else does.

    But he was part of the government that created these issues in the first place and then even helped finalize them when in office and implemented Direct Action, very quietly mid-last year.

    He is basically a weather vane, wearing a suit and doesn’t have the good sense to just leave politics already.

  82. candy

    But he was part of the government that created these issues in the first place and then even helped finalize them when in office and implemented Direct Action, very quietly mid-last year.

    Mid 2016 Malcolm Turnbull was PM. He has been PM since Sept 2015, iampeter. It is confusing to know what you are talking about there.

  83. Muddy

    I see that humping the leg of political corpses is still the thing to be seen doing with the in-crowd.

  84. iampeter

    Candy, reading that back again it probably didn’t make sense.

    My point is that mid last year the Direct Actions emission capping came into effect.
    Direct Action was the climate policy implemented by Abbott after he repealed Gillard’s carbon tax.

    So, not only does this defeat the purpose of repealing a carbon tax in the first place, but it makes this speech here unintentional, standup comedy, as he laments the environmentalist policies this country faces with a straight face, when he was one of the major leaders implementing these policies.

  85. perhaps you should resign from your job, enter Parliament and show us how it is done?

    Basically been there, done that, Neil.
    Now that I’m an old cripple, maybe it’s your turn.

  86. Neil

    Basically been there, done that, Neil.
    Now that I’m an old cripple, maybe it’s your turn.

    I am not the one doing the condemning. You are.

    Fact is the left are vicious. very few people have the balls to stand up to them. Easy to be an armchair critic

  87. candy

    as he laments the environmentalist policies this country faces with a straight face, when he was one of the major leaders implementing these policies.

    Well, it seems a minor policy no-one knows about, and my hunch is he only did that to appease the Liberals who were all for very much stronger policies to reduce the temperatures of the world.

    I think you go either full climate change policies as Bill Shorten proposes, or not and build coal mines and provide power and not worry about the temperature of the world. I am not sure there is a halfway measure in what has become a very ideological issue. It’s almost like religion – you either believe in God or you don’t and act accordingly.

  88. Muddy

    ‘Abbottards.’ That’s a word, right?
    Definition: People who repeatedly vote to be politically pissed on.

  89. Fisky

    This man needs to provide exceptional evidence that he won’t be utter shite, before he gets another turn.

  90. So, not only does this defeat the purpose of repealing a carbon tax in the first place, but it makes this speech here unintentional, standup comedy, as he laments the environmentalist policies this country faces with a straight face, when he was one of the major leaders implementing these policies.

    +1 Iampeter

    The “carbon tax” was always only a temporary measure arrived at by Gillard to get the Greens to agree to pass the ETS legislation in the Senate. Originally the carbon tax was meant to be replaced by the ETS as of 1 July, 2015. Abbott, as PM, oversaw the passage of the carbon tax repeal legislation, around July 2014, complete with loophole allowing the introduction of an ETS “at a later date”.

    On September 2, 2015, while Tony Abbott was still PM, Greg Hunt circulated to Cabinet, the final draft of the Regulation to implement an ETS, in line with what Howard had envisaged in 2007, as outlined in Gillard’s carbon tax legislation of 2011, and as preserved in the carbon tax repeal legislation of 2014.

    In other words, we ended getting exactly what was planned for us way back in 2007. As a member of Howard’s cabinet, Abbott has been involved in this from Day One. Viewed in that light, Abbott’s speech to the GWPF can only be seen as high farce. How he does it with a straight face is beyond me.

  91. Joe Hockey made a great speech in London, came back home and did the freaking opposite.

    Actions, Tony. Not words, actions.

  92. Spring is near

    Very good speech. Delivery needs more passion. I doubt most Voters will engage TA with the paused and considered approach to every word.
    I know TAs speech itself was a winner by the way Aust. Msm mocked him and it.

    Can you believe we are now a country running low on electricity?

    And…
    If i have a look at Facebook i have a bewildering number of friends who want to stop Adani coal mine…
    Cos the scrub and hats and horses and stuff.

    Save me now sweet Jeebus!

  93. egg_

    Actions, Tony. Not words, actions.

    He’s been masterfully trolling Lord Waffleworth and his entrails in Trumplike fashion, for him to turn the Ruinables ship – has anyone managed to achieve this?

    Crickets?

  94. TP

    MV you fuckwit, give us your expert opinion on how to solve our power crisis. Leave Abbott out of it & concentrate on all the current political players including Finkel.

  95. Arnost

    The way I see it is simply as a choice between the Turnbullites and Abbott. (Abbott does not have a sycophantic cheer squad). If appears that most of the Cat prefer Turnbull. Me – not so much.

