Queensland Election Forum

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357 Responses to Queensland Election Forum

  1. Makka

    after having watching LNP preferences give at least 2 seats to their ALP

    This. Yet still there are supposed conservatives who want us to vote for this pit of vermin. I spit on the LNP.

  2. I have not heard a more airheaded election night speech, than that given by Palachuk tonight.
    (This is not a de-facto endorsement of Grim Tim, whose speech was just plain dumb).

  3. Dr Faustus

    Take outs:

    – The major parties have both contracted electoral arse cancer;

    – PHON is a dead duck, quacking;

    – Palacechook will form government with the help of 3 KAP, possibly a Green, and three/four independents – despite categorically stating she would never, ever do that. The QCU bruvvas will insist on this;

    – Tim Nichols appears to think he has done something rather good. He will need to be taken out the back and shot against the pig-sty wall, rather than being left in the library with a brandy and his revolver;

  4. ABC: PHON (circa 22% of the statewide vote) are a “spent force”.
    however, Greens (7%) are “on the rise”.

    FMD. $1.2 Billion per year.

  5. zyconoclast

    Zyco: With Schweppes tonic. But the Tanqueray is “Old Tom”.
    (Why can I get Gin of that quality to here, but nothing better than Schweppes for mixer?).

    Never tried Old Tom.
    I do like Tanqueray 10.

  6. Never tried Old Tom.
    I do like Tanqueray 10.

    I’m still conducting tests. The jury is out on that one. Hard to pick the difference. But “Old Tom” looks nice on the shelf.
    From memory the Gin shelf has Tanqueray: Bloomsbury, Nr 10, Old Tom. Beefeater: Twenty-Four, & Burrough’s Reserve, Hendricks, The Botanist, Prohibition “Bathtub Cut”. (plus all the bogan gins, Bombay sapphire, gordons, vickers, gilbeys, etc.)

  7. pete of Perth

    Thank [email protected] we aren’t connected to the ES grid.

  8. Favourite candidate name: ALP candidate for the seat of Pumicestone: Mr. Hoogwaerts.

  9. BorisG

    Hard to believe 5 or 6 years ago we all were madly declaring the ALP over. Give those xunts credits, like a burning case of the clap caught from a cheap rent boy, they will not go away. The Liberal Party on the other hand is over. Dead and buried.

    But the reason for the ALP resurgence in QLD is Cable Newman. Or rather rejection of his reasonably conservative policies by the electorate. After this you can’t blame LNP for trying something different.

  10. zyconoclast

    From 2016
    Queensland compulsory preferential voting: How Labor beat LNP at their own game

    From a democratic point of view, it was a disgrace.
    As a political manoeuvre, it was pure genius.

    Like the best Frank Underwood plots, it had been ticking away in the background since the beginning, just waiting for the right moment to strike.
    On Tuesday, the LNP handed that moment to the Palaszczuk Labor government, while attempting to seize the agenda itself
    In a stunning coup, aided by the two Katter Party MPs and nudged across the line by Labor defector Rob Pyne, the LNP forced the government to consider, for a third time, increasing the number of Queensland electorates – and to debate and vote on the legislation a little over 48 hours after it was introduced.
    The LNP crowed with its victory, with the government all but guaranteed a defeat.
    But the government saw an opportunity to dress the Opposition bill up as a Trojan horse to pass something which had been boiling away on its own agenda for some time.
    Meetings were called. Discussions were had. It involved all the party power brokers. Stirling Hinchliffe, Jackie Trad, Annastacia Palaszczuk, Yvette D’Ath, Evan Moorhead – they were just some of the names bandied around.

    Could they leverage the vote in their own favour – use the LNP’s own momentum and “urgency” against them to pass something that would work to help secure Labor’s own political future – despite it being a somewhat unpalatable sell? It was not the first time the party had played with reintroducing Compulsory Preferential Voting – but here was the first opportunity to have it introduced and passed without scrutiny, or having to face difficult accusations of nest feathering.
    CPV was always considered a risky but necessary measure to ensuring Queensland Labor could win elections in the changing electoral space. Better to rip it off like a band-aid, and not only had the LNP brought the first-aid kit, they had inadvertently offered to carry Labor across the front lines.

