Open Forum: March 3, 2018

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1,448 Responses to Open Forum: March 3, 2018

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  1. Sally McManus has drawn parallels between illegal industrial ­action and the resistance movement in Nazi Germany after re­iterating her belief that unjust laws can be broken.
    The ACTU secretary has told ABC TV’s National Wrap program that the ability to break an “unjust” law was a “fundamental part of democracy”.

    McManus is one sick unit.

  2. None

    Leak is good. Larry Pickering is wicked. Thanks Tom.

  3. rickw

    Thanks Tom, Mike Lester is indeed brilliant!

  4. John Comnenus

    Would someone please stop Bolt hysterically beating up on Barnaby? Someone needs to explain a couple of pertinent employment law facts to Bolt and his posse of puritans. You can’t lawfully sack someone because they are having an affair nor can you lawfully sack someone for being pregnant. There was no lawful means to do anything to Ms Campion except what they did – move her into another office where she didn’t have a conflict of interest. Failure to find alternative employment for Campion would almost certainly have constituted an unfair dismissal. So the Commonwealth almost certainly acted lawfully and took the only reasonable option available to it in the circumstances.

    But why is Bolt so harsh on Joyce? He is hardly the first ‘family values’ and ‘marriage’ man to fall for the younger staffer. Tawdry, yes, but a crime? no. I don’t recall Bolt going in this hard on Tony Burke or Bob Hawke who Bolt worked for. Hawke was having an affair whilst PM and married to Hazel. Hawke campaigned widely with the popular Hazel whilst having an affair with Blanche D’Alpuget. And let’s not forget whilst Blanche was sleeping with the PM she was getting Commonwealth patronage and work. So please Bolt, spare us your sanctimonious hypocrisy.

    And in a final twist, I vaguely seem to recall that the reason the Telegraph outed Joyce was because he got his staffer pregnant. Now that doesn’t even look to be true.

    Whilst Bolt, the media and Turnbull decry bullying in all its forms, they have had no compunction in lining up day after day to kick a bloke while he is down causing further harm to Joyce’s estranged family, Campion and Joyce. And why have they kicked him, not because he broke any law, but simply because the puritans don’t like the moral choice Joyce made with a consenting adult. The bullying of Joyce by Bolt and others is just disgusting to watch.

    I reckon they outed Joyce as payback for being against same sex marriage.

  5. notafan

    Hear Hear Mr Commenus.

    The confected outrage over Ms Campion’s employment changes are both a smokescreen and a deliberate ignoring of the fact that she was entitled to continue in employment.

  6. John Comnenus

    Absolutely not a fan.

    I am heartily sick of Bolt telling us how bad parliamentarians behaviour is whilst selectively bullying Joyce over his morality. It like he doesn’t remember how bad Parliament was when headkicker Keating was there. When Ros Kelly distributes all the pork barreling money on the infamous whiteboard.

  7. Tel

    You can’t lawfully sack someone because they are having an affair nor can you lawfully sack someone for being pregnant.

    Ahhh, the Fair Work Commission has already ruled in disagreement with your theory… some years back as it turns out.

    http://www.mondaq.com/australia/x/413510/employee+rights+labour+relations/Dealing+with+workplace+relationships+guidelines+for+HR+Managers

    The FWC’s recent decision, in M v Westpac Banking Corporation, to reject the unfair dismissal application of a Westpac manager who failed to disclose an office affair with his subordinate employee, is a case in point for anyone failing to disclose an office relationship.

    In situations where a manager forms a relationship with a subordinate, especially where the manager directly supervises the subordinate, the FWC is of the view that such relationships have the potential to create conflicts of interest.

    At least, that’s how it works in private employment. Can’t think of any reason why public servants should get a free pass on conflict of interest, if anything they should be held to a much higher standard.

  8. Neil

    Would a cattle dog do something like this?

    http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/animals/tribute-to-adored-tot-kamillah-killed-by-rottweiler/news-story/f7c5ea0cdf00bab5ad5d36b26248bccc

    FAMILY and friends have expressed their shock and anguish at the tragic death of a little girl who was mauled by a rottweiler on Saturday….“She was actually being walked by her mother in a pram on the way to her granny’s house just one block away,” Ms Boney wrote….It’s understood the dog jumped a fence before leaping on Kamillah….A beautiful little Angel grew her wings much too early. On the 3.3.18, little Kamillah was taken home

    If i was dictator of Australia i would ban rottweilers. Same goes for guns. Some types need to be banned

  9. Tel

    Here’s another description of the same case, which sounds very bloody close to what Barnaby was up to.

    https://www.austpayroll.com.au/announcements/bank-manager-s-dismissal-for-failure-to-disclose-personal-relationship-not-unfair

    Mr George Mihalopoulos (the Applicant) was employed by Westpac Banking Corporation (the Respondent), in the position of Wollongong Branch Bank Manager. In February 2014, the Applicant commenced a personal relationship with a subordinate employee and the two later lived together.

    Over the duration of the relationship, the Applicant advocated for the other employee to be promoted and receive career advancement opportunities, and following her transfer to another branch, attempted to negotiate her salary. The Applicant also spent a disproportionately high amount of time with the employee in comparison to other employees, including behind closed doors. The employee was promoted and received a pay rise from $58,000 per year to $75,000 per year.

    The relationship was not disclosed to the Respondent despite rumours in the workplace that it was taking place. Further, the Applicant denied that there was any truth to the rumours when he was specifically asked on two occasions by the Respondent’s Regional General Manager.

    The relationship ended in August 2014 after an interim AVO was issued against the Applicant by the employee. It was at this time that Applicant advised the Regional General Manager that he was in a relationship with the other employee and later, that he breached the AVO.

    On 22 September 2014, the Respondent terminated the Applicant’s employment for a number of reasons, including a failure to disclose a conflict of interest and dishonest conduct such that there was a loss of trust and confidence.

    IMHO the FWC got this one right.

  10. John Comnenus

    Tel,

    The point is that Campion didn’t stay in the office. They found her alternate employment, which was the legally correct thing to do. The workplace discrimination law makes it clear that you cannot terminate someone for being pregnant. Once Joyce was in an affair they moved Campion to another office which is what the law requires one to do.

  11. John Comnenus

    Terminating Campion when alternative employment existed would almost certainly constitute unfair dismissal.

  12. Tom

    If you have ever wondered why the Paywallian would appoint a blinkered, bigoted, ex-Guardian leftard with zero curiosity to compile the weekly Media Diary, which he has turned into a gossip column for his lefty journo mates, Google Andrew Bolt: I have more opinions than is healthy in a normal person to read Stephen Brook’s blinkered, bigoted, incurious, wooden profile of Blot, who has more talent in his little finger than Brook (putting aside well-made complaints about Blot like John Comnenus’s above). Link.

    The only good thing about Media Diary these days is that it has been given to Leak Junior to illustrate.

  13. Entropy

    The differences Tel between the Joyce affair and that FWA case are that
    the affair was well known, there was no hiding it. Even I had heard about Barnaby having an affair and his wife leaving him about six months ago, around the time the citizenship thing blew up. Heck it was even discussed on the Cat during the byelection. It was just the media wasn’t reporting it until it got a picture of Campion preggers. And Turnbull pretending he was ignorant is just contemptible like everything else about him.
    The moving Campion to another job was clearly organised by the workplace, and now it appears there was not the massive increase in pay misreported in the media.
    In the unfair dismissal case you describe it was the Joyce character, eg the person in authority that was given the flick, not the subordinate.
    Oh, and the little matter of the AVO.

    As for Joyce, what a sad, pathetic bundle of middle aged self destruction.

  14. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    So please Bolt, spare us your sanctimonious hypocrisy.

    Well, I’d wryly suggest there is a lot sanctimony about. Hypocrisy too.

    I have just defended myself from both on the thread on the Scaf case appeal.

    What I say has unaccountably gone into moderation, as many found happened on that thread.
    Perhap Sinc could give us some guidelines re moderation policies as they are opaque at present.

  15. JC

    Assange has broken, or helped break the biggest stories of the last 15 years. What a would be arragant eggnog.