  96. The way I see it is simply as a choice between the Turnbullites and Abbott. (Abbott does not have a sycophantic cheer squad). If appears that most of the Cat prefer Turnbull. Me – not so much.

    I think it’s more the case of too many of the Cat let themselves be overly optimistic when Abbott gained power. The disappointment stings long and hard.

    As for Turnbull, everyone knew that he would be an utter dipstick, (certain blog owners excepted), and events have proven them correct. Thus no disappointment to bare.

    It’s far worse to let people down than to be a complete failure from the start.

    I myself also hold out hope that Abbott will have learned much during his time of purgatory. As long as The Battered Sav and Peter Van Ineptitude continue to fixate on him then we know that the Abbott fire still burns.

  97. MV you fuckwit, give us your expert opinion on how to solve our power crisis.

    My, such people skills. How come you’re not in the diplomatic corps?

    Anyway, to answer your question, there IS no short, or even medium term solution.
    One day, sometime well into the future, we will build some new coal fired power stations, and let them supply electricity on an open market. But that day is at least a decade away. In the meantime Australians will pay prohibitive prices for an unreliable electrical supply, while most of our industrial base closes shop, goes broke, or moves offshore.

    All goes according to plan.

  98. Muddy

    Let’s do this right and invite KRuddy back. After all, everyone deserves a third chance, right?

    I’d like to pretend that I’m not astounded by the level of delusion that exists, here, after all of this time, but I am. You do not HAVE to choose between Turnbull and Abbott, or between White Labor or Labor Lite. You can DEMAND another option. OR, you can sit back, scratch where you once hoped your balls would grow, and quietly let yourself be suffocated, content in your last moment of misery with the knowledge that at least you had ‘hope’ and you were polite about it all. Fucking retards.

  99. Chris M

    I do believe this is the chap that persecuted Pauline and had her incarcerated…. and we still don’t know where the cash to do that came from.

  100. anonandon

    Quite a few commentators with 20/20 hindsight. There was pre trump and post trump. The political climate was very different pre trump and that was the one TA was working in. Yes he made some mistakes and disappointed many but he was still light years better than the softcock sitting in the Lodge right now and the fuckwit who would be king sitting opposite him. Bring him back.

  101. Rabz

    The entire parliamentary gliberal party should be despatched to Mosquebourne toot sweet and euthanased.

    It’s all they (and the long suffering electorate) deserve.

  102. Arnost

    The entire parliamentary gliberal party should be despatched to Mosquebourne toot sweet and euthanased.

    Indeed… if only some here directed their vitriol on the leftard Libs rather than emulating the bittered sav or wrngselen, then maybe the message would get through. As it is anyone reading this would guess that even the Cat rejects what Abbott666 says.

  103. As it is anyone reading this would guess that even the Cat rejects what Abbott666 says.

    And why wouldn’t we?
    It’s not as though we haven’t heard it all before.

  104. Arnost

    And why wouldn’t we?

    Virtue signalling. Doesn’t cut it.

  105. Virtue signalling. Doesn’t cut it.

    And just what “virtue” is being signaled?
    We are sick of politicians feeding us bullsh1t?
    Seems a worthy “virtue” to me.

  106. Rayvic

    Memoryvault

    What has Malcolm achieved apart from losing 14 seats in the last election, and trailing badly in the polls?

    How is he going to recover to win the next election?

  107. egg_

    . You do not HAVE to choose between Turnbull and Abbott

    You can’t – the Party room does.

    At least Abbott has the balls to say what most MPs likely know – that the IPCC is a crock.

  108. egg_

    What has Malcolm achieved apart from losing 14 seats in the last election, and trailing badly in the polls?

    sTumble knows that Abbott can very effectively troll him with the 2PP down to 46%.

  109. True Aussie

    Abet comes so close but in the end he is a cuck. He is too weak to speak the full truth, too weak to break away from the libs, and too weak to stop his daughter becoming an androgynous freak

  110. I would prefer Abbott leading the Libs rather than Turnbull but I’d still vote AusCon for the foreseeable future.

  111. Rabz

    Is Abbott beyond redemption?

    I think he is, as does a massive chunk of the gliberals’ erstwhile base.

  112. Rayvic

    The Coalition’s polling under Turnbull is actually worse than the latest TPP of 46/54. For the last 15 Newspolls its primary vote has been at a catastrophic 37 per cent or less (cf 41.8 per cent at the 2016 election). As more analysts realise the unworkability of the National Energy Guarantee — what a pretentious title — the Coalition’s polling can only deteriorate further.

  113. Oh come on

    If appears that most of the Cat prefer Turnbull. Me – not so much.

    Arnost, go home. You’re drunk.

