Where da money at

The Sydney to Melbourne plus the Sydney to Brisbane flight corridor the busiest in the world.  Around 900 miles and around 90,000 flights of gold.

Source: Statistaoriginal graph.

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41 Responses to Where da money at

  1. Entropy

    To fix this we clearly need a VFT that will be able to stop at every little town along the way and terminate twenty kms from the Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane CBDs, and produce tonnes less evil CO2. It will do all this and still be quicker and cheaper than a plane because unicorns. And mountains of OPM of course.

  2. Texas Jack

    Thank Howard for his sanity with respect Entropy’s VFT unicorns.

  3. JC

    Around 900 miles and around 90,000 flights of gold.

    What’s that mean?

  4. Bruce of Newcastle

    JC – You are really slow in the morning.

    But soon you can take an electric plane on shorthaul flights:

    Norway aims for all short-haul flights 100% electric by 2040 (18 Jan)

    All of Norway’s short-haul airliners should be entirely electric by 2040, the country’s airport operator said on Wednesday, cementing the Nordic nation’s role as a pioneer in the field of electric transport.

    Avinor, the public operator of Norwegian airports, “aims to be the first in the world” to make the switch to electric air transport, chief executive Dag Falk-Petersen told AFP.

    “We think that all flights lasting up to 1.5 hours can be flown by aircraft that are entirely electric,” he said, noting that would cover all domestic flights and those to neighbouring Scandinavian capitals.

    With all those mountains, fjords, ice and snow what could possibly go wrong!

  5. wretch

    When Josh’a Electric Revolution gets underway who’d want to fly when you can do it in the comfort of your own car in under three days?

  6. Crossie

    To fix this we clearly need a VFT that will be able to stop at every little town along the way and terminate twenty kms from the Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane CBDs, and produce tonnes less evil CO2. It will do all this and still be quicker and cheaper than a plane because unicorns. And mountains of OPM of course.

    VFT that will need to be so heavily subsides until it becomes cheaper than flight. We need to go forward into the past just like we did with renewable energy until we ruin one industry and threaten the existence of others like tourism.

  7. Tel

    Busy routes are not necessarily profitable routes. On Sydney to Melbourne you have Virgin, Jetstar, Qantas, Tiger and maybe some occasional others on the way through. It’s very competitive and prices down around 100 bucks are not impossible… it would cost at least $50 in fuel just to drive the same distance.

  8. H B Bear

    Well it certainly was a pot of gold for Max Moore-Wilton.

  9. Entropy

    Yes, the joy of encouraging EVs.
    Josh’s dilemma: Not competitive? Why is cost of the vehicle and the time to charge a battery so high it discourages people from buying them?

    What Must Be Done?

    Option A: invest heavily in battery research to reduce cost and come up with effective, truly fast charging batteries at dramatically lower cost? You could call it the Lomborg option (boring, not many votes from the left or admiration from media airheads in it).

    Option B: subsidise the shit out of EVs, paid for by a mix of the long suffering taxpayer combined with a big extra charge on ICE vehicles to get them closer to parity with EVs. You could call it something really original, like the ‘Infant Industry Option’. (raising the cost of car ownership and lowering standards of living for everyone below politicans’ and media types’ salaries, but on the plus side will deliver media type admiration and the forlorn and unrequited hope of votes from the left in it).

    Josh and Mal will of course pick Option B.

  10. Nerblnob

    VFT that will need to be so heavily subsides until it becomes cheaper than flight.

    Cheaper?

    The True Australian Way is to penalise the competition until it becomes more expensive.

  11. JC

    Tel

    I’m surprised the Boston, New York, DC corridor isn’t one of the biggest.

  12. Entropy

    Crossie, the VFT Can BE Paid for!

    All you need to do is build it and they will come.

    Well, that, and a massive surcharge on flights, a massive toll on the Hume and Princess Highways, interest free and repayment optional government loans to the VFT company, and guaranteed, compulsory government travel for everyone below executive level, politicans and their staff. They would be too busy of course. And don’t forget deficit funding and unicorn breeding. The unicorns could be kept in the caboose and fed rainbows.

  13. Chris M

    soon you can take an electric plane on shorthaul flights

    Limited by extension cable length?

  14. Tom

    I’m surprised the Boston, New York, DC corridor isn’t one of the biggest.

    So am I. I think that’s because of data fragmentation — that is, we’re not seeing total traffic between New York’s three main airports (EWR, LGA and JFK) and Washington’s three airports (BWI, IAD and DCA). Cumulative New York-Washington traffic would put that route at world No.1, I think — if not, in the top three.

  15. I am Spartacus

    I’m surprised the Boston, New York, DC corridor isn’t one of the biggest.