    Moving the state from optional preferential voting – where voters decide either to just vote one or number every box – to compulsory, which, like federal ballots, forces every voter to number each candidate in their preferential order, had been part of this government’s strategy from its first days. The word from head office following the disastrous Brisbane local government election was it needed to be done, sooner rather than later.
    Voting trends change. When the Goss government made the move to switch Queensland to optional preferential voting, it was at the recommendation of the Fitzgerald Inquiry, via the Electoral and Administrative Review Commission to make the state’s elections fairer. The EARC was responding to concerns that voters should not be forced to vote for candidates they did not wish to see elected. Preference flows mean that a person’s vote could end up being counted for someone they listed further down the paper. Just voting one meant constituents could make their votes clear.
    When the LNP was two parties, preference flows benefited the conservatives, at Labor’s cost.
    In 2001, Peter Beattie managed to successfully combat that with a “just vote one” strategy. Since then, more and more voters had been numbering just the one box. The Beattie ploy had worked a little too well.
    When the Liberal and National Party officially married in 2008, Labor watched as a voting system which had worked in its favour began to sour. “Just vote one” worked for the LNP.
    Until 2015. The Newman government attempted a “just vote one” strategy, but was stymied in the attempt to scuttle the protest vote Labor was counting on. Voters wanted to send a message. And they made sure to number every box so they could put the LNP last.
    That protest vote ended with Labor taking power, despite winning just 37.5 per cent of the primary vote. ABC election analyst Antony Green reviewed the 2015 results and found that if compulsory preferential voting had been in place, Labor would have won eight more seats than it did, bringing its number in the House to 52. That would have given the Palaszczuk government a clear majority, even if it lost the same number of MPs it has seen migrate to the cross bench in the past year.
    Essentially, if compulsory preferential voting was in place in 2015, Labor would hold nearly 60 per cent of the Parliament, despite having won just one in three votes.
    It wasn’t a new problem for Labor. The Bligh government, staring down what it knew was the barrel of defeat ahead of the 2012 election, had also toyed with bringing in compulsory preferential voting, but the architects of that plan, some of which sitting in this parliament, lost their nerve. Labor lost government. And almost all hope of returning to power, having been reduced to just seven MPs.
    But the government had a fresher memory to rely on, when making its decision to push ahead with the move.
    Last month, Labor lost all but six Brisbane City Council wards, including one to the Greens. Despite the LNP dropping its primary vote by just over 7 per cent, Labor picked up less than 2 per cent of that vote, with the majority going to the Greens.
    That worried Labor at more than just a local government level. Key electorates, including Deputy Premier Jackie Trad’s seat of South Brisbane and rising star Steven Miles’ electorate of Mount Coot-tha, were at risk of falling to the Greens at the next election, which could be held any time from August onwards. As it stood, Barron River, Brisbane Central, Bundaberg, Ferny Grove, Maryborough, Mount Coot-tha, Mundingburra, Pumicestone and Springwood were all won on preferences in the 2015 poll.
    Labor already knew it would find it tough to win the next election. The scheduled redistribution of seat boundaries was another unknown, but one which the south-east Queensland Labor MPs were further worried would end badly for them.
    The LNP and Katter’s Party were worried the redistribution would mean regional and rural electorates where the population was sparse would be swallowed up by boundary changes – with Callide, Whitsundays and Dalrymple at particular risk of disappearing, to make room for new seats in the south-east, but keep the numbers at 89 electorates.
    That prompted the LNP’s urgency in adding extra seats through its legislation. Population growth would mean those additional electorates would most likely be created in the south-east, where Labor had a chance of picking them up, but it meant their established blue-ribbon seats would be safe.
    The Opposition knew it had the numbers to get its bill heard and passed and moved quickly, catching Labor completely unaware. But in the 24 hours before what was set to be a fairly major legislative defeat for the government, Labor MPs, when asked about the legislation, were tight-lipped. And smug.
    “Just wait and see,” one said. “I wouldn’t be so sure it’s all cut and dried.”
    The Premier decided to go for it.
    “This wouldn’t have happened without her say so,” one MP said. “She had the guts to pull the trigger. Not everyone would in this situation. She knew what it would mean, in terms of attacks. But she did what had to be done.”
    The LNP bill was passed. Labor barely put up a fight. What was to be one of the biggest changes to the Queensland voting sphere in about three decades was debated for less than an hour. The division was called and Labor, as expected, lost. Queensland would receive the extra four seats the government didn’t want. But its MPs didn’t blink. They sat there. Smiling smugly across the chamber, all but screaming “watch this”.
    In terms of impact, and its ability to change the outcome of elections, Labor’s move was bigger than the recent change to add an additional year to Queensland’s political terms – which required a referendum. This would be done in a few hours, with no consultation.
    And for their opponents, completely without warning. The Katter MPs were spoken to first. They would only say they knew “fairly close” to the Labor amendments being moved on Thursday, but sources within the Labor Party said their agreement, while not hard to secure, given the obvious benefits for minor parties with a compulsory preferential voting system, came around the same time a deal was reached on their Uber bill.
    Mr Pyne, the unknown element, received the amendments at the same time as the rest of Parliament – and given 18 minutes to absorb it.
    Mr Hinchliffe, the Leader of the House, was quick to get into his ear. So was Opposition Leader Lawrence Springborg.
    LNP MPs desperately fought against the motion, adding speaker after speaker to the list to give their party leaders time to talk a crossbencher around – or at least see the amendment sent to committee for review. While words “disgrace”, “shabby”, “deceitful” and “dishonest” were hurled across the chamber, the government just shrugged.
    By the time the dinner break was called, the LNP fuming at being outmanoeuvred and outplayed, it was done. Katter’s Party and Mr Pyne were onboard.
    Labor had won. Even if it did come at the cost of the “openness and transparency” with which a government that has established more than 70 reviews in under a year had promised to govern.
    The new seats will be worked out by the independent redistribution commission. Those electorates will come into play whenever the next election is held. But the changes to the state’s voting system will be law well before the Toowoomba South by-election is held, where its impact will first be seen.
    Labor defended the sudden shift as merely bringing the state in line with the federal system, the same excuse the LNP used when it raised the state’s donation declaration threshold from $1000 to $12,800, a move Labor shouted down at every opportunity – and changed as soon as it came to power.
    It excused the suddenness with which it struck as the LNP’s fault, given the Opposition had forced the urgency with which the original legislation was debated. And it faced down allegations it had betrayed the spirit of the Fitzgerald Inquiry reforms – and the Goss government’s intentions – with little more than a shrug.
    The Premier who had been accused by the Opposition as dithering when it came to decisions, as review first, act never, the “know-nothing, do-nothing Premier”, managed to not only beat the LNP at their own game, she changed the game for Labor from here on out. And she did it, as one LNP MP pointed out, with a smile.

  11. Favourite candidate speech on TV:
    Draw between sitting members Jim Pierce & Scott Emerson, who both look like they lost their seats.
    They.. how to put this?…. didn’t show a helluva lot of respect toward their constituents or fellow candidates.
    Both speeches were noted for pepperings of profanity (“bullshit” was a word heard a few times).

  12. From I forget which newspaper tonight:

    Mr Nicholls paid respect to LNP MPs who had lost their seats.
    The blame, he said, was with One Nation, which preferenced sitting MPs last.

    News bulletin dickhead: The blame is with voters.
    If you don’t want to lose seats… how about.. y’know… doing something to attract voters.

    Now there’s an idea!

  13. C.L.

    Alan Jones wants power generation banned because his father was booted off his dairy farm or something. He’s certifiable.