    Seriously, virtually no one here bar DL prefers Turnbull over Abbott. Criticism of Abbott does not indicate a preference for his idiot successor.

  114. Tom

    This is actually Abbott, the journalist, speaking. It’s a very accurate account of the past decade in Australian politics in which he is just a character, from which Abbott, the journalist, is now detached. And you know he is right over the target with the new wave of Abbott Derangement it has provoked from the gutter press.

    Of course, he was a shit leader. He was full of self-doubt and allowed a woman (Credlin) to countermand virtually every one of his instincts.

    There is virtually zero chance he will return as a party leader, but Turnbull is at least as bad and should never have been recycled by the backbench rabbits. There is a bottomless black hole where our national leadership should have been and Peanut Head will be another disaster as PM who will make the Lying Slapper look good — a corrupt union gangster settling a series of scores and destroying what’s left of the Australian economy.

    Imagine Abbott in that vacuum and beware the redemption arc.

  115. Defender of the faith

    Notable that those who defend Abbott blame either his colleagues or Credlin for his inept job as PM. I would simply remind all that he went into the trenches on no issue. Not one. He legislated the RET. he rammed away at PPL. And somehow decided to test his authority by giving Phil the Greek a gong.
    Abbott had absolute power and could have done whatever he liked after winning government. He didn’t do a thing and he deserves no respect at all.

  116. egg_

    There is virtually zero chance he will return as a party leader

    Methinks Joe Public would give him a chance to redeem himself and in particular the “delcon” base who “don’t matter”.

  117. calli

    Abbott had absolute power and could have done whatever he liked after winning government.

    No Senate majority.

  118. Defender of the faith

    calli: was there any issue on which Abbott tested the senate?

  119. calli

    I don’t know, but I sense a goalpost change.

    Testing the Senate in the chamber is the endgame. Testing the Senate before the vote – I expect he did and got a great big pile of nothing. I would prefer that the Libs took their proposals all the way so at least it could be recorded in Hansard. Disappointing.

  120. With such a large mandate the Abbott government should have defunded the ABC, withdrawn from all UN climate agreements, halted and dismantled all the labor programs and commissions instigated by RGR, cut public service spending by 30%, close down the AHRC and trashed the RET and subsidies.
    Now who in the liberal party worked against this, Turnbull,Brandis,Bishop,Pyne,Hunt plus all the other socialists. The liberals had become a socialist party long before Abbott took the reins and they don’t look like becoming a conservative party any time soon. Time to gee up Cory and Pauline to have in place strong conservative candidates that hate labor policies.

  121. Abbott had absolute power and could have done whatever he liked after winning government. He didn’t do a thing and he deserves no respect at all.
    It is apparent that he did not have absolute power in the cabinet room as the socialists worked against him.
    He succeeded on two things BOATS and CARBON TAX . As for anything else zilch.

  122. Tel

    No Senate majority.

    There’s plenty of ways the Executive can choose not to spend money. For starters they can sack people, and they can simply shut down operations that appear to be wasting a lot of money. The budget is merely an allocation of funds, not a guarantee such funds must be spent.

    What’s more, if they just kept pushing with new budgets, the Senate eventually has to give in, or go to a new election. Abbott could have worked his position much better.

    Also, regardless of what others have said above, the other Liberal Party members were never properly behind Abbott, they did not respect his election victory, and much better results could have come out if those other guys had been willing to make the effort. Abbott is ultimately responsible because he was the leader, but the others are far from blameless. If they had volunteered to step up to the plate a bit more, then it would not have come down so much that the tasks fell to Abbott and Credlin.

  123. calli

    Agreed Tel. It was the “absolute power” comment that I questioned.

    Abbott should have played his hand differently. There were options. Your point about lack of respect is spot on. Something changed during the RGR years that diminished the idea of leadership and loyalty.

  124. TP

    Anyway, to answer your question, there IS no short, or even medium term solution.
    One day, sometime well into the future, we will build some new coal fired power stations, and let them supply electricity on an open market. But that day is at least a decade away. In the meantime Australians will pay prohibitive prices for an unreliable electrical supply, while most of our industrial base closes shop, goes broke, or moves offshore.

    MV, that answer gets you an F. You really are all piss & wind aren’t you. Just keep blaming Abbott for our woes . It just so happens that Abbott may have some answers while you my friend have none.

  125. the sting

    The first rule of any government should be ..what is best for Australia ? Now that may be a forlorn hope but at least with his speech in London, Tony Abbott spoke the truth about Australia’s needs . “Deplorables suggestions at 8.54 am would go a long way to curing the problems our country now faces.

  126. Rabz

    Something changed during the RGR years that diminished the idea of leadership and loyalty.