    Private jets.

  16. old bloke

    It’s surprising that the Jeju to Seoul route is the world’s busiest given that Jeju’s population is only half a million. Why so many flights, is Jeju a popular tourist destination for South Koreans?

  17. Bruce of Newcastle

    I suspect the data is domestic-only. Looks like it from the city-pairs.
    So you wouldn’t see London-Paris or Berlin-Paris in that case.

    As for VFT fun, a most predictable headline appeared last Sunday:

    California’s bullet train (and biggest boondoggle) is over budget by billions

    It’s billions of dollars over budget and seven years behind schedule, and appears to have no plausible way of living up to its goal of getting riders across the state in three hours or less.

    Welcome to what’s arguably the nation’s largest infrastructure project and California’s biggest boondoggle.

    The highly hyped bullet train has been a challenge from the start. No one thought it would be technically, financially and politically easy, but the way the project has been mishandled has some Californians fed up and demanding answers.

    Just this week, the California High-Speed Rail Authority, the organization charged with overseeing construction, reported that the cost of the first segment had dramatically risen – again.

    “The worst-case scenario has happened,” admitted Roy Hill, lead consultant on the project.

    Don’t you just love the way lefties handle money?

  18. feelthebern

    I’m surprised the Boston, New York, DC corridor isn’t one of the biggest.

    My colleague did that via train when he was over there last year.

  19. RobK

    I’m surprised the Boston, New York, DC corridor isn’t one of the biggest.I think that’s because of data fragmentation 

    I think so. Also nodal connectivity (or something). Think Chicago, Schiphol etc very busy, many destinations and many alternatives not far away.

  20. Robber Baron

    Note to self….never take the last flight of the day from Mumbai to Delhi…never use bathroom.

  21. Stephen Sasse

    Open up the routes to Singapore Airlines, Air New Zealand etc. Then we might get there on time

  22. stackja

    Whatever happened to CompAss?

  23. JB of Sydney/Shanghai

    Here is some information on the Shanghai- Beijing high speed rail. Took just over two years to build, 1,500k.

    The Beijing–Shanghai high-speed railway (or Jinghu high-speed railway from its Chinese name) is a 1,318-kilometre (819 mi) long high-speed railway that connects two major economic zones in the People’s Republic of China, the Bohai Economic Rim and the Yangtze River Delta.[4] Construction began on April 18, 2008,[5] and a ceremony to mark the completion of track laying was held on November 15, 2010.[6] The line opened to the public for commercial service on June 30, 2011.[7] This rail line is the world’s longest high-speed line ever constructed in a single phase.[8][9][10] It is China’s most profitable high speed rail line, reporting a 6.6 billion yuan net operational profit in 2015.[1]

    Under former Minister of Railways Liu Zhijun, the railway line was the first one designed for a maximum speed of 380 km/h in commercial operations. The non-stop train from Beijing South to Shanghai Hongqiao was expected to finish the 1,305 kilometres (811 mi) journey in 3 hours and 58 minutes,[11] averaging 329 kilometres per hour (204 mph), making it the fastest scheduled train in the world, compared to 9 hours and 49 minutes on the fastest trains running on the parallel conventional railway.[12] However, following Liu Zhijun’s dismissal in February 2011, several major changes were announced. First, trains would be slowed to a maximum speed of 300 km/h (186 mph), reducing operating costs. At this speed, the fastest trains would take 4 hours and 48 minutes to travel from Beijing South to Shanghai Hongqiao, making one stop at Nanjing South.[13] Additionally, a slower class of trains running at 250 km/h (155 mph) would be operated, making more stops and charging lower fares. On September 21, 2017 350 km/h operation was restored with the introduction of China Standardized EMU reducing travel times between Beijing and Shanghai to about 4 hours and 30 minutes on the fastest scheduled trains.[14]

  24. Bruce of Newcastle

    Here is some information on the Shanghai- Beijing high speed rail.

    The Left comes in three distinct varieties:

    Green-progressive: trains run whenever Gaia tells them to.
    Marxist-Leninist: trains run from randomly selected place to another randomly selected place at a steady grim 40 kph.
    Fascist: trains run rapidly and on time.

    That suggests the Chinese government is of a certain political persuasion.

  25. Botswana O'Hooligan

    Old Bloke

    Jeju (Cheju) is a holiday destination and a Mecca (excuse me) for marriages and honeymooners, gamblers in the casino etc. so the air route runs red hot. It is also a training base for KAL (I was based there) and they charge like scrub bulls for a night in a pub, a happy ending in a whore house, that sort of stuff, and the last time we staged thru there eight years ago the room coast per head was USD$960. The cheapskate who owned the jet being ferried out to here ignored my advice on an overnight stop for he got a wrong accommodation quote as the typo had a room cost at USD$96.00. It came to pass that he was 3K out of pocket instead of about 1K out of pocket if we stayed in Sapporo or Nagoya.