  14. twostix

    The everyman in Australia is about ready to give up on “democracy” at the moment.

  15. Amadeus

    Queensland, heading towards the precipice one day, rooted the next. What an utter shemozzle!!! The idiots are still in charge of the asylum up here. What’s the phone number for Beyond Blue? Oh, no – Gillard is running that show…. and bloody Queensland doesn’t even have euthanasia….talk about being between a rock and a hard place!!!!

  16. twostix

    Voting strategically is the only sane and rational action for the qlder at this point of the global bugman ascendency.

    So we vote for labor to be in government, without the power to do anything labor-like, hobbled on social issues by their hillbilly enablers.

    It’s the absolute best outcome that can be achieved at this moment, in reality.

  17. entropy

    Those central Qld coal seats are like turkeys voting for Christmas. Was it ONP preferences?

  18. Combine Dave

    So we vote for labor to be in government, without the power to do anything labor-like, hobbled on social issues by their hillbilly enablers.

    It’s the absolute best outcome that can be achieved at this moment, in reality.

    That’s not depressing at all.

    And the Federal level?

  19. John Comnenus

    Australia needs an unambiguously pro Australian leader. An Aussie Donald Trump to revive our greatest traditions, build wealth, limit government and re-introduce fiscal discipline.

    Alas not a single name comes to mind.

    As for gin, Dobson’s Sweet Pea is the best gin I have ever tasted.

  20. struth

    Compulsory preferential.
    Kiss your arse goodbye.

  21. Sydney Boy

    Just some quick One Nation analysis:

    In EVERY seat One Nation ran a candidate, there was a swing towards ON – usually double figures, and as high as 25%. The only exception was Currumbin – in which One Nation had a fall in popularity.

    In nearly every seat in which there was both a One Nation and a Greens candidate, the One Nation candidate scored more first preference votes, and often DOUBLE that of the Greens.

    And TheirABC are saying One Nation is a failure and a spent force. $1.2B per year, eh?

  22. Gab

    LNP – socialist lite
    ALP – solid socialist
    GRN – hard socialist

    And with 50% net taxpayers …

    Australia is dead in the water.

  23. struth

    In EVERY seat One Nation ran a candidate, there was a swing towards ON – usually double figures, and as high as 25%. The only exception was Currumbin – in which One Nation had a fall in popularity.

    In nearly every seat in which there was both a One Nation and a Greens candidate, the One Nation candidate scored more first preference votes, and often DOUBLE that of the Greens.

    exactly.
    It will of course be poo poo-ed by the MSM as they focus on one inner city (left wing) seat that may go to the Watermelons.

    It won’t go unnoticed by pollies.

  24. Bear Necessities

    I don’t know if Tim Mander is competent or not but the LNP could do no worse. Got a swing to him in Everton. Everton for non Qld cats is right next to Aspley where the LNP got booted violently. ex NRL ref, fairly down to earth, Christian background gives him a good head start.

  25. Leigh Lowe

    Australia needs an unambiguously pro Australian leader. An Aussie Donald Trump to revive our greatest traditions, build wealth, limit government and re-introduce fiscal discipline.

    Alas not a single name comes to mind.

    Russell Coight.

  26. struth

    Australia needs an unambiguously pro Australian leader. An Aussie Donald Trump to revive our greatest traditions, build wealth, limit government and re-introduce fiscal discipline.

    Alas not a single name comes to mind.

    This will never happen in Australia, due to our political system and our cultural difference to the USA which has seen us be a backwater throughout our history while having the richest natural resources and a great western culture start.
    Theoretically, we should be a superpower.

    The main difference is envy.
    Australians are envious of wealth.
    The core emotion of leftism.

    Americans are not.
    It would take a self funded person like Trump, but still, to navigate our system that doesn’t have “primaries” would get him, and he’d be as popular as a stinking dead rat to most Australians for being rich.

    He’d have to come from a middle to lower class background and then they would eat him alive and he wouldn’t have the resources to fight it.
    I always ponder this.

    For all the guff about how far Europe has fallen to the left and how far the USA had been, it is absolutely nothing in comparison to how far we have fallen.
    It really isn’t.

    I have, like many of you, travelled Europe, the USA, Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, Asia, extensively and there are no people I can see so utterly controlled and bullied by government as Australians are.
    So incredibly regulated private and work lives, so as now, for me, I need to leave this Island prison of hi vis wearing inmates to feel free.
    To enjoy driving.
    To enjoy not seeing hi vis everywhere you look .
    To find people worth striking up a conversation with.
    To do things and buy cheaper than in Australia.
    To get away from bloody flies and Mozzies and extreme heat.
    To go to restaurants without seeing thong wearing boofheads and slobs, or the complete caf’e latte opposite , just normal , decent people.
    Let’s face it……………………………………we’re cooked.
    It’s done.
    But some here, will still mock other nations.
    What a joke.

  27. Combine Dave

    I have, like many of you, travelled Europe, the USA, Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, Asia, extensively and there are no people I can see so utterly controlled and bullied by government as Australians are.
    So incredibly regulated private and work lives, so as now, for me, I need to leave this Island prison of hi vis wearing inmates to feel free.

    Leave Australia to the welfarists, the blow-ins, the dr’s wives and rich Leftist Greens.

    I’ve got a flight to catch.

  28. Combine Dave

    In EVERY seat One Nation ran a candidate, there was a swing towards ON – usually double figures, and as high as 25%. The only exception was Currumbin – in which One Nation had a fall in popularity.

    In nearly every seat in which there was both a One Nation and a Greens candidate, the One Nation candidate scored more first preference votes, and often DOUBLE that of the Greens.

    How many seats did they win?

  29. C.L.

    Slime-ball failed priest Jim Soorely last night shirtfronted Jackie Trad over her decision to give Pauline Hanson’s grandson a gift, asking her if she would resign.

    Still eaten up with hate, the malicious little turd.

  30. C.L.

    Jo-Ann Miller, I meant – not Trad.

