Open Forum: January 6, 2018

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1,808 Responses to Open Forum: January 6, 2018

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  1. H B Bear

    Joe Root has Stuart Broad.

    OK Now I see the problem.

  2. Leigh Lowe

    C.L.

    #2604100, posted on January 8, 2018 at 11:01 am

    Attention Sudanese diversity gangs:

    Graham Ashton has returned to his desk.

    Admit it: you’re terrified.

    Literally shaking in their stolen Nike basketball shoes.

  3. Makka

    I see the backpackers in Perth have recovered from their drug bender. Apologising and promising they’ll pay for their treatment.

    “Nine travellers who overdosed on an alleged date-rape drug in Perth have apologised for their “stupid mistake” and vowed to pay all hospital bills for their treatment.”

    ““Of course we have to pay for the mistake that we did,” one of the male backpackers said.
    “There’s no point that the taxpayers have to pay for us, it is our mistake.”

    I like their attitude, taking responsibility. Be more careful next time , old mate.

  4. stackja

    H B Bear
    #2604105, posted on January 8, 2018 at 11:07 am

    England had hoped for a Hazlewood shutdown.

  5. Bruce of Newcastle

    On the McLachlan thing, caught a snatch snippet on ABC24 between overs.
    ABC lady ze starts by saying proudly “An ABC-Fairfax joint investigation…”.
    Joint investigation?
    Why is there never an ABC-Newscorp joint investigation, or an ABC-7Network joint investigation?
    Why is the taxpayer-funded ABC helping a commercial company like Fairfax?
    I think we have a right to ask for a cut to the ABC budget since they now are giving freebees to ASX companies.

  6. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I like their attitude, taking responsibility. Be more careful next time , old mate.

    Mmmmmyaas, the Minister For Health was making it plain their bills would be recovered, though.

  7. johanna

    The CDC? The CDC who have championed third-hand smoke (yep, smoke on clothes is killing people), particulates which they thought to be so dangerous that they subjected test subjects to them, who simply can’t understand why TB has recurred in States where refugees have been resettled? That CDC?

    Hahahahahahahaha!

  8. Geriatric Mayfly

    And still no answer from Googles on whether Milligan used the canteen typewriter, ABC time and other resources to cobble together that penny dreadful on Geo Pell. I think GG took this on notice at estimates. But, given Milligan’s current state of ‘devastation,’ I am happy to wait until the official mourning period is over, for clarification.

  9. stackja

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2604110, posted on January 8, 2018 at 11:11 am

    ABC/Fairfax, marx to the same beat.

  10. Tintarella di Luna

    Meanwhile he and his wife have raked in millions courtesy of the taxpayer.

    and still at it: Mrs Marrickville has been appointed CEO of the NSW Mental Health Co-ordinating Council commencing her tenure in a couple of months time.

  11. Geriatric Mayfly

    Hollywood Paint It Black?

    Picture of Cate Streep at The Oz site, in some hideous off the shoulder widows’ weeds.

  12. Snoopy

    Australia – Healthcare and Medicare advice for backpackers
    What is Medicare?

    Chances are unless you are the bionic man you might need to see a doctor during your time away. Australia has an excellent healthcare system and with doctors, pharmacies and hospitals in all the major areas it is never hard to get treatment although. Medicare is the government system of healthcare in Australia. If you are from the UK its equivalent would be the NHS.

    In order to receive free or subsidised treatment your country of birth must have a reciprocal healthcare agreement with Australia. Currently there are agreements with New Zealand, UK, Netherlands, Sweden, Finland, Italy, Malta and Ireland. If you are from one of these countries then you will be able to visit the doctor and receive medical help either free or for a reduced fee and also obtain subsidised prescriptions

    Do I need a Medicare card and how do I get one?
    If you are lucky enough to come from a country with a reciprocal arrangement then you need to get a Medicare card if you wish to receive free or subsidised treatment. This is a credit card sized card which has a unique number on it and shows that you are eligible to receive treatment under the scheme. Getting one is simple and you simply need to go to a Medicare office, located in most towns and suburbs, with your passport and visa label and fill out the form. They will then issue you a temporary number on the spot and post you your plastic card. To locate your nearest medicare office and more information visit the Medicare website or down load the application form.

