Monday Forum: February 19, 2018

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1,096 Responses to Monday Forum: February 19, 2018

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  1. stackja

    Gender neutral teacher causes stir among parents at northern district high school
    Stacy Thomas, Northern District Times
    February 21, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    A TEACHER who identifies as ‘gender neutral’ has divided a northern district school.

    The science teacher started the 2018 school term by asking the class to call them Mx, not miss, missus or mister.

    One dad is convinced the principal should have given parents a ‘heads up’ this person would be at the front of the class.

    “I don’t think my son’s ever met a transgender person. I’m sure the same could be said for a lot of other students too,” the parent said.

    “Having somebody like that with boys who are impressionable … the school really should have, at the very least, spoken with the parents of the students who would be taking the class,” the parent said.

    He then posted on a local Facebook group. The post has since been removed.

    This is what he said:

    “Just putting it out there. *John (his son’s name has been changed) is now in Year 10 at **** high school and his new science teacher has informed his class he/she is ‘gender neutral’ and is to be addressed as Mx, not Mr, Miss or Mrs or Sir/Maam.

    I just wanted to get other people’s perspective in the local area as many have children at **** high.”

    The parent said his post wasn’t negative, more of a way to communicate with other parents who had no idea.

  2. C.L.

    Lizzie, if it’s ascetic, design-shifting gardening done, the married duo is fine.

    Just make sure they don’t design their ideal garden rather than yours.

  3. OldOzzie

    ATO targets ‘other’ work expenses this year

    The tax agent who advised a man to claim his 7-year-old son as a work expense has struck again. This time, David McNeice acted for builder Seppo Kael, who sought to claim nearly $10,000 in overtime meal expenses.

    The Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) threw the book at Kael, as it did at other taxpayers who tried to claim tools worth $24,000, ordinary travel in a Maserati and a Harrods shopping spree.

    As tax commissioner Chris Jordan has previously observed, rorting of work-related deductions and the cash economy are bigger problems for Australia than multinationals avoiding tax.

    So the ATO is getting in early, warning people not to lie on their 2018 returns after a record $7.9 billion in “other” deductions such as union fees, home office supplies and phone bills were claimed last year.

    “This year the ATO will be paying close attention to what people are claiming as ‘other’ deductions,” reads an email that turned up in inboxes nationwide this week.

    “These deductions are for expenses other than car, travel, clothing or self-education and may include home office, union fees, mobile phone and internet, overtime meals and tools and equipment.”

    The AAT is often the first port of call for taxpayers who want to dispute an ATO assessment because it is cheaper than going to federal court.

    In 2016, the tribunal was withering in its assessment of IBM salesman Gary Ogden, who said he paid his son more than $5000 for secretarial services when the boy “sometimes ran upstairs to the study when the phone was ringing, answered the phone and then handed it to his father”.

    Brazen claims

    In the vast majority of cases, the ATO is found mostly, if not entirely, correct. The 11 or so work-related expense cases considered by the tribunal last year reveal just how brazen some taxpayers are willing to be.

    Mechanical engineer Vahid Vakiloroaya claimed $60,000 in car, self-education and work-related deductions in his 2014 tax return, all of which were disallowed by the ATO save for $854.

    While the tribunal found Dr Vakiloroaya to be an “honest witness”, his “perceptions of this entitlements in the way of allowable deductions is at odds with the relevant principles…under income tax laws”.

    The tribunal also considered the case of Karim Amin, who claimed more than $73,000, included $30,000 for driving his Maserati from work to university and then home.

    While Mr Amin believed he was entitled to claim use of his car as ether work-related or for self-education purposes, the tribunal disallowed all but a small amount of travel to a conference and a computer.

    “Mr Amin left me with the impression that he was prepared to stretch the truth when it came to claiming deductions in order to reduce his taxable income,” AAT senior member Gina Lazanas said.

    Paid in cash out of gambling winnings

    Mr McNeice is not the only tax agent to make regular appearances.

    Another man, John Fumberger, was cited by the tribunal as the tax agent in no fewer than three cases, all of which relate to truck drivers who were unable to substantiate large claims for meals and travel allowances.

    An aircraft maintenance engineer named only as Mr Sonic tried to claim $24,802 in tools and toolboxes.

    He told the tribunal he paid cash – out of gambling winnings he kept at home – for the tools after responding to an ad on Gumtree.

    “I have decided not to allow the deduction in the amount of $24,802 that Mr Sonic claimed for other work-related expense as I was not satisfied that Mr Sonic purchased any tools or toolboxes amounting to that amount,” the judgment said.

    Three golden rules

    ATO assistant commissioner Kath Anderson said taxpayers must be able to substantiate their spending with receipts. There were “three golden rules”, she said.

    “Firstly, you must have paid for it and not been reimbursed, secondly, it must be directly related to earning your income and not a private expense, and thirdly, you must have a record to prove it.”

    Ms Anderson said the ATO had this “reached” more than a million taxpayers to “support correct reporting” of work-related expense and deal with non compliance, resulted $100 million in additional revenue.

  4. calli

    Hairy might be right, Lizzie. Husband for grunt, wife for detail. Also, men step up to the plate and try to prove their strength in front of women. It’s always nice to see that, it’s as it should be.

    Two guys going hell for leather digging and moving stuff may not produce the desired result.

  5. OldOzzie

    Domestic airfares highest in nine years, good news for Qantas, Virgin

    Economy-class airfares for flying around Australia have surged to their highest levels in nine years as airlines tighten fare conditions and absorb profits, signalling an era of cheap flights is well and truly over.

    The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics’ index for restricted domestic economy fares,which include Qantas and Virgin fares that permit time and date changes as well as refunds, rose to 98.6 in February, its highest level since March 2009 excluding the peak season over Christmas 2017, when the index hit 100.

    The increase is mostly due to a jump in the index in November 2017 when Qantas Group’s Jetstar Starter with Max fare, previously the lowest fare in the category, was removed after a change in its structure to forbid refunds for cancellations.

    The Department of Infrastructure said it could not comment on whether airfares overall were rising.

    “While airlines are happy to advertise the price of a ticket at their various fare categories, the number of tickets sold at each fare category is commercially sensitive,” a spokesperson said. “This means that it is not possible to calculate an ‘average fare’ to measure overall changes.”

    The bureau’s index of “best discount” airfares, which are more volatile, was lower in February than in September.

    But the restricted economy index – which is calculated from monthly surveys of airline internet booking sites – was creeping up even before November, reaching almost 83 in October, compared with levels of around 80 a year earlier.

    Peter Harbison, executive chairman of research group CAPA – Centre for Aviation, said rising fares for flexible tickets reflected the end of a fierce market-share battle between Qantas and Virgin Australian that pushed fares sharply lower between 2012 and 2015.

    “Now there is much more stability in the market,” he said. “They are both content to make profits.”

    Airlines were under intense pressure to reduce costs after oil prices soared in 2014, because fuel accounts for about a third of their total costs. Between 2011 and 2014, oil prices often traded above $US100 per barrel, but then tumbled as low as $26 per barrel in late 2016.

    The drop in fuel prices reduced the financial pressure on airlines, Mr Harbison said. “Inevitably that takes the blowtorch off your feet to cut costs and that’s been a bit of a negative, we’ve seen [airline] costs creeping up.”

    Oil prices have been rising gradually over the past two years and are now trading at around $US62 per barrel but airlines have not returned to aggressive cost-cutting.

    They have instead scaled back capacity, and put smaller planes on some routes. Available seat kilometres, which measure the number of seats available for sale multiplied by the distance flown, were down 0.9 per cent for the 12 months to November 2017, according to the most recent data available from BITRE.

    At the same time, the numbers of people travelling by plane within Australia has been rising, creating more demand for seats. Some 5.4 million people flew domestically in November 2017, up 3.3 per cent on a year earlier.

    Qantas Group will deliver its interim results on Thursday, with analysts expecting the company to report pre-tax profits at the top end of its guided range of between $900 and $950 million after two consecutive years of record profits. Virgin, which has been reducing losses and improving cash flows, reports interim results on February 28.

    Governments have been worried by high regional airfares, with a Western Australian parliamentary report released in November finding the “duopolistic market structure” of Qantas and Virgin may be preventing competitive pricing on some routes. A Commonwealth inquiry into air routes in rural regional communities is underway.