  31. Crossie;

    There are two issues here, approve the mine and lend Adani the money to do it with. I’m for the first but not for the second, Adani should organise their own finances and run the risks. The state should not guarantee them anything except a licence to operate.

    If the return is good, and the loan is secured, why not?

  32. Baldrick

    There are two issues here, approve the mine and lend Adani the money to do it with. I’m for the first but not for the second, Adani should organise their own finances and run the risks. The state should not guarantee them anything except a licence to operate.

    You’ve fallen for the Greenfilth spin. The rail line will not just service the Adani mine but several other coal mines in the region. The money to build the mine is a loan and in the end an important useful piece of Infrastructure remains.

  33. This will never happen in Australia, due to our political system and our cultural difference to the USA which has seen us be a backwater throughout our history while having the richest natural resources and a great western culture start.

    I think it is possible. Struth, but not directly within our political system. What is needed is somebody financially independent and well-regarded by the public, to be the figurehead and voice of a political movement, without actually running for office themselves.

    Just such a movement quietly started in Victoria in 1988, with Mel Gibson as the spokesman and figurehead. It very quickly gained a lot of private, influential support, but then fell over when Mel was offered a truckload of money to return to the states and make Lethal Weapon II.

  34. You’ve fallen for the Greenfilth spin. The rail line will not just service the Adani mine but several other coal mines in the region. The money to build the mine is a loan and in the end an important useful piece of Infrastructure remains.

    All true, Baldrick, and it goes even further than that. Adani never needed a government backed loan to proceed with the railway line. The idea of applying for the loan, which was from the Federal government, but via the state government, meant that both levels of government had skin in the game, and would have hopefully made it less likely for a future, different federal or state government to pull the pin on the project.

  35. Tel

    There are two issues here, approve the mine and lend Adani the money to do it with. I’m for the first but not for the second, Adani should organise their own finances and run the risks. The state should not guarantee them anything except a licence to operate.

    I kind of agree, but problem is that the banks which were all set to lend money ended up being held to ransom by a small bunch of noisy protesters who basically occupied their foyers. If you are going to have a proper system of private finance, you also need a government willing to protect private property from aggressive activists. Of course, the banks themselves are weak as piss, but that comes from a long process where the expectation of an owner being able to make decisions regarding their own property has been abandoned.

  36. Snoopy

    Jim Soorley’s time as mayor was a disgrace. I think it was at the election when Soorley and the ALP finally lost control of the Brisbane City Council where he introduced anti-democratic, anti-free political speech by-laws, enforced by council officers who were nothing more than enthusiastic thugs, to harass and intimidate opposition polling booth volunteers with huge personal fines.

    Truly Mugabesque. A vicious little goblin.

  37. Tel

    You’ve fallen for the Greenfilth spin. The rail line will not just service the Adani mine but several other coal mines in the region.

    So what? Lots of private companies manage to service more than one customer, even without government help. There’s a plausible argument that Adani should not be able to own the rail line, nor should it have exclusive access but that’s got nothing whatsoever to do with tax money.

  38. struth

    It seems to me, although I admit I could be wrong, but PHON took the votes from liberals more than from Labor.
    For good or bad, it seems they took an awful lot.

    There may not be a seat in it, but there is a message in it.
    One that won’t be lost on many federal back bench cling- ons, in the Libs.

  39. Twostix;

    The everyman in Australia is about ready to give up on “democracy” at the moment.

    I can’t argue against that concept.

  40. Baldrick

    There’s a plausible argument that Adani should not be able to own the rail line, nor should it have exclusive access but that’s got nothing whatsoever to do with tax money.

    It’s a L.O.A.N., I can’t make it any simpler.

  41. tomix

    LNP got murdered at PrePoll counting in metropolitan Brisbane last night.
    Postal votes to be counted this morning.

  42. Peter Castieau

    If the greatest swing in the QLD election was to an unprincipled populist party on the right, I think it goes well for the Australian Conservatives come the next federal election.

  43. Snoopy

    Yes, it’s long. But if you’re a Queenslander do yourself a favour and read it.

    zyconoclast
    #2566362, posted on November 26, 2017 at 1:13 am

  44. There may not be a seat in it, but there is a message in it.
    One that won’t be lost on many federal back bench cling- ons, in the Libs.

    Don’t count on it.

  45. Seza

    To all those contemplating the end of a bottle of gin, both Woollies and Dan Murphy stock Fever Tree Tonic Water and Dan’s even has some of the variants. This is the general Tonic of choice in England. Cascade also make a reasonable Tonic Water.
    Our last foray to the Old Dart left from Gatwick, and with time to kill we visited a bar in the terminal with many bespoke gins on offer, and they only used Fever Tree.

  46. struth

    Preferential voting.
    I had the choice of varying degrees of socialism, and to put them in varying degrees of approval.
    I did not get the choice to disapprove of any of them, if I played the game.

  47. If the greatest swing in the QLD election was to an unprincipled populist party on the right, I think it goes well for the Australian Conservatives come the next federal election.

    The ACP may do alright as long as they stay out of the HoR, and concentrate on the Senate.

  48. Snoopy

    I kind of agree, but problem is that the banks which were all set to lend money ended up being held to ransom by a small bunch of noisy protesters who basically occupied their foyers.

    Tel, you are making an unwarranted assumption that the banks’ managements are not global warming loons. The dozens of protesters gave them welcome cover.

  49. John Comnenus

    When Joh won office low 40 % mark it was called a gerrymander.

    ALP will win Qld from around 35% of the vote. The LNP won around 33%. Hardly unanimous or resounding result.

    The LNP needs to refocus and get back to basics – low taxes, fiscal discipline, less immigration, fewer subsidies and more free market.

    But it won’t happen and the Turnbull leadership will never go there, nor by the way will Mr gutless – Tony Abbott.

  50. struth

    If the greatest swing in the QLD election was to an unprincipled populist party on the right, I think it goes well for the Australian Conservatives come the next federal election.