    Yeah, two things did indeed happen. Rudd and Gillard.

    A pair of preposterous imbeciles who were by no stretch of the imagination leaders and being such contemptible dunderheads, were entirely undeserving of any loyalty.

    As for Abbott – I have the following to say – his backdown on 18c was absolutely bloody inexcusable. Abolishing 18c and actually winding back some of the idiotic victim-industrial complex craziness foisted on us by his opponents was one of the key reasons I actually bothered to vote gliberal.

    Now we also have one of the most uncompetitive income tax scales in the so called developed world. Who’s to blame for that? Abbott. Any leader worth their salt would have shut that fat imbecile Hockey down as soon as the idea was first put to the latter by those wombat fondlers at treasury.

    But then any leader worth their salt wouldn’t have appointed morons like Hunt, Hockey, Fifeld, Poodle Man and the Green Windbag of Wentworth to ministerial positions. Or allowed himself to be cucked by a dragon like Creddles.

    His entire period as PM was an utterly disgraceful shambles.

    P.S. Tom – sound points, it is a good speech, but is fatally compromised by the clown delivering it.

  127. Rabz

    Deplorables suggestions at 8.54 am would go a long way to curing the problems our country now faces.

    Yes and I’m sure they’re probably being implemented even as we speak in a bizarre parallel universe somewhere.

  128. calli

    A talent pool as deep as a puddle, Rabz. I despair of finding a deeper one elsewhere. Definitely not in the ranks of Labor.

  129. MV, that answer gets you an F. You really are all piss & wind aren’t you.

    Okay TP. I’m prepared to be flabbergasted by your omnipotent and infinite wisdom. Please wow me with your insights on what is going to happen over the next decade, with a few details of how you perceive your miracle recovery coming to pass given the current circumstances.

    I’m all agog with expectation.

    ————————
    PS – I have no doubt Abbott “has some answers”.
    He is, after all, one of the main architects of our current dilemma.
    But as he has already demonstrated, he has no intention of implementing any of them.

  130. notafan

    With such a large mandate the Abbott government should have defunded the ABC

    Do people forget that there was a thing called the House of Blockage aka the Senate that thinks it has the right to oppose the will of the Australian people.

    Abbott did a lot more than stop the boats and axe the tax, lot of medium term memory loss around here.


    abbott failures list them here

  131. Yes and I’m sure they’re probably being implemented even as we speak in a bizarre parallel universe somewhere.

    Love your work, Rabz.

  132. Rabz

    Abbott also gifted us the new and improved National Brontosaurus Network, courtesy of the GWofW.

  133. Rabz

    Thanks, MV. You’ve certainly not left any stone unturned either, Squire,

  134. egg_

    A talent pool as deep as a puddle

    You have to play the hand you’re dealt – wishing for Aces (“parallel Universe”) won’t cut it, nor will whinging about the past.

  135. calli

    The comments on that site are a hoot, nota. Given the opportunity to list Abbott’s Failures, all they can come up with is “whaaah…I don’t like him”.

    They should pop over here and get some well reasoned points.

  136. egg_

    what is going to happen over the next decade, with a few details of how you perceive your miracle recovery coming to pass given the current circumstances.

    – Their ABC is well aware that there is an Energy crisis
    – Abbott has trolled Turnbull into some belated action
    – That is demonstrable Leadership, especially from the back bench – admirable, even
    – 2PP 46% and sliding could cause those wishing to ‘save the furniture’ to (re)turn to Abbott (as Labor did with KRudd, gritting their teeth in doing so)

  137. Do people forget that there was a thing called the House of Blockage aka the Senate that thinks it has the right to oppose the will of the Australian people.

    The Senate cannot block, or pass, legislation that isn’t even put before it for a vote. David Leyonhjelm wrote an article here a month or so ago, detailing how most of the legislation people refer to now as “blocked by the Senate”, was, in fact, never even put to the vote.

  138. notafan

    The Senate cannot block, or pass, legislation that isn’t even put before it for a vote. David Leyonhjelm wrote an article here a month or so ago, detailing how most of the legislation people refer to now as “blocked by the Senate”, was, in fact, never even put to the vote.

    I don’t belief I was referring any general gas-bagging by Leyonhjelm but to specific matters that were put to the Senate by the Abbott government and rejected, all a matter of public record.

  139. Abbott also gifted us the new and improved
    National Brontosaurus Network, courtesy of the GWofW.

    We’ve got one of those.
    It’s just like ADSL.
    But with regular dropouts.

  140. Faye

    Whether we like Abbott or not, he should have been allowed to finish his first term as Prime Minister. Then he would have been voted in or out by the people.