    The construction of a second airport at Badgerys Creek in western Sydney is expected to make it easier for foreign airlines to enter the Australian market because Sydney Airport has restrictions on how many flights can land and take off each hour and an overnight curfew.

  6. johanna

    For NSW Cats – this morning I had my windows compulsorily modified so that tots are less likely to fall out of them. Anyone in a unit or townhouse with a level above the ground has been compelled by law to do this. Not sure if it applies to detached houses.

    For my sliding windows, it amounted to a locking device being put in place so that the window only opens about 15-20cm. But, you get an Allen key so that you can bypass it and open the window. The theory is, if you fail to lock off your windows and a tot falls out, it’s on you legally.

    Millions of dollars are being wasted on this stupid example of nannyism, across hundreds of thousands of homes in NSW. Yet another extra cost for the homebuyers that politicians endlessly weep crocodile tears for.

    Fortunately, the Body Corporate picked up the bill, so I didn’t have to shell out on the spot. But of course I am paying for it, as are renters and owners across NSW. Because no-one with children will ever want to open their windows fully.

    Eejits. 🙁

  7. struth

    A TEACHER who identifies as ‘gender neutral’ has divided a northern district school.

    The science teacher started the 2018 school term by asking the class to call them Mx, not miss, missus or mister.

    You gotta laugh, a science teacher…………………………………………….

  8. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    When it comes to ‘change management’ consultants, it is a huge, successful, and ongoing con.

    Agreed. That is why Da Hairy Ape never just ‘consults’. He gets headhunted and goes in and does the job; redirects process towards desired outcomes, changes the culture, fires as necessary (he knows the ropes of that), hires new staff as needed and changes things. In some jobs he has stayed on long-term managing, in some he’s out, by his own choice, reasonably quickly. On occasion I have heard on the grapevine that his name can strike fear into beating hearts; once he’s arrived though his first thought is to reassure as well as challenge.

    A lot of that is in his past now; he’s been pedaling back in recent years, due to health concerns and pressure from his loving wife (me!) to do less and enjoy more. One thing I know though; he is not interested in getting on the ‘change management’ spruiking circuit.

    Load of old cobblers, he says. Those who can, do.

  9. The Barking Toad

    The tax agent who advised a man to claim his 7-year-old son as a work expense has struck again. This time, David McNeice acted for builder Seppo Kael, who sought to claim nearly $10,000 in overtime meal expenses.

    Not to many Smith or Jones named in that report from Old Ozzie – just saying

  10. OldOzzie

    Tony Abbott calls on Peter Dutton to cut Australia’s migration intake

    Tony Abbott has ramped up pressure on the Turnbull government to accept a drastic cut to the nation’s migration levels, saying Immigration Minister Peter Dutton could “manage numbers down quite quickly” to help ease local job market and housing affordability pressures.

    The former Liberal prime minister last night made reducing immigration the main focus of his remedy to improve Australian livelihoods in an address to the Sydney Institute.

    While giving credit to Mr Dutton for flagging last week that the immigration intake should be reviewed, Mr Abbott insisted reducing the current level from 190,000 to 110,000 a year was necessary “at least until infrastructure, housing stock and integration has better caught up”.

    Dismissing any suggestion from political opponents that his proposal might be xenophobic or racist, Mr Abbott said scaling back immigration was the government’s “duty” to its citizens.

    While he favoured a “bigger Australia” in the longer term, this did not rule out short-term cuts in the national interest for economic growth.

    In his speech, parts of which were released in advance, the former prime minister said “something has gone badly wrong” with the immigration intake when only 30 per cent were proficient in English.

    At the same time, he said jobs were harder to find because more foreigners were taking those available. Local wages remained static and the high immigration rates concentrated in cities had forced up house prices.

    “My issue is not immigration, it’s the rate of immigration at a time of stagnant wages, clogged infrastructure, soaring house ­prices, and in Melbourne at least, ethnic gangs that are testing the resolve of police,” he said.

    “It’s a basic law of economics that increasing the supply of labour depresses wages, and that increasing demand for housing boosts price.”

    Mr Abbott said the “unreality” of political discourse was that no one until Mr Dutton’s comments last week was prepared to raise immigration as an issue solely in the control of the federal government.

    Answering questions afterwards, Mr Abbott said Mr Dutton could “manage numbers down” quickly but said it could take years before structural changes allowed a return to increased migration.

    Mr Dutton declined to comment beyond remarks made last week when he acknowledged problems caused by the concentration of migrants around Sydney and Melbourne, and spoke against bringing migrants who were “going to be a burden”.

    Population expert Bob Birrell said Mr Abbott had a “powerful case” that could help the government ease economic pressures.

    Mr Birrell, a former Monash University professor and now head of the Australian Population Research Institute, said the government had already acted to reduce skilled migration levels by a third but the “numerical terms” were still unclear.

    He said integration was “undoubtedly a problem” when a large number of migrants on the skilled program could not get managerial positions.

    Mr Birrell said that Mr Abbott had been consistent in his calls for reduced immigration even if his position was “heavily political”.

  11. The Barking Toad

    Janet A has a piece in the Oz about Trumble’s sex ban.

    Without posting the whole piece this is the best:

    Instead, Turnbull did what he often does in a crisis. He dithered.

    Sums him up.

  12. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Mx

    How do you pronounce it. Mkss? Mex? Mexie when being affectionate?

    Ms is apparently pronounced meant to be pronounced as Miz, with a very short ‘i’.
    Most people end up pronouncing it as a New Zealander would say ‘Miss’. i.e. Muss

  13. OldOzzie

    JUDITH SLOAN – By every measure, we need to give immigration a brake

    The main chancers who regularly declare Melbourne the most live­able city in the world must have a sense of humour. They most certainly don’t live in Melbourne.

    Take it from me, Melbourne is a complete nightmare to get around. If you drive, it takes an age. If you take public transport, be prepared for the sardine-tin experience.

    House prices are out of this world. The shopping might be good, but it’s impossible to park at many shopping centres. Hospitals and schools are overcrowded.

    There are parts of the CBD where it’s easy to feel as if you are in another country — there’s not a lot of English being spoken.

    If this is the most liveable city in the world, I’d like to see what’s unliveable.

    I’m not Robinson Crusoe when I express these views. And let’s face it, Sydney is not much better.

    The fact is Tony Abbott is really on to something when he calls for a significant reduction in the number of immigrants coming to this country. What I can’t understand is why a Coalition government hasn’t been on to this issue much sooner. Running a sensible and sustainable immigration program is as important as border control.

    The government seems to be so self-satisfied with its achievement in stopping the boats that it has dropped the ball when it comes to establishing appropriate numbers and rules around both permanent and temporary migration.

    Let’s be clear, the Migration Program numbers — the permanent intake — of 190,000 a year is way too high. And unless the government does something, these numbers will be the same for the next three years.

    It just doesn’t make any sense for net overseas migration to make up most of the (excessive) population growth we are experiencing. Just look at the figures. Last year, it is estimated Australia’s resident population grew by 1.6 per cent.

    The world’s population grew by 1.1 per cent. In Canada, the figure was 0.9 per cent, in France 0.4 per cent, in Britain 0.6 per cent and in the US 0.7 per cent.

    At our current rate of growth, Australia’s population will be more than 38 million by 2050.

    For a while, I had concluded that Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton didn’t understand what he was dealing with. He would bang on about net overseas migration (which includes most temporary migration) being higher under Labor than under the Coalition government. Sure, NOM — immigration minus emigration — peaked in December 2008, not long after Labor was elected.

    Yet the latest figures on NOM for the year ending June 2017 were 245,000 — an increase of 27 per cent from the previous 12 months. Yes, a 27 per cent increase. Pete, net overseas migration is out of control. And note that NOM increased by 31 per cent to NSW — read Sydney — and 23 per cent to Victoria — read Melbourne.

    Here is a golden opportunity for the government to differentiate itself from Labor, which is determined to maintain immigration numbers, if not increase them.

    Former academic Andrew Leigh MP has been sent out to quote some arcane studies about the effect of immigration on house prices and wages.

    Here’s the thing: you don’t need a degree to realise that if you allow the population to grow rapidly, there will be pressure on house prices and urban infrastructure. And for workers whose skills complete with new migrants, there is less scope for pay rises. Without doubt, immigration is contributing to our low wage growth.

    The government needs to get serious about cutting back the immigration intake, even though the universities are likely to kick up a stink. Note that overseas student education is a joint offering: a degree plus a pathway to permanent residence.