  13. thefrolickingmole

    /straps on tinfoil extra tight…

    I have a theory
    1: Trump is due to announce his “worst media award” in the next week or so.
    2: The Book making dozens of outlandish and quite bizarre allegations (including by Bannon) has been out for a week with the media going monkey poo over it.

    = Could it be the greatest trolling of all time? Would the Prez “lower” himself to getting a writer to do a book of the most lurid tales all backed up by his ex-adviser just to snare the last of the mastodon media into a fresh tar pit of credibility?

    Lets face it some were even dumb enough to fall for the “gorilla channel” meme.
    http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/367666-twitter-falls-for-parody-gorilla-channel-excerpt-from-new-trump

    Could this be the one troll to bind them all?

  14. cohenite

    josh frydenberg’s piece in the Australian today on electricity prices is a farce; he’s happy with $100 MWH and quotes business imbeciles saying transition to a clean energy future; there is no fucking future with clean energy just a dark past:

    As the mercury soared above 40C in the eastern states on Saturday afternoon, I clicked on to the Australian Energy Market Operator website. The good news is that the grid was stable and wholesale ­prices were hovering about $100 a megawatt hour, which is not unreasonable for high-demand days. It wasn’t the first and it certainly won’t be the last time our energy system is tested this summer.

    While nobody has a crystal ball to tell you exactly how things will play out over the next few months, we do know that the market operator is doing everything in its power to ensure security of supply. Previously mothballed gas-fired generators in South Australia, Queensland and Tasmania are now operating. The Turnbull government has secured commitment from gas suppliers and pipeline ­operators to ensure there will be no shortage of supply. Experts from the Bureau of Meteorology have been embedded in the ­control rooms of AEMO to facilitate real-time information flows and enhance hot-day preparedness. Maintenance schedules for power stations have been co-­ordinated and, where necessary, brought ­forward, and new ­arrangements with key energy users have been ­entered into to better manage ­demand.

    In all, AEMO has procured for this summer an extra 2000MW of supply, which is significantly ­larger than what used to be generated by Hazelwood in Victoria.

    The situation is challenging, complex and far from optimal, but when it comes to energy markets, we are living in a brave new world. The electricity grid is undergoing a once-in-a-century transition as several key developments simultaneously take place.

    Ten coal-fired power stations have closed in less than a decade for which there has been on average less than a year’s notice. A total of 1.7 million premises has solar panels reducing their reliance on the grid and making AEMO’s task of managing system supply and demand that much more difficult. There has been a greater penetration of intermittent renew­ables, particularly wind and solar, while at the same time, in the words of the Energy Security Board, “very few megawatts of power that can always be dispatched has been added”. And when it comes to ­energy storage and backup, there has been a complete blind spot, particularly in South Australia and Victoria, where they’ve been forced to rush in expensive, polluting diesel generators that use up to 80,000 litres an hour just to keep the lights on.

    All this being said, we now have the opportunity with the National Energy Guarantee to turn a page and create a system that will ­deliver more affordable and ­reliable power. Recommended by the experts, energy users and ­energy producers alike are behind the guarantee, recognising that it represents the best opportunity to break a decade-long impasse.

    Paul O’Malley, the chief executive of Australia’s biggest manufacturer, BlueScope Steel, says of the guarantee that this is “the first time I’ve seen a sensible strategy that addresses the transition to a clean energy future”. Bloomberg New Energy Finance calls it “innovative and elegant”, and the Business Council of Australia says it’s the “most practical workable thing they have seen in business for quite some time”.

    Even the Labor states have started to change their tune around the COAG table, with ­Victoria voting against South Australia’s desperate attempt at the most recent Energy Council meeting to breathe life into the clean energy target and an emissions ­intensity scheme. The National Energy Guarantee is now the only game in town, with Queensland’s new ­energy minister ­acknowledging just before Christmas that the guarantee provides needed “certainty”.