    Now Ecuador embassy’s most famous lodger, ­Julian Assange, has spat at comments made on our Behind the Media podcast interview with ­former CNN war correspondent Michael Ware. CNN’s man in Baghdad during the Iraq War insurgency ventured the opinion that the Wikileaks founder is not a journalist. Ware called Assange a unmentionable nameduring the interview. “Assange, at best, is an archivist or a librarian or a webmaster. And I say that without trying to offend those professions. I feel (offended) on behalf of our profession when he tries to cloak himself in the ethics and the ­nobility of journalism because he’s more of a personal crusade to promote himself.” Assange cottoned on to it after Australian New York Times bureau chief Damien Cave sent out a tweet noting Ware’s descriptors, and responded: “Who would choose to class themselves among one of the least trusted, most dishonest, craven, careless, cynical, anti-intellectual, power obsessed, herd-like professions in existence whose incompetence & duplicity has led directly to the death and displacement of millions?” Who on earth would choose to be a journalist?…..

  16. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    You can pick up the car at hotel but it is advisable to organise it well in advance. Besides I hope you do kn0w that in Japan you do need an international sriving license?

    Boris, if you had bothered to read what I said, you would see that I have made it very clear that we are not going until May; thus we were organizing well in advance. Also, I mentioned that this is my third time in Japan, Hairy’s fifth, and that we have both driven extensively in that country. Of course we are aware of the need for such driving licenses (although you can get away with your local one sometimes).

    Why don’t people read what I actually say? So many blinkered and stupid ones just jump in to make a hit on someone they feel is fair game; which I am not. I ask people to ignore None’s silly so-called summaries upthread of my views on the Scaf case, and to read my comments on the relevant thread if they have an interest in what I actually think re the Appeal on Sentence there. You may have to wait for my final say to be released from moderation.

    I am going to dance off my justified irritation now.
    I may be some time. 🙂

  17. feelthebern

    What do you do with your dogs when you are o/s Lizzie?

  18. calli

    Ramirez for me for the Chuckle.

    Lester for the brutal truth.

  19. Baldrick

    Tom
    #2652202, posted on March 5, 2018 at 5:01 am
    Johannes Leak.

    I’m assuming that’s Alberscrici in the pilots seat. Nicely done.

  20. Baldrick

    Michael Trumble tanked again for the 28th Newspoll. Only 2 more to go before 💩💥

  21. Eyrie

    “Having individual machine logbooks for repairs, maintainance and daily safety checks, signed off by compliant persons only is their State desired outcome.

    Bastard Comrades..”

    Welcome to Australian PRIVATE aviation under CASA. Private pilots are regarded as criminals who have not been caught yet.

  22. Eyrie

    As for dogs, I know of a Blue heeler that took a dislike to a car and ripped all 4 tyres for no reason. Bastard thing should have been put down.

  23. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    South Africa says it has finally traced the source of a listeria outbreak that has killed 180 people in the past year – said to make it the worst in history.

    The source is a factory operated by Enterprise Foods in Polokwane in Limpopo.

    More facilities are being tested to see if they contributed to the outbreak which infected almost 1,000 people.

  24. Eyrie

    The Rottweiler in the killing of the little girl doesn’t appear to have been put down. Do the owner too.
    “There were 1196 dog attacks reported to NSW local councils from July-September 2017, with 125 children attacked and 36 people hospitalised.

    There were 1228 dog attacks during the same period last year, according to the Office of Local Government.”

    Imagine the outcry if this was guns.

  25. Boambee John

    C.L.
    #2652150, posted on March 5, 2018 at 1:07 am
    Exclusive in The Australian:

    Child sex abuse ‘tsunami’

    Child protection authorities are shocked by the scale of neglect and under-­reported sexual activity involving children in NT.

    It’s no exaggeration to say that Gillard’s royal commission looked the other way when it came to the sex abuse holocaust in Aboriginal communities. It couldn’t have cared less.

    Gillard’s Royal Commission did what she wanted. Provided lots of bad publicity that could implicitly be linked to Tony Abbott, with the added bonus of discrediting Christianity in general and the Catholic church in particular.

    In the 1950s and 1960s, Labor was generally the party of choice for Catholics. Not now.

  26. OldOzzie

    Labor vows to step up assault on the wealthy

    Shadow treasurer Chris Bowen will pave the way for more policies targeting the wealthy and possibly paring back legislated company tax cuts in a speech in which he will badge Labor’s approach as “Hawke-Keating refurbished”.

    In a scene-setting address to Per Capita to be delivered today, Mr Bowen says Labor will build on its announced plans to curb negative gearing, halve capital gains tax exemptions for investors, increase the top rate of income tax, and change the tax treatment of trusts.

    He said the medium-term assumptions that have the budget staying in surplus beyond 2020-21 are “crude” and, to shore up the nation’s finances, Labor will target the structural deficits left over from the days of the Howard government. But only those that apply to the well off.

    “The Howard/Costello largesse which largely benefits wealthier Australians continues to hamper the budget getting back to surplus,” he will say. “So it is fair to say that we have more to do to repair the budget and to pay for initiatives that are necessary and in the national interest.”

    It is understood Labor, which is favourite to win the next election, will not touch what is left of the private health insurance rebate which it means-tested when in government, but other areas, such as the tax treatment of superannuation in retirement, could be vulnerable.

    “An important part of any sensible fiscal strategy is identifying those tax concessions which eat away at the revenue base and reform them or abolish them in order to underpin both budget repair and the funding of new initiatives,” he will say.

    Mr Bowen lists un-means tested tax-free super in retirement as one of the profligacies of the Howard years, although Labor did back the 2016 budget measure in which a $1.6 million cap was introduced on the amount that can be transferred to super in retirement phase when earnings are tax-free. Additional savings can remain in an accumulation account where earnings are taxed at 15 per cent.

    ‘Full of holes’

    Mr Bowen said “the tax base remains full of holes and tax concessions and other loopholes go unreformed”.

    “The government has barely even taken a scalpel to tax concessions which largely accrue to wealthier Australians.”

    In doubting the medium-term assumptions that have the budget staying in surplus, Mr Bowen reaffirms Labor will not go ahead with the remainder of the government’s plans to cut company taxes.

    “Simply ensuring that the budget bottom line reflects the cost of the tax cuts does not mean they are funded,” he will say.

    “The fact is that the budget would be $65 billion better off over the decade if the tax cuts weren’t proceeded with.”

    This is a step back from his statement of a few weeks ago when he said Labor would consider company tax cuts but only when the budget was in surplus.

    Mr Bowen will give no commitment to keep the tax cuts already legislated – a reduced rate for firms with turnovers capped at $50 million a year – the cost of which is included in the $65 billion figure.

    In recent months, the government has accused labor of traducing the Hawke/Keating legacy because of economically populist positions such as opposing the company tax cuts, opposing a Medicare levy increase for those on lower incomes to help fund the National Disability Insurance Scheme, and favouring tax increases for those on higher incomes.

    The ethos remains

    Mr Bowen will say today’s challenges are different to those of 1983 but he will argue modern Labor retains the Hawke/Keating ethos.

    “Hawke and Keating didn’t lack for courage. They took on difficult fights and vested interests,” he will say.

    “Tax reform was a crucial part of this reform process. The capital gains tax and fringe benefits tax being particularly stark examples.”

    He will argue the Hawke-Keating model “was about fairness as well as bold change” and that Mr Hawke and Mr Keating “believed in strong fiscal management”.

    “While we have much to learn from the Hawke-Keating model, a Shorten Labor government will face a different set of challenges,” he will say.

    “Relying on a carbon copy of 1983 policies would be exactly equivalent of Hawke and Keating in 1983 proposing the same policies as Labor in 1948.

    “The ethos remains but the context is different.

    “This is what I mean when I talk about our approach to modern government being Hawke-Keating refurbished.”

  27. John Comnenus

    So Labor will repair the budget by destroying the economy.

  28. Elder’s map shows no sacred sites on top of Ayers Rock. Summit belongs to the “Minga”
    https://righttoclimb.blogspot.com.au/2018/03/ayers-rock-summit-belongs-to-minga.html

  29. Gab

    I see the hyenas are out early with refreshedbloodlust for Pell.