    PHON is on the right?

    Who knew?

    The people are sick of the majors, and the bullshit, and she is a protest vote.

    The A C would do well to not sit back and get out there, to gain the right wing protest vote.
    PHON would have got a lot of old Labor votes as well, so it doesn’t really bode that well for a media shy right wing party, I believe.

  51. Rabz

    Most premiers have been dumb, but this boiler’s uglier than Peter Beattie, more irrational than Bligh, and less articulate than Joh.

    LOL.

  52. JC

    So who won? Is labor confirmed?

  53. A Lurker

    If the greatest swing in the QLD election was to an unprincipled populist party on the right, I think it goes well for the Australian Conservatives come the next federal election.

    If the greatest swing went to One Nation, then it is because they are visible. People are aware of their existence.

    I had hoped to vote for Australian Conservatives but sadly there is no candidate for the by-election in my electorate next weekend. For a social Conservative, the next best thing appears to be the Christian Democrats who I will vote for.

    One thing that must be taken on board by Australian Conservatives is that the party needs visibility, which means getting on the news, in the radio and on the internet. You guys need to make waves, get yourselves known, get your candidates known by the plebs out there. Start handing out election material – pamphlet drops into letterboxes. Telephone people. Become visible. Otherwise you will sink like ALA sank last Federal election. The media won’t give you handouts. You have to force the media to come to you. Start becoming notorious.

  54. struth

    They don’t start the count until nine up here JC, and it is still 0832 as I type.
    Too close to call and not enough time for the corruption to be enacted.

  55. A Lurker

    It seems to me, although I admit I could be wrong, but PHON took the votes from liberals more than from Labor.

    Yup, the rotting stench of the Turnbull Coalition Team wafted into Queensland.

    For good or bad, it seems they took an awful lot.

    MV will be a happy man.

  56. MV will be a happy man.

    Why?
    Politically I won’t be happy until we get some conservative contenders prepared to actually tackle the real issues, instead of competing in a media-run popularity contest. Unfortunately I can’t see it happening in what’s left of my lifetime.

  57. C.L.

    The tragedy of Adani is that a first-world white country cannot produce one single mining titan or syndicate to do what a third world outfit wants to do. Australia’s panhandling “businessmen” have been drummed into line by the left; they are allowed to operate only insofar as they obey left-wing strictures.

  58. Rabz

    From the Oz:

    LNP 37
    labor 43
    independent 2
    greenfilth 0
    PHON 0

    Great work. What an unpalatable choice.

    NSW cats con look forward to the same non choice next elelction.

  59. OldOzzie

    Lord Waffles of Wentworth Turdbull will be watching his back for Brutus

    With about 67 per cent of the vote counted, Labor is sitting on about 35 per cent, LNP on 33 per cent, One Nation on 13 per cent (up about 12.6 per cent), Greens on 9 per cent, Katter’s Australian Party on 2.2 per cent and 5.4 per cent on others.

    LNP QLD 33% Primary Vote – Liberals in real trouble

  60. Ubique

    The bottom line is PHON took around 14 percent of the vote, significantly outpolling the Greens who took 10 percent. Neither won a seat.
    Most of the PHON vote came from the LNP who suffered a swing of 8.3 percent. The Greens increased their vote by 1.5 percent, most of which would have come from Labor who suffered a swing of 1.3 percent.

  61. Rabz

    Adani represents everything that has gone so horribly wrong with this country, in spades.

    We truly are too stupid to survive.

  62. Rabz

    LNP QLD 33% Primary Vote – Liberals in real trouble

    What on earth did they expect was going to happen otherwise?

  63. OldOzzie

    Further to above 10.45pm

    While the Greens have done very well in inner Brisbane, in regional Queensland their support is hovering about 5 per cent.

    The “wacky” vote in regional Queensland is one of the reasons the result is so difficult to call with support split among the parties. Currently the ALP has secured 29 per cent of the regional vote, LNP is on 31 per cent and One Nation is on 21 per cent.

  64. PB

    I had a mate in the Prison Service: “ohhh, we gotta get rid if this Bligh woman….”

    Done, Newman comes to power, Like in Vic. under Kennett, they start looking at where the real money gets blown: “ohhh, we gotta get rid of this Newman bloke….”

    And that is the parable why Labor remains in power.

  65. GP

    Most premiers have been dumb, but this boiler’s uglier than Peter Beattie, more irrational than Bligh, and less articulate than Joh.

    Inherited the family seat in 2006, handed the keys to the Tarago in 2012, dull as dogshit, survives on media hospital passes, but will be celebrated in labor folklore – just like the tree of knowledge.

  66. Rockdoctor

    Think Queenslands demographics have irreversibly changed too. There’s no way I could have seen Greens primary polling as high as 30% in places, even South Brisbane 2 decades ago when I lived there last… The big take away from the regions is the LNP vote was canabalised by PHON & KAP while the ALP was largely unscathed. The LNP needs to take the obvious conclusion from this but as others here have predicted they will probably turn left again ignoring their base. Also the faux independant pops up again, Hetty Johnson who recently ran dead on the Heiner Affair did well & Strelow is about Labor as you get.

  67. Snoopy

    they are allowed to operate only insofar as they obey left-wing strictures.

    A ‘social licence’ trumps all others in modern Australia with just one notable exception: marriage. Weird, eh?

  68. struth

    The “wacky” vote in regional Queensland is one of the reasons the result is so difficult to call with support split among the parties.

    Who wrote this meticulously studied, educated, unbiased analysis?

  69. Snoopy

    The real lesson from the Queensland election is that the LNP couldn’t get enough polling booth volunteers. Some booths were totally unmanned.

    This is the legacy of Turnbull and Textor.

  70. Senile Old Guy

    The “wacky” vote in regional Queensland is one of the reasons the result is so difficult to call with support split among the parties.

    Antony Green.