  141. stackja

    Too much sun, too little sun, it does not rain, it rains too much, it is all TA’s fault.

  142. candy

    TA stopped the boats, Rabz, and fixed border protection, and you call him a clown?

  143. Defender of the faith

    For Abbott fans and others offering excuses I’d like to remind you all of his first budget and its contents. A great many things were possible but not a single thing was delivered. He went on to propose a further bloating Ng of public spending with PPL and now wants government to nationalise power grids or at least take over generation. The man us is a throwback.

  144. TP

    MV, I’m not the one sprouting bullshit & spewing hatred for Abbott. You come out swinging like a drunken sailor at the mere mention of Abbott. A lot more players are or have been involved besides Abbott masterminding our pending doom . But hey what the heck if an old fogey like yourself has no clue what hope is there. I’m just an Abbott man looking for hope & a few coal fired power stations & a summer without blackouts.

  145. notafan

    For Abbott fans and others offering excuses I’d like to remind you all of his first budget and its contents. A great many things were possible but not a single thing was delivered. He went on to propose a further bloating Ng of public spending with PPL and now wants government to nationalise power grids or at least take over generation. The man us is a throwback.

    For the record

    The budget was blocked by the senate and the PPL was an election promise, not a post election ‘went on’ in a land slide election that would be considered a mandate however in light of the financial situation and feedback he dropped PPL, good for him.

    As for nationalizing the grid, is that in the vid? because a google search doesn’t bring up any such suggestion.

  146. notafan

    Incidentally I have no doubt, where Abbott to return to the PM role, the LNP would return with an increased majority,nor, unlike so many, I don’t expect him to be practically perfect in every way.

  147. Irreversible

    notafan, Abbott has said in public that government should build power stations. He seems to think that investors are ideologues and only the State knows what power generation is about. PPL was Abbott’s own idea and no one supported him because it was a stupid idea. Abbott will not return to leadership because he is electorally toxic. Which he brought entirely on himself, having won an election on the back of RGR and then demonstrated that he could be less competent than them.

  148. Joe

    He seems to think that investors are ideologues…

    The CEO of AGL has publicly stated that he wishes to close all coal power stations down and that is what his company will do with any coal power stations it owns… and you think TA is a clown!

  149. Joe

    …only the State knows what power generation is about.

    In retrospect, power generation may have been better under state ownership. Certainly, the private owners are all for running it into the ground and then forcing the state to re-invest on the basis of citizen demand for basic power generation.

    All we have achieved with the privatisation of state assets is the enriching of a select few whilst the assets are run down and stripped, leaving the state to pick-up the role of providing new assets to replace those that were outsourced.

  150. egg_

    Abbott will not return to leadership because he is electorally toxic.

    2PP is now at 46%; lower than when sTumble took over the leadership.
    How as Abbott vs Shorten as preferred PM?

  151. notafan

    Abbott has said in public that government should build power stations

    That is no-where near your claim that he wishes to nationalise.

    And seeing as how the various state government have forced the closure of coal fired power plants, I wish someone would built them.

    because he is electorally toxic.

    Now where have we heard that before? Most ridiculous assertion yet.

  152. Joe

    Abbott will not return to leadership because he is electorally toxic.

    You want to know who hates TA – WOMEN! Most men I talk to admire him and are utterly APPALLED at the way he was dumped. Most women I talk to hate him viscerally with no logical reason for that hatred.

  153. notafan

    Not I, out and proud Abbott supporter, I just never expected perfection.

  154. Abbott failed as PM because he extended his hand in peace having destroyed three Labor PMs in four years. Even in failure, he deserved his opportunity as PM in a way that Turnbull never had.

  155. struth

    The liberal party had political capital given to them for free from the RGR years that would have ensured a below average Liberal party in office for years and tears.

    Abbott was useless as an opposition leader .

    Think of what he was up against.
    He had a stroll to Kirribilli.
    All he had to do was get himself and his own ship in some sort of order, but he let it all collapse.

    Whatever his stated policies, it doesn’t matter.
    He wouldn’t be able to implement them anyway.
    This is because he is technically known as a goose.

    Goositis Cooked, I believe is the correct terminology.

    Couldn’t lead a leashed poodle.

    Never forget the bullshit he dribbled before the election, and the disappearing act immediately after that took place………………remember?
    When everyone went, oh shit, what’s going on here.
    Oh no…………….

    This can’t be happening.
    The political capital Abbott lost was immense.
    Yuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge.

    Everything that follows on and everyone that follows on were enabled by a weak leader in Abbott.
    He was fucking useless.