    —-////———-/-/—/———————

    Seems odd Turnbull’s latest Poll results after all those selfies with the aged Cher. I guess prancing around with the publicly defecating gay gras mob hasn’t worked with voters.

  30. stackja

    ALP treat voters as mugs and get elected. Gough, Kev, BS?

  31. Dave in Marybrook

    Madness. The premise and findings of Little Children Are Sacred, inquiry by Reg Wild in the NT, were disregarded. The shock and scandal after Nanette Rogers articulated the horror of a child drowning while being raped and being abandoned in a muddy waterhole is now in the wilderness of forgetting, and Claire Martin’s response to “close the gap” was the precursor to the useless Closing The Gap program.

  32. OldOzzie

    Tom thanks for the Cartoons as always

  33. Rossini

    John Comnenus
    #2652219, posted on March 5, 2018 at 5:51 am
    +1
    Well expressed

  34. Roger.

    …other areas, such as the tax treatment of superannuation in retirement, could be vulnerable.

    Hello!

  35. areff

    As for dogs, I know of a Blue heeler that took a dislike to a car and ripped all 4 tyres for no reason. Bastard thing should have been put down.

    Dogs are peculiar creatures. My late and much missed cocker spaniel, Smudge, would not abide the dishwasher door being in the down position, which would set off a fit of barking and growling. Even more bizarrely, she hated inflatable Santa Clauses — one of which she tore to pieces at a Christmas party while another was attacked and destroyed upon a neighbour’s front lawn.

    Other than that she was a pacific, loving pooch who cheerfully tolerated all manner of abuse at the hands of my then-young son — including having a handful of dried spaghetti jammed up her bum as she ate her dinner.

  36. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    “The government has barely even taken a scalpel to tax concessions which largely accrue to wealthier Australians.”

    perhaps that might be because they pay the vast majority of tax.

    Aggressive taxation is part of the left’s relentless shitholeification of western culture and society.

  37. PoliticoNT

    Aah, Tom, so it’s not just me.

    If you have ever wondered why the Paywallian would appoint a blinkered, bigoted, ex-Guardian leftard with zero curiosity to compile the weekly Media Diary, which he has turned into a gossip column for his lefty journo mates…..

    After he ran a silly puff piece on Mia Freedman I emailed in a genuine enquiry about how much government funding Mamamia had received over the years. (It’s hard to imagine Gillard resisted the urge to throw money at them.) Gotta admit I’d switched off to Diary, apart from Leak Jnr’s work which is only getting better.

  38. stackja

    Bishop Paprocki to Sen. Durbin: Change Your Heart; Change Your Abortion Votes NATION | FEB. 26, 2018
    Richard Durbin was one of the 14 self-identified Catholic senators who voted against cloture for the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Act Jan. 29.
    CNA/EWTN News
    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — Bishop Thomas Paprocki of Springfield in Illinois has reiterated that U.S. Sen. Richard Durbin should not receive Holy Communion due to the Catholic lawmaker’s support for abortion, including a recent procedural vote against a bill that would bar abortion after 20 weeks into pregnancy.

    “Sen. Durbin was once pro-life. I sincerely pray that he will repent and return to being pro-life,” Bishop Paprocki said Thursday. “Because his voting record in support of abortion over many years constitutes ‘obstinate persistence in manifest grave sin,’ the determination continues that Sen. Durbin is not to be admitted to Holy Communion until he repents of this sin. This provision is intended not to punish, but to bring about a change of heart.”

    Bishop Paprocki’s statement cited U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities Chairman Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who said it was “appalling” that the Senate failed to pass the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Act.

    Durbin was one of the 14 self-identified Catholic senators who voted against cloture for the bill Jan. 29, which was needed to prevent a filibuster.

  39. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2652277, posted on March 5, 2018 at 8:45 am

    NYT! I am shocked!

  40. When did Mao Tse-tung transition to Mao Zedong?
    (who, as Jennifer Oriel writes in The Oz today, became Mao Zedog when China banned the letter N)
    The world today is shrinking the opportunity for comedians to make stuff up.

  41. stackja

    Cardinal George Pell returns to Melbourne court for preliminary hearing
    SHANNON DEERY AND RYAN TENNISON, Herald Sun
    8 minutes ago
    Subscriber only
    CARDINAL George Pell has made his way through a tunnel of police as he arrived at the Melbourne Magistrates Court in a bid to clear his name of historical sexual offences.

    Dozens of officers surrounded the cardinal as he walked a few metres from a car to the door of the court.

    A month-long preliminary hearing is due to begin today, after which a magistrate will decide if there is enough evidence to commit the cardinal to trial.

  42. Mother Lode

    Even Clinton paid his respects.

    Clinton is likely getting a little nervous and appreciates that he might need all the friends he can get.

    Obama didn’t go for theological reasons – Graham prayed to some guy in the Bible, all the while ignoring the real deity who just spent 8 years in the White House.

  43. Mother Lode

    Mao Zedog

    Sounds like Mousey Dog.

  44. Roger.

    Mao is experiencing a revival in China today.

    Xi, who is fostering a cult of personality along Maoist lines, often quotes him in speeches and many Chinese are nostalgic for a time when people were poor but at least equal.

    I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see another ‘cultural revolution’ some time down the track as Xi sees a need to purge China of impure elements…i.e. people.

  45. Des Deskperson

    ‘You can’t lawfully sack someone because they are having an affair nor can you lawfully sack someone for being pregnant. ‘.

    The problem here is that Joyce’s own various and confused statements about the nature of his relationship with Campion at different periods of his Ministersip have muddied the waters rather considerably.

    The appropriate Ministerial Standard states: “Ministers’ close relatives and partners are not to be appointed to positions in their ministerial or electorate offices”.

    If Joyce and Campion became partners when he was a Minister, then she could no longer work in his office. MOPS Act staff have very few tenure rights and presumably Campion would have been aware of that. There is no legal or industrial obligation that I am aware of that would entitle her – pregnant or not – to another Staffer job, either at the same level or at lesser salary. If no such job were available, she should have been offered a redundancy package.

    Instead, it seems fairly obvious that jobs were – for whatever reason and at who’s insistence – created for her at the taxpayers expense. My understanding is that when she was working for Drum – then the National Party whip, with no obvious need for a media adviser – she was being paid the same rate – level 3 of a Senior Media Adviser 1 – as she was getting in the office of the Deputy Prime Minister and Leader of the Parliamentary National Party.

  46. Mother Lode

    CARDINAL George Pell has made his way through a tunnel of police as he arrived at the Melbourne Magistrates Court in a bid to clear his name of historical sexual offences.

    There is no guilt attached to him. Lots of innuendo, but you would hope a journo would see that the campaign of innuendo is a bigger story.

    Well, you might have hoped it once.

    Not any more.

  47. H B Bear

    Baaanaby and the Performing Stick Insect are tangling themselves up in knots trying to have their piece of ass and eat it too. The greed of politicians knows no bounds.

  48. What a great idea Julie Bishop.
    Rhianna tweets and immediately Bishop sends $90 million to Julia Gillard’s Global Partnership for Education. Setting up a well paid gig for life after politics.

    PNG gets hit by an earthquake and 16 people die. Bishop pledges @200,000. Yes, two hundred thousand.

    Our immediate neighbours and wartime partners can get stuffed according to the Minister for Paid Partner Overseas Travel.

    No wonder Graham Richardson likes her.

  49. Leigh Lowe

    The appropriate Ministerial Standard states: “Ministers’ close relatives and partners are not to be appointed to positions in their ministerial or electorate offices”.

    But he didn’t appoint his girlfriend to a job in his office.
    She became his gf after she got the job.

  50. OldOzzie

    Caltex franchise model ‘non-compliant and unsustainable’: Fair Work Ombudsman

    Petrol giant Caltex Australia has been blasted by the Fair Work Ombudsman for widespread and systemic underpayment of wages and an unsustainable operating model across its franchise network.

    The report, the culmination of a lengthy investigation into one of the country’s biggest franchise operators, comes days after Caltex shocked the market with a decision to exit franchising.

    The FWO has found 76 per cent of Caltex stores audited were exploiting workers, including breaching workplace laws and “significantly” under paying award wages to young foreign workers on visas.

