Monday Forum: February 12, 2018

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1,980 Responses to Monday Forum: February 12, 2018

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  1. Diogenes

    Wow , an F5 and a new fred

  2. Peter C.

    Good. We are in total agreement. We don’t like each other nor do we support the same political party.

    Join the club, PC – it’s growing larger by the day.
    Cheers.

  3. OldOzzie

    Chris
    #2634596, posted on February 12, 2018 at 10:41 am
    Office of Prime Minister occupation by Gough forgotten?

    Remember!

    You mean

    A distant eye on Morosi affair

    WASHINGTON was watching closely the “political uproar” generated by deputy prime minister Jim Cairns’s proposed hiring of Junie Morosi as his private secretary at the end of 1974.
    Described in one cable as a “striking 41-year-old whose alleged liaison with Dr Cairns has stirred speculation in the Canberra gossip mill for several months,” Morosi and her links with the Whitlam administration had shaken its “image as a government of principle”.

    The appointment of Morosi’s husband, David Ditchburn, to the Australian Film Board “at a salary of $1000” on the basis that, according to the then board chairman, he was “a cultured gentleman who had seen a lot of films”, had caused damage as well, the December 1974 cable notes.

    <stThe recommendation by attorney-general Lionel Murphy that Morosi be fast-tracked for a low-cost government flat in Canberra had been another mis-step for the government.

    “The sum total of all these stories, charges and counter charges is that opposition politicians, the press and moralists of all stripes have had a field day,” the same cable notes.

    However, there was an upside for Washington in the internal woes of the Whitlam government in the months after its May 1974 re-election: the US felt it was unlikely to be troubled by any significant Australian foreign policy initiatives.

    A cable dated August 9 noted “as long as Whitlam and Carins (sic) are absorbed by frustrations resulting from present situation, they will have that much less time to devote to foreign policy moves which create problems for us”.

    One cable offered a warning — following press reports on January 24, 1975, of an alleged break-in with apparent political links at Morosi’s Sydney apartment — that “all members of mission scrupulously to avoid speculation or comment about this strictly Australian scandal”.

    Another cable notes Cairns’s claim, after his downfall as deputy prime minister, that he didn’t believe there had been CIA involvement; rather, that “I think you can explain it in terms of 100 per cent Australianism.

    “A good deal of this was directed at Miss Morosi. I think it is an Australian reaction to women in positions. I think we have a racist component in this country.”

    Of the 1975 foreign loans affair that ultimately brought Cairns down, the US mission notes that the “fact that Dr Cairns’s mistress, Junie Morosi, has been prominently mentioned in correspondence so far made public adds further lurid detail to whole matter”.

  4. Mak Siccar

    From the old Open Forum.

    Andrew Bolt today.

    COURTS CAN’T FIND “STOLEN GENERATIONS” VICTIMS, BUT LABOR WILL PAY THEM
    Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun
    February 12, 2018 8:06am
    Subscriber only
    The Federal Court couldn’t find a “stolen generation” in the Northern Territory, despite hearing a huge test case and a subsequent appeal. Yet Labor will today promise handouts of around $75,000 to “survivors” there – without close checks on whether those “survivors” were actually stolen.

    The “stolen generations” myth – this dangerous myth – seems more important to the Left than the truth, the consequences or the taxpayers’ cash.

    First, some background on the “stolen generations” in the Northern Territory:

    Lawyers had picked Lorna Cubillo and Peter Gunner as their first and best two claimants from among 550 people in the Northern Territory who’d registered with them as “stolen”.

    But the Howard Government fought the claims and won.

    The Federal Court in 2000 found that Gunner had actually been sent to Alice Springs by his mother for schooling and Cubillo had been rescued from a bush camp where she was found with her father long gone, her mother dead and her grandmother far away. Witnesses in the case who’d also signed up as “stolen” were shown not to be.

    Moreover, after going through the records of Aboriginal policy in the Norther Territory, the judge ruled:

    I am limited to making findings on the evidence that was presented to this Court in these proceedings; that evidence does not support a finding that there was any policy of removal of part-Aboriginal children such as that alleged by the applicants…

    That finding was upheld on appeal. No evidence to the contrary has emerged since that finding. Court cases in Western Australia and South Australia, as well as an Aboriginal-led Task Force in Victoria, have all likewise found no proof of what is widely alleged by activists and politicians – that children were “stolen” from their families just for being Aboriginal, rather than, say, for being abandoned or abused. (See summary below.)

    People claiming to be “stolen” have, on closer checking, generally turned out to have been rescued instead – just as we still must rescue Aboriginal children today. The same is true of the Tasmanian compensation scheme.

    But none of this matters to Labor. Nor does it matter to Labor that the Stolen Generations myth is actually killing Aboriginal children, making authorities too scared to save Aboriginal children from dangers we’d saved them from if they were white. Children have been left in danger and have died or been raped.

    Labor ignores all that. It will instead today promise to compensate Stolen Generations “victims” that the courts can’t find – victims of a policy that the courts say didn’t exist:

    Bill Shorten is promising to set up a compensation fund for survivors of the Indigenous stolen generations – offering payments of $75,000 – in a bid to resolve the “unfinished business” of Kevin Rudd’s 10-year-old apology…

    Mr Shorten will use the occasion – which comes one day before the 10th anniversary of Mr Rudd’s historic apology – to announce the compensation fund, which will apply to survivors in Commonwealth jurisdictions not covered by state schemes. It will apply mostly to survivors in the Northern Territory and ACT.

    So how closely would a Labor Government check the claims of those lining up for that $75,000?

    Not very, it turns out. Labor MP Pat Dodson on ABC Radio National Breakfast this morning said claimants would not have to go through tick-a-box checks.

    I’m not surprised. Remember how the “stolen generations” claim that then Labor MP Nova Peris made about her Northern Territory family turned out to be – in my opinion – very shaky when I checked them? Peris then redefined “stolen”:

    Whether you were stolen or given up, the point is my mother was raised on a mission away from her mother.

    Sure, but should we compensate people who were given up rather than stolen, and then hail them as victims of racist child-stealers? Who does this help?

    UPDATE

    Here are some of the court findings on the “stolen generations”. Note that virtually no journalist or politician will discuss these facts.

    WESTERN AUSTRALIA

    As Tony Thomas noted:

    Justice Janine Pritchard in the WA Supreme Court on December 20 rejected claims that from 1958-79 there was any official program in WA to implement the so-called Stolen Generation policy.

    Her judgment dismissed damages claims by the Aboriginal Don and Sylvia Collard and seven of their 14 children removed or made state wards. She specifically dealt with a claim that the children were removed “pursuant to a policy of assimilation of aboriginal children.”

    She found the children were instead removed, mainly to Sister Kate’s in Perth, to safeguard their physical welfare…

    Justice Pritchard found: “The references to ‘assimilation’ in the evidence I have set out above are not sufficient to support a finding on the balance of probabilities that at the time of the wardships there was, within the Department of Native Welfare or the Child Welfare Department, the pursuit of a policy of assimilation of aboriginal people into white Australian society through the wardship of aboriginal children…”

    SOUTH AUSTRALIA

    The one successful claim in any court in the country in fact proves there was indeed no sanctioned policy (in South Australia, in this case) to remove Aboriginal children just for being Aboriginal.

    The court found that Bruce Trevorrow had been unlawfully removed as an ailing one-year-old from his parents in early 1958. The removal was done by a well-meaning but inexperienced Aboriginal welfare worker, contrary to official policy.

    But she took him from his hospital bed (where he’d never been visited by his parents) because she thought he’d been neglected and abandoned.

    The judge made clear that official policy in South Australia was actually NOT to remove Aboriginal children just because they were Aboriginal, and officials worried that Aboriginal children were often left in terrible danger. As I reported at the time:

    Neither Joe nor Thora [Trevorrow’s parents] went with their child, or visited him in the two weeks he was kept in hospital. Who knows what Thora’s relatives told the doctors, but the hospital’s notes say the baby, Bruce Trevorrow, was a “neglected child – without parents”, suffering from “malnutrition” and “infective diarrhoea”‘. The notes add: “The other two children are neglected. Mother has cleared out and father is boozing.” This is the baby that just two weeks later was given to an Adelaide family, which were told its mother had “gone on a walkabout”.

    Unforgiveably, Joe and Thora were never asked for permission to give away their baby. And they were lied to when, six months later, Thora wrote to the Aborigines Protection Board, the official guardian of all Aboriginal children, asking to know when she’d get Bruce back, “as I have not forgot I got a baby in there”.

    The reply, from the APB’s Marjory Angas, claimed Bruce was “making good progress but as yet the doctor does not consider him fit to go home”. What Bruce’s parents did not know is that it seems to have been Angas herself who’d already given away their baby – and that she’d done this against the law.

    As [Justice] Gray ruled: “Mrs Angas may have been well-intentioned … but was well aware, or ought to have been aware, that the removal of the plaintiff from his family, and his placement with the Davies family, was undertaken in circumstances that were understood to be without legal authority, beyond power and contrary to authoritative legal advice.”

    That illegality, said Gray, was why Bruce Trevorrow deserved a payout. The picture the judge paints over many pages is compelling: South Australia never had any laws — or policies – authorising anyone to steal Aboriginal children for racist reasons.

    Gray noted, for instance, that in 1923, as South Australia passed a law to help neglected Aboriginal children, the then treasurer assured Parliament: “The dictates of humanity forbid the state to deprive mothers of their infant children in cases where their mothers desire to keep them.”

    The treasurer added: “(T)he provision in the Bill (to remove older children) is designed only to be used in cases where an illegitimate child is ill-cared for by its parents.”

    But there was a hitch.

    In 1949, the Crown Solicitor confirmed that the law did not let APB officials take Aboriginal children from their parents.

    That was the job of the Children’s Welfare and Public Relief Board, which looked after children of all races, but wasn’t so keen to remove neglected Aborigines. It found them hard to help.

    In that standoff, Aboriginal children seem to me to have been less in danger of being stolen than left to rot.

    Justice Gray gives examples – like the baby brought to Port Augusta Hospital in 1955 in “an advanced state of malnutrition”. Her mother was shown how to look after her child, yet it came back again “in a shocking state”. Despite the pleas of doctors to take her into care, this baby was not “stolen”, but sent back home to God knows what fate.

    In 1958, the year after Bruce Trevorrow was taken, the APB’s secretary described the tragedy he confronted. “I feel sure that a higher mortality rate is evident among Aboriginal children than those of other descent,” he wrote to a colleague. “Unfortunately, there is a considerable amount of undernourishment, malnutrition and neglect.”

    In fact, quite frequently (Aborigines) do not seem to worry whether the child is fed or not.”

    Yet “there is not a high proportion of aboriginal children who are wards of the state, simply because our legislation does not provide that neglected children can be removed”.

    Still, his officials couldn’t always stand by and do nothing. Admitted the secretary: “Again in confidence, for some years without legal authority, the Board have taken charge of many Aboriginal children, some are placed with Aboriginal institutions, which by the way I very much dislike, and others are placed with foster parents.”

    As often as possible we arranged for this type of child to be adopted, necessarily of course, with the authority of the parents.” How many children had the APB removed? Some 300 over the years, taken because they were – Gray found – “thought to be neglected”. Note: not because Australia had to be kept “pure”.

    This practice seems to have stopped by the end of the 1950s.

    South Australia never had any laws—or policies – authorising anyone to steal Aboriginal children for racist reasons. Justice Gray noted, for instance, that in 1923, as South Australia passed a law to help neglected Aboriginal children, the then treasurer assured Parliament: “The dictates of humanity forbid the state to deprive mothers of their infant children in cases where their mothers desire to keep them.”

    VICTORIA

    Victoria’s Labor Government was told in 2003 ago by its Stolen Generations Taskforce that while 36 organisations were now helping the state’s “stolen generations”, not one truly stolen child could actually be found.

    In fact, the Aboriginal-led taskforce (chaired by Jim Berg) admitted that in Victoria, at least, there had been “no formal policy for removing children”. Ever.

    This was too embarrassing a truth for the Government to accept. So it just spent $5.1 million to create yet another outfit – Stolen Generations Victoria – to help the “stolen” children no one can find.

    TASMANIA
    Tasmania has already got a compensation scheme, but where’s the proof that the compensated were “stolen” just for being Aboriginal, rather than simply saved?
    In January 2008, the then Tasmanian Labor government led by Paul Lennon said it would pay 84 Tasmanians $58,000 each because they claimed to be members of the Stolen Generations. And 22 offspring of ‘victims’ who had died, each got $5000. The Liberals there backed the idea. It was all very nice.

    Except that it was legally impossible for any Tasmanian to have been stolen in the period nominated by the Human Rights Commission (“Bringing Them Home”). That period was 1910-70.

    Why? Because after the death in 1876 of Truganini, the last Tasmanian Aborigine, all Aborigines were presumed to have died out and hence there were no laws based on or directed at race. They were not mentioned again legally until the 1970s. There was no mainland-type system of Aboriginal “Protectors” and their wards.

    Hence no Tasmanian could have been legally and officially ‘stolen’ because of their Aboriginality. Even two recent Ph.D. theses on Tasmanian child welfare, 1880-1940, reported: “We found only two passing references to the Aboriginality of state wards, among hundreds of records.”

    The authorities did know that a small community at Cape Barren Island were descendents of indigenous wives of Bass Strait sealers since 1810. But they were only mentioned in legislation to do with land leases.

    Here are the four compensation cases that were made public at the time, presumably because they were the strongest:

    So who are the 106 “stolen generations” members compensated under Tasmania’s $5 million scheme? Most names have been withheld, but four claimants have identified themselves.

    Eddie Thomas was taken from his grandmother when he was six months old and his mother dead. He claimed his grandmother was duped into signing a consent form. Really? For racist reasons?

    Annette Peardon said her case files showed she was actually removed for “neglect”. She didn’t believe it, yet admitted her mother served three months for the crime.

    Debra Hocking, a Stolen Generations Alliance spokeswoman, told the ABC she, too, was “removed on the grounds of neglect” and conceded: “In Tasmania there were no removal policies as such …”

    The fourth, Heather Brown, said she and six other children were taken from home for reasons she can’t explain. But why assume she was stolen merely for being Aboriginal?

    Historian Keith Windschuttle found half of the Aboriginal wards documented from 1969 to 1995 were removed because of “neglect” and most of the rest after they broke laws or were uncontrollable, in danger or abandoned.

    And now Bill Shorten wants a compensation scheme just like this for the Northern Territory.

    Can this be right?

  5. OldOzzie

    Rich kids rule at selective schooling

    A push to make academically ­selective schools accessible to all students regardless of intellectual abilities has been bolstered by fresh data suggesting the sector is overwhelmingly catering for students from highly privileged backgrounds.

    Analysis by the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria shows that on average 70 per cent of students attending selective-entry schools in Sydney and Melbourne come from the top quartile of the population, as measured by socio-educational advantage.

    There are three Sydney schools — Northern Beaches Secondary College, Normanhurst Boys’ High and Hornsby Girls’ High — where four out of five students are classified as being in the top quartile.

    At Normanhurst and Hornsby, which prides itself on its diverse multicultural population, just 1 per cent of students are considered to be in the bottom quartile.

    The analysis, released by the CECV as part of an ongoing campaign over federal education funding changes, coincides with a NSW Department of Education review of its gifted and talented student policy, including the nat­ure and effectiveness of the tests used to identify suitable candidates for academically selective schools and opportunity classes amid claims that some wealthy families have been investing in ­expensive tutoring in order to ­prepare their children for the entry tests.