  71. John Constantine

    The progressive, deliberately managed decline of the obsolete and deplorable Australian prole is laid out for us in Queensland.

    The hellbent deliberate decline of the proles into deindustrialised welfare plantations is their unswerving committed obligation under signed transnational conventions.

    No matter how the proles vote, their elite quisling Class has sold them out to the great looting cartels.

    Sell the Kohinoor diamond for Kopeks.

    What a brilliant idea Julie Bishop.

  72. Baldrick

    This is the legacy of Turnbull and Textor.

    Catallaxy FactCheck ↔ True

  73. OldOzzie

    Ross Cameron on the Outsiders just now nailed it

    when you add up the LNP + PHON + Kat Vote you outnumber ALP + GRN

    and the LNP were too dumb to do a preference swap with PHON

    Liberals/Nationals wonder why they are losing

    Plus

    Snoopy
    #2566532, posted on November 26, 2017 at 10:05 am

    The real lesson from the Queensland election is that the LNP couldn’t get enough polling booth volunteers. Some booths were totally unmanned.

    This is the legacy of Turnbull and Textor.

  74. Tel

    The hellbent deliberate decline of the proles into deindustrialised welfare plantations is their unswerving committed obligation under signed transnational conventions.

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/shopping-i-can-t-really-remember-what-that-is

    Welcome to the year 2030. Welcome to my city – or should I say, “our city”. I don’t own anything. I don’t own a car. I don’t own a house. I don’t own any appliances or any clothes.

    It might seem odd to you, but it makes perfect sense for us in this city. Everything you considered a product, has now become a service. We have access to transportation, accommodation, food and all the things we need in our daily lives. One by one all these things became free, so it ended up not making sense for us to own much.

    These guys really believe in what they are doing. You cannot point out consequences because they simply choose to see something else instead.

  75. OldOzzie

    Comment on Piers Akerman’s Article this morning

    Piers Akerman: Oh yes, Kevin Rudd is still the great pretender

    Apparently Rudd’s new book has sold 3700 copies (Howard’s has sold 120000), but what we can’t measure is how many of the 3700 are Joke Christmas gifts.

  76. twostix

    It’s what textor did to the tories in the UK too snoopy. Purged the party of the bigot base and now have no man power and can barely beat a communist whose own party elite are embarrased by.

  77. .

    The “wacky” vote in regional Queensland is one of the reasons the result is so difficult to call with support split among the parties.

    Antony Green.

    That is bigoted. Revoke his social licence.

  78. sisypus

    How much money will ON get for it’s 1st preferences ?

  79. Confused Old Misfit

    Struth wants to stop the world and get off the island.
    Well mate, knock Canada off your list. I’ve just returned from there after 8 years (or more definitely 7 WINTERS). I grew up there and came out here in ’81 when I was in my 40’s. Most of my experience was on the eastern side. The side that lives off the west. Sort of like Tasmania & South Australia.
    Until you’ve lived through a few Winnipeg Winters you do not know what it is to be cold. And in the spring the mozzies & blackflies are worse than here.
    Only the autumn leaves offer compensation.

  80. Y

    but what we can’t measure is how many of the 3700 are Joke Christmas gifts.

    Hahahahahaha. Gives me idea for Kris Kringle at work.

  81. Woolfe

    Are there 3700 libraries in Australia?

  82. Infidel Tiger

    Apparently Rudd’s new book has sold 3700 copies (Howard’s has sold 120000), but what we can’t measure is how many of the 3700 are Joke Christmas gifts.

    At least 3600 copies of that book were bought by a fat women with greasy hair and her sociopath male companion.

  83. struth

    Struth wants to stop the world and get off the island.

    Well mate, knock Canada off your list. I’ve just returned from there after 8 years (or more definitely 7 WINTERS). I grew up there and came out here in ’81 when I was in my 40’s. Most of my experience was on the eastern side. The side that lives off the west. Sort of like Tasmania & South Australia.
    Until you’ve lived through a few Winnipeg Winters you do not know what it is to be cold. And in the spring the mozzies & blackflies are worse than here.

    Only the autumn leaves offer compensation.

    I love cold weather, and when it gets too much I’ll pop off to anywhere else in the northern hemisphere for a fraction of the price and time it takes to get out of this dump.

    The mozzies are huge in Canada, I know.

    But the vehicles and roads are better, the people are pretty good, and other things that are of a personal interest to me are also better.

    It’s horses for courses on most things.

    Even with the rapid fall of Canada to socialism through cultural Marxism, I don’t think they are as far down the road as us, although I haven’t been there for about five years.

  84. alexnoaholdmate

    There’s no way I could have seen Greens primary polling as high as 30% in places, even South Brisbane 2 decades ago when I lived there last…

    With hipsters, white-collar poli-sci grads, and “urban living” comes Green votes.

  85. Confused Old Misfit

    Struth,
    The kid with the hair is a flower child. “The budget will balance itself!” “Climate change is our greatest challenge!” The latest is that he will allow returning Canadians who fought with ISIS to return for compassionate “rehabilitation”.
    And, like Australia, there are no strong leaders of any stripe waiting in the wings.

  86. Baldrick

    At least somebody in the Stupid.Fucking.Turnbull.Coalition gets it:

    George Christensen ✔ @GChristensenMP
    To Qlders who voted One Nation, I’m sorry we in the LNP let you down. We need to listen more, work harder, stand up more for conservative values & regional Qld & do better to win your trust & vote. A lot of that rests with the Turnbull govt, it’s leadership & policy direction.

  87. Makka

    And, like Australia, there are no strong leaders of any stripe waiting in the wings.

    With most of the nation voting for left green free stuff , the place may not even be worth saving.

  88. Dr Faustus

    We need to listen more, work harder, stand up more for conservative values & regional Qld & do better to win your trust & vote. A lot of that rests with the Turnbull govt, it’s leadership & policy direction.

    Harsh.

