Warning. Planet savers at work with the government

Jo Nova on the background to the disastrous Grenfell tower fire in London.

The UK Dept of Energy and Climate Change wanted help to get insulation onto buildings to save the world in 2011, so it asked the people who sell insulation. Somehow the plastics industry found the energy to turn up and help the government write rules that would increase their sales.

The Grenfell tower, where 71 people died, ended up being coated in Celotex — a flammable plastic. Celotex staff were on that committee, and bragged on their website how they were “working inside government”.

This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to Warning. Planet savers at work with the government

  1. struth

    Crony capitalism.
    Corruptable government causes it.

  2. entropy

    The holy triumpherate: big government; big business; big unions.

  3. Rabz

    71 people died

    Makes Ruddy and “batts are burning” Garrett look like rank amateurs.

  4. Bruce of Newcastle

    At the time the usual suspects blamed everyone and everything except for the Green policies which actually caused the disaster.

    On top of that no one has explored the other underlying Green issue: tower blocks. High density apartments near public transport are part of Green religious doctrine.

    But as soon as you pack people in you have problems with cooling in summer. You can’t let them buy lots of cheap Chinese air conditioners, that would be haram. So you have to add insulation.

    Thus this disaster, and the several other less-fatal tower block fires lately, are due to the Green religious doctrine of forcing people to live together in densely packed blocks – where one failed fridge can destroy a hundred apartments.

    And even the fridge fire may have been due to the enforced religious edict to replace non-flammable CFCs with flammable isobutane.

  5. NuThink

    Who would have thunk that cladding a building in flammable materials was not a good idea? It certainly would not be obvious to someone in government. They should have read the Tombstone Imperative by Andrew Weir.

    ‘We regulate by counting tombstones’ US FEDERAL AVIATION OFFICIAL

  6. Tel

    Domestic refrigerators are sold full of lighter fluid and people have this sitting in their kitchen (most don’t even know there’s a danger). The reason is because of an environmental scam about a hole in the Ozone Layer.

  7. H B Bear

    People have been sacrificing other people to Gaia and other false Gods for centuries. Nothing to see here. Move along.

  8. Charlie

    Who would have thought that building materials manufactured in China would be dodgy

  9. RobK

    The whole saga is a sad indication of the state and weight of British Standards Association. ASA isn’t any better.

  10. Mother Lode

    Well, clearly government policy preventing people from living anywhere near a tree or a yellow-arse-licking frog habitat, and instead heaping one crowded floor on top of another crowded floor in hideous crime-riddled towers in pursuit of a socialist utopia, having to subsequently spend more money confiscated from taxpayers on unforeseen consequences such as people crammed into close proximity are uncomfortable, and then government colluding with cronies to adopt a solution which just happens to line their pockets, obviously all this is a market failure.

    There is only one solution.

    More government.

  11. Baldrick

    More evidence that Greenfilth gerbil worming policies kill.
    Meanwhile, nobody has yet died from natural climate deviations.

  12. Garry

    As soon as I hear the word ‘environment’ my eyes glaze over. In my experience anything to do with the environment will either cost me money, inconvenience me or both! Look at this stupidity starting in NSW today where a carton of beer goes up by five bucks with no way of redeeming the deposit in most locations on the cans or bottles. I intend to buy stubbies only in future and smash them into the recycle bin so that the parasitic council here doesn’t get my deposit back! More useless stupidity that will achieve nothing except fatten the wallets of the government and the companies running the scheme!

  13. mh

    Will the ABC’s Media Watch now apologise to Rowan Dean?

    * crickets *

  14. thefrollickingmole

    And lets not forget the flammable cladding was approved by government inspectors, and government workers ignored fire risks when they inspected the building as well.

    Obviously we need more laws and inspectors, because if they werent doing there job before a new law is sure to work!!

  15. The Moribund Barking Toad

    Gary @11:31am

    I intend to buy stubbies only in future and smash them into the recycle bin so that the parasitic council here doesn’t get my deposit back! More useless stupidity that will achieve nothing except fatten the wallets of the government and the companies running the scheme!

    Don’t use the recycle bin, bust them into the normal bin.

    I recycle nothing since the ACT local council stopped supermarkets giving me bags for my shopping that I could use as bin liners. Fuck ’em.

  16. Roger

    The whole saga is a sad indication of the state and weight of British Standards Association. ASA isn’t any better.

    Some scientists and fire safety experts came out after the fire and said they’d been trying to tell the government for years there was a problem with plastic insulation but the industry was highly litigious and successful in getting studies of the flammability of the insulation withdrawn from publication.

  17. BoyfromTottenham

    Slightly OT – see today’s SMH:
    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/at-great-risk-13-billion-murraydarling-plan-headed-for-failure-report-says-20171129-gzv344.html

    Another $13 billion hosed away by the ALP for nil result. We are truly the ‘Lucky country’!

  18. Rohan

    The road to hell is now paved with flammable plastic siding.

  19. min

    Brussels covered in toxic fumes after new lithium batteries used to store energy from wind turbines exploded. Waiting for those in SA to do the same thing after all the promos ABC have put to air . What they do not tell you is they only store enough energy for 30000 houses for an hour and only .01% wind power produced the other day.

  20. hzhousewife

    I told someone about the battery in Brussels yesterday after he mused that he was starting to look into solar panels and possibly a battery for the household. He reassured me that batteries would be fine in about 2 years time, and he hadn’t heard about toxic Lithium fumes. I suggested he check with household insurance because the battery may have to be free-standing, and to ring the local fire-brigade to see if they had any advice to offer.http://reneweconomy.com.au/lithium-ion-battery-storage-may-be-banned-inside-australian-homes-57002/

  21. classical_hero

    Mole got it right. Government caused it and only the government can fix it. We’re doomed.

