Monopolistic behaviour

The thing about the society we live in is that the state has a monopoly on the use of force.  And the thing about monopolies is that they like to destroy their competition through unscrupulous means, they tend to laziness and incompetence and they despise innovation.

Which brings me to the recent Florida school shooting.

Now Spartacus is not sure that he would support a US 2nd amendment in Australia, but when the body that has the monopoly on the use of force, on the condition of protecting citizens, is as incompetent as the law enforcement agencies in Florida, one has to wonder.

Consider the following:

1 – there was an armed guard on site during the Parkland Florida shooting, but he chose not to enter the school.  See here.

2 – On 5 February 2018, the FBI received a call from someone familiar with Nikolas Cruz warning that he was a risk of shooting up a school.  The FBI did not follow up.  See attached a CHILLING transcript of the warning call.  Trigger warning, really trigger warning, before you consider reading this.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Between the lines of these beautiful words is the right to self defense.  The was a factor in considering the inclusion of the 2nd amendment.

One must wonder.

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38 Responses to Monopolistic behaviour

  1. Driftforge

    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/966854507744374784.html

    May be a good starting point if you want to get past the tip of the iceberg.

  2. Irreversible

    Given the deaths it would seem decent and reasonable to avoid knee jerk polemics.

  3. RobK

    Relying on the State for anything is problematic in any kind of emergency. It is wise to be as self sufficient as possible. The wise State would encourage such preparedness. This is so whether the issue is fire, personal safety, economic security….whatever. When push comes to shove, expect to be fighting for your own well being.
    Disasters are always followed by debriefing asking how can we do it better next time, what have we learnt. Next time is always different and generally nothing much is learnt.

  4. Dr Fred Lenin

    I well remember the old Victorian SEC ,which had a monopoly on electricity generation and supply . It could never accumulate the reserves of cash needed for continual improvement ,as soon as the profit was announced.,the alp governments and communist unions looted it ,it ended up with a huge debt load ,a bloody monopoly of a nescesity borrowing money ? It was notorious for feather bedding ,when it was privatised thousands of employees were made redundant . and the system worked much better than it ever had ,the leftist money managers also broke the State Bank . It’s a pity the leftist money managers didn’t manage the pollies and bureaucrats pension funds ,bet that would cause some screaming

  5. Confused Old Misfit

    I would sure as hell support a 2nd amendment in Australia.
    But our legal systems differ. The US system is a system of negative rights for the state. That is, the rights of the state are defined. (US Constitution, Article [X] (Amendment 10 – Reserved Powers: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people) Any right not so defined is a right of the people).
    And ever since they they have been trying, via regulation and judicial fiat, to revert to the system under which we labour, that is a system where ALL rights are granted to the people by the state. Which comes from the divine right of Kings, passed down through Magna Carta to the nobility with the subsequent evolution to the parliamentary system.

  6. I seem to remember (reading history) that the US War of Independence was instrumental in the wording of the US Constitution and why the 2nd Amendment was included – to fight oppression and to keep the bastards honest. I also seem to remember that the British didn’t want a repeat in Australia and so allowed Australia was granted greater sovereignty so as to avoid a similar war.

  7. Should have been: I also seem to remember that the British didn’t want a repeat in Australia and so Australia was granted greater sovereignty, so as to avoid a similar war.

  8. rickw

    Now Spartacus is not sure that he would support a US 2nd amendment in Australia, but when the body that has the monopoly on the use of force, on the condition of protecting citizens, is as incompetent as the law enforcement agencies in Florida, one has to wonder.

    Australia had an “in effect” 2nd Amendment for most of its history: The people were armed and were lawfully able to use force to defend themselves.

    Now this inherited English Right has been comprehensively destroyed, look at the direction we are headed.

    We will have to learn the lesson again and the price will be paid in blood.

  9. Muddy

    Citizen militias as a counterpoint to the state. They’d be demonised and crushed, I know, but one wonders whether if they were strong enough, they might provide a skerrick of deterrence to the more liberty-denying activities of the omnipotent bureaucracy? Fantasy perhaps.

  10. md

    when the body that has the monopoly on the use of force, on the condition of protecting citizens, is as incompetent as the law enforcement agencies leftist politicians, self-serving pretend-conservative politicians and politicised police and courts in Florida Australia, one has to wonder.

  11. As Mr. Jefferson pointed out,
    When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.

  12. Marcus

    Consider the following:

    3 – The local sheriff seems to be a complete psycho.

    Per Mark Steyn:

    As to whether his department failed to take seriously the danger lurking in Nikolas Cruz’s online postings, well, cut them a bit of slack: it’s very easy to say things which sound in hindsight a little odd. For example:

    Lions don’t care about the opinions of sheep.