    And cheering him on for stopping boats and stopping the carbon tax is like cheering police for arresting someone.
    It’s the most basic competency you should expect.
    Just because it looked good against the totally traitorous actions of the previous government doesn’t make Abbott a genius.

    The Liberal party are dead, and most of it is due to the honking goose that is Abbott.
    Abbott caused Turnbull.

    And yet people are ready to still act tribally.

  156. struth

    for years and tears.

    Hmmm does it work?
    No, yes , maybe………………..

    Years and years………………………………………

  157. Neil

    The budget was blocked by the senate

    About time the Australian people were blamed. They do not want spending cuts and then they blame the debt cause by Labor on the Coalition.

    Rudd was evil and Australia voted for him

  158. notafan

    And yet people are ready to still act tribally.

    having made a goose of yourself over the car industry are you here for a second act?

    Nothing to do with tribalism (whatever you mean by that)

    Australians elected Abbott in a landslide, we were never given our rightful opportunity to decide whether we wanted him or no, not to mention his achievements were far more than the boats and the carbon tax
    which, by the way, for anyone else would still be regarded as crowning never to be forgotten achievements for which Australians ought to be eternally grateful.

    Look at Europe you numpty while you wave away stopping the boats, and say it again, please.

    As shallow an assessment as anything Nikki Savva abbott666 could dredge up.

  159. struth

    Let it go Notafan, take a breath.

    Don’t come back here talking shit about the Car industry , especially when later comments supported my take on it and were obviously stunned at your inability to grasp the basics about the world of interconnected industry.

    Australians elected Abbott in a landslide, we were never given our rightful opportunity to decide whether we wanted him or no,

    Australians voted to kick out the RGR Labor government and would have voted for Humphrey B Bear instead of them.

    They lost the election, he didn’t win it, and especially not him personally.

    We don’t vote for a Prime Minister at all, and we never have.
    He is just a senior representative of a political party and as both sides have proven, you don’t “rightly” get a say in it.

    He was the leader of a party that crumbled underneath his lack of leadership.

    which, by the way, for anyone else would still be regarded as crowning never to be forgotten achievements for which Australians ought to be eternally grateful.

    Aim big notafan………………………………….

    FMD.

    That’s not just tribalism on display, it’s almost religious.

    Look at Europe you numpty while you wave away stopping the boats, and say it again, please.

    Europe is run by the communist E.U.

    So any achievement better than theirs is a great deed in your eyes?

    You measure against outright failure and anything better is success.

    People with your level of acceptance of bureaucratic ineptitude are the reason we are in this mess.

    Brighten your ideas up.

    Your just being a typical bitchy female who didn’t like getting your arse whipped, as you most certainly did.
    Now I am not in the mood to deal with grumpy old bags today, so just breath deeply, and go and make your husband a cup of tea.

    God knows, if you are married he’d deserve something stronger.

  160. Neil

    Australians voted to kick out the RGR Labor government and would have voted for Humphrey B Bear instead of them.

    That is rubbish . Have you seen what has just happened in NZ. people want to vote for Labor parties because they think they are doing something good and moral.

    Any Coalition leader other than Abbott would have lost the 2013 election

  161. egg_

    Europe is run by the communist E.U.

    That is why we need to reject CAGW/UN/EU just as the Brits did Brexit – it’s a racket, pure and simple.
    sTumble is obviously personally compromised in regard to ruinables.

  162. notafan

    That is rubbish . Have you seen what has just happened in NZ. people want to vote for Labor parties because they think they are doing something good and moral.

    Rewriting history in their own imagination is the MO of too many around here.

  163. struth

    That is rubbish . Have you seen what has just happened in NZ. people want to vote for Labor parties because they think they are doing something good and moral.

    What the f..ck has New Zealand got to do with it other than prove my point.

    Besides the fact that they voted overwhelmingly conservative and a career politician betrayed his electorate, they have just had many years of relatively good government, and a new generation is about to learn a big lesson.

    Labor voters vote for Labor governments for their own hip pockets.
    Nothing else.

    Good and moral?
    What they say is not what you should believe.
    The whole economy went down the gurgler under Labor in Australia, so they got boot out.
    It happens…………………………Whitlam etc.

    Using your logic, People didn’t vote in a Landslide to get rid of Whitlam, they voted in Fraser due to him being such an awesome opposition leader.

    Spare me.

  164. Neil

    Besides the fact that they voted overwhelmingly conservative and a career politician betrayed his electorate

    That is my point. labor still won. labor has a unique ability to win elections. To say that Turnbull would have won in 2013 is just rubbish. he would have lost to Rudd just like hewson lost to keating when unemployment was at 11%

  165. notafan

    People voted for Abbott because they wanted to stop the boats and axe the tax.