    What the government has to appreciate is that the largest group of voters are incumbents, not new migrants or even migrants who have arrived in the past decade.

    Even on this point, it’s not clear that migrant groups are in favour of large migrant intakes — the pull-up- the-ladder phenomenon.

    We need to give our cities a break; we need to insist that new migrants culturally integrate and speak English well; we need to ­acknowledge the legitimate interests and views of incumbents rather than always favour new entrants.

    It would be wise for the government to heed Abbott’s advice.

  14. Tintarella di Luna

    Knight – right desk, wrong man. He’s 20 years too late.

    Looks like Knight is stuck in the past — Bill Clinton is no longer POTUS

  15. C.L.

    Bolt reports on an Aboriginal toddler raped in Tennant Creek, argues she should have been ‘stolen.’
    Indeed.
    And that same story at the ludicrous Daily Mail – scroll for the stock picture.

  16. johanna

    stackja
    #2642189, posted on February 21, 2018 at 8:51 am

    johanna
    #2642180, posted on February 21, 2018 at 8:31 am

    Did Gough create this? I don’t remember such a mess before Gough.

    It would have happened anyway. Just look at the UK, Canada, the US and Europe. They all went down the same path.

    A deep faith in technocratic solutions to essentially age-old human problems quickly spawned a class of academics and consultants who were only too happy (for a fee) to assuage their fears.

    The invariable response of any organisation caught short these days is that they are revamping their training and procedures, when in fact the problem was incompetence or malice. Nothing new there, and managers are supposed to be there to prevent it or stop it.

  17. The Barking Toad

    Friends and family of an Aboriginal toddler allegedly raped in Tennant Creek are calling for ­immediate accountability from politicians and bureaucrats, claiming authorities overlooked repeated warnings.

    The girl, who is understood to be about two, was airlifted out of the Northern Territory town to Royal Adelaide Hospital at the weekend, due to the severity of ­injuries she sustained late last week in a neighbourhood known as “The Bronx”.

    Police charged a 24-year-old man with one count of sexual ­intercourse without consent. The man appeared in court on Monday and was denied bail when he appeared again yesterday.

    Fuck me – what about taking some responsibility yourselves you bludging cretins. Recognition, Treaty – fuck off.

  18. OldOzzie

    INDIGENOUS – Repeated warnings ignored, family of ‘raped’ toddler say

    Friends and family of an Aboriginal toddler allegedly raped in Tennant Creek are calling for ­immediate accountability from politicians and bureaucrats, claiming authorities overlooked repeated warnings.

    The girl, who is understood to be about two, was airlifted out of the Northern Territory town to Royal Adelaide Hospital at the weekend, due to the severity of ­injuries she sustained late last week in a neighbourhood known as “The Bronx”.

    Police charged a 24-year-old man with one count of sexual ­intercourse without consent. The man appeared in court on Monday and was denied bail when he appeared again yesterday.

    The incident comes on the heels of a royal commission that highlighted numerous problems with the Territory’s child protection and youth detention systems.

    Locals described the girl as a happy kid but said both parents struggled with alcoholism.

    Her father has spent time in jail and her mother has also had run-ins with the law

    A relative who said his role was “like a dad” to the girl in Aboriginal culture, said his family’s problems were just one example of a mounting crisis in Tennant Creek.

    “It’s a forgotten town running rampant with violence,” the relative said.

    “Someone has got to be held accountable for this little girl. How many (child protection) notifications do you have to put in before Territory Families does something?”

    Authorities were warned about risks to the girl’s wellbeing and that of a relative, he said.

    He confirmed that the girl’s father had spent time in jail, and said a teenager living in the same house had complained to a relative about the toddler’s safety.

    “If this was a little white kid, it would be all over the papers nationally,” he said.

    “By putting it in the paper, hopefully the whole of Australia can see what’s happening in our little town.”

    Graeme Smith, CEO of Manungurra Aboriginal Corporation, said he and his wife had lived near the girl and her parents for several months soon after she was born.

    “We could constantly hear them fighting over the kid,” Mr Smith said. “Sometimes we would ring the cops but other times we would just say, ‘What’s the point?’ This kid should not have been allowed to get to this stage.”

    Sources said the incident occurred in a rundown neighbourhood containing several public housing properties where alcohol is officially prohibited.

    “(The area) is The Bronx of Tennant Creek — all the houses are rolling with drunks,” Mr Smith said.

    He said it was possible to ­“almost pick” which children would end up at risk simply by looking at the social activity of their parents and that some of the agencies responsible for tackling those problems had become despairing and lazy.

    “People go to work from 9am to 4pm. At the end of the day, they go home and lock their doors, and let the town explode around them. All the services are here to make the place work, but it’s not working. Most of the money goes in administration.”

    Recent crime figures show domestic violence-related and alcohol-related assaults rose by 33 per cent and 22 per cent respectively in the year to December — a period in which the Gunner Labor government controversially loosened some alcohol restrictions.

    Police are believed to have faced a spate of violent incidents over the weekend when the rape occurred, although spokespeople had not provided details by the time of publication last night.

  19. struth

    What I can’t understand is why a Coalition government hasn’t been on to this issue much sooner. Running a sensible and sustainable immigration program is as important as border control.

    It’s called the U.N.
    look it up.

  20. Des Deskperson

    Johanna @ 8.31, everything you have said is, of course, spot on and there is little I can add, but I particularly liked your words about the little turd-ess from PM&C:

    “That chick from PM&C spewed out a meaningless word salad, but managed to mention what a great guy her boss Martin Parkinson is. What a revolting little suck-up.”

    Hers is exactly the sort of stuff you get in the cv – or the Linkedin page, it actually looks likest’s been transcribed from a Linkedin page – – of someone who isn’t actually any good, lots of manageobabble but very little information on actual responsibilities and achievements, some detail of which one thinks she could have given without breaking her cover. The overuse of the term ‘strategic’ is, of cours., a dead giveaway.

    I wouldn’t have employed her, but then, I’m not Martin Parkinson.

  21. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Two guys going hell for leather digging and moving stuff may not produce the desired result.

    We shall have to see, Calli. I can provide the feminine detail myself, is my argument. I know what needs to move, what needs to come down, what needs to be cleared out and what needs to be regularly whipper-snipped and clipped. Maybe she will prove to be an expert whipper-snipper and clipper, taking great care around my new fruit trees.

    I will try not to prejudge (too much). 🙂

  22. OldOzzie

    Assimilation must be part of the deal for new citizens
    MAURICE NEWMAN

    It’s remarkable how often former prime minister Tony Abbott sends the commentariat into a spin. Perhaps only Donald Trump attracts more media attention. Recently in an opinion piece on this page (“Australia Day debate: There are 364 other days to wear a black armband”, January 22) he forewarned us: “I’ll have more to say about scaling back immigration.” Perhaps, like Trump, his views on immigration jar with the progressive elite. No surprise there. To mention Abbott and immigration in the same sentence is bound to elicit howls of outrage given his successful record of “turning back the boats”.

    But, then, migration is an emotional topic. Take John Howard’s 2001 election campaign launch speech when, following a wave of unauthorised arrivals, he famously declared: “We will decide who comes to this country and the circumstances in which they come.”

    That sent the open-borders lobby wild. Journalist David Hardaker, commenting on the ABC’s The Drum, suspected nothing but bigotry. “The debate around asylum-seekers,” he said, “has always been framed around the undeclared racism that infects so much of Australia. John Howard’s line, ‘We will decide who comes to this country …’ worked powerfully on those who suspected filthy foreigners were trying to overtake good, upstanding Australia.”

    ABC Insiders anchor Barrie Cassidy saw the Abbott government’s uncompromising action on border security as cruel and intended “to prevent the suffering of others from spoiling our utopia, a utopia built on migration”.

    Not really. The Howard and Abbott governments’ strict enforcement policies saw record numbers of authorised refugees settled. In contrast, the soft approach, with its chaos, criminality and confusion, so favoured by Labor and advocated by the ABC’s intelligentsia, put our official humanitarian commitments in danger.

    What critics of controlled immigration neglect is that Australian citizenship is a many-splendoured thing. It should be prized and not given lightly. It offers opportunity, democratic government, the rule of law, an advanced economy, a generous welfare safety net, taxpayer-funded education, gender equality and a wonderful natural amenity. It’s why so many are willing to pay a fortune for it and risk their lives to get here.