    There are 21 fully selective high schools in NSW — more than any other state — and 25 partially sel­ective high schools. Victoria has four selective schools.

    NSW Education Minister Rob Stokes has flagged the idea of opening up selective schools to local students rather than “deliberately separating children on the basis that some are gifted and talented and others are not”.

    According to the CECV’s report, selective-entry government schools have become highly exclusive; educating students from highly advantaged families and specifically excluding students who are not high-achievers.

    CECV executive director Stephen Elder said the selective school system deprived the schools that those students would otherwise attend of positive influencers and lowered levels of academic achievement.

    ‘‘Students in other public schools also suffer because the huge subsidies going to selective-entry schools means there is less funding available for the schools that really need it,” Mr Elder said.

    Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented vice-president Melinda Gindy said there were questions around whether the testing process was reaching “all students of all social, economic and geographical locations”.

    Ms Gindy, whose organisation has backed the departmental review, said the system needed to ­ensure “equality of access”.

    “What’s happening is children who are gifted, as in having that natural ability in that top 10 per cent of that population, are missing out on a position in a selective school or an opportunity class for a range of reasons,” she said.

    “Maybe they don’t perform well in tests or they are geographically isolated, or they might come from a poor family whose priority is paying rent or getting food on the table,’’ Ms Gindy said.

  6. johanna

    From Mick on ye olde fredde:

    Incidentally, the impact of the Very Big Sports Day for snowflakes to Follow Their Dream at someone else’s expense has started to sink in – for example, construction sites will be forced to shut down for 2½ weeks (no road closures permitted so they cannot resupply using tower cranes, workforce cannot travel to work let alone park nearby and so on) and their workforce is expected to sacrifice a fortnight’s income.

    Local winemakers are expected to pay an aggregate $2 million fee to showcase their product at venues – no pay, no access and they are arcing up about it. So much for promoting State exports.

    From what I can see this event is la grande bouffe for the privileged mates who have won a concession to make a motza and the most severe disruption to everyone else’s business and daily life.

    Indeed.

    My favourite story so far is that a bunch of sand dunes are being carted away to provide a venue for beach volleyball or something. Needless to say, locals who have spent years and dollars on revegetation programs and so on to stablise the dunes are not very happy.

    The Games organisers can’t understand what they are so cranky about. After all, when the Games are over they are going to truck all the sand back and rebuild the dunes. Why, nobody would even know that the Games were ever there!

    This from the State which is allegedly so in thrall to greenies that they are crippling the Adani coal mine.

    Priorities, people, priorities!

  7. OldOzzie

    Mak Siccar
    #2634685, posted on February 12, 2018 at 12:09 pm
    From the old Open Forum.

    Andrew Bolt today.

    COURTS CAN’T FIND “STOLEN GENERATIONS” VICTIMS, BUT LABOR WILL PAY THEM
    Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun
    February 12, 2018 8:06am
    Subscriber only

    Mak,

    Thanks for that excellent post

  8. From the Old Fred:

    “I’ve been screaming all my life. what are we going to do with this anger?” Ms Munro asked the crowd.

    How about getting off your fat arse and making your own way, on your own merits, without relying on the taxpayer, for starters?

  9. Baldrick

    16th Battalion A.I.F

    Axford, Thomas Leslie (Jack) (1894–1983)
    His most conspicuous hour came on 4 July 1918 at the battle of Hamel. The Allied barrage opened at 3.10 a.m. and when it lifted shortly afterwards the 16th Battalion attacked Vaire Wood. Axford’s platoon reached the enemy defences but a neighbouring platoon was held up at the wire. Machine-guns inflicted many casualties among Axford’s mates in the other platoon. He dashed to the flank, bombed the machine-gun crews, jumped into the trench and charged with his bayonet. In all, he killed ten enemy soldiers and captured six. Throwing the machine-guns over the parapet, he called the delayed platoon forward and then rejoined his own. In ninety-three minutes the victory of Hamel was complete. Axford’s initiative and gallantry won him the Victoria Cross. `I must have been mad’, he commented later.

  10. Bruce of Newcastle

    Fascinating article on why you should never try to run a rental truck business in San Francisco. Or any other kind of business.

    Is California Starting to Circle the Drain?

    Even makes Melbournistan look like a well-policed city.

    Bonus stuff includes the current U Haul rates for people escaping to anywhere else – which are up to 16 times higher than rates going the other way.

  11. Baldrick

    TheirABC, still a conservative free zone:

    Bevan Shields ✔ @BevanShields
    OMG! Lara Tingle is the new chief political correspondent for @abc730

  12. zyconoclast

    Worth reading the whole thing.

    Australian power prices worse than banana republics

    Australia has power prices worse than a third world country, a global renewable energy guru says.

    “For a country that has a very high standard of living, stable economic situation and tremendous opportunities, it makes no sense at all for the price of power to be more than a banana republic,” the Australian head of global renewable firm SunEnergy1, and part-time racecar driver, Kenny Habul said.

    Speaking at the Bond Business Leaders Forum on the Gold Coast, Mr Habul said Australia needs to dramatically change its energy landscape in order to escape the energy price crisis, adding that there is a disconnect between Australian standards of living and electricity costs.

    Mr Habul said will meet with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull later this month to discuss how to halt spiralling power costs and restore the nation’s electricity prices to normality.

    “The current Australian Prime Minister has asked me to meet with him in a couple of weeks and just sort of talk about the general situation here in Australia and I’m not an expert at it but I know the cost of power is astronomically high,” Mr Habul said.

    “So I’m looking forward to speaking to the Prime Minister and hopefully understand a bit better why, particularly in Queensland, the rates are ridiculous.”

    Australian electricity prices are currently one of the highest in the world, and are a rising economic and political issue, as energy prices increased 12.3 per cent over 2017 alone, and prices forecast are to only increase further.

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission found Australian consumers are paying between $100 to $200 more for electricity than what could be considered reasonable, while a recent McKell Institute report found this could rise by up to $430 more on average by the end of 2019.

    The federal government has actively worked with energy generators and retailers and outlined new national energy policies in order to drive down the prices, but there has been little headway made.

    Mr Habul said Australia’s energy landscape is undergoing a dramatic transition, and the nation needs to turn away from coal.

    “Our generation is the end of traditional energy,” Mr Habul said.

    “Coal in itself is finished; they’re closing coal plants everywhere. Natural gas was the next best solution. Most coal plants in the US have been shut down and switched to natural gas.

    “Solar is now cheaper than natural gas and the latest advancements in solar cell technology put us at twice the output of the current panel in the next four years and at one-tenth of the cost. There is enough sunlight that hits the earth in one day to power the earth for a year, and we dig coal and we burn it, it’s fundamentally wrong.”

    Mr Habul also forecast that Australian households will defect en masse from the grid, with every home powered by solar panels and batteries.

    “The traditional concept of centralised generation – a 2000 megawatt coal plant, transmission lines, distributions lines – will go away. Maybe what will happen in the end is the utilities will just power the main infrastructure in towns and they won’t power businesses and they won’t power homes.”

    However, Australia is unlikely to follow Mr Habul’s footsteps in hiring former special forces soldiers in order to map future transmission lines for solar projects.

    “We recruited all special forces and S.E.A.L. teams, and we ran our own helicopters, two of them, through the night and basically mapped the transmission lines on the east coast of the US to determine the best locations for solar plants,” he said.

    “You can’t just buy a map, they don’t tell you where they are, it’s a national security threat. You can’t just call up a utility and say ‘where are your transmission lines, mate?’ They’ll tell you to eff off.”

    SunEnergy is one of the largest commercial solar power companies in the US and currently has a pipeline of at least three gigawatts in upcoming solar projects.

  13. egg_

    Is California Starting to Circle the Drain?

    But, but… doesn’t the world revolve around California?
    Global vehicle emissions standards are due to LA smog – a product of its geography.
    Water rationing, windmills – Oz future?

  14. egg_

    Australian power prices worse than banana republics

    We need MORE global warming, so they can grow bananas in SA.

  15. Bruce of Newcastle

    Here’s one of the problems that Trump and Sessions have with trying to do anything:

    The gap at DOJ

    With Brand’s departure, here is what the top echelon of the Department of Justice looks like:

    Attorney General – Jeff Sessions
    Deputy Attorney General – Rod Rosenstein
    Associate Attorney General – vacant
    Solicitor General – Noel Francisco
    Assistant Attorney General, Civil Division – vacant, nomination pending
    Assistant Attorney General, Civil Rights Division – vacant, nomination pending
    Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division – vacant, nomination pending
    Assistant Attorney General, National Security Division – vacant, nomination pending
    Assistant Attorney General, Environmental Division – vacant, nomination pending
    Assistant Attorney General, Tax Division – vacant

    Add in that Rosenstein is one of the cabal and the next rank below these positions is owned by Obama partisans and you can see why there might be a problem chasing Hillary and everyone else.

    Obama use to fix such things by waiting until the Senate went on holiday then making out of session appointments. But the Senate in Trump’s term has colluded to remain technically “in session” through all the holidays, so that Trump can’t do that.

  16. OldOzzie

    JENNIFER ORIEL – Greens turn against Jim Molan to promote Islamist cause

    Jihadis couldn’t take down Jim Molan in Iraq. Indonesian militants couldn’t knock him off in Timor. But the wee men of the Australian Greens think they’re in with a chance.

    It is little wonder they labour under such delusions. The Greens’ grand strategy reads like a Miss Universe cue card: world peace, green dreaming and love sweet love. Scratch the surface and you find nothing but fatal contradictions. For each Greens policy, there is another that cancels it out. In the end, there is nothing left.

    The major contribution the Greens make to Australian life is to fragment politics by vulgarising manners and creating a culture hostile to the free world. The ­attack on Senator Molan is a case in point. Greens MP Adam Bandt said last week that if an inquiry into the Iraq war were held, “you would find Jim Molan would probably be up for prosecution … for his role in the atrocities in Fallujah”. It took a threat of legal action for him to apologise. His first effort sounded so insincere he had to try again before the apology was accepted.

    The Greens often campaign against patriotism. They turn on their fellow countrymen to defend Islamist causes. Molan served as chief of operations in Iraq during the second battle for Fallujah. A few months before, Time magazine published an in-depth article on the “new jihad” in the region. The jihadi insurgency was led by fundamentalists keen to capitalise on regional instability. Michael Ware revealed their plan to transform Iraq into “a training ground for young jihadists who will form the next wave of recruits for al-Qa’ida and like-minded groups”. Almost all of the jihadi groups claimed inspiration from the chief of al-Qa’ida in Iraq, Abu Mousab al-Zarqawi. After he was killed by a coalition strike in 2006, Zarqawi’s men formed Islamic State.

    It would be quite reasonable to form the view that the Greens have an unproductive attachment to Islamism, especially the Sunni variety. But give them some credit for consistency. They contend the 2004 battle to stop jihadis in Iraq constitutes a war crime and they protested against Western troops trying to stop Islamic State genocide in Iraq a decade later.

    The problem isn’t that Molan went too far in Fallujah. The problem is that the West didn’t go far enough. The only solution to genocidal jihad is scorched earth.

    When the Greens aren’t backing jihad abroad, they’re waving it ashore. Their immigration plan ­includes empowering refugees given adverse security assessments by ASIO to challenge the findings. Last year, the government reported that 500 refugees from Iraq and Syria were denied entry after the Five Eyes intelligence alliance warned their names were on international security lists. Dozens had adverse national security assessments.

    When not defending the rights of terrorists against the welfare of free world citizens, the Greens are busy contradicting themselves. There is perhaps no more contradictory policy than pushing big ­immigration via porous borders while complaining about resource scarcity. If what the Greens say is true and Australia is running down its supply of natural resources, then promoting population growth by increasing the immigration intake is self-defeating.

    The Australian Greens form part of the international alliance, Global Greens. Its charter opens with the odd idea that we are “citizens of the planet” — as though the planet were a nation state. The Global Greens believe “the environment ignores borders between countries”. The environment is not a human being. It can neither ignore nor recognise ­nation state borders. But the Global Greens want a world without borders. At the same time, they claim to support “participatory democracy” in which “all citizens have the right to express their views”.

    A world without borders — the global government envisioned by greens parties — would destroy liberal democracy. The free world constitutes a minority of states and a relatively small percentage of the world’s population. In the global political system envisioned by greens parties, most votes would be cast by members of Islamist and communist states. Totalitarianism would spread its tentacles across the globe.

    Despite the totalitarian threat, European greens tried to introduce a system for transnational members of parliament in next year’s European elections. The vote for transnational lists was defeated 368 to 274 last week.

    In the context of a global parliament, it would make sense for politicians to appeal to Islamists and communists/socialists, given they would constitute most voters. Such a political system is not possible unless nation states cease to exist. Liberal democratic nations pose a significant problem for supranationalists because they demonstrate the nation state system can generate prosperity, security and stability for its citizens.

    Greens parties protest against national security in favour of “a comprehensive concept of global security”. The Global Greens’ world security requires “a global security system capable of the prevention, management and resolution of conflicts”. But who would direct the leviathan? The greens nominate the “United Nations as the global organisation of conflict management”.

    UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres could be amenable to the idea. As president of Socialist International, Guterres proposed a global government governed by a UN parliamentary assembly.

    The Australian Labor Party quit Socialist International for a more moderate European alliance. But greens parties have taken up the red flag to promote a global revolution that would devastate freedom and concentrate power in a world of tyranny without borders.

  17. teddy bear

    egg they wouldn’t grow bananas there even if they could regardless of how much you paid them, it goes against their work ethics.

  18. johanna

    NSW Education Minister Rob Stokes has flagged the idea of opening up selective schools to local students rather than “deliberately separating children on the basis that some are gifted and talented and others are not”.

    According to the CECV’s report, selective-entry government schools have become highly exclusive; educating students from highly advantaged families and specifically excluding students who are not high-achievers.

    In other words, they want to abolish selective schools altogether and are using these arguments as a wedge. Just like the same types in the UK abolished grammar schools – for the same reasons – and average academic achievement continues to spiral downwards.

    To these ideologues, better that everyone is worse off than that some people are better off. Next, they will be demanding busing to bring in kids from poor areas to ordinary public schools in wealthy areas, because they also are academically stronger and cater mainly to middle and upper middle class families.

    Every disparity in performance is just the result of lack of social engineering to these envy-ridden dotards.

  19. OldOzzie

    Experimental Drug That Kills The Flu In 24 Hours May Come To U.S. Next Year

    Amid the worst flu-season in nearly a decade, a Japanese drugmaker is hard at work conducting late stage trials on a pill that they say can kill the flu virus within a day – a third of the time it takes Roche AG’s Tamiflu.

    Both drugs take roughly the same amount of time to completely contain flu symptoms, but Shionogi says its treatment provides immediately relief much faster. Considering that the U.S. has been hit by one of the worst flu epidemics in years, with the most intense rates of transmission since 2009, the Japanese company’s treatment can’t come quickly enough.

    The experimental treatment developed by the 140-year-old Osaka-based drugmaker requires a single dose, as opposed to two daily doses of Tamiflu for five days. If the drug is as fast as the company claims, it could mean the difference between life and death for at-risk flu sufferers while cutting down the window of active transmission for contagion.

