Early contender for the Bernard Salt smashed avo award

In the early running it’s … Bernard Salt.

Here’s a series of dangerous ideas. Work hard, don’t do drugs, don’t smoke, build good relationships, learn skills, save for a deposit for a house, spend time with your kids, invest in your health. Here’s another: sometimes when raising a family it’s necessary to do a job that you don’t particularly like for months or maybe even years on end in order to provide for that family. This isn’t life being mean to you; sometimes you just gotta do it. Accept it and move on. Am I being too dangerous for you?

This entry was posted in Australian Story, Cultural Issues, Libertarians don't live by argument alone. Bookmark the permalink.

47 Responses to Early contender for the Bernard Salt smashed avo award

  1. Botswana O'Hooligan

    That’s fine, some of us did just that, and then our wives, good housekeepers, got the bloody lot and left us sadder but not wiser!

  2. Dave of Reedy Creek, Qld

    Best bit of now uncommon, common sense you can possibly read. Practiced it all my life and live with the rewards, tightly knit family, nice home, money in bank and very few regrets.

  3. Tom

    Sorry, Bern. Can’t see you getting a Fakefacts column anytime soon, which means dinner party hell trying to justify your existence as a spawn of Ruperdink MudrockSatan.

    In any case, the only rich people reading Fakefacts are public servants already property millionaires in Darlinghurst and Balmain and North Fitzroy who, thanks to Keating and Howard, never had to live in Outer Bumfuck on their way to wealth their parents could only dream about.

    The whingers are Filth-voting welfare parasites demanding the government gift them goldmines within 5kms of the Sydney and Melbourne GPOs. In retrospect, Keating’s biggest mistake was not giving them the banana republic they craved.

  4. cynical1

    Am I being too dangerous for you?

    Pffft.

    Lemmings have more fun..

  5. H B Bear

    Australia’s 3rd most boring man knocks it outta the park. He forgot never vote Liars – another perinnial threat to your private wealth.

  6. Tintarella di Luna

    He forgot never vote Liars – another perinnial threat to your private wealth.

    and don’t knock up the staff

  7. John Constantine

    Get an ABC job for life, do whatever we you want, whenever you want, to whoever you want,(as long as it progresses ABC life values).

    Partner up with another ABC type and you can prattle your whole life about what a wealthy country you live in.

    The downside seems to be that ABC types are the most hysterically depressed and anxious polyamorous millionaires in all of socialisms diversitydom.

    To live happy in your own skin, deny Stalin and turn your back on his works, even if the cute crazy Stalinist chicks offer free sex for your soul.

  8. Infidel Tiger

    Far out! Bernie has written a corker of a column!

    Whatever next?

  9. Howard Hill

    If only we lived in the land of the free and not where .gov can take it all away at the stroke of a pen or more currently at the flick of a switch. I guess he forgot that bit, huh?

  10. mh

    I don’t hate avocados. I just don’t think they are tasty.

    There, I’ve said it.

  11. Chris M

    Yes and always be a subservient little taxpayer.

  12. Linden

    Well by itself avocados are tasteless, on it is only when you mix it up with something that it seems to be worthwhile eating.How to apply that to politics; food for thought maybe?

  13. Robber Baron

    Learn to grow your own avocados.

  14. Mike Rowe, of Dirty Jobs fame, said something similar recently.
    Find opportunities, get into them, and make sure your passion follows you.
    Don’t fall for the “follow your passion and you’ll never have to work in your life” lie.

  15. Jo Smyth

    As I have gone through life I tried an avocado 🥑 once. That was enough.

  16. Stimpson J. Cat

    Here’s a series of dangerous ideas. Work hard, don’t do drugs, don’t smoke, build good relationships, learn skills, save for a deposit for a house, spend time with your kids, invest in your health. Here’s another: sometimes when raising a family it’s necessary to do a job that you don’t particularly like for months or maybe even years on end in order to provide for that family. This isn’t life being mean to you; sometimes you just gotta do it. Accept it and move on. Am I being too dangerous for you?

    Holy sh$t.
    From out of nowhere.
    A Salt with a pepper spray.

  17. Stimpson J. Cat

    He forgot to end his column with:

    “Embrace the Blockchain.”

    😁

  18. duncanm

    regarding Bernard’s request for a view on what the average fitter has to say on events.

    It reminds me of the BBC’s interviews with the late, great Fred Dibnah.

  19. RobK

    I think Stimpy has this right. A salt n pepper spray.

  20. C.L.

    What’s “don’t smoke” got to do with it?