    The Australian public understands this. They may be generous of spirit but they’re not stupid. They share Howard’s view that however they arrive, “migrants are obliged to ‘be Australian’ and social integration must be pushed harder”. Clearly, among the latest wave of migrants, this is not always accepted. Crime rates among some cohorts are disproportionately higher than for the general population. Many of those of Islamic faith in particular remain consciously outside the mainstream, a pattern that has been obvious in Britain and Europe for decades. Sharia law, illegal cultural practices, not to mention terrorism, have caused the Australian people to reconsider the sources of our migrant intake, humanitarian or otherwise. And when the children of those migrants fail to assimilate, it adds weight to the perception that the problem of integration is more cultural than time-related. It’s not bigoted or intolerant to point this out.

    Nor is it racist to mention that migrants from North Africa and the Middle East are three times likelier than Europeans and Asian migrants to be out of work in the first five years of settlement. Islamic migration experts blame the high unemployment rate on employers who shun applicants named Mohammed and women who wear hijabs. But many have little English and few skills, and with unskilled jobs increasingly lost to technology these people are at risk of becoming a permanent underclass. The fastest growing income-support pension is disproportionately drawn by people born in the Middle East.

    The 1960s bestseller They’re A Weird Mob records the traditional, generous, if sometimes irreverent, welcome given to migrants 50-odd years ago. That spirit remains. But then, as now, there was an implied reciprocal obligation. Immigrants were expected to be grateful for their good fortune, to make efforts to speak English and to rapidly assimilate.

    Then, in the 1970s, came the sudden shift to a multicultural model, with “ethnic” radio and “multicultural” television providing a “cultural bridge” to the arrivals’ new home. The priority for assimilation dissipated. Instead, institutionalised “diversity” promoted by a powerful industry dedicated to identity politics emerged. The result is division, growing intolerance and diminished national pride.

    Because newly settled migrants are to be found away from the corridors of power or the trendy inner city and leafier suburbs, the commentariat has little contact with them outside the workplace. Not for them the daily issues of ethnic enclaves, the crime and the loss of amenity. For them it’s easy to signal compassion and tolerance, and to sneer at those who complain. Yet, while ordinary Australians see their living standards falling and their infrastructure failing, they observe new settlers receiving favoured treatment when it comes to welfare and justice. They watch the price of dwellings being bid beyond their reach by absentee immigrant landlords. Right or wrong, they feel discriminated against. Newly installed senator Jim Molan has picked up on this.

    While skilled migration represents two-thirds of our total intake, the skills focus may need to be sharper. Our immigration policies should rely less on emotion and more on hard-headed experience. What is the point of accepting people as Australian citizens if they and their families want to live their lives as if they had never left the land of their birth?

    The truth is social pressures have always been a feature of Australia’s many waves of migration. What makes the present pushback different and more intractable is the rise of state-backed multiculturalism, which encourages Balkanisation and aggravates cultural tensions.

    Abbott or not, this debate has a long way to go and political correctness can’t settle it.

  23. Myrddin Seren

    Mr Birrell said that Mr Abbott had been consistent in his calls for reduced immigration even if his position was “heavily political”.

    Saw a bit of Peta on Sky the other night where her ‘panel’ included some metrosexual soyboy who argued that it was good that immigration and population levels weren’t a topic for public discussion because ‘racism’.

    Translation – ‘you vile red-necked Proles cannot be trusted not to go full-metal KKK, so shut up and leave the issue to your Moral-and-Intellectual Superiors’.

    Package this soyboy up and send him to Brendan O’Neill at Spiked as a classic example of the M-&-I-S utter distrust and contempt for ordinary people.

    Of course immigration and population decisions – even vacating the stage and making no clear policy like Australia has for decades – is a political decision.

    And when the self-anointed ‘elites’ start moving topics off the political stage – like immigration – it is a red-hot political issue that they are trying to mask under a smokescreen of ‘evidence-based policy’ and ‘the science says’.

    The absolute contempt and disgust with the Proles by the self-regarding M-&-I-S is a sight to behold.

  24. OldOzzie

    PAUL KELLY – Barnaby Joyce and the crisis of conservatism in Australia

    The Barnaby Joyce crisis is a cultural threshold in our politics — it exposes the myth of the authentic outsider, delivers another blow to the decaying fortress of Australian conservatism, affirms the growing progressive quest to regulate human relations and reveals the weakness of the once formidable Nationals.

    The consequences of the Joyce crisis will be immense. The centre-right governs at the national level only in coalition. This requires two conditions — an effective Nationals leader and working trust between the two party leaders — and both conditions are in jeopardy. The Turnbull government is threatened at its apex.

    Barnaby came into politics as a populist, a maverick and a rebel. He tormented the Howard government by crossing the Senate floor on almost 20 occasions and anybody predicting he was a ­future Nationals leader would have been dismissed as delusional. Yet it came to pass. His toughness and adaptability had been underestimated. Barnaby the outsider became Joyce the insider and Deputy Prime Minister.

    He juggled these dual identities and, for much of the time, it worked — but no longer. The tragedy is Shakespearean because Joyce, once that happy rebel, is now discredited since he succumbed as an insider. The lure is often irresistible. Joyce succumb­ed to that artificial, toxic yet enticing world of power, the adrenalin of public office, long hours, free travel, staffers, hard drinking and an alternative life in Canberra.

    He became an insider and fell as an insider. His career is a reminder about the paradox of appealing to voters as an outsider — once you obtain serious influence you begin the transition to insider status. This is the risk for minor party leaders from Pauline Hanson to Nick Xenophon as they struggle to be outsiders yet powerbrokers. It is surely why Xenophon rejects being South Australian premier.

    Joyce’s achievements in a relatively short career are impressive — he represented Queensland as a senator and NSW as a member of the House of Representatives; he is the first person to win a Senate and house seat previously lost to the government; he crushed his rival, Tony Windsor, one of the strongest independents to sit in the parliament; he became the irresistible choice as Nationals leader, survived the dual citizenship crisis last year and won a smashing by-election victory.

    Barnaby aspired to unite the party with its populist, protectionist and economic nationalist roots. It was a natural response to the rise of Hansonism and rural grievance. His elevation, however, came in a party being relentlessly weakened as its great figures faded into history. Barnaby was never a ruthless ministerial giant like John McEwen, a born leader like Doug Anthony, a farmer sophisticate like Ian Sinclair, an unorthodox professional like Tim Fischer or an ­anointed successor like John Anderson. He is a retail and populist politician prone to rash judgments; the Nationals became dependent on Barnaby but also exposed to his flaws.

    Now they are traumatised — they fear he is irrevocably damaged yet they fear removing him. They fear their own weakness. They fear the lack of any compelling successor. Joyce, meanwhile, is in denial about the fatal damage his private life has done to his political character, integrity and brand as a values politician. The idea this is a temporary embarrassment is tempting but false. The Nationals almost certainly face a lose-lose scenario. And that means the bigger losers will be the Liberals as their governing partners.

    The Newspoll this week showing only 23 per cent of people believe Joyce should remain in parliament as leader is devastating but hardly a shock. A total of 65 per cent want him to resign as leader. This includes 58 per cent among Coalition voters and 56 per cent among One Nation voters.

    Malcolm Turnbull last Thursday condemned Joyce’s behaviour and, by asking him to consider his position, made clear he wanted Joyce to resign. The Prime Minister won’t repeat that remark — but it stands, an unprecedented comment by a Liberal PM about a Nationals deputy PM.

    Joyce had another status — as a populist conservative. The two highest ranking and highest profile conservatives since the 2013 election have been Tony Abbott and Joyce — yet Abbott was dumped by his party and is consigned to the backbench, and Joyce is now politically crippled whether he is dumped or not. This is an insight into the crisis of Australian conservatism. Where are its leaders? Where is its moral force? What happened to its institutional authority?

    Conservatives these days excel at drum-beating, making a lot of noise, writing a lot of articles and losing every substantial battle. They are fragmented, intellectually confused and strategically inept. Much of the nation is still conservative in its instincts but this constituency is denied inspiring or effective leadership.

    Conservatives lost the issue of same-sex marriage. They are likely to lose the issue of religious freedom. They are losing the battle over legalising euthanasia. On almost every front from climate change to coal to gender politics to Western civilisation heritage, they are on the defensive.