    A spokesman for Roche – which holds the international license to distribute the experimental drug, said the Shionogi treatment had proven “significantly faster” at killing the flu, more conveniently, and that the compound offered “improved tolerability” vs. Tamiflu.

    he drug was developed as an offshoot of a blockbuster anti-HIV drug, working to block the flu virus from hijacking a cell’s internal mechanism, according to Chief Executive Isao Teshirogi.

    “The data that we’ve seen looks very promising,” said Martin Howell Friede, who heads up the World Health Organization’s advisory on vaccines. “This could be a breakthrough in the way that we treat influenza.”

    Shionogi said Japan’s drug regulator is fast-tracking its approval and could approve it for use in Japan as early as March. The regulator declined to comment. Roche and Shionogi say they will apply for U.S. approval this summer and Shionogi doesn’t expect a decision until next year.

    Other players including Johnson & Johnson , AstraZeneca PLC and a startup backed by Merck & Co. are testing new compounds to treat influenza A, the most common flu strain. Shionogi’s candidate is furthest along and it says the compound can also treat B strains that infect humans too. -WSJ

    Existing drugs allow the flu virus to hijack cells, while working to block the viral material from escaping to infect other cells. This method simply slows down the virus, giving the body’s immune system a giant assist. Shionogi’s treatment – which has been in research and development for over a decade.

    After developing an anti-HIV drug in partnership with Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline which blocks a “metallic enzyme” used by the virus to hijack human cells, Shionogi scientists tailored the same technique to the flu virus.

    “So we said, ‘why don’t we build on our HIV knowledge to find a way to treat the flu?’ And we did,” according to lead developer Takeki Uehara.

  20. egg_

    egg they wouldn’t grow bananas there even if they could regardless of how much you paid them, it goes against their work ethics.

    Mushrooms and barrels in cellars seems to be their specialty.

  21. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Baldrick
    #2634695, posted on February 12, 2018 at 12:13 pm

    16th Battalion A.I.F

    Thanks for that, Baldrick. Get kicked out of the Martin O’Meara V.C. canteen a few times in my (much) younger days.

  22. Tim Neilson

    A push to make academically ­selective schools accessible to all students regardless of intellectual abilities

    Peak fuckwit has been achieved.

    Do people even notice these contradictions any more?

    The Olympics can stage, and broadcasters comment on, “solo synchronised swimming” without anyone pointing out that “solo” and “synchronised” are mutually exclusive.

    And now this.

    To be fair, Jennifer Oriel (tks Old Ozzie) is a ray of hope – There is perhaps no more contradictory policy than pushing big ­immigration via porous borders while complaining about resource scarcity.

    But the Greens will be impervious to her logic. It will all be declared to be achievable via more government funding.

  23. Roger

    “The traditional concept of centralised generation – a 2000 megawatt coal plant, transmission lines, distributions lines – will go away. Maybe what will happen in the end is the utilities will just power the main infrastructure in towns and they won’t power businesses and they won’t power homes.”

    In other words the grid will be deconstructed because it is unsustainable on renewables.

  24. Fisky

    This idiot was a complete waste of space and the worst president in history. What a dumb line!

    Former President George W. Bush said on Thursday that the U.S. needs to “welcome” immigrants and thank them for doing the “jobs that Americans won’t do.”

    Americans don’t want to pick cotton at 105 degrees, but there are people who want to put food on their family’s tables and are willing to do that,” he said, according to The Associated Press. “We ought to say thank you and welcome them.”

  25. Roger

    There is perhaps no more contradictory policy than pushing big ­immigration via porous borders while complaining about resource scarcity.

    She’s assuming the Greens a rational; they’re not, they are long march revolutionaries.

  26. Caveman

    I waz stolen.

    ( Bookmark this post as proof it really happened, to collect my winnings )

  27. Stimpson J. Cat

    There is enough sunlight that hits the earth in one day to power the earth for a year, and we dig coal and we burn it, it’s fundamentally wrong.

    Hippy.

  28. johanna

    Fauxfacts is chiming in with the US MSM about how the country is riddled with white supremacists, headed no doubt by the Supremacist in Chief. They have dredged up a self-promoting nobody whose claims are based on this kind of ‘evidence:’

    Picciolini’s experience is echoed by a 2015 FBI Counterterrorism Policy Guide that highlights its investigations into domestic terrorism.

    A participant gives a Nazi salute during a march through the grounds of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, …
    A participant gives a Nazi salute during a march through the grounds of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia in August 2017. Photo: New York Times

    The FBI identified active links to officers who were employed by some of the 18,000 law enforcement agencies across the United States. A 2006 FBI intelligence report also flagged infiltration of law enforcement agencies by white supremacist groups.

    Well, what more needs to be said? QED, and all that.

    Of course, it is possible that this wannabe hero has other agendas and motives:

    In 2016, Picciolini won an Emmy Award for his directing and producing role in a public service campaign called “There is Life After Hate” aimed at helping deradicalisation.

    “The reasons why people might join a neo-Nazi movement or fly from middle America to Syria to join ISIS are similar,” Picciolini says.

    “It’s a broken individual’s search for identity, community, and purpose. For people who might have potholes they can’t navigate around, sometimes the detours take you down a pretty dark path.”

    Life After Hate’s work was acknowledged by the Obama administration in 2016 and awarded a $US400,000 ($515,000) grant from the Department of Homeland Security – only to find it rescinded by the Trump administration last year.

    “There was no explanation,” says Picciolini.

    🙂

    Draining the swamp, even if only a teaspoonful at a time.

  29. thefrolickingmole

    Exhibit 1,023,456 in “why Australia is rooted, an ongoing series.

    The department of education is about to send 2 men 400km or so to replace a lock on a door.

    We have tradesmen in town qualified (carpenters) to do the job, but they arent the “head Contractor”.

    Works should only take an hour to complete – replace privacy lock to front entry.

    This work order has been issued by the Department of Communities and we are the Head Contractor in this area.

    Are we anywhere near preak stupid?
    Thats easily $2,500 to replace a doorlock. (car km, tradesman & apprentice etc)

  30. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Morant execution fundamentally flawed: MPs
    8:42amKaren Sweeney

    MPs across parliament have acknowledged fundamental flaws leading to the execution of Harry ‘Breaker’ Morant and Peter Handcock during the Boer War.

    From the Oz. What can they do – bring them both back to life? Those two men were responsible for shooting unarmed Boers, who were obeying the British call to surrender themselves, give their parole , take the oath of allegiance to the British Crown and take no further part in the fighting. Two of them were twelve year old boys.

  31. C.L.

    NSW Education Minister Rob Stokes has flagged the idea of opening up selective schools to local students rather than “deliberately separating children on the basis that some are gifted and talented and others are not”.

    Thank God for the Liberal Party, eh?

  32. C.L.

    Let’s just pause to take that in:

    A push to make academically ­selective schools accessible to all students regardless of intellectual abilities has been bolstered by fresh data suggesting the sector is overwhelmingly catering for students from highly privileged backgrounds.

    The Liberal Party now wants to ban selective schools.

  33. OldOzzie

    Janet Albrechtsen: ‘Skanky ho’ one day, an enemy of PM the next

    Columnist Janet Albrechtsen has laid bare the deterioration of her friendship with Malcolm Turnbull, who in 2002 rang as a friend to alert her she had been called a “skanky ho” in federal parliament, but last year as Prime Minister blocked her from a board reappointment.

    “I worked out very early on in this job that you make a new set of friends every week and a new set of enemies, and that’s just kind of how it is,” Albrechtsen told The Australian’s Behind the Media podcast.

    In 2014 the Abbott government appointed Albrechtsen to the National Museum of Australia’s council for a three-year term

    “At the end of last year I was told that I wouldn’t be renewed on the board of the National Museum even though I’d been told by the relevant minister that I was going to be renewed.

    “And then I heard that Malcolm Turnbull had said, ‘Well, I can’t possibly — why would I reappoint her? She is an enemy of mine.’

    “And I’m thinking, I’m not an enemy. I’m writing from the centre right. I regard myself as a liberal. I’m not a member of the Liberal Party but a small ‘l’ liberal.”

    Albrechtsen contrasted the attitude of Mr Turnbull to that of former prime minister John Howard, who agreed to an interview with her on the Sunday Night program in 2014 even though she wrote an influential column in 2007 urging him to end his prime ministership.

    It was very different back in November 14, 2002, when Turnbull, a family friend via her then husband John O’Sullivan, rang to alert her that Labor MP Mark Latham had stood up in federal parliament and used an American slang term of abuse, referring to her as “a skanky ho who will die in a ditch to defend the Liberal Party”.

    “It was Malcolm Turnbull who rang me. I was sitting in my office at home writing and he rang and said, ‘Oh, did you hear what Mark Latham has called you in parliament? He called you a skanky ho.’

    “And I said to Malcolm, ‘What does that mean, I don’t know.’ I should have just asked one of my children.

    “So I’m on the phone to Malcolm and I started Googling to work out what the hell does skanky ho mean and, oh boy, I got lots of porn — I got more porn than is decent when you’ve got three children running around the house.”

    Latham, then a Labor MP, actually got his reference wrong, according to Albrechtsen. “He actually didn’t call me a ‘skanky ho’ the first time, he called me a ‘shanky ho’ as if I were some kind of cut off a lamb. I was more shocked than hurt; it takes a bit more to hurt me. You just don’t expect to get written up in Hansard as a skanky ho.”

    Under the Howard government, Albrechtsen was appointed to the ABC board, a controversial appointment after Media Watch had claimed she misrepresented the work of academics in one of her columns. Albrechtsen says she utterly failed to change things during her term on the board. “It was only controversial when it was seen kind of through the filter of the left. I wanted the ABC to abide by its charter. When I first joined as a director we went to one of these social events to meet staff members and people from TV and radio, and one woman came up to me and started stroking my arm and said, ‘Oh, I just didn’t realise you’d look like this.’

    “I just don’t know what they expected, someone with two heads or three eyes?”

    Now in the age of social media insults, Latham’s attack on Albrechtsen seems not such a big deal, but back in 2002 it was enormously controversial.

    Albrechtsen never sought redress in her columns but asked parliamentary officials to remove the reference. But she was told columnists are regarded as having their own platform and can’t have Hansard corrected.

    Later Latham apologised to her at a function and wrote of his regret in his published diaries.

    “I remember when he became opposition leader, I sent him a note congratulating him and signed it ‘regards skanky ho’.”

  34. testpattern

    ‘A push to make academically ­selective schools accessible to all students regardless of intellectual abilities’

    Began a while ago with quotas for the Gifted and Talented [GAT] program

  35. egg_

    Former President George W. Bush said on Thursday that the U.S. needs to “welcome” immigrants and thank them for doing the “jobs that Americans won’t do.”

    The idiot son of the US ruling class.
    Someone should pay him to shut up.

  36. Habib

    MPs across parliament have acknowledged fundamental flaws leading to the execution of Harry ‘Breaker’ Morant and Peter Handcock during the Boer War. Another hobbyhorse myth of the idiot left. Both were war criminals, under British command which had the death penalty, they admitted to murdering unarmed prisoners. I’d have given the order myself, if only to knock on the head any more fuck-awful poetry from that pommy bore.

  37. Shy Ted

    I waz stolen.
    Me too. Only a $75k Ford Mustang will aid in my recovery. And it will close the gap on that SS Commodore in front of me.

  38. LNP insider

    Posted this in tbe old thread but by the time it passed moderation this thread started. For the information of those interested in internal National Party matters:

    Just before this Joyce story broke demoted Nationals backbencher Keith Pitt told his local LNP membership that he was tired of not achieving outcomes for his electorate, broken promises by ministers, staffers becoming politicians, the Nationals’ leaders office leaking against him and that he wanted permission to
    “throw out the toys” and go public about his disatisfaction.

    Warren Truss at the meeting cautioned against that talk and said he and the local membership would never support Mr Pitt leaving the Nationals going to the crossbench.

    Interestingly Mr Pitt had been ringing around supporters telling them about Barnaby’s baby.

    Funnily enough Mr Pitt was satisfied to keep quiet while an assistant minister….

    Lots of issues inside the Nats. Four groups emerging. The Barmaby loyalists (Canavan, Landry, Scullion, O’Brien, Littleproud, Drum etc), the angry Queenslanders (O’Sullivan, Pitt, Christensen), the Victorians and friends (Chester, McKenzie and some scattered from other states) and the McCormack people (mainly NSW MPs).

    Very interesting to hear Wacka Williams this morning.

  39. OldOzzie

    INDIGENOUS – Uluru Statement voice must be in Constitution

    Lawyers and academics who crafted the Uluru Statement have rounded on suggestions its proposed indigenous “voice” to parliament need not be enshrined in the Constitution, warning it is the best practical approach for reforming the foundering Closing the Gap strategy.

    Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt and prime ministerial indigenous affairs adviser Chris Sarra each said that while the proposed body was still being considered, it would be done through legislation only, not by a referendum.

    But Referendum Council co-chair Mark Leibler warned that indigenous Australia would “not countenance the substitution of what was a unanimous outpouring at Uluru”.

    The indigenous constitutional convention at Uluru last year gathered about 250 delegates from across the nation, who concluded the “voice” would be a way of having input into government decision-making by way of non-binding advice and was the best form of indigenous constitutional recognition.

    Constitutionally enshrining the body, they concluded, would require the government of the day to make its case should it decide to disband it and it would be unlikely to do so unilaterally, as John Howard did with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission in 2005.

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten is expected to announce further plans for backing the constitutionally enshrined proposal when he delivers his reply to Malcolm Turnbull’s Closing the Gap speech in parliament later today.

    Referendum Council co-chair Pat Anderson and members Noel Pearson and Megan Davis said that “whatever the merits of a legislated body, it would not amount to indigenous constitutional recognition”.

    “We live in a country that gives 500,000 Tasmanians 12 senators inside the commonwealth parliament according to a Federation deal struck in the Australian Constitution in 1901,” the trio said.

    “And yet 117 years later do we seriously think the Australian people would reject the proposition that 600,000 indigenous Australians should not have a constitutionally recognised body outside of the commonwealth parliament? If they did then the country would not be serious about recognition.”

    Aboriginal lawyer Teela Reid, a participant at the Uluru convention who took Mr Turnbull to task late year on the ABC’s Q&A program for his abrupt dismissal of the recommendation, was fiery in her response to yesterday’s suggestion.

    Ms Reid said it indicated a “lack of good faith, low expectations and continual contempt of the Turnbull government towards indigenous peoples”.

    “The government’s failure to Close the Gap demonstrates the urgency for substantial law reform (and) the Uluru Statement provided a realistic and modest road map to achieve this,” she said.

    Mr Wyatt confirmed the government was, however, enthusiastic about the other recommendation from the Uluru process, which was a Makarrata commission to oversee treaty-making and a truth-telling process.

    “I think the opportunity is still there for things to be on the table for us to talk about, I get no sense that anything else is locked out other than just the enshrined voice,” he told Sky News at the weekend.

    CLOSING THE GAP PROGRESS REPORT

    * Close the gap in life expectancy by 2031: On track with overall mortality rate down 15 per cent (from 1998 to 2015).

    * Halve the gap in child mortality by 2018: Down 33 per cent (between 1998 and 2015).

    * Have 95 per cent of all indigenous four-year-olds enrolled in early childhood education by 2025: On track.

    * Close the gap in school attendance by the end of 2018: Little progress.

