The Fragile Generation

A FANTASTIC read in Reason Magazine – the Fragile Generation.

preschoolers at the Learning Collaborative in Charlotte, North Carolina, were thrilled to receive a set of gently used playground equipment. But the kids soon found out they would not be allowed to use it, because it was resting on grass, not wood chips. “It’s a safety issue,” explained a day care spokeswoman. Playing on grass is against local regulations.

Read the whole thing if you can.

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44 Responses to The Fragile Generation

  1. Oh come on

    The fragile generation being, of course, the parents who insist on this shit.

  2. Confused Old Misfit

    Oco: Parents? Or the nancy boys & girls in the liability insurance trade?

  3. Oh come on

    Kids are no or less fragile than they’ve ever been. A bunch of retarded parents don’t realise this, though.

  4. mareeS

    Spouse and I were free-range kids, along with our brothers and sisters. We were allowed to roam around our city and beaches so long we went to school at the appropriate times and were home before the street lights came on.

    Now in our 60s, we consider we have had an adventurous life.(war and peace, no elaborations, sorry).

    We sent our son to sea when he lost his driving licence and apprenticeship. He completed his Master V at the national maritime college and spent several years helming yachts in international races and general deliveries, including rescues at sea and husbanding mortally damaged boats to port. Exciting for him, he now operates tower cranes.

    Our daughter was a bit of a wild girl, now trains other young misses in dealing with the public. Both are success stories in our opinion, without any helicopter parenting.

    We have trouble with the way present parenting is disabling children.

  5. Baldrick

    Strange world.
    Kids as young as 4 can choose their own gender or identify as an attack helicopter if they like, but are not allowed to play on the grass.

  6. Roger

    Oco: Parents? Or the nancy boys & girls in the liability insurance trade?

    Yes; if a kid fell form the equipment onto grass and broke his arm, the pre-school could be sued for negligence.

    The wood chips – bark chips in Oz – are there to both break the child’s fall more gently and avoid the insurance payout.

  7. RobK

    Risk management is institutionalized along with everything else.

  8. Confused Old Misfit

    Step 1:

    To combat this problem, we have established a new nonpartisan nonprofit, the Let Grow Foundation. Our goal is to restore resilience by overthrowing the culture of overprotection.

    Step 2: Employ sociologist
    Step 3: Apply for Government Grant
    Step 4: Do study that concludes more money is needed
    Step 5: Lobby for Government regulation of the Child Growth Management Industry.

  9. overburdened

    When the dust settles after the defeat of everything, the social engineers will find they have achieved a pyrrhic victory.

  10. How come the likes of Twitter and Antifa are tolerated? These have to be the worst kids around.

  11. 132andBush

    Even wood chips are not allowed in NSW, it has to be that rubberized “soft fall” material.
    The cost of installing it at our small rural school was over $30K.

  12. Living in rural Victoria, as I now do, the idiocy that is creeping into even Australian suburban life has thankfully not reached this far yet.

  13. hzhousewife

    When the 8yr old daughter of a co-worker spent a couple of hours at work with her Mum following a broken arm and prior to the appointment for getting the plaster on, I congratulated her on being a “proper kid” and she heard about 20 different stories about how we’d all broken bones as kids. It was a fun morning refalling all the adventures !

  14. Shine a Light

    The wonder of modern science is elderly people have survived the health and safety issues associated with grass in ever increasing numbers.

    I’d hazard a guess and say that grass is not the root problem but the equipment and height the children have fallen from.

  15. jupes

    How can grass be more dangerous than wood chips?

  16. Bruce

    “The wonder of modern science is elderly people have survived the health and safety issues associated with grass in ever increasing numbers.”

    Only to be incarcerated and slaughtered by “modern medicine”.

  17. JohnA

    jupes #2546072, posted on November 7, 2017, at 6:18 pm

    How can grass be more dangerous than wood chips?

    Because of the Einstein Principle:
    Einstein (widely quoted that he) believed there were probably only two elements in the Universe of unlimited quantity: Hydrogen and Stupidity, but that he could not establish a proof for Hydrogen.

  18. Roger

    How can grass be more dangerous than wood chips?

    It’s not the grass that breaks the bones, it’s the dry, hard ground underneath!

    Bark chips, when poured onto a playground floor and properly maintained, leave pockets of air that absorb the inevitable impacts. Thus the children can still extend themselves and have fun but they are protected from the worst consequences of their innocent misjudgments. Win, win, no?

    I haven’t seen the rubberised soft fall material 123andbush mentions above, but the cost seems prohibitive.

    Speaking as a former private school council member and chair, I would not wish broken limbs upon any child; nor did we relish higher insurance premiums for non-compliance which would have to be passed on to parents or the prospect of being denied cover and effectively having to close. That’s what it boils down to these days.

  19. OneWorldGovernment

    132andBush
    #2546024, posted on November 7, 2017 at 5:29 pm

    Even wood chips are not allowed in NSW, it has to be that rubberized “soft fall” material.
    The cost of installing it at our small rural school was over $30K.

    132andBush

    In between jobs many years ago I did a very short job selling that rubberized “soft fall” material into Canberra when it first came out.

    It used to be made from recycled tyres.

    Having worked at a sawmill for many years I would consider falling on wood chips to be very harsh.

  20. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From mareeS at 4:46 pm

    “including rescues at sea and husbanding mortally damaged boats to port”

    That is quite – well – confronting, and racist.

  21. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Shine a Light at 6:05 pm

    “The wonder of modern science is elderly people have survived the health and safety issues associated with grass in ever increasing numbers.

    I’d hazard a guess and say that grass is not the root problem but the equipment and height the children have fallen from.”

    Very wise Shiner, those dopey old people need to be reminded of the facts.