    In this context the demise of Joyce testifies to the conservative plight. Conservatives champion family values yet fail as exemplars, inviting the accusation of hypocrisy. They defend tradition at a time when tradition is being destroyed. Embarrassed by their personal failures they try to keep them secret, only to intensify the damage when the truth is revealed. This shatters the trust between the politician and the public but has a deeper generic impact — it shatters public fidelity to the conservative mantra.

    In the absence of conservative leadership — and with Turnbull a declared progressive — the political risk deepens for the Liberal and National parties.

    How do they retain the support of conservative voters? How do they manage the fragmentation represented by Hanson and, to a lesser extent, by Cory Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives? The emergence of ­Donald Trump sharpens this dilemma because he splinters conservative opinion into camps fighting over whether he is saviour or demon. Turnbull’s ban on ministers having sexual relations with their staff formalises what should be the case anyway. Yet it also mirrors a far bigger cultural revolution — the private life is now being increasingly subjected to new public norms. In companies, universities and government, this directional shift takes different forms but is unmistakable — personal discretion and liberty are being compromised in the name of identity rights and respect. This is a progressive, not a conservative, movement. It means libertarianism is being sacrificed to identity justice, a process catching many people out. It assumes people cannot be allowed to pursue relationships freely because of the risk of exploitation on the basis of power or gender. The progressive quest is for new rules and regulations to govern human relations.

    This is not just about halting sexual abuse or harassment, an essential goal. The progressive vanguard has moved far beyond this — it is now focused on power and argues that consensual sexual relations based on a power imbalance are suspect on grounds of exploitation. Just think about that crazy idea.

    It is one thing for Turnbull to justifiably take a stand and say ministers cannot have sex with their own staff. But there is a more momentous cultural shift under way, fed by the cult of victimisation, to impose even more rules on human sexual behaviour in the name of halting the supposedly limitless abuses of power that plague us daily.

  25. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    He said it was possible to ­“almost pick” which children would end up at risk simply by looking at the social activity of their parents and that some of the agencies responsible for tackling those problems had become despairing and lazy.

    No. They had listening too closely to a well-crafted Parliamentary ‘apology’ for the shown to be spurious ‘stolen generations’.
    The various welfare agencies had thus become too scared to act in favour of the children.
    This abused two year old should be the catalyst for an immediate swoop and remove agenda.

    Well, I can dream, can’t I?

    Obviously most of these ‘Bronx” children should have been removed from harm already.

  26. H B Bear

    Is there anything a modern Lieboral likes doing than talking about Liberal Party values and policies from the backbench or Opposition?

    We’ve heard it all before Tony.

  27. Leigh Lowe

    Instead, Turnbull did what he often does in a crisis. He dithered.

    Yes.
    But it gets worse.
    On the rare occasions when he does act, he inevitably picks the wrong issue and jumps the wrong way.
    Two things drive him …
    (1) He asks himself “What would Tony do?” then does the opposite.
    (2) What will Lucy’s Wednesday tennis girls group say?

  28. Johanna, you are right about “change management” theory being around for ages.
    Straight out of Change Management 101, TAFE Management Certificate class 1983 (ish):

    Exodus 18:21 New International Version (NIV)
    21 But select capable men from all the people—men who fear God, trustworthy men who hate dishonest gain—and appoint them as officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties and tens.

    Voila! Our first management hierarchy.

  29. H B Bear

    But, then, migration is an emotional topic. Take John Howard’s 2001 election campaign launch speech when, following a wave of unauthorised arrivals, he famously declared: “We will decide who comes to this country and the circumstances in which they come.”

    Before throwing open the doors and presiding over 300.000+ arrivals a year. Not exactly surprising from The Father of Middle Class Welfare. Always check the actions not the words of a modern Lieboral.

    Of course Howard was talking about the clients of Indonesian and ME criminal syndicates that are nothing to do with migration at all but don’t let details like that get in the way of the narrative.

  30. Myrddin Seren

    A TEACHER who identifies as ‘gender neutral’ has divided a northern district school.

    The science teacher started the 2018 school term by asking the class to call them Mx, not miss, missus or mister.

    You gotta laugh, a science teacher…………………………………………….

    And the school administration thought there was no need to heads up anyone or lay some ground work for this.

    2017 Teacher X was a Mr or Ms ( maybe a bit butch or femme – but addressed as Mr or Ms ).

    2018 Teacher X is one of Spacechook’s 647 different genders – or all of the above.

    Principal, Deputy, Science Head – all shrug shoulders….Probably as there are no guidelines as to HOW to break the news to the school without risking being dragged before the HRC, it is simply stand back and let it roll, out of sheer self-preservation.

  31. C.L.

    Paul Kelly, as usual, ignores the bellowing hairy mammoth in the room:

    Conservatives these days excel at drum-beating, making a lot of noise, writing a lot of articles and losing every substantial battle. They are fragmented, intellectually confused and strategically inept. Much of the nation is still conservative in its instincts but this constituency is denied inspiring or effective leadership.

    Conservatives lost the issue of same-sex marriage. They are likely to lose the issue of religious freedom. They are losing the battle over legalising euthanasia. On almost every front from climate change to coal to gender politics to Western civilisation heritage, they are on the defensive.

    One word, Paul … no, three: left-wing media.

  32. C.L.

    But it isn’t all the media’s fault.
    It is true that the Liberal Party point blank refuses to fight for any principle.

  33. Des Deskperson

    ‘It would have happened anyway. Just look at the UK, Canada, the US and Europe. They all went down the same path.’

    It was the Hawke government, inspired, like most Australian ‘innovation’ by trends oversea, that implemented policies and programmes designed to improve performance and accountability in the APS by focussing on better and more responsible management and integrating the service more closely into the broader economic and industrial framework.

    This was good in many ways – streamlined systems, devolved decision-making, outsourcing of work better done by other sectors, procedures for actually getting rid of dud employees – though they never went far enough – but the downside was that it opened up the system to managerialist mountebanks, carpet-baggers and fad surfers, hence the crap just delineated by Johanna and others.

  34. Leigh Lowe

    – but the downside was that it opened up the system to managerialist mountebanks, carpet-baggers and fad surfers, hence the crap just delineated by Johanna and others.

    Don’t be labouring under the misapprehension that it is any different in medium/ large private corporations.

  35. Mark A

    C.L.
    #2642193, posted on February 21, 2018 at 8:55 am
    Just make sure they don’t design their ideal garden rather than yours.

    If you don’t provide a plan of yours cast in stone, that’s precisely what you usually end up with.

  36. Caviar

    Seppo Kael

    Vahid Vakiloroaya

    Karim Amin

    Deport them

  37. Caviar

    I wonder if we should do away with tax deductions all together. We could the fire 90% of the ATO

  38. Tom

    One particular motivation behind programs like Broward County’s was the pressure from multiple sources to reduce the statistical disparity between black and Hispanic student arrests on one hand and white and Asian student arrests on the other.

    By virtue of his name alone, Nikolas de Jesús Cruz, the adopted son of Lynda and Roger Cruz, became a statistical Hispanic. As such, authorities at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland had every reason not to report his troubling and likely criminal behavior to the police.

    Thanks, Bruce of Newk. I knew there must have been some progressivist lunacy at work in Broward county. The mayor is a black female Democrat moozley whose company was busted for Medicaid fraud in 2013.

  39. John Constantine

    The whole point of mass importation of people not fluent in English is to comply with our unswerving commitment to the transnational conventions on decolonisation and the diluting of the free living, English speaking, racist settler diaspora.

    Conventions drafted by and voted into existence by totalitarianism.

  40. OldOzzie

    WOW! Mueller Indicts London Lawyer Regarding Interview on His Work with Ukrainian Ministry — IN 2012!

    We are witnessing the most corrupt and expansive witch hunt in US history!
    The Salem witch trials have nothing on Robert Mueller!

  41. johanna

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2642156, posted on February 21, 2018 at 7:59 am

    Dob in a colleague. That’s the message the Australian Tax Office is sending to staff in the wake of concerns about time wasting.
    In a memo to employees the Australian Tax Office wants staff to report colleagues who take too long to have their lunch, or waste time reading newspapers at work.

    Horrific. Robespierre would be proud of that. It’s no way to run an efficient organization having people ‘dobbing’ each other all over the place. Managers at a certain level of seniority are the people who should be keeping their eye on how people perform, not colleagues who will inevitably include the perpetually jealous or outraged or those who are simply nasty. When you dismiss managers and have only leaderless ‘teams’ this is the end result; no-one is in charge.