    * Halve the gap in reading and numeracy for indigenous students by 2018: On track in the ACT and Tasmania.

    * Halve the gap in Year 12 attainment by 2020: On track.

    * Halve the gap in employment by 2018: On track in NSW.

    Comments overall so far not complimentary

  40. egg_

    There is perhaps no more contradictory policy than pushing big ­immigration via porous borders while complaining about resource scarcity.

    But the Greens will be impervious to her logic. It will all be declared to be achievable via more government funding.

    Those from third world sh1tholes are used to Energy as a scarce resource?

  41. Mak Siccar

    Groan! Hot from the Oz.

    MPs to examine indigenous recognition
    Australian Associated Press12:57PM February 12, 2018

    A parliamentary committee will soon be established to investigate recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the constitution.

    Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the committee, which has the backing of the federal opposition, will bring together the earlier work of the Referendum Council and other expert panels.

    “We can now progress this important matter,” Mr Turnbull told parliament on Monday.

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said the committee should focus on establishing a constitutionally enshrined indigenous voice to parliament, which was rejected by the Turnbull cabinet last year.

    “In this place we don’t get to choose what the people tell us, in this place we listen to what the people want us and we implement their choice,” Mr Shorten told parliament.

    Mr Shorten pledged to legislate an indigenous voice to parliament if there wasn’t a bipartisan commitment to hold a referendum.

    “I say to the prime minister and the government – we will work with you, but we will not wait for you,” he said.

  42. OldOzzie

    Barnaby Joyce derails Coalition just as PM was back in the polls

    There was a moment on Friday afternoon when it seemed clear that Barnaby Joyce’s political career probably is finished. You could see the blood draining from Malcolm Turnbull’s face, you could read the justified curses in his mind, and feel the momentum of the Coalition’s mini-fightback falling into a black hole of tawdry mundanity that should never even figure in matters of national leadership.

    But that is what the Deputy Prime Minister had done. Forget the issues of character, trust and morality that are none of our business — we can never know the inner workings of anyone else’s relationships — but Barnaby’s poor judgment and poor management had allowed his personal life to derail his government.

    So on Friday afternoon the Prime Minister was hosting the formal media conference with all the state and territory leaders after the Council of Australian Governments meeting — usually a wonky, high-minded, policy-orientated event — and he was asked about Barnaby, or more specifically, whether everything was “above board” when it came to the job switches and promotions for his girlfriend and former staffer Vicki Campion.

    Turnbull was having none of it. “Can we just focus on COAG, we’ve got Closing the Gap, we’ve got health, we’ve got schools,” he protested.

    Here was the leader of the nation reduced to the tedious, low-rent dance of avoiding questions triggered by another man’s personal imprudence. Turnbull would have hated it — and understandably so.

    The journalists came back to the issue. “Prime Minister, can I ask, did you, can you confirm that you personally counselled Barnaby Joyce to remove a staff member from his office, a staff member he was having an affair with?”

    Zing. A question that went directly not just to the Prime Minister’s Office and staffing approval but to his alleged personal counselling of his deputy.

    “I was asked about this matter this morning and I’ve got nothing to add…” he said dismissively, but “not that question” interrupted the journalist as Turnbull continued, “…to what I said this morning.”

    Yet the Prime Minister had studiously avoided the issues of staffing that morning. “I don’t want to add to the public discussion about it,” he had said, expressing concern for Joyce’s family.

    There have been more questions since. There have been more revelations. This will get worse for the government — regardless of the fact other MPs have been involved in similar scandals (most notably Labor’s parliamentary manager Tony Burke, whose marriage apparently ended when his staffer, Skye Laris, became his partner and his chief of staff).

    So what has the Deputy Prime Minister done to the government, apart from provide an unholy distraction? Turnbull’s start to the year had been better than he could have hoped, largely because of a bit of luck.

    Labor was helping him by dancing with the Greens on loony Left ideas such as shifting the date of Australia Day and blocking the Adani coal mine. Labor had also exposed itself as duplicitous and vulnerable on the dual citizenship issue, with Susan Lamb and Justine Keay refusing to resign or refer themselves to the High Court, despite all the evidence suggesting they were ineligible for parliament when they nominated for last year’s election. And Donald Trump’s tax cut victory in the US has not only helped to boost global economic growth estimates but bolstered Turnbull’s key argument for tax cuts.

    The Coalition had started to inch back in the polls. This had happened in the way it was always going to happen — lost voters on the right fringe who had parked their intentions with One Nation were starting to drift back. The Nationals Leader, as the pre-eminent social conservative in the government, is a crucial running mate for Turnbull in reassuring conservative voters they can come back to the Coalition. Can Barnaby be that person any more, or has he destroyed his own brand and that of the social conservatives? In an ugly saga said to be bereft of winners, people might have forgotten about Cory Bernardi and Pauline Hanson.

    The fact we have not seen Turnbull blow up in public yet, frankly, surprises me. He has every right to — he has been let down by foolishness. I have been disappointed by his prime ministership and critical of his lack of policy differentiation. But Turnbull could always argue that his strategy has been one of calm and steady progress so that he might be re-elected by a reassured electorate.

    About a week ago this strategy was starting to pay dividends. It had been blown off course last year by the silly citizenship oversights of the Deputy Prime Minister and others. Having weathered by-elections and turmoil over same sex marriage, Turnbull was just getting into his stride this year — daring to dream he could break his now ominous run of losing Newspolls — and he has been tripped over by Barnaby’s strides around his ankles.

    This imperils the government’s standing, jeopardises Turnbull’s self-imposed Newspoll imperative, angers conservative voters and could increase the chances of leadership instability and/or an eventual election loss. Thanks Barnaby.

    In public affairs the personal can be political. Therefore the personal can have an impact all the way up the tree on the good governance of this nation.

    Putting personal issues aside for the professional, Joyce and Campion failed to manage the employment situation properly — they needed to make sure there was no question of public funding for private convenience — and they also failed to manage the public release of information about what was always going to be a matter of public interest.

    The extent of involvement from the Prime Minister and his office is still unknown. But on Friday afternoon, under the glare of cameras and questions, Turnbull was put in a terrible spot. A Deputy who puts a Prime Minister in that sort of position is not one that can be easily tolerated.

  43. C.L.

    So what Shorten is saying is that Aborigines are too stupid to be elected to Parliament.

  44. Confused Old Misfit

    Please Cats, stop for a moment and consider poor Steve Kates and me. Not only do we have to own up to the fact that the country of our birth also spawned Justin Trudeau but now there is this:

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-february-9-2018-1.4527912/gay-at-the-games-how-canada-is-hosting-pride-house-a-safe-space-for-lgbt-athletes-at-the-olympics-1.4528002

  45. Leigh Lowe

    I stolen to brudda.
    Where my cash.

  46. Let’s just pause to take that in: …

    The Liberal Party now wants to ban selective schools.

    The Liberals are to a man urban bugmen through and through. Without a doubt.

  47. “Be the Autists we know you are”

    JC, have you been reading 8Chan? It appears that you were right about 8Chan being a bunch of brilliant autists.

    The corresponding comment might be off the mark, but the images reveal interesting takes on why no arrests have taken place and why the media is suddenly swooning over North Korea. What sort of idiot thinks cheering North Korea makes Trump rather than themselves look bad?

    Not buying the CIA controlling North Korean nukes though. I think I can safely call that a miss.

  48. OldOzzie

    Former RSL chief Don Rowe’s ‘shameful’ rort

    The former president of the NSW RSL engaged in “shameful and disgraceful” behaviour by misusing hundreds of thousands of dollars on his corporate credit card, and has been referred to the NSW Police Force for investigation following an independent inquiry into the organisation.

    A report by former NSW Supreme Court judge Patricia Bergin, released today, has made 26 recommendations following a year-long investigation into RSL NSW, RSL Welfare and Benevolent Institution, and RSL Lifecare.

    The inquiry found Don Rowe spend $465,376 on his RSL credit card between 2009 and 2014 and allowed his son to stay, rent free, in RSL-owned accommodation in the Sydney CBD for seven years.

    Ms Bergin has referred the activities of 13 current and former NSW RSL State Councillors to ASIC and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission over Mr Rowe’s conduct, and is referring eight former and current RSL Lifecare officials to ASIC and the ACNC over their own conduct.

    “As for Mr Rowe, whose reprehensible conduct was a catalyst for the exposure of so many problems within each of the organisations,” Ms Bergin wrote in the final, 700-page report, “there is a recommendation for a much wider NSW Police investigation surrounding his misuse of RSL NSW funds and the circumstances of his departure.”

    James Brown, current president of RSL NSW, said no money raised by the organisation would be kept this Anzac Day, rather, it would go to the Invictus Games.

    “We have lost our way in the last decade,” he said. “We accept the findings of Ms Bergin.”

    Mr Brown said larger branches of the RSL will provide funding for smaller, regional members in the meantime. He hoped the organisation would be able to start fundraising again by Remembrance Day on November 11.

    NSW Minister for Better Regulation Matt Lean said the “old guard” of the NSW RSL had almost taken the organisation to the “brink of destruction”. “There’s no double the RSL has been through a devastating experience as the astonishing level or rorting, cover-ups and cronyism was exposed for all to see,” he said. “With James Brown and Andrew Condon now stepping to the plate to take the RSL into the new era, I’m confident trust can be restored.”

    Minister for Veterans Affairs David Elliott said the actions of Mr Rowe and others mean the good work the NSW RSL and NSW Government have been doing have been forgotten.

    “Over the course of the last decade all the good work has been ignored,” he said.

    More broadly, Ms Bergin made a number of recommendations that may, if adopted, impact other charities. She recommended NSW Fair Trading and the ACNC develop “clear guidelines” for charities in respect of political donations and attendance at political functions.

    She also recommended a unified regime for charitable fundraising.

    “It is recommended that consideration be given to the introduction of a single, unified Australian statutory regime for the regulation of charitable fundraising,” she wrote.

    There were 35 witnesses over 32 days of public hearings in the inquiry.

  49. None

    All the SSM activists are now rallying around the Uluru apartheid statements. Bouyed by bullying Australians into gay marriage by spreading the falsehood of marriage inequality among the ignorant who then rushed to virtue signal by voting yes in a non binding postal survey (now used as a millstone around necks of dissenters) while 52% voted no or nothing, they hope to achieve the same with this abominable falsehood that there are no indigenous voices in parliament (hello Mr Wyatt, Mr Dodson, Ms Burney etc…too bad if Aboriginals are OVER represented in federal parliament now).
    I cannot believe the country of my birth is now pushing for institutionalised apartheid.

  50. thefrolickingmole

    Turnmerkel just cant wait to jump on the next “doctors wives” hot issues.

    Not content with his victory in the battle of the Buggery, he seeks to send the Constitution “over the top” towards the serried ranks of crooks, spivs and 1/32 bloods waiting behind their Barbed grievances and litigation nests.

    When hes wiped his ass on it he will declare victory in our time, and throw more funding at a behavioral, not an economic problem.

  51. Stimpson J. Cat

    “Be the Autists we know you are”

    We are in the best timeline ever.
    Just outrageous.

  52. testpattern

    #BarnabyLionOfArabia

    This is not the man’s fault. I would advise all women in Parliament House to dress more modestly. Burqas Abayas and Mortein underarm will kill a man’s interest like Louie the Fly. If they dress like raw meat what man would not pounce like an Arabian lion? What man would not think look at that delicious lamb chop, that uncovered lamb chop, that lamb chop must want to jump into my tongs and onto my Australia Day BBQ? What man would not think look at that spicy sausage displaying herself like a Boer’s best worst, just perfect for my election campaign sausage sizzle? What man would not sing to himself how much is that hotdog in the window, the one with the uncovered meat and waggly tail? Sheikh McHilali has already given us the best of all guidances on this important matter –

    ‘If you take out uncovered meat and place it outside … without cover, and the cats come to eat it … whose fault is it, the cats’ or the uncovered meat’s? The uncovered meat is the problem. If she was in her room, in her home, in her hijab [the headdress worn by some Muslim women], no problem would have occurred.’

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2006/oct/26/australia.marktran

  53. Leigh Lowe

    From the Oz. What can they do – bring them both back to life? Those two men were responsible for shooting unarmed Boers, who were obeying the British call to surrender themselves, give their parole , take the oath of allegiance to the British Crown and take no further part in the fighting. Two of them were twelve year old boys.

    I was so fucking excited when I saw the footage of Bryan Brown in front of a firing squad.
    I was more than a little disappointed when I discovered it was just a fillem.

  54. Diogenes

    There are three Sydney schools — Northern Beaches Secondary College, Normanhurst Boys’ High and Hornsby Girls’ High — where four out of five students are classified as being in the top quartile.

    At Normanhurst and Hornsby, which prides itself on its diverse multicultural population, just 1 per cent of students are considered to be in the bottom quartile.

    Well for those 3 schools …. well durrrrr !!!

    I have had a quick shufti on myschools at the local non selective primary schools looking at their ICSEA (bottm to top)
    Hornsby Heights School Distribution 6% 17% 34% 44%
    Hornsby North School Distribution 2% 8% 24% 65%
    Hornsby South chool Distribution 4% 14% 35% 47%

    Mona Vale Public 4% 20% 34% 41% and non selective Pittwater High
    ool Distribution 8% 23% 35% 34%

  55. Boambee John

    Zulu at 1305

    From the Oz. What can they do – bring them both back to life? Those two men were responsible for shooting unarmed Boers, who were obeying the British call to surrender themselves, give their parole , take the oath of allegiance to the British Crown and take no further part in the fighting. Two of them were twelve year old boys.

    On Morant’s order, Handcock murdered a German missionary who witnessed some of the shootings and his black servant.

    Was this matter brought to the attention of aParliament?

  56. I was watching Turnbull’s speech in which he was schooling us on the ‘complexity’ of aboriginal culture and language. I said , Dad, when Cook arrived there wasn’t a single store in this land, to which Dad replied, Store? There wasn’t even a pair of pants.

  57. Mak Siccar

    None
    #2634765, posted on February 12, 2018 at 1:28 pm

    See my earlier post re establishment of a parley committee for indig recognition.

  58. johanna

    Constitutionally enshrining the body, they concluded, would require the government of the day to make its case should it decide to disband it and it would be unlikely to do so unilaterally, as John Howard did with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission in 2005.

    So disbanding the corrupt, wasteful gravy train called ATSIC was a bad thing? These people are only jealous that it wasn’t there for them to get on it.

    ATSIC’s thieving, boozing, gambling and all-round rorting was well known. Some of its members were classic Big Men, who regarded the public purse and their own communities as spoils of war, to be distributed among favourites and family. There were plenty of allegations of sexual assault, and assault generally, by its members.

    The hotel where they often stayed in Canberra was near my work at the time, and by 3pm they were in the bar, putting everything on the taxpayer’s account. Life consisted of flying around the country business class, staying at the best hotels, and fostering grievances wherever they went.

    Yeah, just what we want to enshrine in the Constitution.

    We already have all that with the Parliament. They just want an easier track to the trough.

  59. OldOzzie

    Labor to attack Coalition over Barnaby Joyce, staffer travel

    Malcolm Turnbull is facing a rapidly accelerating political crisis over Barnaby Joyce’s relationship with a former staffer and her allocation to ministerial offices.