    With the Energy Security Board now doing detailed design work on the guarantee ahead of the next Energy Council meeting in April, the question becomes what is Bill Shorten’s position? Will Labor play the role of the spoiler, while continuing to pursue uncosted, ideological positions merely to assuage its green left flank? Or is it prepared to listen to the experts, back the guarantee and act in the national interest?

    At this point, nobody in Labor, let alone the rest of us, knows what its energy policy is. Labor went to the past federal election promising an emissions intensity scheme with a legislated 50 per cent renew­ables target for the energy sector and a 45 per cent emissions reduction target and an emissions trading scheme for the rest of the economy. The design of its schemes and their costings were promised but never revealed. Since that time, Labor has been on the back foot, unsure as to whether its renewables target was an ­“ambition”, “objective”, “goal” or “framework”. In the end, it tried to lance the boil by abandoning a legislated target altogether, which only confirmed that Labor’s position was politically convenient and not based on any conviction.

    So, too, when it comes to its emissions trading scheme, Labor’s position is unclear. Mark Butler says “it’s an ETS without a carbon price”, while Shorten said: “I do support a market-based system to set a price.” Shorten has also publicly endorsed the clean energy target, saying he would implement all of Alan Finkel’s 50 recommendations, but weeks later deputy Tanya Plibersek told the ABC an “emissions intensity scheme is our preferred model”. A policy that, it’s worth noting, Penny Wong ­described when climate change minister as “a mongrel”, “a smokescreen” and “not a credible alternative”. As for Labor frontbencher Joel Fitzgibbon, he’s not really ­focused on what the party’s policies are called at all, saying “you can call it a tax if you like”.

    But even some tough talking from Labor’s fellow travellers doesn’t seem to get through. Graham Richardson said of Labor’s emission and renewable targets, the “farce of this policy has ­become obvious to all, Labor has no plans as to how this target would be reached. Sadly, Labor is playing games with people’s lives.”

    On the issue of coal-fired power, Labor is also disingenuous, trying to walk both sides of the street. Shorten says “I’m not a rampant greenie”, “coal has a ­future in Australia” and, after the victory of Donald Trump, is quick to say we need to “heed the lessons from the mines and mills and the factories of Detroit”. But at the same time he and his party are happy to support Senate motions to “encourage the retirement of coal-fired power stations” and which state explicitly “coal has no long-term future in Australia”.

    In his book last year, The ­Climate Wars, Butler admits that when it comes to climate and ­energy policy, “we in Labor have sent too many mixed signals”. But with the National Energy Guarantee, Labor is presented with a chance to redeem itself. No new taxes, trading schemes or subsidies; a mechanism recommended by the experts; widespread industry support and independent modelling confirming households will save $400 a year and businesses a lot more. To coin a phrase, it’s time for Labor to get on board.

    Josh Frydenberg is the federal Minister for Energy and Environment.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/heat-is-on-labor-to-explain-its-energy-policy-as-temperatures-rise/news-story/f658f48cb70eb114c9727403f60d4afb

  15. H B Bear

    I like their attitude, taking responsibility. Be more careful next time , old mate.

    Let’s just wait till the cheque clears eh? They did seem sincere and repentant. I guess I would too if I had nearly killed myself by snorting some white powder that “randomly” appeared in the letterbox.

  16. Makka

    Gary gets the moslem – again. 7th time.

  17. Geriatric Mayfly

    Australia – Healthcare and Medicare advice for backpackers

    Very handy that reciprocal arrangement ut not enough participants. Prevents me for example, white water rafting the Congo River. But on the serious side. a fishing mate busted an ankle bigly in NZ, in pursuit of that trophy fish, and all he could think about was discharge and the account rendered that goes with it. He was pleasantly surprised. I’m off there next month, and knowing my luck, will probably fracture all bones in my casting arm on the first outing.

  18. H B Bear

    In all, AEMO has procured for this summer an extra 2000MW of supply, which is significantly ­larger than what used to be generated by Hazelwood in Victoria.