    Well said. WTF are managers being paid for?

    I vividly remember calling in a chap who nominally worked for me (he did SFA) when I was a manager in the APS, to talk about his flextime sheets.

    The sheets had a remarkable symmetry which always resulted in him accumulating time off. That did not gel with my observations of his attendance.

    The kicker was a Monday when, as usual, he claimed to have worked a half an hour above his 8.21. When I pointed out that it was a public holiday, he wasn’t the least embarrassed. Apparently, it was just a clerical error in his fabrications. No harm, no foul. He really couldn’t understand why I was even raising it.

    There was nothing I could do about it. He would never be sacked, or even demoted, for fiddling his flextime sheets. But, I rode him like the harridan I can be and he eventually resigned.

    It made me unpopular with his mates, but I don’t care.

    As I said above, making real change in the public service requires brute force.

  42. Leigh Lowe

    Hey ZK2A … still overjoyed at the USD 55 cent (AUD 75 cents) dividend from BHP last night?
    BHP down AUD 1.50 at the open this morning.

  43. John Constantine

    The Ponzi population scheme that uses debt to mass import Big Government client citizens to dilute the Anglosphere settler culture is our decolonialising strength.

    What a brilliant idea Julie Bishop.

  44. P

    Pickles #2642236, posted on February 21, 2018 at 9:57 am

    Refreshing honesty.

    Very interesting vid. Thanks.

  45. OldOzzie

    Facebook Ad Executive Rob Goldman Apologizes for having “Uncleared Thoughts”…

    Good grief, I doubt there is a more apropos example of how liberal echo-chambers generate a sketchy group-think compliance mindset.

    After President Trump re-tweeted a discussion thread from Facebook VP of Ads Rob Goldman, which cited analysis done last year of Russian ad purchases/engagement, the liberal hive instantly attacked the executive.

    According to Wired.Com Rob Goldman quickly began apologizing for expressing “uncleared thoughts”, where those thoughts are actually based on facts – but run counter to the necessary liberal narrative – so they must be repelled at all costs.

    This you have to read:

    (Via Wired) On Friday morning, just before 10am on the West Coast, the office of special counsel Robert Mueller published his indictment of 13 Russian operatives for interfering in the US election. The document was 37 pages, and it mentioned Facebook 35 times. It detailed how Russian operatives used the platform to push memes, plan rallies, create fake accounts, suppress the vote, foment racism, and more.

    […] But then, roughly eight hours after the indictment appeared online, Rob Goldman, a VP for ads for Facebook, decided he had a few points to add to the debate. He was just freelancing, and had not cleared his thoughts with either Facebook’s communications team or its senior management.

    […] With Mueller’s indictment, according to multiple people at the company, everyone felt that Facebook had done something right. The 35 mentions clearly showed that Facebook had fully cooperated with authorities. Many of the details in the indictment, particularly from pages 25 to 30, which include details of messages sent between private Facebook accounts, were given to Mueller by Facebook. That could have been a good story. But then Rob Goldman decided to weigh in, using a rival platform. He now has 10,500 Twitter followers, but a few fewer friends at work.

  46. OldOzzie

    Byron York: Devin Nunes’ 10 questions about the Trump dossier

    1. When and how did you first become aware of any of the information contained in the Steele dossier?
    2. In what form(s) was the information in the Steele dossier presented to you? By whom? (Please describe each instance)
    3. Who did you share this information with? When? In what form? (Please describe each instance)
    4. What officials actions did you take as a result of receiving the information contained in the Steele dossier?
    5. Did you convene any meetings with the intelligence community and/or law enforcement communities as a result of the information contained in the Steele dossier?
    6. When did you first learn or come to believe that the Steele dossier was funded by a Democrat-aligned entity?
    7. When did you first learn or come to believe that the Steele dossier was funded by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and/or Hillary for America (Clinton campaign)?
    8. When did you first become aware that the Steele dossier was used to obtain a FISA order on Carter Page?
    9. Was President Obama briefed on any information contained in the dossier prior to January 5, 2017?
    10. Did you discuss the information contained in the Steele dossier with any reporters or other representatives of the media? If so, who and when?

  47. Senile Old Guy

    SMH:

    A rising star [senator Linda Reynolds] inside the Turnbull government has called for a national debate on introducing mixed gender competitions to professional sports, asking why women are segregated from competing against men in codes like the AFL, NRL and rugby union.

    Can anyone enlighten me on this? I cannot recall any significant achievements of S. L. Reynolds, so why is she a “rising star”?

  48. OldOzzie

    Fathers and daughters: Have we lost our minds?
    EDITORIAL

    Perhaps it is time to give up on Western Civilization if something as innocent and inoffensive as a Father-Daughter Dance has been ground to dust by the gears of political correctness.

    The Hampton Parent Teacher Association voted in November to change its Daughter’s Choice Dance to a family dance, bowing to the onslaught on gender neutrality.

    Are people really walking around so eager to be offended that dads sharing a special night with their little girls must be sacrificed?

    We can be equal without being identical. Hampton fathers looking to restore their local tradition insist that boys who wanted to attend were never turned away. Not all girls have fathers. Some have two. There is nothing exclusionary or judgmental in acknowledging the father-daughter relationship, and giving it an evening in the spotlight.

    Attempts to eradicate any reference to a traditional family structure from public life are not about inclusion. We can protect and value family structures that differ from societal norms without pretending that such norms do not exist.

    Likewise, we should stop pretending that differences between boys and girls are only in our minds. This is madness.

  49. lotocoti

    Careful John C.
    Keep it up and Boris will be along with another post explaining why that attitude causes anti-semitism.
    Or something.

  50. Tintarella di Luna

    As I said above, making real change in the public service requires brute force.

    Anecdotal on this — a certain person we know was tasked with flushing out a particularly constipated bureaucracy – this person was competent, honest and determined — after 5 years and having got absolutely nowhere the person resigned. Comment made was there was a certain understanding about why Stalin slaughtered so many — it was the only way to change anything. So I guess these days Shakespeare’s Dick the Butcher would not start with the lawyers.

  51. OldOzzie

    Special Report
    What Robert Mueller & the Russians He Indicted Share in Common

    The bigger question is why he didn’t also indict Hillary and her dossier Democrats.

  52. Leigh Lowe

    Can anyone enlighten me on this? I cannot recall any significant achievements of S. L. Reynolds, so why is she a “rising star”?

    Vagina.

  53. Tintarella di Luna

    Can anyone enlighten me on this? I cannot recall any significant achievements of S. L. Reynolds, so why is she a “rising star”?

    can rising stars be dead stars? How tall is Senator Reynolds?

  54. Senile Old Guy

    Refreshing honesty.

    Rick Shine has been saying this for at least a decade, possibly longer. It is possible to reduce toad numbers in urban areas, like Darwin, but elsewhere, not so much. The only way would be with some sort of biological agent, but there has been little success in finding anything that would target just the toads.

  55. OldOzzie

    Another Perspective
    A Day at the FBI National Urgent Tipster Emergency Hot-Line Call Center

    At the Bureau, the entertainment never stops.
    (Background Music): Tonight’s Episode: The Animal

    ACT I

  56. egg_

    Turbines use avtur. Other name kerosene. Buodiesel can dussolve in it.

    Someone’s found a market for this bio-crap by “cutting” kero with it?

    What’s this (GM) canola-derived sh1te that Qantas is using?

  57. Leigh Lowe

    Rick Shine has been saying this for at least a decade, possibly longer. It is possible to reduce toad numbers in urban areas, like Darwin, but elsewhere, not so much. The only way would be with some sort of biological agent, but there has been little success in finding anything that would target just the toads.

    Mmmyes.
    The cane toad was a biological control for cane beetle, so …

  58. OldOzzie

    The Right Prescription
    Mueller’s Sop to the Slavering Media

    The multi-headed beast must be fed so he can continue his search for a crime.

    Having anxiously watched Robert Mueller blunder around the Beltway for a year with his metal detector and tinfoil hat, the legacy media were doubtlessly relieved Friday when he seemed to have finally found something they could sink their teeth into. Sadly, for them, there isn’t much to his indictment. All it confirms is the blindingly obvious reality that Russia interferes in American elections. Because we are the big dog and they are the mangy tail that would wag us, the Kremlin tried to influence us via Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat. The indictment doesn’t even claim this hare-brained scheme worked.