    The Prime Minister is at risk of being at the end of a “travel rorts” series of questions seeking to tie him and his office to the transfer of the staffer to the offices of other Nationals. The perception of the possibility of misuse or at least inappropriate use of taxpayer funds is now established in the public mind.

    Declarations from the Prime Minister’s office or from Ministers, such as Simon Birmingham this morning, that there was been nothing untoward and the staffing changes went through “all the normal processes” does not deflect the politics of the unravelling web.

    Labor will direct its questions straight to Turnbull now and demand to know what he or his office knew about the transfers. It doesn’t matter whether there wasn’t anything untoward, in the theatre of Parliament merely asking the questions and connecting Turnbull to the public disquiet is damaging.

    If indeed the “normal processes” were followed, it is almost certain the Prime Minister’s office knew of the transfer and approved it. If not, and the Nationals approved the move, which Nationals’ office did so?

    Barely 12 months into his new Government John Howard ultimately lost three ministers and two staffers, including his long-term friend, Grahame Morris, over the “travel rorts affair” when Labor started to ask who knew what and when.

    Morris recognised he was the link to Howard over the Ministerial mistakes on travel allowances and declarations. He also knew he had to go to protect Howard.

    Turnbull’s overly optimistic interpretation of the beginning of the year for the Coalition is threatening to unravel as Labor pulls at the political threads of Joyce’s personal drama.

    Labor is not attacking over the affair but whether it led to the misuse of taxpayer funds and who authorised it?

    Turnbull’s best shirt-sharing buddy from the night of the New England by-election could rapidly find himself without a shirt on his back if the Prime Minister is endangered and that’s what Labor is aiming at.

  60. Do you find it a waste of time that you spent probably no less than 100 hours last year posting your (weird) ideas and theories about Trump being imprisoned and being a Russian agent and hollywood style scenarios of him being taken down by plucky uncorruptable FBI agents….

    and not one bit of that happened?

    In fact the exact opposite has happened he’s riding high and the FBI and democrats are now on trial for spying on his campaign ( as I predicted).

    Don’t you look back and think “boy, that was a terrible waste of time I was so wrong”?

    “Riding high”… yeah not so much. He’s heading for a bigly thrashing at the upcoming midterms. Republicans are the only ones to be indicted so far in the Russia thing, with many more to come.

    Dubbya was “riding high” there for a long time based on lies and pretence. It’s a long-established pattern for you lot by now. Where is Trump’s potential for greatness? He’s blown out the deficit like all right-wingers do, apart from that there’s very little to show for a year in office. It doesn’t get any better from here.

  61. Tom

    LNP insider
    #2634753, posted on February 12, 2018 at 1:19 pm

    For the information of those interested in internal National Party matters:

    Fascinating. Don’t be a stranger, Insider. Too much information will barely be enough.

  62. testpattern

    ‘Georgiana Molloy Anglican School book ban: works by William Shakespeare and Tim Winton may be among those withdrawn from curriculum’

    ‘English teachers at the Busselton school were told on Thursday to audit books — understood to include Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and works by Winton such as Cloudstreet and Breath — for sexual references and vulgar language.’

    A ban on Winton is long overdue. I sensed that Wintonmania had peaked in the last semester of 2017 when my son’s Lit teacher entertained them with a rant about how only little old ladies who drink wine read Winton, who in any case had only written one good text and that was his first one.

    https://thewest.com.au/news/education/georgiana-molloy-anglican-school-book-ban-works-by-william-shakespeare-and-tim-winton-may-be-among-those-withdrawn-from-curriculum-ng-b88741175z

  63. testpattern

    ‘The hotel where they often stayed in Canberra was near my work at the time’

    Over the road probably. Brats.

  64. OldOzzie

    South Australia’s 100 Most Influential –
    81 – 100
    Who are SA’s most influential people? Tap the pictures to find out.

    Julia Gillard No 83

    H/T Tim Blair Blog

    THOSE HORRIBLE CONSERVATIVE MISOGYNISTS CAN’T STOP HER NOW

    The ceaseless rise of global political powerhouse Julia Gillard continues.

    Look at her go! Our former Labor Prime Minister is now rated as the 83rd most influential person in South Australia, behind Jenny Paradiso but ahead of Nev Kitchin.

  65. Tom

    He’s heading for a bigly thrashing at the upcoming midterms.

    Hahaha! Thanks, Monty. I’ll read your 2018 wrongology file back to you in November.

  66. Boambee John

    Constitutionally enshrining the body, they concluded, would require the government of the day to make its case should it decide to disband it and it would be unlikely to do so unilaterally, as John Howard did with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission in 2005.

    Labor supported disbandment of ATSIC, so it was hardly unilateral.

  67. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    On Morant’s order, Handcock murdered a German missionary who witnessed some of the shootings and his black servant.

    Was this matter brought to the attention of aParliament?

    The South African historian Charles Leach (who lives in that part of the Transvaal, and who’s book “The Legend Of Breaker Morant Is Dead and Buried” is essential reading) estimates the death toll at being far higher, but “No – one counted Africans.”

    The problem is that the film may make a good court room drama, but it bears very little relationship to the actual truth.

  68. Stimpson J. Cat

    When is Trump going to jail Monty?
    The same day to you go to Malmo?

  69. testpattern

    ‘WESTERN AUSTRALIA

    As Tony Thomas noted:’

    He’s full of shit. Every family of firsts in WA have their file, documents that span a century and chronicle the changing face of WA racism, including the stealing of children based on skin colour. My wife’s WA part of the family have some 500pp of documents and we have copies. One rellie was saved because the doctor sent to the reserve found the child [baby] too young to determine what the eventual skin colour would be and postponed any action.

  70. I don’t think they will actually send Trump to jail, Stimpy. He’s a white collar criminal, they always get handled differently. Many of his subordinates will get time in pokey though. It’s hard to find one of them who hasn’t already resigned in disgrace or is going to by the end of the year.

  71. OldOzzie

    m0nty
    #2634777, posted on February 12, 2018 at 1:42 pm
    “Riding high”… yeah not so much. He’s heading for a bigly thrashing at the upcoming midterms. Republicans are the only ones to be indicted so far in the Russia thing, with many more to come.

    Explain

    Description: 12/12/2017 Order of Judge Sullivan in US v. Flynn

    Accordingly, the Court,
    sua sponte,
    directs the government to produce to defendant in a timely manner – including during plea negotiations
    1
    – any evidence in its possession that isfavorable to defendant and material either to defendant’s guilt or punishment. The government is further directed to produce all discoverable evidence in a readily usable form. For example, the government must produce documents as they are kept in the usual course of business or must organize and label themclearly. The government must also produce electronically stored information in a formin which it is ordinarily maintained unless the formis not readily usable, in which case the government is directed to produce it in a readily usable form. If the information already exists or was memorialized in a tangible format, such as a document or recording, the information shall be produced in that format. If the information does not exist in such a format and, as a result, the government is providing the information in a summary format, the summary must include sufficient detail and specificity to enable the defense to assess its relevance and potential usefulness. Finally, if the government has identified any information which is favorable to the defendant but which the government believes not to be material, the government shall submit such information to the Court for
    in camera
    review.
    SO ORDERED
    .
    Signed
    :
    Emmet G. Sullivan

    United States District Judge December 12, 201

  72. Roger;

    “We have every right as a nation to say we’ll make decisions in our own best interests, in the best interests of our economy and our environment.” Tanya Plibersek.

    Beggars can’t be choosers, Tanya.

    Roger, she isn’t making decisions for Australia, she’s making them for her ideology.

  73. Yes OldOzzie, Flynn is a Republican, and he was indicted, and that is a routine order required by law as reported in this story.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-russia-flynn/u-s-judge-orders-special-counsel-to-turn-over-evidence-on-michael-flynn-idUSKBN1E62YJ

  74. duncanm

    Fairfax trying to ramp up bleating about coal-induced-climate rainfall in the upper Hunter.

    Fortunately, the Hunter Valley was established fairly early in the scheme of things, and there’s over a hundred year’s of rainfall records publicly available on the BOM which show no significant change in annual rainfall.

  75. Des Deskperson

    “So disbanding the corrupt, wasteful gravy train called ATSIC was a bad thing? These people are only jealous that it wasn’t there for them to get on it.”

    Johanna, another thing about ATSIC the bureaucracy was that it was, ironically, a career killer for Indigenous APS employees.

    There was a general belief among APS managers, born of experience, that anyone who had come up through ATSIC was likely to have developed bad working habits from being exposed to a workplace culture based on a sense of entitlement and the racism of low expectations. These assumptions tended also to apply more generally to anyone who had worked for too long in the ‘Indigenous’ unit of any line agency.

    This stigma was unfair to many intelligent and hardworking individual Indigenous APS employees, but it reflected a collective truth. Racist, perhaps, except that whiteys who had worked in ATSIC – I had to take a couple on a transfer once – also tended to develop slapdash and entitled work habits.

  76. Oh I see OldOzzie, you’ve been reading the fevered imaginings of Conservative Treehouse. That stuff rots your brain you know. It’s the same rubbish as birtherism and 9/11 trooferism. Don’t get sucked in.

  77. egg_

    Turnmerkel just cant wait to jump on the next “doctors wives” hot issues.

    He needs a BIG UNITY distraction squirrel such as an “Abo voice”* to distract from Bananababy for the week.

    *The Abo Industry doesn’t have a big enough voice as it is?
    We can’t get the Magic Aborigines to shut their traps, Linda Burney being the latest Federal loudmouth because shutup!

  78. OldOzzie

    m0nty
    #2634797, posted on February 12, 2018 at 2:05 pm
    Oh I see OldOzzie, you’ve been reading the fevered imaginings of Conservative Treehouse. That stuff rots your brain you know. It’s the same rubbish as birtherism and 9/11 trooferism. Don’t get sucked in.

    Monty, as against your ravings, I find their assessments, lucid, well structured, and as time progresses, turning out to be pertinently correct in their assessments – vs say CNN or Washington Post, NY Times – Leak Chambers of the Democrats – sorta like FauxFax and Labor ABC

  79. It is fascinating that the conspiracy theory forming at places like Conservative Treehouse (favourite of USSR) is based around the ultimate kingpin being James Baker, former Reagan CoS, Bush the Elder SoS and manager of Bush the Younger’s Florida recount team. You have to be pretty dumb to believe that he is the new Democrat uber-Kissinger.

  80. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2634797, posted on February 12, 2018 at 2:05 pm
    Oh I see OldOzzie, you’ve been reading the fevered imaginings of Conservative Treehouse. That stuff rots your brain you know. It’s the same rubbish as birtherism and 9/11 trooferism. Don’t get sucked in.

    Memeorandum is soooo muuuch moore reliable?

  81. egg_

    “We have every right as a nation to say we’ll make decisions in our own best interests, in the best interests of our economy and our environment.” Tanya Plibersek.

    Telegram from Gaia: “I don’t need your help, thanks.”

  82. egg_

    Labor to attack Coalition over Barnaby Joyce, staffer travel

    The ALP bruvvas would be on very thin ice.

  83. thefrolickingmole

    testpattern

    Yet somehow all the cases tried on so far have failed…
    Encouraged any middle class values lately, or are you still stuck in the “misery and bad lifestyle habits are authentic Aboriginality” mindset again?

  84. Habib

    The SFL won’t return fire despite having more ammo than a Nork bunker, they’re either too stupid or too gutless, or more likely both. They deserve to be roundly trounced by Labor, it’s like watching two derros punching on, one’s blind from metho but has both arms and legs, the other has no limbs, and keeps hollering “over here, you missed me”.

  85. OldOzzie

    Victorian MP subjected to Greens’ ‘war criminal’ slurs

    Victorian MP Peter Khalil has hit out at the Greens for attacking Senator Jim Molan as a potential war criminal, claiming that he too was the subject of similar slurs under a Greens doorknocking campaign during the 2016 Federal election.

    In a fiery speech to parliament, Mr Khalil accused the Greens of ignorance and attempting to mislead the public for the sake of a cheap political attack by calling Senator Molan a “coward” and suggesting he could have committed war crimes.

    Mr Khalil, Labor member for Wills, said Senator Molan should be disciplined for sharing a video posted by a British far-right group “Britain First” but reserved his angriest comments for the Greens, who he said had also used war criminal allegations to target him in the 2016 Federal campaign.

    “I remember after the last election people saying to me that Greens doorknockers had told them that I was a war criminal for having served in Iraq. And I thought it was just what people were saying, and then I found out more information which lead me to believe it was actually part of their doorknocking script,” he told The Australian.

    “And so when these sorts of accusations came up with Jim, the first thing I thought was ‘well, this sounds familiar.”

    The comments come after Greens Melbourne MP Adam Bandt was forced to publicly apologise last after making comments that Senator Molan would “probably be up for prosecution” if there was ever a review into his conduct leading troops in Iraq.

    In parliament this morning, Mr Khalil accused the Greens of impugning Senator Molan and thousands of Australian veterans who had served in Iraq and were still serving overseas.

    He also accused the party of ignorance and attempting to equate Australian soldiers and serviceman with some of the Iraqi regime’s most brutal generals and dictators.

    “The attacks on Senator Molan’s record as a soldier and the imputation that he committed war crimes by the Member for Melbourne, Adam Bandt, and Senator Di Natale were utterly disgraceful,” Mr Khalil said.

    “Either these members of the Greens political party made these statements of moral outrage born of ignorance of Fallujah, or worse, they knew the facts yet still confected a moral outrage in order to launch a base political attack.

    “Either way, the outcome is the same. They not only impugn the record of Senator Molan’s military service to this country, but equally deride the service of thousands of veterans and current serving men and women in the ADF. They also debase themselves in the process.

    “But this is not new, Deputy Speaker. During the 2016 election campaign, Green Party activists went door to door in my electorate and told constituents that because I was in Iraq, I was a war criminal.”

    The attack comes as Victorian Labor amps up its campaign against the Greens for the by-election in the seat of Batman, which neighbours Mr Khalil’s inner Melbourne seat of Wills.

    Mr Khalil is regarded as an expert on Iraqi security affairs and served as director of national security policy for the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq in 2003, and later as a foreign policy adviser to Prime Minister Kevin Rudd before winning the seat of Wills in 2016.

    During his 2016 campaign for Wills, a pamphlet was circulated in the electorate titled “The Truth” which featured a header with his face and a background featuring dripping blood, claims that Mr Khalil was linked to former US President George W. Bush and hawks within his administration.

  86. stackja

    Old ‘news’?

    Gangster accused of swallowing drugs goes three weeks without a …
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk › News
    3 days ago – He is accused of swallowing a drugs stash, and is being kept in custody. Officers have been tweeting updates of what they have described as “poo watch”

  87. egg_

    Victorian MP Peter Khalil has hit out at the Greens for attacking Senator Jim Molan as a potential war criminal, claiming that he too was the subject of similar slurs under a Greens doorknocking campaign during the 2016 Federal election.

    “Colour me pink”.

  88. Memeorandum is soooo muuuch moore reliable?

    BJ, are you aware that Memeorandum is just an automated aggregator, which includes as one of its sources the very site you’re talking about? Or are you as ignorant on that point as on most others.

  89. Habib

    This prick has no shame.

    Given his resume’ the greens were probably pissed off he didn’t embrace their bosom.

  90. johanna

    Des Deskperson
    #2634796, posted on February 12, 2018 at 2:04 pm

    “So disbanding the corrupt, wasteful gravy train called ATSIC was a bad thing? These people are only jealous that it wasn’t there for them to get on it.”