    Ah yes, that good old fashioned, high cost diesel generation that was phased out of large scale generation decades ago. Not forgetting low efficiency, open cycle gas turbines that in a properly managed system would only be run for a couple of months a year.

    Keep up the good work Josh and AEMO.

  19. EvilElvis

    I see the backpackers in Perth have recovered from their drug bender. Apologising and promising they’ll pay for their treatment.

    “Nine travellers who overdosed on an alleged date-rape drug in Perth have apologised for their “stupid mistake” and vowed to pay all hospital bills for their treatment.”

    ““Of course we have to pay for the mistake that we did,” one of the male backpackers said.
    “There’s no point that the taxpayers have to pay for us, it is our mistake.”

    I like their attitude, taking responsibility. Be more careful next time , old mate.

    And the cops have charged them right?… How fucking pathetic are we.

  20. Friedeggburger oz article. And ya reckon I ramble incoherently.

  21. H B Bear

    Very handy that reciprocal arrangement ut not enough participants.

    Bloody oath. I spent 6 weeks in hospital in the UK, underwent a bunch of tests and treatments and walked out without even seeing a bill. The same thing as private patient in Australia would have cost thousands.

    The moral of the story is that under the NHS or any other socialised medical system is that you want to be very, very sick. Anything postponable or vaguely elective and you are stuffed.

  22. johanna

    I was interested to see the references to the drug hyoscene in the Perth backpacker story.

    I’ve had hyoscene in the house for over 40 years, in the form of Buscopan. It used to be on prescription, but recently was released for OTC.

    It’s a muscle relaxant. In my case I used to get, for no apparent reason, excruciatingly painful stomach cramps. Buscopan was the answer. In one case, I had it injected in the middle of the night because I was in so much pain.

    It is like someone got hold of your intestines, dragged them out of your body, and twisted them. I am not making this up, I usually avoid doctors whenever possible. Nobody knows why, hence that handy term ‘idiopathic.’

    Anyway, it just goes to show that there is a nice economic balance between entrepreneurs and consumers in the illegal drug market.

  23. EvilElvis

    AEMO, seriously why the fuck is it there?

  24. stackja

    Would MT let JF wander from the ‘right path’?

  25. H B Bear

    As a follow on, my experience with the NHS was fine. Rapidly diagnosed with a pretty obscure disease in a large Manchester public hospital. The hospital food was pretty ordinary but when you can barely sit up in bed your mind tends to be elsewhere.

  26. thefrolickingmole

    Albo-sleezy resurrecting the “Toll for Toll” idea to destroy the small operators and ensure only union approved drivers are left on the roads.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/jan/08/national-response-to-heavy-vehicle-road-toll-needed-says-anthony-albanese

    He noted that in 2016 parliament had abolished the Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal which set minimum pay rates for independent owner-drivers to remove the incentive to skip breaks or neglect maintenance.

    “It would appear that since its abolition there has been a real spike in accidents involving heavy vehicles, particularly in New South Wales,” he said.

    After the RSRT was abolished, a report by the small business ombudsman found it had caused owner-drivers financial pressure by making it harder to compete with larger trucking companies and recommended safety not be regulated through pay rates, despite reports to government that the two are linked.

    Albanese questioned what the government was going to replace the body with, suggesting it was important to find a replacement “by consensus so you don’t have regulation changing when the government changes”.

    When the Coalition abolished the RSRT it promised to redirect funding to the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator to focus on monitoring of heavy vehicles and to build a national network of speed cameras.

    In the year to September 2017 the number of deaths in NSW from crashes involving articulated trucks, such as semi-trailers, increased from 29 to 54, or 86%.

    The chairman of the Australian Trucking Association, Geoff Crouch, has argued the increase cannot be attributed to abolition of the RSRT because declines were recorded in Victoria (down 4.5%), Queensland (down 14.8%), South Australia (down 23.1%) and Tasmania (down 80%) over the same period.

