Virtue signalling

There was a time that departmental secretaries received relatively modest salaries, worked hard in the background in the interests of the Australian people and helped governments by providing sensible advice.

Those days have sadly passed.

Today’s departmental secretaries are overpaid, egotistical and chase personal publicity and celebrity. They need to signal their personal virtue.

The latest outrage occurred when the secretaries got together to sign a domestic violence pledge, with PM&C secretary Mr Parkinson leading the way.

This is wrong in so many ways – what right have departmental secretaries to pry into the private lives of their staff? Are they going to install cameras in people’s homes? If (say) one half of a PM&C couple applies for domestic violence leave, will the other half be automatically sacked? Or, for that matter, if a person applies for domestic violence leave will there be action taken against the partner who is employed elsewhere in the public service?

Secretaries have a responsibility to provide a safe working environment. They have a right to demand their staff abide by the APS code of conduct. But they have no right to interfere in the private lives of staff in their homes.

And take this from the statement (reproduced in full below):

While men do experience domestic and family violence and sexual assault, the evidence shows that most victims are women.

But the survey cited – ABS Cat No. 4906, Personal Safety Survey, shows that more men experience violence than women (42 per cent of men compared with 37 per cent of women). It also shows that the rate of violence is falling, but it is also concentrated in particular areas.

The proper authorities for addressing violence, whether sexual, domestic or otherwise, are the Police, not departmental secretaries.

Yet it does seem the departmental secretaries will be prying into the private lives of their staff

We understand the boundaries between work and personal life are not absolute. We also acknowledge that we play a role in reinforcing respectful behaviours and relationships.

And for those at the Cat who say Who Cares? They are only public servants, these types of pledges are being signed by CEOs of major companies trying to virtue signal too.

Look at the pledge

I will stand up, speak out and act to prevent men’s violence against women.

What about violence again men (which is more prevalent)? How will they act to prevent men’s violence against women?

By the way, not signing such pledges does not mean one supports violence.

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet chief Martin Parkinson marks White Ribbon Day.

The statement reads:

On White Ribbon Day, the Australian Public Service’s departmental secretaries affirm our commitment to addressing domestic and family violence within our workplaces.

Domestic violence takes many forms. It is a crime of power and control. It is inexcusable in any form and should never be trivialised.

We understand that, while there is complexity to the underlying drivers of this violence, more often than not it is driven by gender inequality. While men do experience domestic and family violence and sexual assault, the evidence shows that most victims are women. Both men and women are three times more likely to be assaulted by a man than a woman.

We acknowledge that the victims, perpetrators and witnesses of this crime are within our workforce. According to current statistics, almost one in three Australian women over the age of 15 will experience physical violence, and one in five will experience sexual violence.

These are dreadful statistics, yet they tell only part of the story. These experiences are accompanied by both physical and emotional trauma that can last well beyond the time of the offence.

Australian government departments have developed domestic violence policies and/or guidance. These policies were developed to give staff affected by violence the reassurance that flexible and timely support is available.

Through our workplace responses to domestic violence, the APS secretaries are contributing to the integrated responses to this issue being pursued through the COAG under The National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children 2010‑2022. This approach is also reflected in the development aid we provide to countries in our regions.

In September, secretaries from across the APS met to consider how to improve support for staff affected by this crime. We agreed to explore ways to better support staff who are exposed to (or witness) this crime, both in person and through secondary exposure, including from client-facing activities. We also considered how workplaces could engage with staff who use, or may use, violence, to support behavioural change.

As leaders, we know our actions, by example, set the standard for our staff’s behaviour. We understand the boundaries between work and personal life are not absolute. We also acknowledge that we play a role in reinforcing respectful behaviours and relationships.

Given the well-documented prevalence and harm it causes, reducing the occurrence of domestic and family violence is a pressing national issue that we, as leaders, will address. We hope you will join us in committing to supporting respectful relationships in the workplace and in your community.