  59. Leigh Lowe

    Turbines use avtur. Other name kerosene. Buodiesel can dussolve in it.

    Someone’s found a market for this bio-crap by “cutting” kero with it?

    What’s this (GM) canola-derived sh1te that Qantas is using?

    The three considerations for fuel in a high performance single-engine combat aircraft should be ..
    (1) Safety;
    (2) Efficiency of Performance;
    (3) Nothing else

  60. Turnbull’s ban on ministers having sexual relations with their staff formalises what should be the case anyway. Yet it also mirrors a far bigger cultural revolution — the private life is now being increasingly subjected to new public norms. In companies, universities and government, this directional shift takes different forms but is unmistakable — personal discretion and liberty are being compromised in the name of identity rights and respect. This is a progressive, not a conservative, movement. It means libertarianism is being sacrificed to identity justice, a process catching many people out. It assumes people cannot be allowed to pursue relationships freely because of the risk of exploitation on the basis of power or gender. The progressive quest is for new rules and regulations to govern human relations

    This makes no sense. Libertarianism is not a conservative movement. Conservatives have consistently argued that public norms govern areas of our private lives, for exapmle, marriage, and that the distingration of these norms would only naturally lead to the establishment of far more intrusive governance of our private and public relations. Which is precisely what we are seeing now.

  61. OldOzzie

    A Further Perspective
    The Economy Is Booming

    Why Americans should thank President Trump.

    I did not support Donald Trump for president. I recall arguing with some of my pro-Trump Consumer Technology Association (CTA) board members in 2016 — smart business leaders who were convinced that as president, Trump would drive U.S. economic growth. I was skeptical and focused on Trump’s personal, divisive attacks.

    But within hours of Trump winning the election and the Republicans holding on to the Senate, I went on record saying Trump would grow the economy by “knowing when to step back, cut burdensome rules and let businesses innovate and thrive.” I also believed — correctly — that he would view the stock market as a “real-time measure of his economic success.” Since then, I have remained bullish, based on a growing global economy and the actionable steps President Trump has taken to make the U.S. economy better.

    President Trump’s plan is working. Despite recent stock market volatility, the economy is strong and the stock market has experienced growth. During President Trump’s first year in office, the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 31 percent and the S&P 500 grew 23 percent. Unemployment is down to 4.1 percent. The number of Americans working full-time has grown to a record 154 million, and we just added 200,000 jobs in January. Consumer confidence is high. Inflation and gas prices remain low.

    It is a commonly held belief in Washington that the president gets too much blame and too much credit for the health of the economy. But in this case, I believe President Trump deserves much of the credit for the nation’s economic success. Here’s why:

  62. C.L.

    America wetting its pants about 13 dudes on the internet trolling the election must be the absolute nadir of this once great republic. But then again, it’s all theatre. The MediaCrat Party is actually pretending to be outraged by the naughty 13 because the Mueller pseudo-indictments are nothing more than a retro-fitted justification of Obama’s, Clinton’s and the FBI’s illegal behaviour.

  63. Senile Old Guy

    The Northern Territory Acting Chief Minister and Police Commissioner will meet in Tennant Creek today, as crisis talks continue over a spike in crime that has left one man dead and a two-year-old girl hospitalised. As part of the rollout of the Banned Drinker Register, the NT Government has stopped requiring police to patrol bottle shops to restrict alcohol sales.

    The BDR treats everyone as a potential criminal (ID required to buy alcohol) but fails to target the problem; as it did last time it was tried. There is no solid proof that the CLP approach was better — it was not really run for long enough — but the ALP BDR was ineffective the first time it was tried and is equally ineffective now, despite the inconvenience for law abiding people.

  64. EvilElvis

    Our previous young man has moved on to better things, as I had encouraged him to do. He was a hard worker and our garden needs more landscaping than it does gentle weed pulling

    Oh, Lizzie. Does that means he’s still on the payroll but has just been moved inside to trim your hedges?

    I can’t wait for the next installment you horticultural minx, you. 😉

  65. egg_

    He said integration was “undoubtedly a problem” when a large number of migrants on the skilled program could not get managerial positions.

    Probably due to ESL IMHO – dangerous on the ‘shop floor and a hindrance in Management; the issue has never been formally addressed IIRC probably because DIVERSIDEE!!!

  66. Zyconoclast

    Langoulant inquiry: How Royalties for Regions created a WA budget black hole

    Only one in 10 projects had solid business case
    Under pressure to spend “buckets of money” allocated to RfR each year, due process went out the window, starting with the quality of project business cases.
    Nine out of 50 RfR projects examined by the inquiry had no business case, while others were poorly defined, selected and targeted.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-21/langoulant-report-on-how-royalties-for-regions-left-budget-hole/9467622

  67. W Hogg

    CNN focusses on the really big stuff:

    Political scientists rank Trump last, Lincoln first in presidential greatness survey

    Had they run the same survey a year into BHO’s caliphate, “balance” would have forced them to abstain from voting on him given the inherent unfairness of judging him before completing a full term.

    I confronted an extremist leftard suffering from TDS and TARD, speaking at an event recently. He is a writer for The Age. (BIRM) Having gone Literally Hitler on Drumpf I then posed the obvious question: Other than the nasty things he said as a candidate about some people, and his tweeting, specifically what actions as POTUS do you find
    a) harmful, and/or
    b) dictatorial?

    His response was effective “Well I can’t point to any specific actions I don’t like because he hasn’t really done anything yet. But Hitler because Mabo and the Vibe.” (No, he couldn’t find any references to the Constitution as T666 has actually taken quite an originalist stance to date and concentrated on repealing powers of the POTUS that were overreached by St 44.)

  68. Zatara

    America wetting its pants about 13 dudes on the internet trolling the election must be the absolute nadir of this once great republic.

    It might be, if anyone other than the MSM really gave a shit about it. But they don’t.

  69. C.L.

    Nothing from any Liberal about the corrupt (and lightning) dismissal of complaints against angry brown Muslim, Yassmin Abdel-Magied.

  70. struth

    I remember one time in Alice Springs a couple of German tourists going off their brain about having to show I.D. to buy alcohol at dat der Licka-land.

    They had restriction when alcohol could be sold, what type after what time and in what containers, and I.D required etc, etc, etc.
    Just made aboriginals drink harder and faster and pay more for it so their kids starved.
    Recently, a bottle of Jim Beam was sold in Maningrida for 500 bucks.
    And that’s not even a completely dry town.
    They have set drinking days, if you can believe that.

  71. LNP insider

    The media coverage will go through estimates and then more will be revealed. Meanwhile Barnaby loyalists are silly enough to feed the story by leaking who is working against Barnaby to journalists. Great strategy there!

    Internally Barnaby is pushing back at those disloyal threatening their preselections.

    Plus Barnaby is searching for a lower house seat for Canavan…

  72. struth

    America wetting its pants about 13 dudes on the internet trolling the election must be the absolute nadir of this once great republic.

    Did the FBI spot the commo Aussies that actually flew over to the states to campaign for the left?
    Who gave the Australian Labor Party a slap on the wrist fine?

  73. Bruce of Newcastle

    Facebook Ad Executive Rob Goldman Apologizes for having “Uncleared Thoughts”…

    The Waffen SJWs are running rampant in Silicon Valley..

    Like Peter Thiel, Tech Workers Feel Alienated by Silicon Valley ‘Echo Chamber’ (WSJ)

    Several tech workers and entrepreneurs also have said they left or plan to leave the San Francisco Bay Area because they feel people there are resistant to different social values and political ideologies. Groupthink and homogeneity are making it a worse place to live and work, these workers said.

    “I think the politics of San Francisco have gotten a little bit crazy,” said Tom McInerney, an angel investor who moved a decade ago to Los Angeles from the Bay Area.

    “The Trump election was super polarizing and it definitely illustrated—and Peter [Thiel] said this—how out of touch Silicon Valley was,” said Mr. McInerney, who describes himself as fiscally conservative, but socially liberal.

    Tim Ferriss, the tech investor and best-selling author of the “4 Hour Workweek,” moved to Austin, Texas, in December, after living in the Bay Area for 17 years, partly because he felt people there penalized anyone who didn’t conform to a hyper liberal credo.