  26. EvilElvis

    “We think that all flights lasting up to 1.5 hours can be flown by aircraft that are entirely electric,”

    “I think I should be taxpayer funded to spend my days in a hot tub with taxpayer funded smoking hot chicks”

    It’s about as feasible and realistic as the above. Don’t even start looking at positive outcomes or benefits of this kind of thinking

  27. Up The Workers!

    Electric airplanes?

    For a bargain-basement price of only a trillion taxpayer dollars or so, Elon Musk has a battery in his carpet-bag which will do that.

    He can also offer cheap life insurance premiums and cut-price cremations.

    Weatherdills’ mendicant State of Greater Snowtown will be right onto it!

  28. Mark M

    “Australian taxpayers have coughed up about $350,000 in just six months to send empty VIP jets across the country to ferry around government ministers.”

    https://twitter.com/theheraldsun/status/948124477254184960

  29. Pedro the Ignorant

    Where da money ain’t.

    Perth to Mt Magnet.

    Me, the pilot, two FIFO workers, a carton of cask wine and the daily papers.

    The fares might have paid the landing fee. No wonder many regional air routes only exist because .gov lgally compel the aviation companies.

  30. Pauly

    The Japanese numbers are incomplete. Tokyo has 2 airports, Haneda and Narita. Narita has a lot of LCC carriers.

  31. Roberto

    I’m surprised the Boston, New York, DC corridor isn’t one of the biggest.

    The Acela trains.

  32. sabena

    A few comments on comments already made:
    JC 2617050
    Passenger traffic from Boston is 631K to La Guardia and 504K to Newark.I have no figures for JFK but there is not a significant schedule to there.The train is a significant competitor.
    Bruce 2617091
    All the routes quoted are domestic,but even if they were not,it would make no difference.
    London to Paris is 1,143K and the number of passengers to Frankfurt and Munich from Paris is greater than that to Berlin,the first 2 being 965K and 895k respectively.The train is a significant competitor on London to Paris.
    The rating is by departures and the figures for passengers are
    Sydney to Melbourne 8,904K
    Sydney to Brisbane 4,658K
    Finally one should not overlook some other stats:
    The traffic from London to New York is greater at 2,985K than it is from New York to Los Angeles(1,662K).
    The traffic from Sydney to Los Angeles is 906K(6th busiest international route from there) and to Singapore 1,455K

  33. JB of Sydney/Shanghai

    Bruce of Newcastle, further to your earlier post on Chinese rail …the fast trains leave about every 20 minutes, or so, Shanghai-Beijing, fares vary, say about $A100 or so average.

    A look at “The man in seat 61” might interest you.

  34. JB of Sydney/Shanghai

    Airbus Group confirmed production plans for electric aircraft E-Fan 2.0 from late 2017 or early 2018.

    The company will invest €20 million in the overall design and development of the E-Fan 2.0 aircraft, while the rest will comes from partners and government support.

    The aircraft will be manufactured by subsidiary Voltair in a new plant, for which construction is scheduled to begin in 2016 in Pau in the southwest of France.

    Initial production volume will be small, and should grow to some 80 units annually by 2025.

  35. Diesal

    This is all nonsense the energy density difference between any battery even concerned and jet fuel is at least 10. This difference being one of the many reasons we use jets not rockets the oxidiser doesn’t need to be carried with the aircraft. If it a terrible idea for trucks how much worse passenger jets. But turf ball and Pyne will probably sign the RAAF up to electric jets because ?

  36. Diesal

    Conceived not concerned

  37. Muddy

    It will do all this and still be quicker and cheaper than a plane because unicorns.
    And don’t forget deficit funding and unicorn breeding.
    The unicorns could be kept in the caboose and fed rainbows.

    There’s a pattern in there somewhere, but I can’t figure out what it is…

    P.S.
    Surely there’s some grant money in investigating the energy potential of unicorn milk. Unicorn tears? Or was that unicorn semen?
    That’d be a great name for an airline though: UnicornAir.

  38. Muddy

    Good morning ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to UnicornAir Flight 316 to Entropy via Adelaide.

  39. Jimf

    Yeah but let’s build a “very fast train” coz the current mode is not meeting the market!

  40. Jimf

    These are commercial route stats of course. They exclude the 70,000 flights Julie took to red carpet events over the same period.

  41. old bloke

    Botswana O’Hooligan
    #2617200, posted on January 23, 2018 at 12:30 pm

    Thanks Botswana, glad to hear that you didn’t have to pay the hotel bill.

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