Martin Parkinson – Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

John Lloyd – Australian Public Service Commission

Chris Moraitis – Attorney-General’s Department

Daryl Quinlivan – Department of Agriculture and Water Resources

Mike Mrdak – Department of Communications and the Arts

Greg Moriarty – Department of Defence

Michele Bruniges – Department of Education and Training

Kerri Hartland – Department of Employment

Rosemary Huxtable – Department of Finance

Frances Adamson – Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Glenys Beauchamp – Department of Health

Renée Leon – Department of Human Services

Michael Pezzullo – Department of Immigration and Border Protection

Heather Smith – Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Steven Kennedy – Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development

Kathryn Campbell – Department of Social Services

Finn Pratt – Department of the Environment and Energy

Simon Lewis – Department of Veterans’ Affairs

John Fraser – The Treasury

About Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

I'm a retired general who occasionally gets called back to save the republic before returning to my plough.
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47 Responses to Virtue signalling

  1. BrettW

    Over two years ago I looked at the White Ribbon web page as a CFMEU organiser, Reardon from VIC, who was a White Ribbon Ambassador, and had been allegedly involved in threats against females working for the ABCC.

    The ambassadors were listed by states. The number of CFMEU and MUA leaders on the list was way out of proportion to other Unions and it was clearly a policy to be involved in this charity. The other group of people well represented were Police and the Judiciary.

    Following an issue with another ambassador from the NT (politician ?) the list was removed from the page.

  2. Snoopy

    If (say) one half of a PM&C couple applies for domestic violence leave, will the other half be automatically sacked? Or, for that matter, if a person applies for domestic violence leave will there be action taken against the partner who is employed elsewhere in the public service?

    We need to push this to become policy in every public service across the country. After all, anything else would be excusing domestic violence, wouldn’t it?

  3. stackja

    Canberra raises the white flag.

  4. manalive

    What about violence again men …

    Prue Goward and her mob would have us believe that by not signing “… men give their tacit approval of violence against women …”.
    No self-respecting man would give in to this kind of feminazi bullying.

  5. Malcolm

    Is it a fact that those most in need of virtue signalling are the ones most lacking in virtue?

  6. Tim Neilson

    Prue Goward and her mob would have us believe that by not signing “… men give their tacit approval of violence against women …”.
    No self-respecting man would give in to this kind of feminazi bullying.

    Recall the Patriotic Declaration scene in Catch 22.

    We need some Major – De Coverleys.

  7. John Constantine

    Making a wymynsys so angry she hates you and has to flail at you with her little wymynsys fists:

    This is actually male violence against wymynsys.

    Refusing to say:

    “What a brilliant idea Julie Bishop”

    Is violence against wymynsys.

    Comrades.

  8. .

    Threatening to leave a relationship is violence as well, apparently.

  9. C.L.

    I’d sign … provided all the women staffers signed a pledge to speak out against and act to stop violence against unborn children. This is, after all, the real domestic violence crisis in Australia.

  10. manalive

    Men Women and children are on the receiving end of domestic violence, the proportions are irrelevant, any normal person is against all of it, there is no need for pledges or petitions.

  11. Myrddin Seren

    The people REALLY running Australia…..

  12. .

    Mass sackings. If any of the professional conservative snowflakes here can accept any change.

  13. Squirrel

    This process reeks of the methods and tactics of the totalitarian state – so apt that it should occur in the same week that the wake in fright (about China) White Paper was released.

  14. John Comnenus

    In the meantime the Department of Foreign Affairs accidentally funded the Islamic terrorist that attacked the Philippine city of Marawi. Any chance anyone will be charged for undoubtedly breaking the law? No chance at all. Public Servants have no skin in the game which is why they are so happy to virtue signal and lecture and hector the rest of us. After all, they know best!

  15. kae

    Virtue signalling trivialises any cause.

  16. A Lurker

    The public service could be reduced by half and our country would function more efficiently and more effectively – and just think of all the savings!

    I believe the cull should start with all those who have so-helpfully written their names on that list.
    Sulla would back me up with my proscription idea.

  17. entropy

    I don’t know how this video thingy works. It’s Kramer not wanting to wear the I on, and what happens to him as a result:

    https://youtu.be/3iV8X8ubGCc

    https://youtu.be/3iV8X8ubGCc

  18. Aussieute

    Have a friend who is a policewoman who tells me the worst physical family violence is lesbian couples … “unbelievable”.
    Next is woman on men … cricket bats, golf clubs and frying pans are the weapons of choice.