    Crouch argued that since 80% of multi-vehicle crashes involving trucks are not the fault of the truck driver, “the crashes cannot be prevented by changing the way truck drivers work or are paid”.

    He suggested “building better roads and better speed enforcement” as more appropriate solutions to reduce the road toll.

  27. EvilElvis

    As Australia’s independent energy markets and power systems operator, AEMO provides critical planning, forecasting and power systems information, security advice, and services to our stakeholders.

    How much electricity or gas do you produce AEMO? Not a fucking jatz crackers worth! Mind you, ‘market operator’ is going to get squeezed into my resume every opportunity. It’s well beyond time to end this rubbish.

  28. H B Bear

    Albo-sleezy resurrecting the “Toll for Toll” idea to destroy the small operators and ensure only union approved drivers are left on the roads.

    Government of the unions, by the unions, for the unions, shall not perish under the Liars.

    Better start getting used to it.

  29. EvilElvis

    Rae, great work rolling on with the lying, incompetent, monolithic state funded media empire agrees with lying, incompetent, monolithic state funded treasury department who run numbers to agree with the lying, incompetent, ‘massage’ parlour loitering scum party.

    Don’t let reality hit you on the way out of your rented home…

  30. Anthony

    I do hope that George Pell will be given a chance to clear his name.

  31. stackja

    AEMO pretends to ‘solve’ energy problem by organising brownouts.

  32. stackja

    19 hours ago – UPDATE 4:30PM: Parts of Canton Beach, Noraville, Toukley are still experiencing power outages to around 800 homes due to the severe heat outside. Ausgrid says their power will be restored around 5:30pm. UPDATE 1:50PM: Power is now safely restored to homes around Gorokan.

  33. H B Bear

    It’s not a brownout if AEMO pay you to turn the power off.

  34. H B Bear

    It’s “demand management”.

  35. H B Bear

    Just like tax increases are actually Budget savings.

  36. EvilElvis

    Stackja, why is Ausgrid making grand announcements about power restoration? The are not the ‘market operator’.

  37. Stimpson J. Cat

    “Nine travellers who overdosed on an alleged date-rape drug in Perth have apologised for their “stupid mistake” and vowed to pay all hospital bills for their treatment.”

    Even I would not snort a random bag of white powder I found in someone’s f$cking letterbox.

    I would test it on some retarded backpacker guinea pigs first to see if it was any good first, of course.

  38. Makka

    19 hours ago – UPDATE 4:30PM: Parts of Canton Beach, Noraville, Toukley are still experiencing power outages to around 800 homes due to the severe heat outside. Ausgrid says their power will be restored around 5:30pm. UPDATE 1:50PM: Power is now safely restored to homes around Gorokan.

    Reminiscent of Communist Europe.

    “Shoe Factory #34 , this week you will have power Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
    “Clothing Factory #22, this week you will have power Tuesday and Thursday”
    “Pie Factory #16, Our Leader has granted you a week’s holiday. Enjoy!”

  39. and still at it: Mrs Marrickville has been appointed CEO of the NSW Mental Health Co-ordinating Council commencing her tenure in a couple of months time.

    I’m guessing Mrs. Sleazy has the same experience and qualifications for this position as the Slovenian hags hubby has for his highly paid sinecure with the NSW DoE, i.e. none whatsoever (unless dealing drugs to school aged kids is counted as a qualification in the case of Coutts-Trotter). Salary would be in the 6 figures and starting with a 3 or 4 along with 17% Super, bucket loads of days off and travel rorts included.
    Thieving, corrupt, hypocritical Socialist vermin.

  40. stackja

    EvilElvis
    #2604150, posted on January 8, 2018 at 11:55 am
    Stackja, why is Ausgrid making grand announcements about power restoration? The are not the ‘market operator’.

    Ausgrid get the money from the blackout restored.

  41. Even I would not snort a random bag of white powder I found

    For stimp.

  42. Bruce of Newcastle

    = Could it be the greatest trolling of all time?