    In a statement to The Australian Financial Review, Caltex confirmed it had completed 293 audits – which represents half its franchise network. It said for the period from October 2016 to mid-2017 its audit results were in line with the work place regulator.

    Systemic non-compliance

    The regulator found evidence of wage underpayment, non-payment of overtime and penalty rates, poor record keeping and pay slip breaches.

    It said the lack of records “suggests serious and systemic non-compliance”. In some cases there was deliberate falsification of payroll records.

    It said Caltex’s failure to put effective systems in place to ensure its system complied with work laws contributed to the underpayment of workers.

    “In light of this alarmingly high level of non-compliance across its retail fuel outlets, I am not surprised by Caltex’s announcement to the ASX last week that it will transition franchise sites to company operations,” Fair Work Ombudsman Natalie James said.

    Caltex told franchisees and investors on February 27 it would convert hundreds of franchised stores to corporate-run stores by 2020, at a cost of up to $120 million.

    The Financial Review can reveal that a week earlier, on February 21, FWO Natalie James met a group of senior Caltex executives, including chief executive Julian Segal, to discuss the investigation, the rate of non-compliance, and inform them a report would be made public the week beginning March 5.

    “FWO’s report shows Caltex Australia has been presiding over a non-compliant and unsustainable operating model,” Ms James said.

    Caltex says 60pc of stores non-compliant

    Caltex said in a statement the decision to transition all Caltex stores into a company-operated structure was not influenced by the wage underpayment issue, but the outcome of a strategic review.

    “The operating model review determined that controlling our core business is the best way to achieve our retail growth objectives,” it said.

    Rampant wage fraud across the franchise network was exposed by Fairfax Media in late 2016. It found systemic wage abuse and falsification of payroll records across the network of stores.

    Insiders said head office had known wage fraud was rampant and key senior management, who have since left, had covered it up.

    Caltex said its audits since mid-2017 revealed that 60 per cent of stores were non-compliant.

    “To us, it demonstrates the value of whistleblowers and the need to make them feel safe to come forward,” Caltex said in a statement.

    “Based on declining whistleblower activity over time, and other observations to date, we expect we will see this non-compliance rate decline further as we complete the final tranche of audits during 2018-19.”

    In response to the media investigation, Caltex set up a $20 million compensation scheme for underpaid workers.

    The scandal damaged the brand and prompted Caltex to commit to auditing all its franchisees to ensure they were paying correct wages. In March 2017 it considered changing its name.

    A name switch would have saved the company tens of millions of dollars a year in licence fees to multinational Chevron Texaco.

    Demand for compliance deed

    The FWO called on Caltex to enter a proactive compliance deed.

    “The Australian public expects nothing less from such large and reputable companies and recent changes to the law mean that in some circumstances franchisors or holding companies can now be held liable for breaches or underpayments by their franchisees.” Ms James said.

    Caltex said the option of a compliance deed was taken off the table on February 21. “We find this confusing, given the discussions last year,” Caltex said.

    As part of its investigation, the FWO visited 25 stores across the country, and found 100 per cent non-compliance in Sydney, 71 per cent non-compliance in Adelaide, 67 per cent in Melbourne and 60 per cent in Brisbane.

    During the investigation two franchisees were slapped with legal action, while others were hit with infringement notices, 11 compliances notices and 16 formal cautions.

    Ms James said if underpayments were replicated throughout the business, it could add up to millions of dollars of underpayments.

    Caltex is the latest in a line of companies found to be underpaying workers. Many are franchisors including Domino’s, United Petroleum, Retail Food Group, Pizza Hut and convenience store giant 7-Eleven, which has so far paid back more than $130 million in underpaid wages.

    “A large number of employees at the audited sites are young and migrant workers, cohorts that we know to be particularly vulnerable to workplace exploitation and reluctant to complain about mistreatment,” Ms James said.

    Caltex said wage underpayment and mistreatment of vulnerable workers was unacceptable.

  51. Des Deskperson

    ‘But he didn’t appoint his girlfriend to a job in his office.
    She became his gf after she got the job.’

    Surely a mere technicality. If the aim of the standard is to avoid real and perceived conflicts of interest involving a Minister working with his/her partner, then surely it has to cover relationships that occur after the appointments, otherwise it doesn’t work.

  52. Mother Lode

    Xi, who is fostering a cult of personality along Maoist lines, often quotes him in speeches and many Chinese are nostalgic for a time when people were poor but at least equal.

    How Trumble-esque.

  53. stackja

    Des Deskperson
    #2652322, posted on March 5, 2018 at 10:07 am

    And ALP standards?

  54. Roger.

    Many are franchisors including Domino’s, United Petroleum, Retail Food Group, Pizza Hut and convenience store giant 7-Eleven, which has so far paid back more than $130 million in underpaid wages.

    And how many of their franchisees are themselves migrants from the sub-continent who bought the franchise to obtain PR? Inquiring minds would like to know.

  55. OldOzzie

    Liberals’ war chest divides the powerbrokers

    For a big political donor, thanks often come in small ways — the first name “hello” as a Prime ­Minister handshakes through a crowd; the seating plan at an event; most personal of all, the prestige of the hand-signed Christmas card on the mantelpiece that shouts ­“connected”.

    But in these days of virtual ­reality, Malcolm Turnbull has ­dispensed with the signed card-in-the-post to donors and other ­important party supporters, ­instead emailing a personalised mass e-card bearing his season’s greetings.

    It has been met with disappointment and clenched-teeth in many quarters; after all, you can’t showcase an email on a bookshelf, admitting: “Oh that came from Malcolm and Lucy!”

    Splitting hairs over whether the Prime Minister sends cards has an air of trivia; but for a political party in such financial trouble that it had to slash by two thirds its nightly phone-polling research in the 2016 federal election (in the order of thousands of calls per night never made, according to the party post-mortem), every calculated move to massage the donor base counts.

    One of the party’s most senior figures — a fundraiser for many years — was so concerned about the Prime Minister’s resistance to the card-in-the-mail that he pressed Liberal federal treasurer Andrew Burnes late last year. He suggested Burnes provide the cards in a stack for signing during spare moments on a plane. The suggestion came to nought. ­Burnes did not respond last week to questions.

    One major donor said this week that no one he knew had received a real card in the post. “There’s been a virtual drought,” he declared. A spokesman for the Prime Minister confirmed the cards for Christmas were digital.

    Turnbull’s predecessor Tony Abbott signed and sent out almost 3000 cards at Christmas, (signing many on a plane). John Howard, the master of etiquette, always signalled gratitude; he knew supporters appreciated tearing open the envelope. As a strategy to make donors feel warm, nothing says “insider” like a signed memento.

    Turnbull himself was of course the biggest donor to his own re-election in 2016, giving a declared $1.75 million. Turnbull’s donation came in the shape of a guarantee to the federal party enabling a last-minute advertising blitz in the late stage of the campaign — with the actual cash materialising as soon as the bills came in.

    This year, party officials hope to trot the Prime Minister out as a regular attraction in the hope his presence will loosen wallets for party events. Turnbull, they say, has never warmed much to the machinery of politics and in particular to headlining fundraisers. But in the face of a serious financial struggle, he is now scheduled for a number of functions this year.

    Numerous older-wealth families and companies have cut back or closed shop on donations, ­leaving the party urgently, yet again, exploring funding models for high volume, low value.

    The big four banks as donors — some of whom provided the backbone in tough times — have been in retreat for several years ­although there was an uptick in the 2016-17 disclosures.

    NAB revealed in 2016 that it had already stopped making ­political donations. This was a ­significant blow. In the 2014-15 year, NAB had donated $239,686 to the Coalition (and $35,600 to Labor). A year later there was nothing from NAB, $27,500 each from Westpac and CBA and $100,000 from ANZ. Not much for a party that had literally struggled to keep the lights on.

    By 2016-17, Australian Electoral Commission records show NAB again gave nothing; Westpac gave two donations of $27,500 almost a year apart and then a third donation of $12,650; CBA gave two donations, $27,500 and $12,650; and ANZ gave $150,000.