    Johanna, another thing about ATSIC the bureaucracy was that it was, ironically, a career killer for Indigenous APS employees.

    There was a general belief among APS managers, born of experience, that anyone who had come up through ATSIC was likely to have developed bad working habits from being exposed to a workplace culture based on a sense of entitlement and the racism of low expectations. These assumptions tended also to apply more generally to anyone who had worked for too long in the ‘Indigenous’ unit of any line agency.

    This stigma was unfair to many intelligent and hardworking individual Indigenous APS employees, but it reflected a collective truth. Racist, perhaps, except that whiteys who had worked in ATSIC – I had to take a couple on a transfer once – also tended to develop slapdash and entitled work habits.

    True, dat.

    It illustrates the great paradox of ‘positive discrimination’ perfectly.

    When I was in PM&C, the Indigenous unit was next door. While we slaved away for well beyond the minimum hours, and I was reprimanded for nipping out to get a coffee (‘it’s not in our culture’) their desks were never full, often half empty, and there was rarely anyone there after 5pm.

    There is no doubt that anyone who ‘worked’ there was tainted in the eyes of hardworking colleagues. The trouble was, nobody had the guts to pull them into line because racism. I reckon that a lot of them would have been at least of acceptable standard if anyone had created a culture where that was expected. They weren’t all lazy or stupid, by any means. But no-one ever asked where they were all morning or all afternoon, or insisted that they meet deadlines. What do you expect would happen?

  91. Pedro the Ignorant

    Both my grandfather and father were returned servicemen (WW1 and WW2 respectively) and were stalwart supporters and lifelong members of the RSL.

    They would be spinning in their graves over the thieving mongrel President of the NSW RSL who stole nearly half a million dollars meant to support needy diggers.

    I hope he goes to prison for a very long time, his assets stripped to repay the RSL welfare funds and the dodgy board members who either condoned or covered up this thief’s actions are shamed into eternal obscurity.

    What a low dog act.

  92. Bruce of Newcastle

    TP – If you haven’t seen it yet there’s a Browns Range announcement today. Here it is (PDF).

  93. Anne

    Scores of Holistic Doctors, Scientists and Cancer researchers have been murdered.
    The first woman interviewed in this video, Dr Erin Elizabeth has since been found dead. (Wife of Dr Mercola)

    https://youtu.be/dREmueW1yDI

    Big Pharma has brutally suppressed knowledge and availability of cures for the common chronic diseases and cancers. (GcMAF)

    As the Deep State is dismantled these evil CorporatocRats 🐭 will lose their stranglehold on the multi $Trillion dollar Sickness Industry.

    Q drop today on that topic 👉


    732
    Feb 12 2018 11:32:20
    Anonymous
    ID: 91a1c7
    342919
    >>342895
    Q, how long will we have to wait for the cures of cancer and other sicknesses?
    Feb 12 2018 11:38:19
    Q
    !UW.yye1fxo
    ID: 540a54
    343019
    >>342919
    Chatter amongst those in control has begun.
    They know we know which means the public will know.
    Release prior to cover up.
    Public informed and collapse.
    Which option?
    Q

  94. jupes

    Victorian MP Peter Khalil has hit out at the Greens for attacking Senator Jim Molan as a potential war criminal, claiming that he too was the subject of similar slurs under a Greens doorknocking campaign during the 2016 Federal election.

    Wasn’t he also under sniper fire on the tarmac with Hillary Clinton?

  95. egg_

    whiteys who had worked in ATSIC – I had to take a couple on a transfer once – also tended to develop slapdash and entitled work habits.

    It’s da kulcha, not the colour.

  96. Anne

    Another QAnon drop. Touching. 💖

    734
    Feb 12 2018 11:40:54
    Anonymous
    ID: 996020
    343080
    >>342895
    I hope some day Patriots, Vets, and Anons get the respect that we deserve. Marine anons have felt betrayed by the same people we were willing to die to protect.
    I’ve felt lost until you showed up in October.

    Thank you form the depths of my heart
    Feb 12 2018 11:47:06
    Q
    !UW.yye1fxo
    ID: 540a54
    343195
    >>343080
    We are with you, Patriot.
    We honor your service to our great country.
    Without people like you, the world would be lost.
    Godspeed.

    Q

  97. egg_

    likely to have developed bad working habits from being exposed to a workplace culture based on a sense of entitlement and… low expectations.

    There are some very ugly workplace cultures out there in Private Enterprise, too.
    Some blue collar management bruvvas leave a lot to be desired.

  98. thefrolickingmole

    It’s da kulcha, not the colour.

    This needs to be a liberty quote.

  99. egg_

    thefrolickingmole
    #2634820, posted on February 12, 2018 at 2:45 pm

    I’m sure Joe Public wishes the Michael Mansells of this world would STFU.

  100. Boambee John

    m0nty at 1423

    Or are you as ignorant on that point as on most others.

    This from the site’s resident wrongologist?? LOL.

  101. dopey

    Drug that kills the flu in 24 hours.
    Vinegar will kill it in 24 seconds.

  102. stackja

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2634825, posted on February 12, 2018 at 2:55 pm
    This is what we are up against folks – Vogue Magazine.

    Anna Wintour
    Dame Anna Wintour DBE (/ˈwɪntər/; born 3 November 1949) is a British-American journalist and editor. She has been editor-in-chief of Vogue since 1988. In 2013, she became artistic director for Condé Nast, Vogue’s publisher.

    Condé Nasty?

  103. Bruce

    Then, there’s the old Morosi-era joke:

    “A tourism campaign with a Queensland twist;

    “See Cairns in June”.

  104. Louis

    So someone on here honestly believes ‘big pharma’ are murdering ‘holistic’ doctors etc.. (btw I don’t think that word means what you think it means) to cover-up the fact that they already have a cure for cancer??? Is this like cancer caner or the CIA created cancer?

    A cure and subsequent vaccine for cancer or any other big health killer would make big pharma far richer than any money made from current medications.

    The savings such drugs would provide the many socialized health care systems around the world (Aus, Can, Europe, England) would have them collectively willing to pay trillions. Not to mention the financial sodomy that would come their way from class action lawsuits if it were true. I mean the amount of tears that would flow from Jimmy Kimmel alone would cause a second great flood.

  105. johanna

    They would be spinning in their graves over the thieving mongrel President of the NSW RSL who stole nearly half a million dollars meant to support needy diggers.

    It is part of the inevitable life history of voluntary movements. Either they just wither and die, or they latch on to ways of making life more comfortable for their officeholders, who once worked for nothing.

    Just look at registered clubs in NSW, which I grew up with. Mostly established in just before or just after WWII, they began on a shoestring to further aims like support for veterans, local sport, trade union members and so on. By the late 1960s, thanks to poker machines, rivers of cash began to flow through, attracting the usual suspects. They leveraged their tax-free status, donations to local organisations and political connections and became behemoths chock full of well paid executives. Not to mention their connections to organised crime for contracts, money laundering and all the rest.

    The problems exposed in the RSL are just the tip of the iceberg, and not only within the RSL, which has plenty of well paid executives and lucrative contracts to hand out. It extends into many other originally voluntary outfits like major charities and sporting organisations.

  106. Mother Lode

    But the Greens will be impervious to her logic. It will all be declared to be achievable via more government funding.

    In my experience rank and file Greens are none too bright.

    But they have faith. They really believe they are following bright people and place great trust in them. Even if they cannot see through problems they believe in the visionaries can, and in the final denouement providence will vindicate their faith.

    Fuckwits, the lot of them.

  107. johanna

    Stimpson, that is child pron, pure and simple.

    I would bet my house that this kid will not make it to age 50. He/she is product of a culture that makes Michael Jackson’s upbringing look like the Brady Bunch.

    Sick, sick, sick.

    Meanwhile, a grown man touching a grown woman’s knee is sexual assault.

    Stop the world, etc.

  108. The Nigella Appreciation Society™ gives thanks to whoever posted a link to The Gastronomic Goddess on the Old Fred.

  109. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Then, there’s the old Morosi-era joke:

    “A “Morosi” is a loose screw that holds a Cabinet together.”

  110. johanna

    Bruce of Newcastle, could you please decipher the story at RobertS’s link at 2.59 about a hydrogen power plant in South Australia?

    I have read it twice and can’t make head nor tail of it. The only thing I get is a strong smell of boondoggle.

  111. Boambee John

    The other Morosi joke relates to something that could reach from Cairns to Junie.

  112. H B Bear

    So someone on here honestly believes ‘big pharma’ are murdering ‘holistic’ doctors etc..

    Relax. It’s just Anne.
    Anne is a crank.
    Don’t be like Anne.

  113. Shy Ted

    The only certainties in life are death and taxes and Kevin Rudd will have never had a bit on the side.

  114. Boambee John

    dopey
    #2634827, posted on February 12, 2018 at 2:57 pm
    Drug that kills the flu in 24 hours.
    Vinegar will kill it in 24 seconds.

    Once sorted out a bad head cold with a whiff of anhydrous ammonia. Mixed the beaker with that containing distilled water, took a sniff to check which was which.

  115. The Barking Toad

    Saw Kevni ranting on at the press club.

    Fuck, he’s larded up.

  116. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get to first base’: Jacqui Lambie reveals she’s on Tinder – but admits her first few dates ‘haven’t been pretty’

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5377769/Tasmanian-MP-Jacqui-Lambie-Tinder.html#ixzz56rhneHPb
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    You wouldn’t be that desperate, surely?

  117. Top Ender

    Surgeon fatally punched after row over smoking, court told

    Cardio and thoracic surgeon Patrick Pritzwald-Stegmann was standing in a Melbourne hospital foyer with his arms and hands pointed downwards when Joseph Esmaili fatally punched him in the face after an argument about smoking on hospital grounds, a court has heard.

    Mr Esmaili is charged with manslaughter over the death of Mr Pritzwald-Stegmann who died last June, four weeks after the attack at Box Hill Hospital on May 30.

    Crown prosecutor Mark Gibson SC told the Melbourne Magistrates Court today that Pritzwald-Stegmann was leaving the hospital after his shift when he saw Mr Esmaili and others smoking in a designated non-smoking area on hospital grounds.

    Mr Gibson said Pritzwald-Stegmann returned inside and asked the receptionist to call security.

    He said Mr Esmaili walked into the hospital around this time and spoke with Mr Pritzwald-Stegmann.

    The flower tribute at the front of the Box Hill Hospital last year. Picture: Yuri Kouzmin
    The flower tribute at the front of the Box Hill Hospital last year. Picture: Yuri Kouzmin
    “The victim was heard to be telling the accused that the area he was smoking in was a non-smoking area,” Mr Gibson said.

    “The victim was heard by witnesses to say to the accused ‘did you just spit in my face’.

    “A short time later the accused was heard to say to the victim ‘I need you to suck my dick’, and the accused seemed to be getting more annoyed and angry.”

    Mr Gibson said Mr Esmaili then opened up his stance, brought back his right arm and punched Pritzwald-Stegmann with force in the face, hitting his left cheekbone and breaking his nose.

    “The effect of the blow was to immediately cause the victim to fall backwards to the tiled floor where the evidence suggests that the back of his head had cracked,” he said.

    “It would appear prior to hitting the floor he had been rendered unconscious.”

    Mr Gibson said the evidence was that Mr Esmaili then fled the scene in someone else’s car.

    The committal hearing before magistrate Ross Maxted continues.

    Link but complete article posted – no comments allowed.

    I hope he goes to jail for an extremely long time. What a loss to the community he has caused – and deprived a fine citizen of his life.

  118. Woger;

    In other words the grid will be deconstructed because it is unsustainable on renewables.

    I wonder of Zero Point Energy will happen in our lifetimes?

  119. Roger

    Roger, she isn’t making decisions for Australia, she’s making them for her ideology.

    Hello, Venestralia!

  120. squawkbox

    ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get to first base’: Jacqui Lambie reveals she’s on Tinder – but admits her first few dates ‘haven’t been pretty’

    Jacqui, if you couldn’t get laid for 3 years in Canberra, you’ve probably set a new record for sexual undesirability.

  121. C.L.

    The Nigella Appreciation Society™ gives thanks to whoever posted a link to The Gastronomic Goddess on the Old Fred.

    Well done, whoever it was.
    She has the Perfect Figure.

  122. Habib

    ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get to first base’: Jacqui Lambie reveals she’s on Tinder – but admits her first few dates ‘haven’t been pretty’. I must admit she has a telent for understatement.

    I had no idea Tinder had been opened up to other species. I have a feeling she might do better on Gumtree- I suggest “second-hand appliances”.

  123. Up The Workers!

    I see that with the Wentworth Prefect off on one of his regular International Waffling Tours next week, Alan’s cousin, the sheepish sheep-frightener Barnaby Joyce, will be our official Acting P.M. (Pregnancy Monitor).

    Maybe he should have a quiet chat to Bonking Billy Short-One, who has a far more vigorous body of practical experience in the dubious arts of “surreptitious sausage-sinking” (aka “hidden horizontal jogging”), to find out precisely how he goes about regularly pulling the wool over the electorates’ head, when he’s forgotten once again to pull a condom over his own?

  124. johanna

    TE, I get your point, but somebody smoking in a non-smoking area is hardly worth dying for. It’s not even worth getting a punch in the nose for, unless you are a zealot.

  125. Habib

    I also thought “free to a good home”, but I’m rather fond of fidos.

  126. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Kim Beazley backed by Peter FitzSimons to be new governor or WA
    Gary Adshead | PerthNow
    February 12, 2018 10:12AM

    THE leader of the Australian Republic Movement, Peter FitzSimons, has backed the push to make passionate pro-republic advocate Kim Beazley the next governor of WA.

    Mr FitzSimons said the former Federal minister and ambassador to the US could continue his role on the republic advisory panel, which wants an end to the constitutional monarchy, despite being widely tipped as the next representative of the Queen in WA.

    “I don’t see a conflict of interests,” the ARM chairman said.

    “It’s quite legitimate to work within the system we have while wanting to change the system.”

    But WA senator and constitutional monarchist Dean Smith believes Mr Beazley’s integrity on the issue will be damaged if he takes over the governor’s role later this year from Kerry Sanderson. “It undermines the integrity of his republican sentiment by accepting the role as the Queen’s representative,” Senator Smith said. “That aside, no one could doubt his professionalism and the fact that he’s a proud West Australian.”

    It has been reported that final paperwork seeking the Queen’s endorsement of Mr Beazley is already at Buckingham Palace.

    Getting the endorsement from Red Bandanna head would be putting the kiss of death on Beazo’s hopes of getting the nod, surely?

  127. Bruce of Newcastle

    The only thing I get is a strong smell of boondoggle.

    Johanna & Robert – Well if you could take solar energy, make hydrogen by electrolysis then produce ammonia from the hydrogen in about the tiniest ammonia plant in Australia and make money then everyone would have an ammonia plant in their back yard. I costed an ammonia plant once, bigger than this one. They are expensive.

    Then there’s the small problem that they announced a 15 MW electrolytic plant supplying a 10 MW gas turbine and 5 MW fuel cell. Which doesn’t leave a lot of hydrogen left over for the ammonia plant. Indeed as about a third of the electricity in electrolysis is wasted due to hydrogen overpotential it is fun that they are assuming 15 – 5 = 10 + 5.