    That is what he campaigned on that is what he won in a landslide on

    Turnbull has not made the slightest attempt to overturn the boat policy because it would be electoral suicide, if it were head to head Shorten and Abbott in the next the key issues will still be immigration and energy policy and Abbott would landslide again.

    It really is that simple

  166. egg_

    just like hewson lost to keating when unemployment was at 11%

    Hence, Hewson’s misguided(/wishful) predictions about Abbott aren’t worth a pinch of poo.

  167. notafan

    There is no way Turnbull would have campaigned on axe the tax , it is why he lost the LNP leadership in the first place.

  168. MV, I’m not the one sprouting bullshit & spewing hatred for Abbott. You come out swinging like a drunken sailor at the mere mention of Abbott. A lot more players are or have been involved besides Abbott masterminding our pending doom .

    TP, scroll to the top of the page. Surprise, surprise, this column is about a bloke called Tony Abbott and a speech he gave. My comments are specifically about that speech and the man who gave it.

    But hey what the heck if an old fogey like yourself has no clue what hope is there.

    I “have a clue”. My “clue” is that there is no simple cure for the disaster our politicians have created of our power supply, and we have at least a decade of pain coming as a result. And by the time we do manage to start reversing the situation our industries will have long since closed shop, gone broke, or relocated overseas.

    It was that “clue” that you so viciously attacked, that has led to this exchange between us. But when offered the chance to offer an alternative view, you didn’t have one.

    I’m just an Abbott man looking for hope & a few coal fired power stations & a summer without blackouts.

    Well stiff sh1t – you’re out of luck on all counts. Abbott is an A-grade failure, there is no hope, you’re not going to get a coal fired power station any time soon, and blackouts are about to become an everyday part of your life.

  169. egg_

    I’m just an Abbott man looking for hope & a few coal fired power stations & a summer without blackouts.

    A skilled pollie would use ‘clean coal’ to shut up the eco-tards – or threaten them with Nukes, citing Mr Gaia, James Lovelock.

  170. AC

    You want to know who hates TA – WOMEN! Most men I talk to admire him and are utterly APPALLED at the way he was dumped. Most women I talk to hate him viscerally with no logical reason for that hatred.

    Mostly ugly women with meaningless jobs in the public service who need to spout nonsense about “gender gaps” and the feminist agenda in order to justify their reproductive failures – the sort of cows an alpha male like Abbott would never inseminate in a million years.

  171. Neil

    My “clue” is that there is no simple cure for the disaster our politicians have created of our power supply

    It is not the politicians. People want to feel goodby doing something about climate change. It never occured to the people that doing something would lead to price rises. Same goes for the NBN. people want FTTP but they never think about the cost or how long it would take to build,

  172. People want to feel goodby doing something about climate change.

    Yeah, yeah, it’s all “the people’s” fault. People who have been fed BS for the past 30+ years, as part of their childhood education, then fed the same BS as “fact” by the taxpayer funded ABC; “facts” manufactured out of thin air by taxpayer funded bodies like the CSIRO, BoM, and Flannery’s taxpayer funded “Climate Council”, these people should nonetheless be able to see through all the BS and arrive at correct, rational conclusions.

  173. Defender of the faith

    Abbott isn’t relevant to any debate today. He will be lucky to keep his seat. The fact that he has lost the support of Cormann and Dutton tells you all you need to know.

  174. Neil

    Yeah, yeah, it’s all “the people’s” fault.

    Look at people who support climate change. They all tick the republic, gay marriage, climate change, land rights, palestine, NBN-FTTP etc box

    They are all attracted to false ideas or things that don’t work

  175. Look at people who support climate change. They all tick the republic, gay marriage, climate change, land rights, palestine, NBN-FTTP etc box

    Yeah. ALL subjects where Joe Public has been fed taxpayer funded BS from taxpayer funded sources while they suppress any and all contrary views. WITH the apparent blessing of our elected “representatives”, regardless of which party is in power.

    Thanks for proving my point.

  176. Neil

    Thanks for proving my point.

    people believe what they want to believe. I was never attracted to Rudd but with the best economic numbers for 40 years, Australia voted for him in 2007. NZ just voted Labour. Why?

    About time to start condemning the people who vote for wrong things.

  177. About time to start condemning the people who vote for wrong things.

    In 2007, having made himself almost universally despised with Workchoices, Howard attempted to buy the election by becoming Santa Claus and introducing middle class welfare big time into Australia. KRudd, on the other hand, sold himself as “the fiscal conservative”, who would save us from irresponsible government expenditure. And that was the line sold to Joe Public by the taxpayer funded ABC, all the taxpayer funded “economic experts”, and others.