    The loosers out of all of this … the children who are traumatised. They don’t matter.

  19. Alex Davidson

    Are they going to install cameras in people’s homes?

    The day can’t be far off. They’ve already succeeded with smoke alarms, water tempering valves, pool fences, and many other violations of our right to decide how we live and behave in our own homes.

  20. Roger

    Finn Pratt – Department of the Environment and Energy

    Sort of sums it up.

  21. Sydney Boy

    And yet none of these people seem to care that 94% of fatalities in the workplace are men. Men DIE at a rate 30 times that of women in workplace incidents.

  22. .

    Tempering valves are now mandatory. Hot water cannot be legally delivered at more than 50C to outlets in the house.

    What a shit splattered toilet of a country we live in.

    http://www.hpw.qld.gov.au/construction/Sustainability/SustainableHousingLaws/Pages/ElectricHotWaterSystemReplacement.aspx

    A tempering device ensures that hot water is delivered to taps at a maximum 50° Celsius. This temperature is considered sufficient for domestic hygiene purposes and effectively reduces the risk of scalding-related injuries from hot water use.

    A tempering device is required to be fitted to all new and replacement hot water systems.

    What a load of cocks and balls.

  23. stackja

    Lionel and his group created this.

  24. PoliticoNT

    Those days have sadly passed.

    Dot/John C/Des – when I am Minister for Defence – how much power will I have? Will I have the power to:

    – Sack the existing Secretary and install my own?
    – Half the Secretary’s salary
    – Abolish all 3-star civilian positions, and cut by two thirds the remaining 2 and 1 star SES roles?
    – Abolish the diarchy? (unifying command under CDF)
    – Implement my own greatly streamlined ADO committee system
    – Cut departmental air travel by 75%?
    – Abolish two thirds of overseas civilian postings?

    And that’s just on the first day. Remind me otherwise but I thought Defence (as my favoured example) existed only to provide operational capability to the government of the day. Fuck all the silly empire building otherwise. (I favour a mix of articulated, formal power, and what else I can inspire in the good and ready.)

    Mind you, if you think this latest Parkinson led stupidity is the worst bit of SJW virtue wanking that twit has involved himself in then perhaps start reading some of his all-staff emails. Or maybe don’t – it’s brain aneurysm territory.

  25. PoliticoNT

    Sorry…..halve their salary.

  26. jupes

    If only there was a politician (even the POTUS) who was against all this politically correct bullshit.

  27. jupes

    In the meantime the Department of Foreign Affairs accidentally funded the Islamic terrorist that attacked the Philippine city of Marawi. Any chance anyone will be charged for undoubtedly breaking the law? No chance at all. Public Servants have no skin in the game which is why they are so happy to virtue signal and lecture and hector the rest of us. After all, they know best!

    Exactly.

  28. Siltstone

    ths clip pf Kramer not wanting to wear the AIDS ribbon is like a documentary, not a comedy show

  29. .

    Mind you, if you think this latest Parkinson led stupidity is the worst bit of SJW virtue wanking that twit has involved himself in then perhaps start reading some of his all-staff emails. Or maybe don’t – it’s brain aneurysm territory.

    I have a deep cover agent in the NSW RMS. He tells me their departmental head threatens police investigation of non-crimes.

  30. candy

    Mr Parkinson standing next to the sign and having his signature first speaks of some kind of self importance.

    I do believe he wishes he was prime minister, I think. He has a need to be noticed, to be “someone”. This kind of stuff provides the medium for him to be seen.

  31. .

    Dot/John C/Des – when I am Minister for Defence – how much power will I have? Will I have the power to:

    You will be promoted to Colonel and leader of the revolution.