    A year ago Turnbull justified his own massive contribution when he revealed then federal ­director Tony Nutt had been asked to work for no salary for the first few months after his appointment in 2015. Such was the parlous state of affairs. “At the end of 2015, when Tony Nutt became the director of the Liberal Party, the party had so little money he had to work for several months without any pay, so the party was very short of money,” Turnbull told Nine’s Laurie Oakes.

    The party’s biggest donor, the Liberal-aligned Cormack Foundation, is now in limbo, caught in a pending court battle that has shocked everyone and opened rifts behind the scenes among top Liberal officeholders.

    Cormack as a company was founded on the profits of the $15m sale of the Liberal-aligned 3XY radio station in 1986. Since the late 1980s Cormack directors have given the party $60m — entirely from dividends, while preserving untouched capital now worth ­almost $70m.

    In 2016, Cormack donated $1m to the federal Liberals for the ­election campaign, although Turnbull had met with members of the board and asked for $3m. Cormack directors apparently agreed to consider the request, but, unwilling to spend anything outside accrued dividends, sent the party only $1m.

    At the same time, a wrestling match over the $70m was already under way between the Cormack board and Michael Kroger, the Victorian Liberal party president; Kroger took a stand that both the capital and the dividends of Cormack were wholly the property of the Victorian party. The Victorians were still riding out the impact of a massive $1.5m fraud by a former Liberal state director, and if there was Cormack money likely to be available (for the feds) then Kroger had been arguing it should be given to the Victorian branch.

    The objects of the Cormack Foundation’s constitution directed it to promote libertarian causes and individual enterprise: it could grant donations “for any public purpose or for any object of the company”. Because two of the first directors, Hugh Morgan and John Calvert-Jones, had signed side-letters to ensure they used their best endeavours for the benefit of the Liberal Party, Kroger argued this meant the funds were the property of the party.

    When Cormack made two small but controversial donations — $25,000 each to the (now non-existent) Family First party, and the Liberal Democrats, Kroger claimed the grants breached the Cormack constitution. Ironically, Kroger himself was a director of the Institute of Public Affairs for almost seven years when the IPA received an average of $300,000 a year.

    By the middle of last year, with the Cormack board dug in, Kroger and the Victorians triggered legal action set to commence this month on March 19. Both sides claim they have principle on their side.

    Amid the drama, however, there were smoke signals that the federal Liberal Party was not aligned with Kroger’s decision. This, after all, was also the federal party’s own long-time biggest donor (outside Turnbull’s one-off gift of $1.75m).

    The battle between Kroger and the Cormack board showcased a particularly bizarre moment on Wednesday, June 21, last year — a sunny winter day of mostly 12C — when one of the more aggressive letters ever sent by the Liberal Party whisked from the Victorian branch office at 104 Exhibition Street to the office of then Cormack chairman Morgan at 333 Collins Street, Melbourne. It was a 10-minute walk but just a click by email.

    The letter demanded that all ­directors — including former Western Mining boss Morgan, stockbroking legend and former ANZ chair Charles Goode, former stockbroker Calvert-Jones (brother-in-law of Rupert ­Murdoch) and five other leading businessmen must stand down and hand over their board seats to a group of party stalwarts.

    These proposed directors were: then party president Richard ­Alston, former party president Alan Stockdale, former ­federal MPs David Kemp, Michael Ronaldson and Fergus Stewart McArthur; and Robert Doyle, a former Victorian Liberal leader and long-time lord mayor of ­Melbourne who stood down in February this year over allegations of sexual harassment.

    The June 21 letter was signed by Kroger, Alston (whose term as party president expired three days later), Women’s Council chairwoman Helen Kroger (ex-wife of Michael Kroger), Stockdale, honorary state treasurer Russell Hannan, and the federal Liberal Party’s chief fundraiser, travel entrepreneur ­Andrew Burnes. With Alston set to retire 72 hours later as president, it was Burnes’s signature on the letter that gave it the federal party’s imprimatur. A copy of the letter was sent simultaneously to Calvert-Jones.

    The following day, the same letter was reissued by the Victorian branch with all the same signatures ranging from Kroger to Alston — but with the signature of Burnes removed. The weird sequence of two identical letters of a threatening and legalistic nature — sent a day apart and one with a signature removed — gave at least the appearance that some sort of skulduggery — or major bungle — was afoot.

    Behind the scenes, the rumour mill — which made it into this newspaper’s Margin Call column at the time — alleged that Burnes had been unaware his signature had been used and that when he found out, he had demanded it be taken off the letter. And moreover, that he had been sufficiently angry that he contacted Cormack directors to apologise.

    From those close to Kroger, a different claim ensued: that ­Burnes had been more than happy to slug it out with the Victorians against Cormack; that he had agreed to the use of his signature, but by that night he came under pressure from “others” at the federal level not to get involved; his signature was promptly ­removed to save him further ­embarrassment.

    It was far from a storm in a teacup. Burnes’s signature was on file in the Victorian branch from the days when he was honorary state treasurer of the branch from 2009 to 2011. Suddenly it was on an ­exceedingly threatening document directed at the party’s biggest donor. Had Burnes agreed to join the attack on Cormack and given permission for his electronic ­signature to be extracted from a database for use? Had his PA sent it to a Liberal Party PA? Burnes ­declined to answer questions from this newspaper.

    The June 21 and June 22 letters, obtained by The Australian, reveal how swiftly the first letter was ­replaced with Burnes’s signature removed.

    Some senior Liberals point to the fact that the federal party has made no move to publicly back Kroger’s campaign against ­Cormack, nor to join the legal case as an interested party. On the other hand, during a federal executive meeting on June 23 last year, Turnbull was said to have mounted no defence of ­Cormack directors after an ­aggressive denunciation by ­Kroger. Some in the meeting claim Kroger called into question the ­integrity of Goode and Morgan.

    Three weeks after the letters from the Victorian branch ­demanding Cormack directors ­resign, both Morgan and Calvert-Jones quit the board apparently in protest over unresolved Liberal Party governance issues.

    Control of the $70m fund now rests with the outcome of the court action as Liberal divisions around the country — to say nothing of the federal office — hold their breath wondering what it will mean if Kroger and the Victorians come out on top with a vast war chest in their hands. Will this be Liberal Party money or the property of the Victorians, and who will get a slice of the pie?

    The parlous state of federal party finances was identified as a critical factor in the blistering ­report on the 2016 election delivered last year by former trade minister Andrew Robb. The post mortem report was kept secret at the time, but revelations in The Weekend Australian showed that the party was hamstrung by lack of funds for research, leaving the campaign sometimes flying blind as it ­attempted to run a political strategy without polling.

    With the federal secretariat costing an estimated $3m a year to operate, including the research budget, a shift in control over the Cormack funds could easily open new party wars.

    New federal party ­president Nick Greiner could find himself facing off against his ­predecessor Alston — who is ­potentially the new chairman of Cormack and in charge of who gets what out of the cashbox.

    Greiner, who late last year ordered the federal Liberal polling to be restarted as a matter of urgency, is equally likely to have a strong view of priorities in any carve-up.

  56. Mother Lode

    The greed of politicians knows no bounds.

    A handy definition of infinity.

    Take the avariciousness of a politician.

    And divide by 2.

    (Yes, I know infinity is a concept of mathematics and not a number. Sue me.)

  57. stackja

    Caltex began in 1936 as the California Texas Oil Company, a joint venture between the Texas Company (later named Texaco) and Standard Oil of California (later named Chevron Corp.) to market oil from newly gained concessions in Saudi Arabia. It was renamed Caltex Petroleum Corp. in 1968.

    Proudly Australian, we have grown from humble beginnings to become the nation’s outright leader in transport fuels, supplying one third of all Australia’s transport fuel needs.

    Caltex took over the Australian companies Golden Fleece in 1981 and Ampol in 1995.

  58. Roger.

    This year, party officials hope to trot the Prime Minister out as a regular attraction in the hope his presence will loosen wallets for party events.

    ROTFLMAO.

    Two polls to go.

    He may not get rolled – after all, who wants to take the now poisoned chalice of Liberal leadership? – but it will deepen the despair.

  59. thefrollickingmole

    on behalf of our profession when he tries to cloak himself in the ethics and the ­nobility of journalism

    Someone would deliberately coat themselves in leper shit and parade around talking about nobility?
    Positively Stimpy of them.

