Roll up. Roll up. Get your Blockchain education here.

You’ve probably heard of blockchain. It’s the technology that powers a US$180billion cryptocurrency industry. But the truth is, bitcoin is only a small part of blockchain’s potential. We’re here to show you the big picture.

RMIT is the first Australian university to offer a dedicated blockchain short course:

Developing Blockchain Strategy.

This isn’t a course that is all about theory. We’ve partnered with industry leaders, like Accenture and Stone & Chalk, to develop a hands-on blockchain program. It’s a course for people who want to build real-world strategies and upskill fast. Less essay, more application.

Learn the foundations of blockchain, study with global thought leaders and get mentoring from industry experts.

So, ready to get started?

TIME COMMITMENT

8 weeks per course
(5-7 hours per week)

NEXT START DATE

19 March 2018 (Spots available)

PRICE Launch Special

A$ 1600 A$1300 GST inc.

 Learn about payment options here.

SKILL LEVEL

No entry requirements, critical thinking required.

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19 Responses to Roll up. Roll up. Get your Blockchain education here.

  1. Chris M

    Yes. Also they don’t accept cryptocurrency for payment.

  2. OneWorldGovernment

    Well done Sinclair and others at RMIT.

    Sounds fantastic.

    I know of a major (non bitcoin) application to take to the world right now.

    I’ll be glad when your course gains traction and more decision makers learn what it is about.

  3. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Excellent, Sinc. The price is a bargain. Don’t undersell it too much.
    I speak from experience as I’ve organized such university-industry courses in the past.
    Made a lot of money out of them for a certain university.
    It’s a CPE special for a number of industries who would be willing to pay.
    Send out some PR releases about it to relevant industry media and professional societies.
    Get it on their CPE radar. Chat to them re possibilities. If not already done, of course.
    Don’t want to presume to tell you how to suck eggs. 🙂

  4. Herodotus

    Blockchain – sounds like the tactic swampy activists use to stymy gas drillers and coal miners.

  5. struth

    I always feel uncomfortable around global thought leaders.

  6. flyingduk

    As an alternative, look also at ‘Ivan on Techs’ online ‘Blockchain Academy’ course from Sweden. I am 1/2 way through it now, have taken 25 pages of notes and learned an awful lot, and I was already a convert.

  7. flyingduk

    How secure is it seeing that the Japanese coincheck was hacked?

    Bitcoin itself has never been successfully hacked. Any reported hacks have instead involved insecure storage of it (analgous to your bank being robbed) rather than insecurity of the network itself. If you store your bitcoins securely, there is very little risk of a hack.

  8. Tel

    How secure is it seeing that the Japanese coincheck was hacked?

    If you use your credit card online you can get hacked just as easily, same with online banking. That’s not even getting into skimming devices used at ATM’s.

    Even with two-factor authentication I’ve seen one case where the mobile phone got hacked, and the two-factor code got taken by a bad guy who then attacked the bank account. Bitcoin does not make you either more or less vulnerable to these kind of attacks. Any piece of networked equipment is potentially at risk, especially when you consider that Operating System flaws get discovered years later.

    This is one of the reasons self-driving cars are guaranteed to fail, because software overall is getting less reliable and less secure as it gets more complex, and we have a long way to go just handling basic systems like secure payments. Every year there are billions of dollars lost to credit card fraud, and that’s still steadily growing.

  9. Ez

    How secure is it seeing that the Japanese coincheck was hacked?

    Although not proven, the Coincheck hack reeks of insider assistance.

    The hacker(s) had:
    (a) knowledge of Coincheck’s NEM being held entirely in a “hot wallet” (not cold storage like some of their other cryptos) ; and
    (b) they obtained the private key to that wallet, for access, from the exchange.

  10. Zatara

    If you use your credit card online you can get hacked just as easily, same with online banking. That’s not even getting into skimming devices used at ATM’s.

    Yes, and with most credit card/ ATM companies there is a limit to what they allow you to charge or withdraw and you can generally get reimbursed if the card gets “hacked”. They also have 24/7 security monitoring looking for anomalies, like a sudden, uncharacteristic, major withdrawal made in Ulan Bator.

    Many millions of dollars have been hacked out of various crypto-currency systems and some have even been irretrievably lost due to system errors. Those people will never see that money again.

  11. Leigh Lowe

    Can I pay using LoweCoin?

  12. BorisG

    I always feel uncomfortable around global thought leaders.

    Good point.

  13. BorisG

    Every year there are billions of dollars lost to credit card fraud

    yes but given that volume of transactions in cryptos is many orders of magnitude smaller, it looks like they have much higher proportion of hacks.

  14. BorisG

    analgous to your bank being robbed

    if my bank gets robbed I am unlikely even to notice.

  15. BorisG

    A$1300 GST inc.

    Cheeeeeeap

  16. Cpt Seahawks

    What happens to crypto currencies if electricity isn’t available?
    The magnetic pole reversal is occurring and who knows what will happen as the planet’s magnetic field weakens.

  17. John Constantine

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiemoy/2018/02/12/blockchain-disrupts-adult-industry-and-sextech/#6a201f0afba2

    Massive demand for secure, anonymous payment systems that can also accumulate ‘reputation’ points.

    Pay for robot brothel time with cryptocurrency, the nerds of the world demand it.

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