    Like, you know, really, back in the olden days they fell in mere feet per second from short, squat playground equipment and the kiddies now must cope with longer falls measured in metres per second.

  22. Dan Dare

    I grew kikuya (?sp) in my yard as insurance against the unlikely
    possibility of taking a fall whilst Adrian Quist.
    I can assure you it’s like falling on a beautiful soft mattress.

  23. jupes

    Bark chips, when poured onto a playground floor and properly maintained, leave pockets of air that absorb the inevitable impacts. Thus the children can still extend themselves and have fun but they are protected from the worst consequences of their innocent misjudgments. Win, win, no?

    No.

    The little petals can still get cuts and splinters from wood that they wouldn’t get with grass. Imagine playing footy on woodchips and going for a dive. FMD when grass is a hazard we really have reached peak stupid.

  24. Dan Dare

    Jupes, Roger has gone beyond peak stupid

  25. struth

    Lawyers.
    Way too many of the pricks.

  26. One of my school friends had in primary school what would be arguably one of the worst injuries to ever result from a fall from playground equipment.
    The resulting horrific injury (total loss of a limb – too high up for any hope of a prosthetic) was however more due to medical negligence than the surface upon which the fall took place.
    Which was IIRC hard dirt. I’m not sure scratchy/splintery wood chips would have changed the ultimate outcome.

    I’d rather take a tumble onto grass than wood chips, which are waaaay too scratchy & splintery for me.

  27. Mark A

    overburdened
    #2546317, posted on November 7, 2017 at 10:33 pm

    I wish to breed with this gal as a rear guard action against the softies http://www.news.com.au/sport/sports-life/worlds-scariest-female-bodybuilder-is-back/news-story/b39036be45ab3dd4e68b713a4ca5484d

    You think you’d survive the act?

  28. manalive

    The ‘hygiene hypothesis’ suggests that exposure to bacteria in early childhood helps build more robust immune systems that protect against a variety of inflammatory diseases later in life.

  29. john malpas

    Way back in the 40s and 50s the swings (metal), see saws, and ‘merry go rounds’ could dish out some really good injuries. The ground was , of course, ashfelt or concrete. But best of all were trees.

  30. Eyrie

    At West Leederville primary in the late 50’s the boy’s monkey bars were in a good Perth sand area in the playground. The playground itself was gravel and the boys all were barefoot all year round.

  31. Jessie

    There goes ……………..

    Alice in Wonderland
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    Winnie the Pooh
    Roald Dahl
    The Jungle Book

    The Adventures of Tintin:
    Tintin is a girl and ‘probably asexual’, French philosopher claims
    The Secret Seven: Peter done for sexual harassment and poor leadership due to ignoring inequality
    The Famous Five and
    Adventures of Huckleberry Fin…………..

  32. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Dan Dare at 9:32 pm:

    “Jupes, Roger has gone beyond peak stupid”

    Roger was “a former … chair”.

  33. struth

    As somebody with a life spent mostly in the outback, these stories always amaze me.
    I can’t help but think of what goes on in Aboriginal communities when it comes to all this lawfare elsewhere.

    With the kids running barefoot on football fields full of glass and garbage, and dangers everywhere, they get in wrecks of cars we would near be put in jail for putting a wheel on the roadway, and drive their drunk adults around.
    Actually, I start describing this scene, I wouldn’t know where to stop.

    And then, at the other end of the spectrum, there is this nonsense.

    Police and lawyers give up on Aboriginal communities because the aboriginals are poor?

    No way.
    Their community councils etc are rolling in it.
    The ones with the responsibility are loaded.

    So why the difference?

    I know the answer.

    Just saying.

  34. mareeS

    Mick Gold Coast QLD,,

    He actually surfed a stricken yacht across the Richmond River bar in high seas at night after it had cracked its bow stem , while his mate was bailing for all get out. The maritime rescue boat and others were too chicken to come out, and remained on standby inside the river to fish them out if they foundered. Yacht was 3/4 under water when it tied up at the wharf and they were able to get onshore pumps working.

    Also some interesting adventures in Bass Strait.

  35. lotocoti

    Way back in the …

    Even into the 60s & 70s.
    And not only swings and roundabouts but also the occasional retired locomotive, steam traction engine or surplus 25 pounder.

  36. overburdened

    I’m willing to take one for the team

  37. Mique

    And it is counter-intuitive but nonetheless true that we who were born in Australia in or around World War II had a far more privileged and interesting childhood than any generation of children since. Our parents were far to busy with more important and urgent issues than worrying about whether we were losing a bit of skin or breaking a bone or two. If and when something happened, they worried and dealt with the problem. They, having themseles been born and raised in troubled times, had that precious gift so rare in this modern world – a sense of proportion.

  38. Shine a Light

    It propably makes sense to some but maybe we should replace bycyles lanes and pavements made from concrete by woodchips
    It can be really painful even fatal, if you knock your head against concrete,,even when you are cyclist or pedestrian
    Why grass should get such a bad rap I do not know.

  39. Shine a Light

    In the fifties, bombsites and bombshelters were the nearest thing to playgrounds – a bit like Syria today.
    Leaping from one bombshelter to another with a 3 metre drop was almost an Olympic Sport.
    A broken leg or arm was.a badge of honour and bravery. Yeah, things have changed.

  40. classical_hero

    My parents would be in jail if they raised me like they did. When I was a tiny tot, I was allowed to play in the front yard in the sprinklers while naked. The horror. Also numerous times my brother and I would escape the house and take the dogs with us. This was before school age.

  41. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker) Gray

    Hey, some grasses have sharp leaves! We can’t have toddlers cutting their shoes, can we?
    And those Aboriginal children mentioned above- when a lawyer visits those communities, I bet mum and dad will be sued by kids with a new appreciation of their rights!

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