    Mr Bowen lists un-means tested tax-free super in retirement as one of the profligacies of the Howard years

    Going after the savers, that always ends well.
    We were only laughing about South Africa’s madmen snatching farmland, here we have the same year zero heros snatching capital as opposed to physical assets and 1/2 the population cheer for it.

  60. OldOzzie

    Lucy Waffles of Wentworth strilkes again

    Housing supply: NIMBYs preventing needed medium-density housing, Grattan says


    State and local authorities will have to overcome NIMBY opposition to medium-density development if it the country wants to supply enough affordable housing and avoid severe inequality among its fast-growing population, the Grattan Institute says in a new report.

    The hostility of well-educated and well-resourced residents to denser housing in the very suburbs best equipped to support it is preventing the country from meeting the accommodation needs of a population that grew an average 350,000 people a year between 2006 and 2016, the think tank says in its report Housing affordability: Re-imagining the Australian dream.

    Without intervention by state governments and local councils to overcome local opposition, housing supply will not grow and falling home ownership rates – which force younger people to stay at their parents’ homes longer and put off starting their own families – will fail to change. In addition, social inequality will deepen, because lower-income households have suffered bigger falls in home ownership rates than higher earners and will continue to do so, the report shows.

    “There is a smoking gun that a variety of state planning regulation and how that is administered by councils has led to not enough housing being built,” Grattan Institute chief executive John Daley said.

    “My kids can’t afford to buy a house. There is widening inequality between generations and widening inequality of wealth within generations.”

    While the report makes a number of recommendations including reducing the capital gains tax and negative gearing benefits benefiting property investors and ending stamp duty exemptions for first home buyers that it says simply push prices higher, the key is to boost supply of new homes.

    But while lobby groups representing Australia’s large developers frequently argue for more supply on the urban fringes of cities, the medium-density housing needed is within established middle ring suburbs – on sites more likely to be developed by small developers than the large ones with a voice and political muscle, Mr Daley said.

    “Those relatively small mum-and-pop [developers] can add up to some very big numbers collectively but individually they tend to be a much less visible lobby group,” he said.

    At the same time, opposition by local residents to developments of the scale needed – such as putting six townhouses on an 800-square-metre residential block – is vociferous, Mr Daley said.

    In some respects, Sydney was doing better than Melbourne by building more medium density housing along major transport routes. Last week Planning Minister Anthony Roberts said state records showed the NSW capital constructed a total 38,759 homes in 2017, which was a 4600-dwelling on the previous 2016 record.

    “This is something that Sydney, to its credit has got right,” Mr Daley said. “It looks like Sydney is finally hitting its housing target for the first time in a decade.”

    Sydney remained as challenged as Melbourne, however, in tackling “true” suburban infill, he said.

    Melbourne had not done the same thing, despite efforts by the incumbent Labor government to reform the suburban zoning controls put in by the previous Liberal government. Victorian planning data showed the success rate of development applications in Melbourne suburbs and showed them to be slower in higher-income suburbs.

    “The higher the income of the resident, the more effective [at opposing development] they tend to be,” Mr Daley said. “They have higher education levels, so they tend to be better at it.”

    I wonder if the Grattan Institute has thought about reducing Immigration into Australia?

  61. notafan

    Can I just point out Tel that Campion was not the manager in the case and she was transferred at approximately the same salary to both other offices.

    You haven’t even got one leg there, let alone four.

  62. Arky

    When did Mao Tse-tung transition to Mao Zedong?

    ..
    They are the same.
    Just different romanisation systems.
    Pinyin is the one more common now.

  63. OldOzzie

    Roger.
    #2652332, posted on March 5, 2018 at 10:19 am
    This year, party officials hope to trot the Prime Minister out as a regular attraction in the hope his presence will loosen wallets for party events.

    ROTFLMAO.

    Two polls to go.

    He may not get rolled – after all, who wants to take the now poisoned chalice of Liberal leadership? – but it will deepen the despair.

    He will not get rolled – the Photios Liberal lemmings will go over the cliff with Lord Waffles of Wentworth, and they will keep their seats – usually very safe Liberal seats – while some good Liberals disappear

  64. Roger.

    I wonder if the Grattan Institute has thought about reducing Immigration into Australia?

    Must have been Daley who was on RN AM this morning.

    He did at least imply that there were two options: reduce immigration or increase supply.

    Either he is ideologically not disposed to the first option or he pragmatically takes the government at its word: they will not be reducing immigration.

  65. Mother Lode

    This year, party officials hope to trot the Prime Minister out as a regular attraction

    Going for the blowfly vote, I take it.

  66. Davey Boy

    if you have not already seen this. Scroll alert:
    Qantas staff told not to ‘manterrupt’ women
    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions” — when men interrupt women — and refrain from using the gender-inappropriate words guys, mankind or chairman.
    The airline’s People and Culture group executive Lesley Grant sent an information pack on how to make employees feel comfortable as part of its Spirit of Inclusion month.
    The pack advises people to stop using honey, darling or love, even as a term of endearment, because they “often offend”.
    It also encourages staff to use partner and spouse instead of husband and wife, and parents instead of mum and dad because it excludes some LGBTI families.
    On a more controversial note, Qantas advises staff to “recognise reality” that “Australia was not settled peacefully”.
    “Describing the arrival of Europeans as a ‘settlement’ is a view of Australian history from the perspective of England rather than Australia,” the information pack sent to staff states. “Instead of settlement, try ‘colonisation’, ‘occupation’ or ‘invasion’.”
    Qantas, in an effort to encourage cultural cohesion and avoid “unconscious bias”, warns against using terms that could exclude some families.
    “Always using the terms ‘husband’ and ‘wife’ can reinforce the idea that people are always in heterosexual relationships …
    “In the same way, always referring to ‘mum and dad’ can make many families feel excluded — both same-sex couples and single-parent families.”
    Qantas’s spirit of inclusion.
    The material on gender words states: “Language can make groups of people invisible. For example, the use of the term chairman can reinforce the idea that leaders are always men.”
    Qantas suggests staff use the word humanity instead of mankind, manager instead of foreman, and team, folks, you all or people instead of the term guys.
    “Words like ‘love’, ‘honey’ or ‘darling’, even when used as terms of endearment, often offend. In the workplace, it is best to avoid these sorts of words,” it says.
    In a hilarious fact-box headed “Minimise manterruptions”, Qantas advises: “Research shows that in many situations, including the workplace, men interrupt and speak over women, while the reverse rarely happens.”
    The material asks employees to think about words they use for each gender and to stop stereotyping.
    “For example, words like ‘abrasive’ or ‘bubbly’ are almost never used to describe men,” it states, adding that while a man might be called “hard line”, a woman in similar situation might be called a “ballbreaker”.
    Interestingly, Qantas also calls out “seemingly positive stereotypes” and says: “Praising a particular action because it is not typical of gender stereotypes is insulting (eg, he’s amazing collecting his children after school).”
    In a note to staff, Ms Grant said she wants Qantas to be an environment where “everyone feels comfortable to bring their whole selves to work”.
    “We have a long and proud history of promoting inclusion among our people, our customers and society, including support of indigenous issues, gender parity in business and marriage equality,” she wrote.
    Qantas said the material was devised by the Diversity Council of Australia.
    Similar information is provided to many of the council’s 450 member organisations.

  67. areff

    on behalf of our profession

    Journalism ain’t a profession. It’s a craft that hitches the intelligence of its journeymen to the job of telling the truth. Or should be.

  68. Roger.

    Qantas said the material was devised by the Diversity Council of Australia.

    Upholding peoplekind everywhere.

    The revolution is being subsidised, comrades.

  69. H B Bear

    This year, party officials hope to trot the Prime Minister out as a regular attraction

    Bwahahaaa. Presumably they are waiting for the dunking stool to come from the fabricators.