    Why would you take solar electricity, convert it wastefully into hydrogen, then immediately burn the hydrogen and make electricity from it again? Hydrogen can’t be stored very easily, so there doesn’t seem to be much attraction for using this as a load levelling method.

    Then there’s the other small problem that to make an ammonia plant go you have to run at high pressure and high temperature (see Haber Process). To get these conditions you need a lot of energy. Which has to come from somewhere…

    Maybe this bit has something to do with it:

    The company is getting a $4.7 million grant and a $7.5 million loan from the state renewables fund.

    Free money. Sigh. I could be so rich if I hooked my wagon to the climate train.

  128. The Barking Toad

    I had no idea Tinder had been opened up to other species. I have a feeling she might do better on Gumtree- I suggest “second-hand appliances”.

    Jacqui-Jackie would frighten a dildo – it’d refuse to vibrate

  129. C.L.

    I hope he goes to jail for an extremely long time. What a loss to the community he has caused – and deprived a fine citizen of his life.

    He should be jailed for no fewer than 30 years.
    One of the most useful, prized, important and hard-working citizens – dedicated to healing others
    spat upon and punched to death in his workplace (for no reason) by an entitled underclass lout.

    And these two bubs are now fatherless.

  130. egg_

    I had no idea Tinder had been opened up to other species. I have a feeling she might do better on Gumtree- I suggest “second-hand appliances”.

    IIRC Grigs recommends the Aldi electric jackhammer?

  131. RobK

    Then there’s the small problem that they announced a 15 MW electrolytic plant supplying a 10 MW gas turbine and 5 MW fuel cell.

    Not to mention that the plant would have an average availabilty of around 25% or so. Slow/no return on investment.

  132. The Barking Toad

    More trooble at mill for short willie…from the Oz

    Kevin Rudd has described Anthony Albanese as a “first-class political leader in his own right”, after being asked to comment on his former deputy’s public positioning as an alternative Labor leader.

    Mr Albanese this afternoon attended Mr Rudd’s National Press Club address on closing the gap between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians, instead of joining most of the rest of the ALP team in parliament as they watched their leader Bill Shorten present his own Closing the Gap speech.

    Not sure how much it will help rub & tug boy by hitching to the Kevni wagon

  133. johanna

    Thanks, Bruce and RobK.

    The SA government seems to be living in a parallel universe as far as the laws of thermodynamics are concerned.

  134. jupes

    “I don’t see a conflict of interests,” the ARM chairman said.

    Of course he doesn’t.

    That’s why he’s employed all those monarchists in the ARM …

  135. Rohan

    In the past 24 hours, government websites in the UK and Australia have been hit by cryptomining malware along with thousands of other sites. An attacker compromised a service called Browsealoud and injected code into their javascript that causes site visitor browsers to mine Monero currency using CoinHive code.

    Linky

    It’s great to see the Australian Government getting on board with the blockchain.

  136. Stimpson J. Cat

    So someone on here honestly believes ‘big pharma’ are murdering ‘holistic’ doctors etc..

    It’s crazy isn’t it?
    As crazy as Margaret Sanger starting Planned Parenthood to kill babies.
    Who would want to kill babies?
    Ridiculous.

  137. Chris

    Free money. Sigh. I could be so rich if I hooked my wagon to the climate train.

    Indeed. Also
    NDIS approved providers
    Childcare accreditation
    Employment agency services
    The entire higher education sector
    Immigration fru education
    apart from the giant renewballs scam.

    All of them ways to open the tap of borrowed taxpayer money in your own swimming pool.

  138. Habib

    The Waxgoblin must hate the Ferret Faced Fist Magnet on a cellular level- wonder what he did?

  139. johanna

    You forgot the indigeneous gravy train, Chris.

  140. zyconoclast

    ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get to first base’: Jacqui Lambie reveals she’s on Tinder – but admits her first few dates ‘haven’t been pretty’

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5377769/Tasmanian-MP-Jacqui-Lambie-Tinder.html#ixzz56rhneHPb
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    You wouldn’t be that desperate, surely?

    After this, is there anyone who still bemoans or regrets Jacquie Jackie getting the punt from the Senate?

  141. testpattern

    ‘there’s a Browns Range announcement today’

    hadn’t seen it thanks BON. It confirms what I wrote about ramping up construction this year and an extension of the projected life of the mine. more will follow. Newcrest has been busy picking up as much ground as they can on the Stansmore map.

    The Gifford Cr RE resource only becomes more interesting. A small coastal group allegedly backed by a multinational are allegedly trying to purchase the surrounding pastoral leases although another group has the Native Title. Everyone wants to be close enough to get a slice of it. if it happens.

  142. C.L.

    Wo.
    Report: ex CIA Director John Brennan to be investigated for perjury.

    The aide, who spoke only on condition of anonymity, said Nunes will focus on Brennan as well as President Obama’s first CIA director, Leon Panetta, along with the former president’s intelligence czar, James Clapper, and national security adviser, Susan Rice, and security adviser-turned U.N. ambassador Samantha Power, among other intelligence officials.

  143. egg_

    Mr Albanese this afternoon attended Mr Rudd’s National Press Club address on closing the gap between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians, instead of joining most of the rest of the ALP team in parliament as they watched their leader Bill Shorten present his own Closing the Gap speech.

    Not sure how much it will help rub & tug boy by hitching to the Kevni wagon

    Albo’s only interested in ‘closing the gap’ at the local knock shop?

  144. areff

    India has more going for it than you might imagine. They’ve banned Radio National’s very own wanka wallah Phillip Adams. (ER item and links just posted at Quadrant)

  145. egg_

    ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get to first base’: Jacqui Lambie reveals she’s on Tinder – but admits her first few dates ‘haven’t been pretty’

    Barndoor?

  146. Leigh Lowe

    ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get to first base’: Jacqui Lambie reveals she’s on Tinder – but admits her first few dates ‘haven’t been pretty’

    Of course they weren’t pretty.
    Jacqui Jackie was a participant.

  147. Baldrick

    ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get to first base’: Jacqui Lambie reveals she’s on Tinder – but admits her first few dates ‘haven’t been pretty’

    I’d suggest Jacqui go here – AboriginalDating.com.au
    It may be more in keeping with her values.

  148. Chris

    You forgot the indigeneous gravy train, Chris.

    Entirely outside my experience. That article yesterday suggested that about 4/5 of the Territory are living off it.

  149. Stimpson J. Cat

    It’s great to see the Australian Government getting on board with the blockchain.

    This has Jacques and Sinc’s fingerprints all over it.
    They are L. B. S. – Libertarian Blockchain Skynet.

  150. 132andBush

    The Nigella Appreciation Society™ gives thanks to whoever posted a link to The Gastronomic Goddess on the Old Fred.

    I missed that!!
    Thanks Winston.

    I’m now melting to a puddle on the office floor.

  151. Bruce of Newcastle

    After this, is there anyone who still bemoans or regrets Jacquie Jackie getting the punt from the Senate?

    Me. She’s no worse than about 90% of current senators and is better entertainment than anything on the tele right now.

  152. testpattern

    ‘India has more going for it than you might imagine. They’ve banned Radio National’s very own wanka wallah Phillip Adams. (ER item and links just posted at Quadrant)’

    Bit late Capt. I posted that yesterday.

  153. 132andBush

    If more women looked like Nigella there would be less gay men in the world.

  154. Stimpson J. Cat

    Now this is some weird sh$t:

    David Rothschild
    @DavMicRot

    Honest Question: what charges would allow the gov’t to arrest an American citizen in US and inter him or her at Gitmo? For disagreeing politically? For being Jewish?
    11:22 AM · Feb 12, 2018

  155. testpattern

    17 Feb 2017 will mark 150 years since the Flying Foam massacre in the Pilbara, the genocide of the Yaburara. 5 days to go and counting down to Flying Foam Massacre Remembrance Day.

    Here is a description of the whip used to flog Firsts who absconded from their slavers and owners like the McRaes at Roebourne.

    ‘handle made of light wood 16 inches long, covered with black cloth. Nine pieces of the largest size of Schnapper line each two foot six inches long, four to six knots, weighing about eleven ounces. The largest Cat in Roebourne gaol weighed nine and a half ounces.’

    I don’t know whether a specimen of these ‘Cats’ still exists but it would make a unique WA contribution to a global museum of torture. The white settlers obviously mixed the pleasures of fishing for Norwest Snapper and flogging the Aboriginal slaves who absconded from their boats and pastoral properties.

  156. Stimpson J. Cat

    Now this is some weird sh$t:

    David Rothschild
    @DavMicRot

    Honest Question: what charges would allow the gov’t to arrest an American citizen in US and inter him or her at Gitmo? For disagreeing politically? For being J$wish?
    11:22 AM · Feb 12, 2018

  157. JC

    David Rothschild

    You shouldn’t be posting that surname. It sends Annie batshit crazy.

  158. max

    C.L.
    #2634855, posted on February 12, 2018 at 3:44 pm

    Well done, whoever it was.

    Heh.

  159. CL;

    I hope he goes to jail for an extremely long time. What a loss to the community he has caused – and deprived a fine citizen of his life.

    He should be jailed for no fewer than 30 years.
    One of the most useful, prized, important and hard-working citizens – dedicated to healing others
    – spat upon and punched to death in his workplace (for no reason) by an entitled underclass lout.

    CL, I would put him in a cage and burn him alive.
    Honestly.
    And piss on his smouldering corpse and laugh while gleefully poking his body “Now you’re smokin'”
    I believe we need to really crack down on these arseholes and make a demonstration to encourage the others.

  160. John Constantine

    The Trumpnado 2018 military budget has 7 billion bucks for battlebots.

    ASX listed robotic stocks have dived recently, my skynet watchlist is almost at fossicking levels, robots zero percent of the portfolio right now, could almost go to one percent in a mad rash rush.

    Once aussie military goes full diversity, the purchase of robots capable of carrying heavy packs for those not built to be beasts of burden will be essential, or big percentages of the armed forces will break down from load carrying fatigue.

    Drones that can fly in packs?.

    Walking robot packs that march alongside frolicking diversity infantry?.

    Not your fathers warzones.

  161. C.L.

    Report: clumsy, un-co women already getting concussed badly from pretending to play football …
    Experts puzzled:

    Dr Adrian Cohen at the University of Sydney said a lack of robust concussion research overall meant it was not clear what caused the reported gender disparities, but researchers suspected genetic predisposition left women more susceptible.

    Mmm. Mmm. And by “genetic predisposition” researchers mean they’re girls.

    Not to worry. Just pressure girls into becoming more like boys:

    An increased risk of concussion should not deter women and girls from playing contact sports, Drs Pearce and Cohen said.

    Quite the opposite. Attracting girls at younger ages to the sports would give them more of an opportunity to develop the protective musculature and tackling techniques that could help ameliorate the risk.

    In the SMH.

  162. JC

    Mike Pence has lost the all-important male homosexual figure-skating demographic.

    LOl

    As controversies go, this one seems to have it all. Mr. Rippon, a charismatic 28-year-old figure skater, newly minted gay icon and social media darling, criticized Mr. Pence for his opposition to gay rights and long-rumored support of conversion therapy, a discredited practice that proponents claim can make gay people straight. Mr. Rippon also declined an invitation to meet with Mr. Pence before the Games, his agent said.

    Mr. Pence and his spokespeople have pushed back, arguing that he does not support conversion therapy, which has been discredited by the medical community and condemned by rights groups. And the snub from Mr. Rippon? They say it never happened because they never asked him to meet in the first place.

    Charismatic means he’s one of those flamboyant over -the-top gays.

  163. The Barking Toad:

    Not sure how much it will help rub & tug boy by hitching to the Kevni wagon

    Kevni knows he’s buggered. But he’ll settle for Power Behind the Throne status.
    Follow the money…

  164. Well done, whoever it was.
    She has the Perfect Figure.

    She reminds me of Christina Hendricks. Perfection.

  165. Oh come on

    decapitates Jesus and Virgin Mary statues

    Remind me again about how Muslims venerate Jesus and consider Mary the perfect female?

  166. Johanna;

    The SA government seems to be living in a parallel universe as far as the laws of thermodynamics are concerned.

    Only the Laws of Australia are recognised.

  167. Mr. Rippon, a charismatic 28-year-old figure skater, newly minted gay icon and social media darling

    Translated: the public had never heard of him before today, and most people still haven’t, and those that just did couldn’t care less.

  168. Stimpson J. Cat

    David Rothschild
    You shouldn’t be posting that surname. It sends Annie batshit crazy.

    Go read his Twitter.
    He’s manic as f$ck.

  169. egg_

    researchers suspected genetic predisposition left women more susceptible.

    Is that bureaucratic doublespeak for “women crash into more lamp posts than men per km travelled” or summut?

  170. Robber Baron

    India has more going for it than you might imagine. They’ve banned Radio National’s very own wanka wallah Phillip Adams.

    A country in which it is a traditional custom to shit in the street won’t allow that commo in tells you how disgusting Adams is. (Perhaps he is on a list?).

  171. JC

    I was going through the list of futures contracts that people can trade. People actually trade butter as a commodity. WTF? Who would trade butter?

    I wonder if it’s processed cocoa and not milk.

    You can also trade skim milk.

    Commodity brokers/traders are the lowest of the low.

  172. OldOzzie

    John Constantine
    #2634902, posted on February 12, 2018 at 4:31 pm
    The Trumpnado 2018 military budget has 7 billion bucks for battlebots.

    Drones that can fly in packs?.

    John,

    ask and ye shall receive

    INSIDE THE OLYMPICS OPENING CEREMONY WORLD-RECORD DRONE SHOW

    For the Pyeongchang Games, those watching the curtain-raiser at home also witnessed a sight never seen before: a record-setting 1,218 drones joined in a mechanical murmuration.

  173. egg_

    Phillip Adams himself tweeted: ‘After a year’s planning & months seeking visas LNL was blocked from entering India ..no reasons given, just obsfucation.(might it have something to do with 4C’s Adani report?)’.

    Karma brudda.

  174. Robber Baron

    I hear that Barnaby isn’t alone in the trouser department. The newly elevated AG also has been at it recently.

  175. The Barking Toad

    The newly elevated AG also has been at it recently.

    Well don’t leave us in suspense

    Name & shame

  176. JC

    (might it have something to do with 4C’s Adani report?)’.

    I hope so. The fat pig is opposes to poor Indians having electricity. He should have been refused oncology treatment for similar reasons… it produces atomic waste. What a disgusting slob.

  177. Bruce of Newcastle

    Not your fathers warzones.

    That was the fun thing about that Iranian drone the Israelis shot down yesterday.
    It was a stealth drone. The Iranians were seeing if they could get it into Israel undetected.
    An Apache helicopter shot it down 90 seconds in…

    Then the Israelis blew away several batteries of vaunted S-300s after the Syrians surprised a F-16 with a saturation launch.

    This is a couple days after the USAF obliterated a battalion of Syrian kiddies with heavy armour support.

    Message sent…

  178. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    I hear that Barnaby isn’t alone in the trouser department. The newly elevated AG also has been at it recently.

    Porter?

  179. herodotus

    Tag team Testes and Monty clogging thread. Enjoy.

  180. Indolent

    David Rothschild
    @DavMicRot

    Honest Question: what charges would allow the gov’t to arrest an American citizen in US and inter him or her at Gitmo? For disagreeing politically? For being J$wish?
    11:22 AM · Feb 12, 2018

    Why don’t we try treason.