    People in Silicon Valley “openly lie to one another out of fear of losing their jobs or being publicly crucified,” said Mr. Ferriss in a recent discussion on Reddit.

    Mr. Ferriss, who describes himself as socially liberal, said during the discussion that he found that Austin has a “a wonderful exploding scene of art, music, film, tech, food, and more,” adding that “the people are also—in general—much friendlier.”

    Austin is the leftiest bit of Texas. If San Francisco is getting so bad that lefties are fleeing to less lefty places it must be getting pretty ripe.

  74. Roger

    Political scientists rank Trump last, Lincoln first in presidential greatness survey

    Lincoln, who, declared a civil war when he ordered a blockade of southern ports and raised an army, usurping powers held only by Congress…who suspended habeus corpus and tried civilians before military courts…who established the first domestic intelligence agency to spy on Americans and who accrued more power to the Federal government than any president before him effectively creating the swamp that is Washington, the greatest?

    Tells us a lot about political scientists.

  75. egg_

    Take it from me, Melbourne is a complete nightmare to get around. If you drive, it takes an age. If you take public transport, be prepared for the sardine-tin experience.

    Are the Greek mafia still running the yellow cab taxis?

  76. egg_

    Internally Barnaby is pushing back at those disloyal threatening their preselections.

    Plus Barnaby is searching for a lower house seat for Canavan…

    The Turnbull poison spreads – the modern era of retail politics.
    Hang in there, Barn.

  77. Zatara

    ‘Teacher of the Year’ Blames Parents, Modern Culture for School Shootings

    Facebook post composed by a Florida “Teacher of the Year” for the 2017-2018 academic year has gone viral because it places the blame for mass shootings not on guns, but on a culture that coddles children.

    Until we, as a country, are willing to get serious and talk about mental health issues, lack of available care for the mental health issues, lack of discipline in the home, horrendous lack of parental support when the schools are trying to control horrible behavior at school (oh no! Not MY KID. What did YOU do to cause my kid to react that way?), lack of moral values, and yes, I’ll say it – violent video games that take away all sensitivity to ANY compassion for others’ lives, as well as reality TV that makes it commonplace for people to constantly scream up in each others’ faces and not value any other person but themselves, we will have a gun problem in school. Our kids don’t understand the permanency of death anymore!!!

    Parents: it’s time to STEP UP! Be the parent that actually gives a crap! Be the annoying mom that pries and knows what your kid is doing. STOP being their friend. They have enough “friends” at school. Be their parent. Being the “cool mom” means not a damn thing when either your kid is dead or your kid kills other people because they were allowed to have their space and privacy in YOUR HOME.

    It’s about 20 years ago this year I started my teaching career. Violence was not this bad 20 years ago. Lack of compassion wasn’t this bad 20 years ago. And God knows 20 years ago that I wasn’t afraid daily to call a parent because I KNEW that 9 out of 10 would cuss me out, tell me to go to Hell, call the news on me, call the school board on me, or post all over FaceBook about me because I called to let them know what their child chose to do at school….

    I’ll take a wild guess that the MSM isn’t pulling out all the stops to get her on TV and interview her.

  78. Bruce of Newcastle

    The cane toad was a biological control for cane beetle, so …

    The firearm was a non-biological control for the Redshirt, so …

    I like the implied hypocrisy of the ABC who are all in on the anti-gun lefty lunacy whilst not recognising that doing anything practical is as impractical as getting rid of cane toads.

    John Hinderaker had an excellent article about this last Sunday:

    Repeal the 2nd Amendment? Yes, Please Try

    Mere impossibility hasn’t stopped the left from yodelling at the moon though.

    Gun Control Hysteria Sweeps the Left (Hinderaker again, today)

    Sigh.

  79. Tom

    Leigh Lowe
    #2642178, posted on February 21, 2018 at 8:30 am
    Question.
    What sort of buffoon is Neil Cavuto on Fox?

    Answer: not as big a buffoon as Shepard Smith, FNC’s resident loony leftist, whose twisting of stories right down to making stuff up and recycling of CNN/DNC talking points prompted me yesterday to fire off a letter — something I rarely do — to FNC pointing out he’s doing more to damage the channel’s credibility in an hour each day than if they gave Nancy Pelosi a show.

    Cavuto, on the other hand, is just a line-and-length buffoon with a huge opinion of himself who’s not so bad he forces me to change the channel.

    Hope that helps, Leigh.

  80. Rae

    I vividly remember calling in a chap who nominally worked for me (he did SFA) when I was a manager in the APS, to talk about his flextime sheets.

    The sheets had a remarkable symmetry which always resulted in him accumulating time off. That did not gel with my observations of his attendance.

    The kicker was a Monday when, as usual, he claimed to have worked a half an hour above his 8.21. When I pointed out that it was a public holiday, he wasn’t the least embarrassed. Apparently, it was just a clerical error in his fabrications. No harm, no foul. He really couldn’t understand why I was even raising it.

    There was nothing I could do about it. He would never be sacked, or even demoted, for fiddling his flextime sheets. But, I rode him like the harridan I can be and he eventually resigned.

    It made me unpopular with his mates, but I don’t care.

    As I said above, making real change in the public service requires brute force.

    Imaginative, but still total BS.

  81. hzhousewife

    Yet it also mirrors a far bigger cultural revolution — the private life is now being increasingly subjected to new public norms. In companies, universities and government, this directional shift takes different forms but is unmistakable — personal discretion and liberty are being compromised in the name of identity rights and respect.

    Auntie L became pregnant in 1943, she was living with her in-laws while Uncle L went back to New Guinea with the Army. As the pregnancy progressed, her mother-in-law forbade her to waddle down the street for fear the neighbours, who KNEW Uncle L was away, may conclude that Auntie L had been a naughty woman.
    Ambrose Bierce said ” There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we don’t know”.

  82. C.L.

    ‘Teacher of the Year’ Blames Parents, Modern Culture for School Shootings

    It was feminists and leftists who trivialised to nothing life itself and the most vulnerable of people (Roe v. Wade); it was feminists and leftists who infected academe with the plague bacillus of relativism; it was feminists and leftists who cheered the destruction of families and marriage; it was feminists and leftists who encouraged mothers to virtually abandon their children; it was feminists and leftists who denigrated masculinity and fatherhood, creating millions of despairing, maladjusted adolescent boys; it was feminists and leftists who taught individuals to be enraged with institutions as a matter of existential course. The culture of school shootings was created by the left. They are morally responsible. Once you raise to the majesty of law the ‘right’ to slaughter Down Syndrome children to extinction and throw born alive babies into garbage bins (as supported by Barack Obama) there is no enormity or pathology into which a society is not bound to fall.

  83. thefrolickingmole

    Theres that smell of mothballs and moldy mummie crotch again, spiced with the tang of black and gold skin lotion.

    Fuck off rae.

  84. candy

    Maybe the public service should use Kronos, if they don’t already.
    Some companies use Kronos also for lunch breaks as well and if a person is back late pay is docked.

  85. Neil

    I like the implied hypocrisy of the ABC who are all in on the anti-gun lefty lunacy

    Ronald Reagan was for gun control

  86. Caviar

    Can anyone enlighten me on this? I cannot recall any significant achievements of S. L. Reynolds, so why is she a “rising star”?

    I hope she keeps rising. Create mixed gender football so we no longer have to hear about women’s leagues. As I bonus I expect to be heartily amused when the first 300lb roid munching forward runs over football Barbie like a steam train over a bicycle

  87. Caviar

    Rick Shine has been saying this for at least a decade, possibly longer. It is possible to reduce toad numbers in urban areas, like Darwin, but elsewhere, not so much. The only way would be with some sort of biological agent, but there has been little success in finding anything that would target just the toads.

    Put a bounty on the bastards. $5 a hoax maybe.

    Make it a minimum 1 year gaol, $20,000 fine and deportation (if applicable) for anyone who tries to rort the system by breeding them.

  88. Caviar

    $5 a hoax maybe.

    I don’t know what autocorrect has against toads though

  89. Top Ender

    The cane toad was a biological control for cane beetle

    Less three last night around our place…

  90. Bruce in WA

    How true.

    More here. You and I may not agree with all of them, but they are worthy of more than a quick glance.

    Scroll down the page.

  91. W Hogg

    Can anyone enlighten me on this? I cannot recall any significant achievements of S. L. Reynolds, so why is she a “rising star”?

    Having a uterus?

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