  21. Gavin R Putland

    “Work hard, don’t do drugs, don’t smoke, build good relationships, learn skills, save for a deposit for a house…”

    All those things will help you become a home owner if you’re the only one who does them. If all your competitors do them, their increased spending power simply bids up land prices and land rents.

    Which of course is why established property owners keep telling us to do those things. Land ownership is a dragnet for capturing the fruits of other people’s virtues.

  22. duncanm

    Gavin,

    All those things will help you become a home owner if you’re the only one who does them. If all your competitors do them, their increased spending power simply bids up land prices and land rents.

    your stupidity is boundless.

    Care to offer an alternative? Maybe if everyone sat on their arses, housing would be affordable?

  23. mizaris

    Toast, butter avocado, poached egg, hollandaise – tastes good and I can afford it because – worked hard, saved up. No salt needed.

  24. stackja

    Work for a wage. Helps if can be fulfilling. But bills need to be paid. Unless ALP provides it all for ‘free’.

  25. Gavin R Putland

    duncanm @ #2634057 re:

    Care to offer an alternative? Maybe if everyone sat on their arses, housing would be affordable?

    The virtues recommended by Salt will solve many problems, but will not make housing affordable. The only way to make housing affordable is reduce the intensity of competition for housing, by making it uneconomic to hold land for speculative purposes.

  26. tezza

    am I the only one to think Bernard’s last paragraph sounds rather like Jordan B Peterson?

    Let’s ask Steve Kates.

  27. Leigh Lowe

    He repeats what was an unremarkable truism from a generation ago and it is now considered “dangerous”.
    Of course, everyone has to work for a shitty boss or in a shitty job from time-to-time and you just have to weigh up whether it is worth hanging on, or going down the “take this job and shove it” route … knowing that the bills won’t stop.
    But we now live in the “pursue your passion” age which explains why we have so many unemployed actors and musicians, failed b-grade restaurants, overpriced and underbought hand-crafted food, “ales” and wines, and how Harvey Weinstein managed to get his dick sucked five times a day.

  28. Clam Chowdah

    Bernard Salt thinks the wage gap is a thing. Unless I’m misremembering a recent column, in which case I withdraw my savage defamation unreservedly.

  29. JC

    Bernard Salt can talk all he likes about the spending preferences of young people vs buying a home. But fact is the the prices of goods and services have collapsed over the past 50 years, while the cost of housing mainly due to taxation and restrictive code has gone through the roof.

    The way to look at this is to study the average spending habits of a couple in the 50s and the average spending habits of a couple in the present day. Then examine the movement of real income. Finally, look at cost of buying an average home. Real estate prices have gone through the roof.

    Salt is misleading people. Regulations and high taxation has killed of the Australian dream of buying an affordable home.

  30. Stimpson J. Cat

    What’s “don’t smoke” got to do with it?

    Heaps.
    I can afford to save for my hair transplants Now I don’t smoke.
    Also I am paying less taxes.

  31. stackja

    Regulations and high taxation has killed of the Australian dream of buying an affordable home.

    LDP has killed of?

  32. Chris M

    What’s “don’t smoke” got to do with it?

    Many things. It means you are voluntarily paying way more tax than necessary. It shows lack of self respect and self control…. all his points are with view of the long term gain. Smoking leaves you impotent and with hideous skin, knackered lungs & heart disease.

  33. JC

    News at 7. Stack found a typo. His most insightful comment of the day.

    killed off.

  34. Roger

    Smoking leaves you impotent and with hideous skin, knackered lungs & heart disease.

    I witnessed my father die a horrible death prematurely due to emphysema.

    Smoke if you want, but first inform yourself concerning its impact upon your health, which is your most valuable asset in terms of earning a living and remaining independent.

  35. Tim Neilson

    JC
    #2634210, posted on February 11, 2018 at 8:45 pm

    JC, I did a rough calc recently comparing the early ’90’ (when I bought my first house) and now. It looked to me like house prices have gone up phenomenally, outstripping real wage growth by a good deal, but interest rates are massively less.

    My take was that housing is now less affordable but not colossally so.
    Am I missing something? (Maybe after-tax real wages?)

    I think that “average spending habits” do have a lot to do with the perception. There’s simply a lot more stuff to spend on these days. There’s a lot of people out there whose life so far has been:
    (a) finish school at 18;
    (b) take a gap year;
    (c ) go to uni, swap course after a year, swap majors after three years, and end up taking 5 years to graduate from a 3 year course;
    (d) decide that before embarking on a career you’ll spend two years “pursuing your passion” in case it takes off and turns into a lucrative living;
    (e) after that fails, spend a year backpacking to get over the disappointment and get it all out of your system;
    (f) so, end up taking your first serious entry level job at 27;
    (g) for the next few years rent a comfortable flat in a fashionable location, dress well, eat well, have all the latest gadgets, and take an overseas holiday every year;
    (h) so far so good and I wouldn’t criticise anyone for choosing to do so – but step (h) is then to whine petulantly about “housing affordability” because you can’t immediately buy a 3 bedroom terrace or warehouse conversion within walking distance of the Sydney or Melbourne CBD.