    The Turnbull Election Winning Machine was straight out of the blocks this morning, explaining why the fact that 30% fell off the LNP last night means the most important thing Parliament can do for the rest of the year is debate SSM legislation.

    (The Shorten Crime Family is also fairly quiet about the fact that 60% of the Queensland voteherd equates the ALP with disaster and decay.)

  89. stackja

    Courier Mail

    THE outcome of the Queensland election is still undecided, but Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk is confident Labor will secure the 47 seats it needs to form a majority government.

    Counting resumed at 9am, but a result could be days away.

    The count has been complicated by One Nation’s decision to preference the Greens last and all sitting MPs second last, and the reintroduction of compulsory preferential voting.

  90. Queensland election: Labor will win election with 48 seats, Antony Green says
    Posted 10 minutes ago

    ABC election analyst Antony Green is predicting Labor will win the Queensland election with 48 seats.

    He says Labor has won 46 seats and will likely take two more, clearing the 47 needed to govern with a majority.

  91. nemkat

    The LNP have lost the Pre Poll and Postal Vote counts in Brisbane Seats where they are always well ahead.
    When ECQ releases those results, the extent of the bloodbath will be clear.

  92. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    NATIONAL BREAKING NEWS

    Federal issues didn’t affect Qld poll, PM

    Australian Associated Press
    2:08PM November 26, 2017

    Malcolm Turnbull has distanced his government from the apparent failure of Queensland’s Liberal National Party in Saturday’s state election campaign.

    He says he has spoken to LNP leaders Tim Nicholls and Deb Frecklington and praised them for a good campaign in a tough environment.

    Annastacia Palaszczuk’s Labor government looks set to be returned with a small majority of 48 seats in the 93-seat parliament.

    The LNP fell well short and faced a swing against it in the southeast of the state, with the loss of at least three senior members, including shadow treasurer Scott Emerson.

    But Mr Turnbull wouldn’t take any blame for the amalgamated party’s failure, even though there has been turmoil at the federal level.

    “(Voters) know the difference between state and federal issues, and that was a state election fought on state issues,” he told reporters while campaigning in Sydney for the by-election in Bennelong.

    Mr Turnbull made just one brief appearance in Queensland during the election campaign, with a short, rousing speech at the LNP launch and a short street walk last Sunday.

    He said he would wait until all votes were counted before commenting further.

    “But at this stage we will be very interested to see if Annastacia Palaszczuk is prepared to stick to her pledge not to accept the support of any independent or minor party,” the prime minister said.

    So predictable…S.F.L.

  93. gorgiasl

    Tim Storrier’s (and my) view as reported in The Spectator:

    It makes one wonder what on earth is happening to Australia. Short sighted, inept, conceited and corrupt governance appears to be taking us over the ‘Argentine precipice’. Unless we get leadership with backbone the whole legion of unionised, welfared and over- taxed mugs, that has become a significant part of the Australian population is going to find it hard to get a job as a caddy on a Chinese owned golf course. Considering the vast progress of Asian countries we Australians are going to have to change to even consider competing.

  94. OldOzzie

    gorgiasl
    #2566780, posted on November 26, 2017 at 2:40 pm
    Tim Storrier’s (and my) view as reported in The Spectator:

    It makes one wonder what on earth is happening to Australia. Short sighted, inept, conceited and corrupt governance appears to be taking us over the ‘Argentine precipice’. Unless we get leadership with backbone the whole legion of unionised, welfared and over- taxed mugs, that has become a significant part of the Australian population is going to find it hard to get a job as a caddy on a Chinese owned golf course. Considering the vast progress of Asian countries we Australians are going to have to change to even consider competing.

    From my post on Catallaxy Thread Stephen Cable: No matter the question, government is the answer

    In a very strange, but correct article in The Australian, Grace Collier sums it up

    Our tax system rewards losers, so it reaps failure

    There is loud, pumping dance music, and lots of shouting and shrieking. Every Tuesday morning at the local sporting club, you will find me, and an excited gaggle of women, doing our best to play “extreme tennis”. In terms of fitness crazes, it is the new pole dancing.

    This is not tennis in the traditional sense, and not for the faint-hearted or noise-sensitive. Our male coach bellows instructions over the music, directing us in a series of crazy tennis games. We try to keep up and help each other, but most of the time it is chaos; the blonde leading the blonde.

    Coach herds a dozen women on to just one court, where we are supposed to hit the ball, and not each other.

    Every time a shot is missed, the loser must sprint around the court perimeter. Unfortunately, in our age group this is out of the question; the best most can do is a wheezy Cliff Young shuffle.

    Last Tuesday, a new game was introduced. Two women were designated “champions” and placed on one side of the court, as doubles. The remaining 10, including me, were designated “challengers” and placed on the other.

    The challengers formed two lines, and the couple at the front had to play a rally of doubles with the champions opposite, with the intention of winning.

    The pair who lost the rally had to go to the back of the challenger line as losers. The pair who won the rally remained the champions or crossed the court to take the champions’ place as the winners.

    It was 30C. Half the court was shaded beautifully by large trees, but the other half was not and it was baking hot.

    The coach placed us challengers in the shade and the champions in the sun. There we stood, comfortable and cool, feeling grateful, even smug. The two champions stood opposite, rackets ready, sweltering and squinting. We giggled at their misfortune. What schmucks they looked, glistening and turning pink under the blazing sun. The game began, and each pair of challengers lost every rally, with determined force.

    All of a sudden, we had morphed into hopeless tennis players, missing by miles the easiest shots. To confess the truth, I was one of the worst; frankly, I couldn’t lose quick enough. I was terrified of winning and gleefully skipped to the back of the losers’ line every time we successfully lost.

    Initially, the coach screamed and shouted but soon gave up because he was being ignored. Eventually he stood there mute, utterly bewildered, trying to work out what on earth was going wrong.