  70. thefrollickingmole

    Diversity Council of Australia
    /Mos Eisley cantina scene on

    Lieutenant General (Retired) David Morrison AO,
    Chair, DCA Board
    Sam Mostyn,
    Deputy Chair, DCA Board
    Stephen Barrow
    Alec Bashinsky
    Tim Fawcett
    Nick Fernando
    Chris Lamb
    Ming Long
    Amanda Revis
    Abbie Wright

  71. hzhousewife

    I have taken to reminding people that I have a husband and I am offended when they refer him as my partner.

  72. OldOzzie

    Australia’s banks are ‘value traps,’ set for lower profits: Ariel Investments

    Australia’s large banks represent “value traps” and investors should brace for a period of lower returns on equity, as regulation and other threats drag on profitability.

    That is the view of Chicago-based Ariel Investments, which is bearish on Australia’s lenders and is significantly underweight the broader banking sector globally.

    “We think consensus is fundamentally getting a lot of things wrong in that analysis of banks around the world,” Ariel’s Chaim Schneider told The Australian Financial Review while visiting Sydney last week.

    He is Ariel’s research director for global equities and its lead financials analyst.

    Mr Schneider said Ariel viewed Australia’s big banks as “value traps” and thought they were in for a tougher ride in the years ahead, particularly as the royal commission got into full swing and technology continued to evolve.

    “When we think about this regulatory pressure that is coming up in Australia we see some parallels to other markets that have faced similar regulatory reviews of their industry, which have led to changes,” he said.

    “Australian banks still make very compelling profits, which is a very good place to be, but we do need to be cognisant of the risks and parallels to other markets.”

    In Australia the “ROE path [for banks] will follow the path of other markets down,” he said.

    Mr Schneider noted Australia’s banks were already adjusting to regulation on capital requirements and lending restrictions in riskier parts of the market.

    Regulators are “trying to calmly slow down the market where clearly there have been pockets of frothiness,” he said, adding that banks – including those in Australia – would need to spend up on technology and systems in coming years to continue to compete and ward against threats.

    “When it comes to cyber security, banks are the number one target.”

    Ariel – which manages $US13.1 billion ($16.9 billion) – is often referred to as a contrarian or non-consensus investment firm. While it is underweight the global banking sector, the firm is overweight diversified financials and likes stocks including exchange group Deutsche Borse and Mastercard.

    The investment firm’s strategy is driven by a research process, which is heavily skewed at delving into four scenarios rather than rating stocks a buy, hold or sell. It also taps into a company’s risk management frameworks.

    “What we are doing is deep business model analysis to understand the winners and losers and, really more than anything else, to look for tomorrow’s blue chips, irrespective of what the market perceived to be yesterday’s blue chips,” Mr Schneider said.

    Locally, the only stock that Ariel owns is wealth group AMP. It believes the company is getting on the right path and that any future asset sales will reduce its risk profile.

    “AMP is a company that has faced a lot of pain and a lot of challenges to its business model for many, many years now or for more than a decade,” Mr Schneider said. “From regulation and from other industry-wide challenges and they’ve confronted that head on. They have reduced costs, improved efficiency and they’ve done a lot of heavy lifting to improve the franchise.”

    Since opening an office in Sydney in 2015 Ariel has picked up two related global mandates in the region. One of those is AvSuper, the aviation and safety industry super fund, and the other an undisclosed Middle Eastern fund.

    But Ariel, like many of its peers, has not been immune to the fee pressures sweeping the industry given the global rise of more passive investing styles.

    Last year, Ariels’s chairman and chief executive John Rogers said the firm was cutting fees to better align with the industry.

    The company counts high-profile investment executive Mellody Hobson, who is married to film director and Star Wars creator George Lucas, as its president.

    Ariel’s international fund has returned 8.33 per cent annualised over five years to January 31, compared to 7.85 per cent over the same period for the MSCI EAFE index which spans developed markets, including countries in Europe, Australasia and the Far East.

    The firm’s global fund has returned 10.5 per cent over five years, which is less than its MSCI AC World Index benchmark at 11 per cent.

    Hmm – so their return in the bottom case is less than the Index

  73. C.L.

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    Especially the captain. Let him fly the damn plane in peace. Unless he’s from a non-knife and fork country and he’s doing a Lakemba fly-by at 50 metres. Manterrupt him then by all means.

  74. Dr Faustus

    Mao is experiencing a revival in China today.

    A whole generation of Australian journalists are obviously hearing about him for the very first time: the preferred pronunciation of the name ‘Mao’ among the younger radio/TV hacks is something along the lines of ‘Mayo’.

    It won’t be long before some bright-eyed dimbo is quoting excitedly from the Little Red Book…

  75. C.L.

    Whitlam’s meeting with Mao was a lot like Prince Edward’s with Adolf Hitler.
    Gough never saw a mass murderer he didn’t like.

  76. Bruce of Newcastle

    Housing supply: NIMBYs preventing needed medium-density housing, Grattan says

    Grattan seems to think “needed” is defined as “unwanted”.

    There’s an apartment glut in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane as far as I can tell from a quick search.

    Who’d want a sardine-can flat with an attached bunch of money hungry body-corporate Nazis to tell you what you can’t do? Especially when aircon is becoming increasingly haram and public transport increasingly risky.

  77. BrettW

    Just checked Diversity Council web page.

    Their Our Team page shows their top 13 staff. Only two are male and not much “diversity” in the 13 at all. Not even an Aboriginal !

    Hypocrites.

  78. notafan

    The risk of manterruptions was greatly diminished on my flight home from Dubai last week, cabin crew in economy was exclusively male, mostly hetero.

    I was a little surprised when I went hunting for a drink to meet a not so straight gentleman attendant clearly dying for a chat, I don’t recall any manterruptions, though there were some female passengers demanding alcohol.

    Continuing to segregate flight crews would eliminate all such risks.

    Hmm and I’m pretty sure the majority of Australians are offended by the term invasion.

  79. C.L.

    That Diversity Council team picture here.

    LOL.

    It was nice of them to include the Asian cleaning lady.

  80. stackja

    C.L.
    #2652365, posted on March 5, 2018 at 10:58 am

    Wheeler, Sir Frederick Henry (1914–1994) by John Farquharson
    Sir Frederick Henry Wheeler was once described as a “legendary public servant and a master of guerrilla warfare in the bureaucracy.”

    There is a story that at one stage when Sir Frederick started lecturing the Prime Minister on the dangers of the loans affair, Mr Whitlam’s response was, “Shut up. I’ve heard everything.”

    Sir Frederick was reported to have come back with, “Prime Minister, you will listen to me. I am drawing to your attention facts, your ignorance of which, will bring you down.” These proved to be prophetic words, as Mr Whitlam was to learn the hard way when Mr Connor revived the loan arrangement with Mr Khemlani after his authority to do so had been terminated.

  81. OldOzzie

    Newspoll: Bad figures point to Turnbull’s management failure – SIMON BENSON

    A perfect storm is looming for Malcolm Turnbull. While there is little doubt now that he will best Tony Abbott’s record of 30 losing Newspolls within several weeks, he also faces the prospect of reaching that milestone with Bill Shorten as preferred prime minister.

    The simple fact is, the Turnbull government is facing a crisis of political management.

    It is proving incapable of dealing tactically with issues as they arise and there is little evidence of thorough strategic thought as to how to handle issues it knows are coming. This, rather than policy, has long been a Coalition weakness under Malcolm Turnbull’s leadership. But it is now becoming a profound and enduring failure.

    Newspoll: PM pays big price for Joyce scandal

    Turnbull clearly wasn’t responsible for Barnaby Joyce’s affair. What he is ultimately responsible for, however, is the political management of the crisis which some colleagues argue encouraged the persistent examination of its twisted entrails.

    The Prime Minister, who supporters will say was dealt few ­options other than the one he eventually pursued, is now paying the ultimate personal price, while the government has been robbed of legitimacy in prosecuting a case against Shorten, let alone promoting its own agenda.

    The government is presently incapable of carrying a message.

    This is the secondary effect that will ultimately prove fatal for the government unless something dramatic and demonstrative is done to arrest it.

    The latest Newspoll confirms that the government continues to meander toward defeat.

    That it picked up a primary point reflects the continued internal trading of primary votes ­between One Nation and the ­Coalition. The same must be said of Labor and the Greens.

    Even so, the structural fundamentals at a federal level remain largely unchanged. The Coalition’s six-point primary vote deficit on the last election result appears locked in.