    People voted for what they thought was “the right thing”, based on the propaganda information fed to them. The fact that they didn’t get it is par for the course.

    Thanks for again proving my point.

  178. Neil

    KRudd, on the other hand, sold himself as “the fiscal conservative”, who would save us from irresponsible government expenditure

    Yes he did. But i never bought it. But Australia did because they wanted to.

    About time to start blaming people rather than politicians. That Australia voted for Rudd says a lot about what we have become as a people. Lazy, bludging off others, only caring about money, not giving a stuff about the country. Australia has changed. For the worse.

    And THE PEOPLE are responsible

  179. Lazy, bludging off others, only caring about money, not giving a stuff about the country.

    You’re talking about the people who voted Abbott in with the second biggest landslide in federal political history, on a warning of a looming financial crisis requiring austerity and sacrifice by all, in the form of reduced government expenditure.

    Enough! This has become a boring, two person conversation that is going nowhere. Instead of trying to defend our reprehensible, lying politicians, starting with Abbott, why don’t you get together with JP and Candy, and form the Abbott Admiration Society. He might just let you could take turns sniffing his bicycle seat.

  180. Neil

    You’re talking about the people who voted Abbott in with the second biggest landslide in federal political history,

    perhaps. Who knows why Australia voted for Abbott.

    But THE PEOPLE are responsible for our current problems.

    THE PEOPLE want NBN=FTTP, want renewables. do not want spending cuts, want gay marriage.

    Looks like NZ does to

    It used to be 40% voted Conservative, 40% voted Labor and to win govt U needed the 20% swingers. Things have changed.

    Australia voted for Rudd. That is all i need to know about Australia

  181. Jimf

    Abbott can never his time back,everything he says now is viewed through the prism of “but when you had the chance”..etc.The fact is he won an election by skewering a dysfunctional ALP with simple cut through and repetition.
    Those of you who think it was then only a matter of follow through with a clear mandate are wrong. The Australian electorate is wedded to govt handouts and govt as the answer/cause of all woes.
    Tough budgets,welfare pull back, libertarianism and personal accountability are concepts of the past .
    The voters didn’t reject Labor ideals in 2013,they just bought into (rightly) the dysfunction narrative spearheaded by “no carbon tax” fuck ups .
    Abbott’s 2014 budget was doomed . Yes he was a lousy salesman, yes he didn’t sow the seeds, but the ideology of cut backs was never gong to work. If he thought a big election win meant the punters were up for belt tightening he was deluded.It’s just not how we roll anymore.
    Turnbull of course doesn’t even try austerity , but if he did he would be even further in the shit.
    Centre right ideology is dead; its premise of self reliance and work before reward just doesn’t gel with the entitlement mentality now. This will get worse as kids of dumb arse sponging parents move into the voting age .

  182. Jimf

    Abbott naively thought the voters had bought into the problem of budget deficits . They don’t give a shit . Because he ran on it so hard in opposition he assumed it was a real issue. It wasn’t . FFS we are now spending $14b a year on servicing the interest alone on our debt and it’s a non issue out there in mug land . People just can’t make a connection between dead money, waste and what the pending result will be “down the track”.
    If Shorten loses the next election it won’t be because the punters are concerned about spending .

  183. Neil

    Abbott’s 2014 budget was doomed

    What Abbott should have done when the Senate blocked the 2014 budget was to call an election and go down with all guns blazing. But that is in a perfect world which we do not exist in.

  184. Rabz

    Well stiff sh1t – you’re out of luck on all counts. Abbott is an A-grade failure, there is no hope, you’re not going to get a coal fired power station any time soon, and blackouts are about to become an everyday part of your life.

    LOL.

  185. egg_

    Abbott isn’t relevant to any debate today. He will be lucky to keep his seat. The fact that he has lost the support of Cormann and Dutton tells you all you need to know.

    The 2PP will be interesting post Summer blackouts.

  186. Defender of the faith

    Egg: will be surprised if there is any load shedding. But won’t be surprised if shorten continues to drag down the alp. His constituency – unions – are keen for a push that will probably coincide with slowing consumer spending and the larger layoffs from the car industry.
    It is entirely possible that global interest rates will finally start tightening at about the same time.

  187. EB

    Abbott’s finished. The only reason he’s still around is for entertainment purposes. The media know Turdbull vs Tones is more spiteful and thus generates more clicks than Turdbull vs Shorten.

  188. I suppose what we are really saying is that Abbott cannot make a comeback without 60 or more really strong committed conservatives in the liberal party backing him. Reality is that any strong liberal conservative with 60 or more strong supporters could roll Turnbull and shorten but the liberals are a socialist homosexual party that have not a clue.

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