  32. flyingduk

    nice timing! I am currently taking my CEO to court for emailing his staff inviting them to ‘show support for marriage equality’ by wearing ‘rainbow epaulettes’ on their uniforms ( I work for a state emergency service). I pointed out that this breached the States Code of Conduct by:
    1) Acting in a partisan political manner ( I am a Bernardi member, and my party platform opposes gay marriage)
    2) Failing to respect all views and allow diversity in the workplace (no invite to wear ‘ I support traditional marriage’ badges)
    3) Failing to disclose a perceived conflict of interest (the CEO is gay)

    His response: apologise or else
    My response: see you in court.

  33. Bruce

    “Tempering valves are now mandatory. Hot water cannot be legally delivered at more than 50C to outlets in the house.”

    For those with some plumbing skills and a few basic tools, these devices are adjustable. The have to be adjustable because they have to be adjusted to deliver water at the specified maximum. Different hot-water systems, different feeder pipe lengths and diameters, etc., etc..

  34. Good luck, flyingduk. (Hey, that rhymes.) That’s the sort of thing that really does need to be heard in front of a judge. It’s all well and good to virtue signal, or even for the CEO as an individual to make his own position public; but to “invite” all staff to wear rainbow epaulettes in an organisation such as an SES – where members will be dealing with all members of the public whose opinions and feelings may well be diametrically opposed to his – is wrong. If a member of the public was to be offended by the rainbow gear, for religious, ideological or conscience reasons, how would they feel? He apparently also doesn’t care about the feelings of his own staff, upon whom he depends for support and work output. No, it’s not on. No doubt the CEO was encouraged and/or inspired in his stand by the airline leprechaun and his split rings. Just shows how far a silly (or offensive) idea can travel if encouraged.

  35. .

    Good luck duk, government workplaces should be absolutely neutral.

  36. Neo Bauhaus

    Again I say, Roger vs Mr. T,
    There was a time when Mr. T was derided as a a Goldman Sachs collectman,
    in addition the dubious number of platinum scholarships that paved his way, our equivalent to Trump may well be Roger.

  37. Up The Workers!

    Martin Parkinson and all the other Public Serpent Virtue-Signallers could easily obliterate 100% of “Men’s Violence Towards Women” from within the vile ranks of the A.L.P.’s rank and vile Public Serpentry by decreeing that ONLY men who are in a politically approved SSM relationship will be employed in future.

    Once you remove the complainers, you remove the complaints.

    There…problem solved.

  38. struth

    I know where there should be some violence!
    A bunch of taxpayers should storm into their plush offices and kick these bludging parasites arses out to the pavement.

    All this rot being done on my dime proves they have way too much time on their hands with this blatent overstepping of their employment position.

    There should be violence alright.

  39. mh

    I think we should have a time limit for people to work in the APS. Ten years? After that they should not be allowed to work in any area that has direct connections to the public sector. ie consultants

  40. LBLoveday

    Andrew Bolt, December 2, 2009:

    Only last week, I watched Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and the opposition leader, Malcolm Turnbull, boast they’d taken the following oath, which they urged all other men to swear, too:
    I swear: never to commit violence against women, never to excuse violence against women, and never to remain silent about violence against women. This is my oath.
    Were Rudd and Turnbull saying it was this oath that now stopped them from belting their wives?
    Was their oath likely to be sworn by the kind of men that would?
    Were they telling me to swear it, too, because they think I’d otherwise punch a woman? How dare they.
    So what was all that really about?
    Rudd’s smug face told the story. Here was another preening ritual of seeming good without achieving it, while making even the innocent feel accused.

  41. pbw

    Meanwhile, in the new citadel of Christendom…

  42. Soberinthemorning

    I know Martin Parkinson from a long time ago and he has always been prone to political correctness, while actually being a raving elitist in person. Wanker. And it speaks volumes that he’s Turnbull’s man.

  43. Clam Chowdah

    This is wrong in so many ways – what right have departmental secretaries to pry into the private lives of their staff? Are they going to install cameras in people’s homes? If (say) one half of a PM&C couple applies for domestic violence leave, will the other half be automatically sacked? Or, for that matter, if a person applies for domestic violence leave will there be action taken against the partner who is employed elsewhere in the public service?

    Why do these people always assume that their staff have the lowest ethics and motives?

    That’s a rhetorical question.

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