  22. jupes

    At the time the usual suspects blamed everyone and everything except for the Green policies which actually caused the disaster.

    The usual suspects still do and, it would seem, will continue to do for a while yet at least.

    Just this morning Sky News reported on Musk’s battery going operational today. They opened the segment reminding us of the state-wide black-out that was the catalyst for SA buying the battery.

    Apparently it was a “once in 50 year storm” that knocked down a number of towers and lines that caused the black-out. No mention of green policies whatsoever. Nor was there mention of what the battery cost or indeed exactly how much electricity it could generate.

  23. BoyfromTottenham

    Jupes, batteries cannot and do not generate electricity, they just store it and release it, less some losses. After manufacture, the battery has to be charged up (and BTW this takes this time – typically minutes to hours) from a real power source (a generator) and stores it. Then when that stored power is needed, the battery discharges most, but not all, of its stored power – they are not 100% efficient. Charging and discharging cycles are repeated until the battery wears out by reaching its charge/discharge cycle limit (which every type of battery has). Then it is scrap and has to be disposed of. Different types of battery have optimal charging and discharging rates, and levels of % charging and % discharging, which if not adhered to shortens the battery life.
    I understand that the giant Musk battery being built in South Australia when fully charged could power the SA grid for a few minutes, which might help smooth out the random power supply fluctuations caused by the intermittent output of SA’s many wind turbines – that is about all. I’m not sure how long it would take to be recharged (maybe hours?), but until it is, it can do nothing useful. This is probably why national electrical grids haven’t had batteries as part of their design for the past century or so – they were expensive, useless and unnecessary.

  24. sabena

    The council members will be a little relieved at this news-prior to it they were facing the prospect of corporate manslaughter charges.

  25. manalive

    @ hzhousewife at 1:28 pm;
    A study of the effectiveness of solar + batteries in sunny Arizona has indicted that to supply all-year constant power for every usual need when required without interruption and be completely off-grid that a house with an 8 kW solar array would need approximately eighty Powerwalls.

  26. The greenfilth told us that global warming would kill many in the future.
    This is the ONLY thing they’ve been correct about.

    By the way, as a regular Lithium battery user I can tell you with experience that these things are quite dangerous. That is why Australia Post will NOT deliver them by air nor will any airline take them.

    As far as charging is concerned, I discharge my batteries at around 10 Amps during regular use and recharge them at 500mAmps. That means what can take minutes to discharge takes hours to charge and the quicker you charge them (I can charge them at up to 2Amps) the shorter the life cycle.

    A 2nd by the way, Lithium batteries hate heat. The Musk scam in South Australia is a disaster waiting to happen if they don’t protect those batteries from 40Deg temperatures in the SA summer.

  27. Gerard

    Note that the fire was started by an exploding green fridge. This has a flammable refrigerants (butane) and flammable insulation.

  28. Cementafriend

    RobK you right. The problem arises from having interest groups (social, environmental snd political) on standards committees and a rewuirement of consus voting. Standards were started by engineers and scientiists. The Romans had standards and procedures. There are still Roman roads, bridges and aquaducts in use. One of the first modern standards was for Portland cement issued by the Prussian (German) government in 1878. It stsndardised the quality of the cement via testing (mainly strengh) Environmental groups and unversities who know nothing about quslity, production and use have have put themselves on committees to further their egos, monetary rewards and political power. Then there are also manufacturer groups who send weak persons but with anaim to maintain their profits.
    The insulation fiasco is an example of greens, greedy manufacturers and politicians only interested in looking good for their reelection.

  29. Tim Neilson

    A 2nd by the way, Lithium batteries hate heat. The Musk scam in South Australia is a disaster waiting to happen if they don’t protect those batteries from 40Deg temperatures in the SA summer.

    Maybe, when fully charged, the battery can produce enough power to keep itself cool enough to function properly.
    Then we’d only need to use backup generation to power the battery-cooling apparatus while the battery was recharging for future use to keep itself cool.
    You know it makes sense.

  30. Glen Turner

    There is 1400 buildings in Victoria alone that are now virtually unsaleable. How many in NSW? At least Qld is doing something about the PA Hospital though the apartment boom is going seemingly going to be left to its own devices. Should have ignored flammable cladding and built out of … timmbberrrrr!

  31. cohenite

    Jupes, batteries cannot and do not generate electricity, they just store it and release it, less some losses.

    Those losses can be up to 25% of the stored electricity.

  32. Chris M

    I recycle nothing since the ACT local council stopped supermarkets giving me bags for my shopping that I could use as bin liners.

    Amateur. I now incinerate rubbish due to the greenies increasing dumping fees.

    Don’t dump, burning is the green thing to do.

  33. W Hogg

    Jupes, batteries cannot and do not generate electricity, they just store it and release it, less some losses.

    Those losses can be up to 25% of the stored electricity.

    Take off another 30% for cooling this monstrosity and we’re down to 50%. So Weatherdill has spent $100m (and don’t bet on the subsidies being over just because it’s built) to reduce the output of a windfarm by 50% AND take maximum power from the grid at times of greatest system stress – hot, still days.

  34. Up The Workers!

    Weatherdill might have done better by avoiding the Musky carpetbagger and using those old barrels in the Snowtown bank vault. Top them up with hydrochloric acid, run some copper wires between the electrodes in each barrel, and Bob’s Your Aunty!

    They wouldn’t necessarily work any more effectively than his Musk one does, but it would be a hell of a lot cheaper.

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