  181. JC

    Herod

    Monty is better value than some of your buddies here, doofus.

  182. Boambee John

    johanna
    #2634868, posted on February 12, 2018 at 4:01 pm
    Thanks, Bruce and RobK.

    The SA government seems to be living in a parallel universe as far as the laws of thermodynamics are concerned.

    It is OK, that nice Mr Turnbull has assured us that the laws of Australia override the laws of mathematics. I’m sure he can extend that to make the laws of Australia override the laws of thermodynamics.

  183. calli

    Porter?

    Wouldn’t surprise me. He’s been going hard after Lamb on s44.

    Don’t look here, look there!

  184. John Constantine;
    We’ll import about 25000 Filipino Maids to do the carrying stuff.
    No Worries.

  185. JC

    Schneiderman is a legal pervert. He perverts the US legal system. Anything he touches turns to shit.

    New York’s attorney general is accusing Hollywood movie producer Harvey Weinstein of “repeatedly and persistently” sexually harassing female employees at his film company, according to a lawsuit filed on Sunday by the state prosecutor that could impact the company’s potential sale.

    “As alleged in our complaint, The Weinstein Company repeatedly broke New York law by failing to protect its employees from pervasive sexual harassment, intimidation, and discrimination,” state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in court papers filed against Weinstein and the company.

    Schneiderman launched a civil rights probe into the New York City-based company in October after The New York Times and The New Yorker exposed allegations of sexual assault and harassment spanning decades.

    Weinstein’s attorney, Ben Brafman, released a statement Sunday evening saying many of the allegations against his client are “without merit.”

    “While Mr. Weinstein’s behavior was not without fault, there certainly was no criminality, and at the end of the inquiry it will be clear that Harvey Weinstein promoted more women to key executive positions than any other industry leader and there was zero discrimination at either Miramax or TWC,” Brafman said.

    Note, the suit isn’t brought against Big Fat Harvey, but the firm.

  186. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Wouldn’t surprise me. He’s been going hard after Lamb on s44.

    So he should be. She is flagrantly flouting the Constitution and should be in jail.

  187. calli

    It’s ugly egg_.

    And it has cankles.

  188. Bruce of Newcastle

    Commodity brokers/traders are the lowest of the low.

    Absolute bottom has to be the UN CER traders.
    Futures currently are 17 euro cents per tonne of CO2 emitted.
    That’s down from about 50 euro cents last year iirc.
    Traders valiantly trading a harmless colourless odourless gas in support of a gigantic scam in a contract which is so rorted that it is worthless.
    Must be so depressing.

  189. H B Bear

    Albasleazy in open non-campaign mode. It’s on.

  190. Egg.
    Anyone who had a bag so badly packed can be point for the patrol.

  191. calli

    Only in the ACT. Why have a flashing sign when you can employ a hi-viz lollipop man.

  192. Snoopy

    m0nty
    #2634787, posted on February 12, 2018 at 1:55 pm

    Many of his subordinates will get time in pokey though. It’s hard to find one of them who hasn’t already resigned in disgrace or is going to by the end of the year.

    Monty please name:
    1. Those going to jail.
    2. Those who will resign in disgrace by year’s end.

  193. JC

    Bruce

    About 7 odd years ago I tried to see if you could trade the Euro C02 market as i wanted to short the shit out of it, seeing they all cheat. From memory I wasn’t able to, as they made it almost impossible through various impediments like huge margin requirements etc.

    That would have been one of the best gimmes of all time. Smoking jacket and alligator slippers trading.

  194. egg_

    Shorten questioning Turnbull re Barndoor with Burke at his elbow – shameless.

  195. egg_

    I tried to see if you could trade the Euro C02 market

    Didn’t the Russian Mafia rip them off to the tune of a billion dollars?

  196. OldOzzie

    CUT & PASTE

    Look over there! Bad boy Barnaby is the real story unless, er, it’s about women after all

    The Tele was wrong to put Barnaby’s girlfriend on the front page. Kate Doak, Twitter, on Wednesday:

    Big photo of Barnaby on the front page rather than one of his new partner would have been a bit more tasteful. He’s the main mischief maker.

    Talking about it ropes in the women and they haven’t been naughty. Malcolm Turnbull, Herald Sun, Friday:

    It is a tough and distressing episode and I am very conscious — Lucy and I are very conscious — of the hurt occasioned to Natalie and their daughters in particular.

    But let’s make it a woman story anyway. Clementine Ford, SMH, Thursday:

    If this were a 50-year-old woman — hell, if it were a 40-year-old woman — whose sexual relationship with a much younger subordinate male employee were exposed, she would be crucified by the press and the public.

    Julia Baird, SMH, Saturday:

    Julia Gillard was judged repeatedly for being “barren”; Joyce was ignored for being fertile. To repeat: a woman doing nothing was the subject of public attack, while a man creating an actual baby with a woman other than his wife is a “private matter”.

    Baird also dredges up the outing of Gareth Evans-Cheryl Kernot affair:

    Evans has received an Order of Australia; she is still fielding calls about their relationship (yes from me, too). She is the scarlet woman; he is the statesman with a blip in his past, not to be mentioned in polite company.

    And Miranda Devine offers a twist on the double standard argument. Sunday Telegraph yesterday:

    Barnaby hasn’t been an easy dog to keep on the porch, as Hillary Clinton once put it, but Natalie has persevered, understanding that highs and lows are part of his personality. “He always comes back”, she’s told friends.

    But this baby creates an exquisite dilemma. Do you act like a faithless bastard by leaving your wife of 24 years and four children, or by abandoning your mistress and unborn child? In this #metoo era it would have looked worse if he had walked away from the pregnant staffer. Worse, still, if he’d pushed for an abortion.

    For satirical website The Shovel, it was about female squeamishness:

    Calls For National Sick Day After Nation Forced To Imagine Barnaby Joyce Having Sex

    So, Western Civ is obviously in decline. Look to Elizabeth Farrelly for perspective. SMH, Saturday:

    Egregious, despicable and morally inexcusable, the leaf blower represents the triumph of utility over beauty, of the individual over the collective, the synthetic over nature and science over soul. In short, it represents all our collective errors since the Renaissance.

    In other environmental news, the South African city of Capetown is fast approaching the day when it runs dry of water. The Times of London, Saturday:

    Nigel Casey, the British high commissioner, urged guests at a cocktail party at his residence in Bishopscourt to urinate in the gardens rather than flushing the toilets — as long as they avoided the electric security fence around the property. He added: “Please don’t drink any water. There’s plenty of wine, whisky and beer.”

    Hope nobody moved to Capetown to escape Perth’s own water crisis. SMH, 2005:

    “Perth is facing the possibility of a catastrophic failure of the city’s water supply,” says Tim Flannery, director of the South Australian Museum and Australia’s most high profile scientist and ecologist.

  197. JC

    Just get a load of this chart. For a trader, it’s Picasso… Da Vinci even.

    In 2011 the price was around 16 Euros and now 17 cents. It didn’t even look like going back up. Possibly one of the best gimme trades in my life.

    https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/future/cerez8/charts?countrycode=uk

  198. JC

    Didn’t the Russian Mafia rip them off to the tune of a billion dollars?

    Dunno, but good luck to anyone who ever did.

  199. Baldrick

    They’re relentless.

    It would take TheirABC a little over 20 years of tax-hoovering to amass the same amount.

  200. calli

    So, Western Civ is obviously in decline. Look to Elizabeth Farrelly for perspective. SMH, Saturday:

    Egregious, despicable and morally inexcusable, the leaf blower represents the triumph of utility over beauty, of the individual over the collective, the synthetic over nature and science over soul. In short, it represents all our collective errors since the Renaissance.

    Lol. She’s at it again.

  201. areff

    “Personal rumours about [Porter]’s supposedly mid-life crisis related behaviour have also done the rounds last night, with fevered speculation on his personal situation perhaps informed by his past record of ditching the first wife, Lucy – in the style of Don Draper – for the secretary, Jennifer, after a wild three-day wine-swilling bed-creaking weekend at Margaret River that came to the attention of first wife. Not good. But that was then, and this is now and there’s nothing to the new speculation, Liberal insiders say.”

    From the late and unlamented VexNews in 2013. This might be the source of those scurrilous whispers

  202. Robber Baron

    Apparently Porter is an accomplished “pants-man.” More recently, he allegedly has become estranged from his wife and has shacked up with a staffer.

  203. JC

    Baldrick
    #2634952, posted on February 12, 2018 at 5:10 pm

    They’re relentless.

    It would take TheirABC a little over 20 years of tax-hoovering to amass the same amount.

    Emily Bourke wrote that. Get a load of the forehead.

    On maternity leave, this taxeater was grabbing money anywhere she could get it too.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-28/confessions-of-a-double-dipper/7973576

  204. Crossie

    Turnbull was just getting into his stride this year — daring to dream he could break his now ominous run of losing Newspolls — and he has been tripped over by Barnaby’s strides around his ankles.

    Poetic in every sense if the word.

  205. C.L.

    Rambette and affirmative action “brigadier” Linda Reynolds – decorated for office work – has earned herself a berth on Q&A tonight; and all she had to do was attack Cori Bernardi for pointing out that women have no place or use in combat.

    And she’s not the only ‘conservative’ on the show tonight!

    John Hewson too!

  206. Tom

    Egregious, despicable and morally inexcusable, the leaf blower represents the triumph of utility over beauty, of the individual over the collective, the synthetic over nature and science over soul. In short, it represents all our collective errors since the Renaissance.

    I suppose it’s asking too much for Barking Betty to be reborn as a starving victim of an Ethiopian drought.

  207. JC

    John Hewson too!

    He’s obviously on to help give renewballs a plug.

    The great thing about these idiots is they are so fucking predictable.

  208. areff

    from Porter’s maiden speech:

    “Finally, to my wife—I am perhaps a bit slow to give my wife public compliments but, as Ray Charles said, ‘Wake up, boy, because a girl like that ain’t going to wait all night.’ So here is my compliment to my wife. Jennifer, if I were told that it were within my power to go back to the 1970s to watch Dennis Lillee bowl again at the WACA, that I could take all my friends, that Sir Isaiah Berlin and Han Solo would be special guests and that James Reyne would do an acoustic set during the lunch break, but that the one catch was that you could not attend with me, then I would not bother, and you and I could go to the Yanchep Beach lagoon with the dog. So my compliment is: Jennifer, all the good things are nothing special without you.”

    a somewhat jaundiced Porter profile here.

  209. Leigh Lowe

    I hear that Barnaby isn’t alone in the trouser department. The newly elevated AG also has been at it recently.

    I knew it!
    Brandis and Pahn have been at it.

  210. duncanm

    Scores of Holistic Doctors, Scientists and Cancer researchers have been murdered.
    The first woman interviewed in this video, Dr Erin Elizabeth has since been found dead. (Wife of Dr Mercola)

    uh huh. I love a good internet conspiracy.

    http://www.waronwethepeople.com/sex-drugs-internet-fraud-the-secret-life-of-erin-elizabeth-finn-and-dr-joseph-mercola/

  211. calli

    I sense a business opportunity.

    Brain bleach – $100 per ml.

    You know you need lots.

  212. Pickles

    Sad to hear Jacquie Jacky is short of a run. I suppose I’ll have to put me jocks on the outside and help her out. Although I am still hurting from the loss of My Little Snuggle Bunny. Give her my email Sinc. Purely as a community service mind you.

  213. They’re relentless.

    The bugman class are considering another round of the ‘dissolution of the monasteries’, in which they enrich themselves at the expense of Catholics. These people are despicable thieves.

  214. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Kinda… very un-PV and thus….not really safe for work these days
    Airline sparks outrage after scantily-clad models put on show

  215. H B Bear

    As someone who may or may not have been at UWA law school with a Mr Porter, it is fair to say he didn’t want for female company at that time.

  216. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The project’s final conclusion reportedly found that “the lower average IQs of blacks, Southeast Asians, and nonwhite Hispanics means that they are not as likely as non-Hispanic whites and Northeast Asians to be accepted into a more academically rigorous program such as HISP,” the report said. “Therefore the racial disproportionality of HISP is justified.”

    After complaints from students, parents and faculty, the project was removed from the science fair on Wednesday, the outlet said, and the district is currently investigating the incident, Alex Barrios, said the spokesman for Sacramento Unified district.

    “We are looking into the appropriate response to a situation like this,” Barrios told The Bee. “We understand it concerns a lot of people and doesn’t reflect our culture here.”

  217. Crossie

    Then, there’s the old Morosi-era joke:

    “A tourism campaign with a Queensland twist;

    “See Cairns in June”.

    I remember a cartoon showing a map of Australia with a heart over NSW/Qld with one arrow pointing at Cairns and another at Junee.

  218. Stimpson J. Cat

    Egregious, despicable and morally inexcusable, the leaf blower represents the triumph of utility over beauty, of the individual over the collective, the synthetic over nature and science over soul. In short, it represents all our collective errors since the Renaissance.

    This is beautiful.
    I literally have tears in my eyes.
    I want this on a t-shirt I can wear.

  219. Tom

    I am still hurting from the loss of My Little Snuggle Bunny.

    Poor Pickles. As if we had forgotten.

  220. H B Bear

    Most of our collective errors since the Renaissance can be found working at Fauxfacts.

  221. Atoms for Peace

    Stimp. I have a better T shirt slogan for you.
    Triangle with SF sitting over CA CA.

    Wear it to San Francisco with pride

  222. max

    They’re relentless.

    The Age has pulled out all stops today.

    It’s all about money. Sell off St Pat’s Cathedral (built through public subscription) so those poor ‘victims’ can get their next handout and self-obliterate.

    Sell of Xavier College (actually, not a bad idea).

  223. C.L.

    Calli’s link:

    ABC: Catholic Church national wealth estimated to be $30 billion, investigation finds.

    And right on cue – there are Calls …
    These become Growing Calls after 24 hours.

    There are calls for the Catholic Church’s tax-free status to be reviewed after a Fairfax investigation revealing the extent of property, assets and investments owned by the church in Australia.

    Let’s see how they came up with a figure:

    Fairfax’s six-month investigation found the Catholic Church was worth more than $9 billion in Victoria alone.

    The investigation extrapolated that figure to estimate the church’s national wealth at $30 billion.

    LOL.

    The Age’s journalists obtained property valuations from dozens of Victorian councils.

    They found 1,800 church-owned properties, including churches, presbyteries, schools, nursing homes, hospitals, offices, tennis courts and even mobile phone towers.

    But beyond real estate, there was superannuation, telecommunications, Catholic Church Insurance and Catholic Development Funds, which serve as an internal treasury.

    Wow. The Church owns property used for educating children, housing the homeless, caring for the elderly, curing the sick and counseling the troubled. This is a scandal!

    Let’s see who is making these “calls.”

    Catholics for Renewal’s Peter Johnstone, a corporate governance consultant, said most Catholics would have no idea about the extent of the church’s assets.

    Ah yes. The far left-wing “Catholics” for Renewal – which backed the destruction of marriage.

    Who else?

    Professor Ann O’Connell, a taxation specialist at Melbourne University’s Law School, said the definition of charity should be examined.

    A quick Google shows Professor O’Connell published a “fact check” review of the Sex Party’s claims re religion and taxation in Australia. Naturally, she backed their claims.

    So these “calls” come from two people, one a dissident group of Pell haters and the other a woman who defends the virulently anti-Christian Sex Party.

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