    Sounds a bit kooky, maybe? Who said it? Nikolas Cruz to a fellow teenager?

    Er, no. Sheriff Israel, responding to credible allegations of public corruption.

    Yeah, on top of the cowardice and potential corruption, megalomania seems to be an issue too in the local police department.

    Doesn’t inspire a lot of confidence.

  13. Tim Neilson

    Which comes from the divine right of Kings, passed down through Magna Carta to the nobility with the subsequent evolution to the parliamentary system.

    That may be the way it’s currently operating, but that has nothing to do with Magna Carta.

    The whole point of Magna Carta was that the kingship was a position created by the law, and the law defined both its existence and its limits. The king having no right or power to do certain things was correlative to citizens having liberties and immunities that the king couldn’t override.

    In the UK, that state of affairs was, as you say, effectively abolished by the development of the doctrine of the supremacy of Parliament over the law.

    We’re in much the same position except that power is at least notionally divided between State and Commonwealth, not that that has proved any sort of protection in practice.

  14. Some thoughts on how micro-societies put a brake on things like monopolies, which at end of day impose Hobson’s choice on people.

    https://thepointman.wordpress.com/2018/02/23/its-the-parts-that-make-the-whole-and-its-greater-than-the-sum/

    Pointman

  15. Stephen

    The price is high but that is the price of liberty –
    “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty”.
    John F. Kennedy

  16. Caviar

    You forget about the 3 armed deputies who arrived and refused to enter while kids were murdered.

  17. Caviar

    They’d be demonised and crushed, I know

    Would they? Read up on 4th generation warfare. The world’s largest army lost in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq…

    Every time there is a terrorist attack in Europe government’s shutdown the goddamn country. Chris Dorner paralysed an entire city in America.

    It would take less than a thousand Chris Dorner’s to bring Australia to it’s knees.

  18. manalive

    Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765) states:

    “… [the right to bear arms is] a natural right of resistance and self-preservation, when the sanctions of society and laws are found to be insufficient to restrain the violence of oppression”.

    Spartacus and some of his readers may have a legal background and be aware of the history, I found this summary of the difference between English and US law helpful.

  19. Crossie

    You forget about the 3 armed deputies who arrived and refused to enter while kids were murdered.

    Yes, they too were cowering behind their police car until officers from another precinct arrived and demanded to know why they did not try to engage the shooter.

    What’s even worse Sherrif Israel went on that CNN program with student accusers and blamed the NRA for the deaths of the students and staff knowing full well that his deputies could have saved at least some of those lives. Truly an odious character.

  20. Confused Old Misfit

    Tim Neilson
    #2645817, posted on February 25, 2018 at 5:32 pm

    I was trying to avoid getting too verbose and hence avoided the nuance.
    Without Magna Carta you don’t get to where we now are. While it was essentially a fight for power among the ruling class of the time it was a seminal moment in the devolution of power to “the people”.
    But despite the evolution our system has very little formal protection from the whims of our ruling class. They can disperse or retract rights and privileges as suits a majority of our so called representatives.
    We are, as you say, exposed.

  21. duncanm

    the only state actor which seems to have the right idea is the Swiss… though they have drifted off course a little with their changes to military ammo.

    The laws are intended to hinder foreign incursions, but they’re an excellent way to keep the government in check.

  22. yarpos

    Seems to be a massive confusion of issues in this item and the responses.

    Second amendment is not about a right to violence , its about the right to bear i.e. possess arms
    Second amendment is not about a citizen militia. The comma in the wording is signficant. The militia is the preamble, then it simply says that the people also have the right to bear arms.
    Competence of law enforcement is a secondary issue, the reality is its unlikely that they will be able to attend in a useful timescale (even if eveything is optimal). Ask anyone who has had a home invasion how long before they saw a uniform, how long to respond to an armed rob, how long to arrive on the scene of any mass shooting.

  23. Leo G

    The whole point of Magna Carta was that the kingship was a position created by the law, and the law defined both its existence and its limits. The king having no right or power to do certain things was correlative to citizens having liberties and immunities that the king couldn’t override.

    You don’t appear to have studied the document, in particular the three extant clauses of the Henry III Magna Carta of 1225AD.
    The charter was created under the authority of the king, so the kingship was not reestablished under some other authority. It was a essentially a financial deal, assigning certain rights in return for money to a small number of very privileged individuals, and to the Church.