    Mole – The mid terms are coming up and while Cats disagree with me I think the Moore sliming was a pivotal moment. Trump and Bannon now understand that the Dems will literally do anything and say anything to dirty the Republicans. With impunity. Jesus would not survive such character assassination.

    So now that the Bannon name is a target for the Dem-MSM slime factory he is disassociating himself from Trump in such a theatrical manner that the MSM can’t spin it. That way Trump can endorse righties for Congress without them being smeared as Bannon picks. This lets the tea party feed names to Trump without them immediately getting accused by the MSM of goat molestation.

    The target for a lot of this is the RINO grandees running the GOP. They let Moore fall rather than allow a Bannon pick to get into the Senate. Trump and Bannon therefore have an incentive to prevent such from happening in the mid terms. Trump now has runs on the board with the tax cuts and the parallel Wall St boom. So he can use that cred to overawe the RINOs. In that equation Bannon needs to be far on the outer: so far that no one can credibly make the case that he is pulling strings. Hence the lurid Wolff stuff.

    At least that is one Sun-Tzuish way of looking at it.

  43. Snoopy

    It’s official.

    It (Sydney) was also the hottest city on Earth.

  44. johanna

    AEMO and States and the federal government no doubt have emergency plans for themselves in the event of a outage. First things first.

    As for the rest of us, stock up on candles and board games.

  45. Mater

    AEMO, seriously why the fuck is it there?

    To be fair to AEMO, they don’t make the rules or the policies. They are just tasked to try to make it work.
    Think of them as the poor old bus driver, who tries to maintain his schedule (which is developed by others) whilst obeying all the road rules (which are also developed by others).
    The organisation who creates the rules and policies, to which AEMO must adhere, is the Australian Energy Market Commission (AEMC).

    How the energy markets are governed

  46. stackja

    Snoopy
    #2604158, posted on January 8, 2018 at 12:02 pm
    It’s official.

    It (Sydney) was also the hottest city on Earth.

    Summer in Australia.

  47. Tom

    At least that is one Sun-Tzuish way of looking at it.

    A very useful analysis, Bruce of Newk.

  48. zyconoclast

    Dudes, new thread.

  49. EvilElvis

    Ausgrid get the money from the blackout restored.

    AEMO obviously need a few lessons in PR then, comrade. They should be all over claiming the glory for this. 😉

  50. struth

    NSW heatwave: Sydney set to swelter again with fire bans in place and crews on standby

    Updated 7 minutes ago

    Email Facebook Twitter WhatsApp

    Watch Hot air mass will dominate weather for days, commissioner says
    Video [3:44] Hot air mass will dominate weather for days, commissioner says

    ABC News

    Another hot day is forecast for Sydney and the Hunter region, although it is unlikely to reach the near record-breaking temperatures experienced in Sydney’s west on Sunday.

    It is forecast to reach 33 degrees Celsius in Sydney city,

    Their ABC……………………..FMD.

  51. Struth:

    No one is born with rights just because they are human.
    You defend yourself and your property if you can and live under the rights of the culture you exist in.

    Cohenite:

    Ok, JC has used the unalienable rights of the US constitution as an example of natural rights. They are not, as I explained, nor is self-defence of your-self, your property or your family. So what is an example of a natural right which can be expressed without consequence from the social structure?

    Joe:

    You are trying to get me to say that Struth is right completely and that there are no rights.

    OK I agree.

    Memoryvault:

    There aren’t any, Cohenite. The only “rights” a person has, are those conferred on them by the society in which they live. The society itself may explain these”rights” as “God-Given”. However, the individual only continues to enjoy them for as long as society chooses to continue to recognise them.

    People here are confusing at least three separate questions: Whether a natural right exists with either the recognition of that right, or with the satisfaction of that right. A natural right can exist even if it is not recognized or even if it cannot be fully satisfied.

  52. Tintarella di Luna

    Mr Rusty
    #2604153, posted on January 8, 2018 at 11:59 am

    Accurate to the nth Mr Rusty.

  53. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Last I looked, your ‘I’m cute so I can get away with it’ foray into subjects you know nothing about did not end well.

    whateva

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