    There was no point winning, you see, when the prize was hot discomfort. It was far more sensible to take it easy, sit back and lose, and remain comfortable and cool. Coach had set up the rules of the game all wrong. He had created a strong incentive for losing and, unsurprisingly, a bunch of hopeless losers is what he received in return.

    So it is with our tax system, in particular our income tax schedules, which now allegedly are under review.

    Scott Morrison is looking at our income tax system with a view to proposing tax cuts before the next election. Well, he may have a really hard look because our system is set up all wrong and needs the rules dramatically changed. Our tax game incentivises losing. We need fewer losers, more winners. So we must incentivise winning. Our system takes too much off those who are bright, who work the hardest, take the most risks and, yes, have the best luck, too.

    Our system incentivises us towards failure, and so the result is failure and an undesirable, tall poppy-hating culture. In Australia there seems to be no point in working overtime, working too much, trying too hard and becoming a champion. We punish those who try to create wealth. We sneer at our winners. We line up to lose and cheer ourselves on as losers.

    Virtually half the country lines up at Centrelink every fortnight with their hand out, without a moment’s thought towards the person who had to go to work to put that money into their possession.

    One half of our community supports the other half. Surely, everyone can see how ridiculous this is. Worse, the supported half seem insatiable; no matter how much they are given it is never enough and constantly there is loud clamouring for more.

    The Treasurer, to put it mildly, is a disappointment of the highest order. With regards to his tax proposal he is likely to do something characteristically foolish and self-defeating yet again. If he cuts income taxes it will probably be by a few measly bucks a week. This will be an insult that will infuriate, and hasten his demise.

    The government needs a circuit breaker and strong product differentiation from Labor. Wise heads within the government should push Morrison to turn the income tax system on its head. The system should drive wealth creation and reward self-sufficiency. People should be incentivised to earn as much as possible, to stand on their own two feet. Avoiding contact with Centrelink should become a source of pride and a national obsession, the ultimate goal everyone strives to achieve.

    There will always be people in our community who need support but there is no way that number is 50 per cent. At the moment, because of our tax system, dishonesty, mediocrity and failure are rewarded, therefore aspired to, and ultimately revered. Imagine how much better our country would be if all of that were totally reversed.

  95. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    QLD ELECTION
    Queensland election: Possible Greens win in Maiwar busts ‘myth’

    AAP
    3:06PM November 26, 2017

    The Greens’ strong showing in inner-Brisbane at Saturday’s state election should dispel the “myth” the left-wing party can’t win seats in Queensland, according to Maiwar candidate Michael Berkman.

    Mr Berkman remains neck-and-neck with Labor’s Ali King for second place on primary votes in the western suburbs seat, putting him within reaching distance of being the first Greens candidate ever elected to Queensland’s parliament.

    He says the party’s strong showing in Maiwar, where he could unseat shadow treasurer Scott Emerson, as well as nearby McConnel and South Brisbane proves the party is a serious force in the state.

    Federal Greens leader Richard Di Natale said the party’s “outstanding” result in the Queensland election is further evidence politics in Australia has changed forever.

    “The message from voters is loud and clear. They are sick and tired of the old parties,” he told ABC television on Sunday.

    The Greens look like winning one seat in Queensland – hardly a landslide.

  96. Mr Turnbull made just one brief appearance in Queensland during the election campaign, with a short, rousing speech at the LNP launch and a short street walk last Sunday.

    That was the day Turnbull made a total ass of himself by being totally unable to answer a question about unemployment, and went off, obviously irritated with the journalist who asked the question, on a ridiculous tangent. It was at that point that I reckon the LNP lost any lingering chance to win.

  97. Having taken the time to look through the current count in every electorate in the state (my sock drawer being already well organised), it was interesting to note that in almost every seat that ONP stood a candidate they polled no less than about 17% of the primary vote.
    In several they polled over 25%, and in a few over 30%.
    In only 2 or 3 they polled below 10%.
    In several they polled higher than the LNP, and in many (apart from the deadest of dead-set inner city electorates) polled higher than the Greens.
    While they will not be likely to win any seats in the parliament, the overall percentage of the primary vote for ONP has been pretty high, and it looks like the 2 major parties, but LNP in particular, are the ones to lose votes to ONP.

  98. vr

    The Greens look like winning one seat in Queensland – hardly a landslide.

    Holy crap. this is my electorate.

  99. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Holy crap. this is my electorate.

    My condolences.

  100. Love the media declaring the death of One Nation.

    I thought the media had already declared them dead five or six times in the past 18 months.

    Gamest zombies I’ve ever seen

  101. Sydney Boy

    The Greens look like winning one seat in Queensland – hardly a landslide.

    Hey Di Natale, what do you say to the point that One Nation scored almost TWICE the first preference votes the Greens did in almost every electorate?

  102. Roger

    Love the media declaring the death of One Nation.

    PHON vote up c. 12% on last election. MSM: PHON dead.

    Green vote up c. 1%: ABC QLD TV News gives their likely winner of an inner city seat – the son of an ABC employee – an in-studio interview tonight.

    Mind you, I don’t have much time for PHON, and I’d be happy if the Greens won a few more seats, forcing the ALP to go into a de facto coalition with them in order to govern, a la Gillard. There’s a great deal of ruin in a state, and it seems QLDers need to experience some more before questioning the Left narrative.

  103. Y

    In The Aus:

    Annastacia Palaszczuk now the most successful female politician in Australian history, poised to take government for a 2nd term.

    You simply cannot make this up – it would seem too implausible for The Thick of It. Truly the Stephen Bradbury of politics.

  104. Louis

    I love how Labor just declare themselves the winner. They will be busy this week working out how to divy up the prize pool that is government to them. E.g. who’s owed a plumb government position. Who gets a grant or government contract.

  105. PB

    “Love the media declaring the death of One Nation.”

    Disinfo at its finest.

  106. Rockdoctor

    Harper has declared Victory in Thuringowa. Bit premature, 2PP has 15 out of 147 booths in. Tellingly neither challenger has conceded, time will see I suppose…

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