  24. J.H.

    Brazil has had 60 000 Murders, most by guns….. Yet guns in Brazil are controlled. There is a movement to change this in Brazil and give Brazilian citizens similar rights as Americans…..

    https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/03/28/472157969/brazil-has-nearly-60-000-murders-and-it-may-relax-gun-laws

  25. Macspee

    Fred Lenin
    Spot on. CEO, Jim Smith (little Jim, to distinguish him from a larger one) told Cain that if the SECV was an ordinary company he and his directors would be prosecuted for paying dividends from capital. Cain, of course took no notice.

  26. Iampeter

    Don’t need to read between the lines because the role of government is spelled out in the very next line where it says “That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men”.

    In other words what the founders were saying was that everyone has rights and that a government is instituted to protect rights. That’s it. What this means when applied to firearm ownership is that since owning a gun is not a rights violation it should not be illegal in a rights protecting/free country.

    It’s not about monopolies on the use of force (although that’s legitimate function of government). It has nothing to do with self defense which is just an added bonus.

    It’s about rights protecting government.

  27. Tel

    The thing about the society we live in is that the state has a monopoly on the use of force.

    Obviously that’s not true, else a school kid would not be shooting up a school, and gangs would not be ravaging inner city Melbourne.

  28. 2dogs

    a monopoly on the use of force

    It’s something entirely unnecessary.

    When police forces were introduced, people were rightly concerned at the development, but were reassured by the Peelian principles, particularly #7.

    But #7 has been slowly eroded ever since, and grand juries were snuffed out without barely a murmur.

  29. Confused Old Misfit

    But #7 has been slowly eroded ever since, and grand juries were snuffed out without barely a murmur.

    As in all things, those that would be our betters, those that know what is best for us, infest all walks of life. They call themselves progressives. They should be called REgressives as what they would take us back to is the tribal milieu with all of us subservient to “The Big Man”.

  30. Muddy

    Caviar
    #2645839, posted on February 25, 2018 at 6:06 pm

    They’d be demonised and crushed, I know

    Would they? Read up on 4th generation warfare. The world’s largest army lost in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq…

    Perhaps I could have been more specific there. What I meant was not being crushed in an armed contest, but by legislative and bureaucratic means, the apparent ‘need’ for the same having been heavily influenced by the feral media and associated posses whose collectivism would be threatened by a competing collectivism (of a sorts).

    As tempted as I am to respond to your Vietnam comment, that would open up a whole other can of worms. I will only state the historical fact that South Vietnam was finally conquered by a multi-divisional conventional assault.

  31. Dave in Marybrook

    a monopoly on the use of force
    Please, Sparty: the monopoly of the use of force.
    Anthony Burgess taught me. So much more clearer.

  32. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I will only state the historical fact that South Vietnam was finally conquered by a multi-divisional conventional assault.

    After having repelled one attempt at conventional invasion in 1972.

  33. Cy

    @yarpos:

    The Militia is actually made up of “the people “. It is an instrument of the state set up to protect against the potential over-reach of the federal government. All the able bodied men of a particular state would form that militia. The people refers to the citizens in that state who are not military or professional soldiers but ordinary people, I think that’s how Hamilton defined it.

    It’s all in the Federalist papers. People argue about definitions of terms used in the 2nd amendment but each aspect of all the original amendments were thoroughly discussed at the time they were being drafted and those discussions documented later in the form of the Federalist papers.

  34. harry buttle

    given the lindt cafe siege, does anyone believe Australian police forces are braver or more competent than broward counties were?

    or that our police commissioners are any better than sherriff Israel?

    and if you don’t then you had better start voting for the few parties that will let you defend yourself.

  35. Caviar

    I will only state the historical fact that South Vietnam was finally conquered by a multi-divisional conventional assault.

    Vietnam was not won on the battlefield. Vietnam was won on the tv screens and in the newspapers. Vietnam was a propaganda war and the left won and has been winning ever since.

  36. Caviar

    Second amendment is not about a citizen militia. The comma in the wording is signficant. The militia is the preamble, then it simply says that the people also have the right to bear arms.

    It’s the other way around. A militia is just a citizen army called up when needed. Well regulated means well supplied. For a militia to be called up and be well supplied requires already armed citizens who can respond go the call.

  37. Zatara

    The world’s largest army lost in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq…

    Yes, the Chinese, with the worlds largest army, lost while invading Vietnam in 1979.

    Neither China nor India, with the worlds largest 2 armies, have fought in Afghanistan in the last century.

    The Iraqi army was rated #10 in size when they lost Iraq.

  38. JohnA

    Dave in Marybrook #2646022, posted on February 25, 2018, at 10:02 pm

    a monopoly on the use of force

    Please, Sparty: the monopoly of the use of force.
    Anthony Burgess taught me. So much more clearer.

    “more” is redundant. 🙂

    But the State only has the monopoly of the legitimate use of force, surely?

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