  36. JC

    Tim

    I bought a place in 1991 in a decent burb and sold it around 2005. It traded again in the middle of last year with nothing done to it. The compounded rate is 11.9%. Nothing in the west has gone up like Australian real estate. I think I read somewhere that Oz RE has been the best investment for the past 30 years.

    Now that’s Melbourne and the returns in Sydney are even higher.

    Real estate prices rising is poison to the rest of the economy – especially so at the rate Australian RE has gone up. It seeps into everything.

    Affordability is certainly a huge problem.

  37. duncanm, thanks for the Fred Dibnah links. My first exposure to him and I loved the videos.
    Apart from getting scared witless just watching him, I did laugh at these highlights:
    1. a quick fag after climbing to the top of the tall chimney.
    2. he did mention “safety” once.
    3. he did have the good grace to be puffed after one strenuous climb.

  38. sfw

    Walter Williams said the same ages ago

  39. Tom

    Real estate prices rising is poison to the rest of the economy – especially so at the rate Australian RE has gone up. It seeps into everything.

    Thanks, JC. Your commentary last night was excellent.

    Real estate is booming in Australia because the economy is stuffed — and I doubt it can recover while the R/E Ponzi exists. It’s a symptom of Australia’s in-bred get-rich-quick-scheme laziness. There is a whole nouveau riche social layer in Australia that would much prefer milking a scam to making an honest living. A descent into a debt-fuelled economic collapse is inevitable, I fear.

  40. Tel

    The only way to make housing affordable is reduce the intensity of competition for housing, by making it uneconomic to hold land for speculative purposes.

    This is such a good idea, and not even particularly radical when you consider it has already been done in every other aspect of the Australian economy; housing is merely the last hold out, needing to be be brought into line.

    Just look at the auto industry. We have successfully reduced the competition for any investment in automotive manufacturing by making it entirely uneconomic to speculate. Huzzah! Empty factories all over the place available for cheap.

    High taxes help reduce speculation in the Australian stock market, thus keeping the value of ASX shares to a minimum. Very successful policy right there.

    You don’t want Australian citizens speculating in bank accounts, with savings and all that anti-Keynesian demand reduction so we offer artificially low interest rates and high bank fees to ensure saving money is as uneconomic as possible.

    A combination of unions, minimum wage laws, complicated national industry awards, and draconian punishments have done a brilliant job of making it uneconomic to speculate by opening a business of hiring anybody. This has freed up so many resources!! With the help of generous welfare benefits, being out of work is more affordable now than ever before. There is no longer any need to speculate by trying to pick up work skills and get an education. To ensure that all education is as uneconomic as possible we have filled the entire teaching system with as many compulsory but useless subjects as possible.

  41. duncanm

    OCS

    duncanm, thanks for the Fred Dibnah links. My first exposure to him and I loved the videos.
    Apart from getting scared witless just watching him, I did laugh at these highlights

    I thought the funniest was where he discusses criticism of him having a few pints before a big job.

    “Well you try working at 300ft without a few” – or words to that effect.

  42. duncanm

    There are ways to correct house prices, pointed out here by many
    – deregulate! Land and building. That will free up immediate supply are major urban centres.
    – make non-urban centres more attractive to business. Again, if business was more attractive to run out of the major cities, people will follow.

  43. Gavin R Putland

    Tel @ #2634507 does a fine job of explaining how speculators’ money, and even productive investors’ money, can flee. But land can’t flee. If it becomes uneconomic to own land without using it, the land still exists, and becomes a forced participant in a game of musical chairs in which it must attract labour and capital or be left standing. So labour and capital can always get access to land, and everyone has a job and a home.

    Tel rightly notes that high wages, high administrative costs, and high legal risks can deter enterprise, but he somehow overlooks the deterrent effect of high rents or high prices of space in which to do business.

    Tel rightly notes that easy access to welfare makes it affordable to be out of work, but somehow doesn’t acknowledge that easy access to “capital gains” makes it affordable to withhold land from those who want to work on it or create jobs on it.

    In the present context, concerning the garbage that passes for education, I can do no better than to quote Harry Gunnison Brown:

    A college economist planned
    To live without access to land
    And would have succeeded
    But found that he needed
    Food, clothing, and some place to stand.

Comments are closed.