    This indicates there has been little change in national voting ­intentions with the government now back in the same bog it found itself in at the end of last year.

    For Turnbull, the danger looms again that it deteriorates into an issue of leadership. He is now two Newspolls away from being hoist on his own petard.

    Some may argue that the 30th Newspoll that he set as the benchmark metric for failed leadership is now irrelevant as he has already outstripped Tony Abbott’s longevity for presiding over an unpopular government.

    It has been 611 days since Turnbull returned a positive two-party-preferred vote for the Coalition.

    Abbott on the other hand spent 530 days in negative territory ­before he was rolled.

    But these numbers are likely to be of less concern for Turnbull than the collapse in his personal ratings since the beginning of February. He is now only two points clear of Shorten as preferred prime ­minister, having enjoyed a 14-point lead barely a month ago. The statistical margin of error suggests the two leaders are now virtually neck and neck.

    The contest has been this ­narrow only once before during the three years of Mr Turnbull’s leadership. That was back in ­November when the Coalition was in the midst of arguably its worst period in government since the election.

    There are several explanations for this. Either the government’s attempts to bend the politics to a question of character for Shorten are failing, or Shorten’s unpopularity is a feature already factored in. After all, Shorten’s own numbers have never been good to begin with.

    Anyone in government who thinks the CFMEU and Adani-­related hits on Shorten are working, as valid as they may be, is drinking a special brew of Kool Aid. That Shorten has improved his stocks as preferred prime minister at a time when both leaders have suffered a fall in satisfaction levels should be a deeply troubling trend for Turnbull.

  82. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2652373, posted on March 5, 2018 at 11:08 am
    Newspoll: Bad figures point to Turnbull’s management failure – SIMON BENSON

    MT is a failure? This is news?

  83. Baldrick

    That Diversity Council team picture here.

    Not much diversity going on there, although to be fair any number of them may identify as aborigine.

  84. OldOzzie

    Protection agencies swamped by ‘tsunami’ of sex abuse

    Child protection authorities are overwhelmed by the scale of neglect and under-­reported sexual activity involving children in the Northern Territory, which has seen rates of sexually transmitted infections soar over the past decade and prompted one former minister to suggest the rampant abuse of minors can only be stopped by imposing a form of martial law.

    Territory Families took just five sex abuse victims into temporary protective custody between 2012-13 and 2015-16 despite substantiating 232 abuse cases, according to data compiled by a royal commission.

    The then minister, John Elferink, said yesterday that he felt “frankly, largely powerless” in the face of a “tsunami” of under-reported and under-recognised child welfare problems that no government then or now had the capacity or willingness to resolve.

    “What’s the solution? We keep sticking Band-Aids on the amputation, hoping to Christ that it will stop the bleeding over time. But it’s simply not good enough,” he said. “Unless a child’s situation is truly bad or they are particularly young, there’s minimal chance that the child will see any form of government protection come their way.

    “We would almost have had to have declared a state of emer­gency to deal with all the issues, which would have entailed enormous consequences. There’s no way, in the current environment, that you could create a state of emergency, which would be almost like declaring martial law, and so you’re stuck with all these compromise approaches.”

    The Howard government’s 2007 NT Emergency Response had ostensibly failed, he said.

    Between 2006 and 2016, the numbers of notified cases of childhood STIs rose by as much as 180 per cent for some diseases. Underage Aboriginal girls are now almost 60 times more likely to contract syphilis than their non-Aboriginal counterparts and 30 times more likely to contract gonorrhoea or trichomoniasis, ­according to official figures.

    Former NT Children’s Commissioner Howard Bath said STI rates were among “only a very few objective indicators we have” of child sexual abuse.

    “In my view, they are a better indicator of background levels of abuse than reporting because so many of those cases don’t get reported to anyone, whereas kids with serious infections do tend to go to a doctor,” Dr Bath said.

    The Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the NT showed that while the number of warnings about sex-related harm and exploitation of children received by authorities in 2015-16 was more than 70 per cent higher than eight years earlier, the number of substantiated cases was down by one-third. In the intervening years, recorded instances of child sexual abuse dwindled to a handful, partly due to errors that saw Territory Families wrongly classify sex abuse as neglect.

    Commissioner Mick Gooda said the evidence — some of which went beyond the inquiry’s terms of reference — had been included in its final report because the issues involved were so severe.

    “We didn’t really have time to go deeply into a whole lot of that stuff. That’s why we said that it needs further investigation,” Mr Gooda said. “We were concerned.”

    Aboriginal men, who often complain about being demonised, made up about two-thirds of all those charged with child sexual-­assault offences over the past 10 years, according to the report. ­Aboriginal people comprise about one-third of the Territory’s population.

    Dr Bath said the data was extremely worrying. “Neglect creates the conditions for sexual abuse to occur,” he said. “It’s not that there are any more nasty predators running around (in ­remote communities); it’s that there’s often easier access and less supervision.”

    The commission’s final report quoted a senior manager saying: “In reference to the Child Abuse Taskforce, it is very, very infrequent that we remove children from their families. Very, very infrequent … I think we’ve done it on two occasions.”

    Mr Elferink said that was correct. He also claimed the NT Department of Health, which he previously ministered, did not treat STIs in kids older than 14 years as child protection matters.

    “Children over the age of 14 years were basically abandoned,” he said. “The problems are so entrenched that neither the Territory nor the federal governments have the capacity to deal with them.”

    Those included giving contraceptives to underage girls.

    The commission said it was “unclear” how many sex abuse victims remained in the environments where the abuse had occurred. Dr Bath said the safety of such kids was hard to guarantee.

    “I have never had confidence that the child protection system can do the job that absolutely needs to be done … the objective reality is that these kids aren’t safe,” he said, adding that a shortage of out-of-home care in the NT meant removing kids was no “magic bullet”. “I would reframe it and just say there needs to be better protection of kids,” Dr Bath said. “Part of that protection is removing kids, part of it is more intensive monitoring and part of it is better family support.”

    The revelations follow concerns about why Territory Families failed to protect a toddler who was raped in Tennant Creek last month.

    Mr Gooda said child safety should be the priority and where risks could not be “removed from the child, the child must be removed from the risk”, but called for a case-by-case examination.

    Jenni Collard, an Aboriginal woman from WA who headed the Territory’s child protection ­agency for six months in 2013, said the agency had struggled to find quality staff in outback areas and that those operating in small communities could be reticent about making tough decisions.

    “In these small offices they all socialise together and can stop seeing what’s right and wrong,” Ms Collard said.

    Over the past decade, 40-60 per cent of sexual assault cases ended in charges being withdrawn and only about half of those convicted received terms of imprisonment not partially or fully suspended.

    The office of the Minister for Territory Families, Dale Wakefield, was unable to respond on Friday or over the weekend.

  85. Boambee John

    OldOzzie at 1025

    I wonder if the Grattan Institute has thought about reducing Immigration into Australia?

    Wash your mouth out with strong soap, and write out 1000 times “Immigrants are good for the (left political) environment.

  86. stackja

    2GB: Tony Abbott: “I never turned the polls into the ultimate test of leadership”

    Tony Abbott has thrown down the gauntlet to Malcolm Turnbull as the Prime Minister edges closer to 30 straight Newspoll losses.

    Today’s loss is Mr Turnbull’s 28th in a row and has also seen his lead as preferred PM evaporate.

    The PM started the year with a 45% to 31% lead over Bill Shorten… that’s down to just two points.

    In 2015, Mr Turnbull used Newspoll results as a key factor in overthrowing Tony Abbott saying:

    “The one thing that is clear about our current situation is the trajectory. We have lost 30 Newspolls in a row. It is clear that the people have made up their mind about Mr Abbott’s leadership.”

    As the mark creeps closer, Ray asks the former PM what should happen when it arrives.

    “I never made the polls the be all and the end all. I never turned the poll into the ultimate test of leadership. It was someone else who did that.

    “It was the Prime Minister who set this test and I guess if he fails the test it will be the Prime Minister who will have to explain why the test was right for one and not right for the other.

    “It will be up to him to tell us all why the test doesn’t apply in his case.”

    Mr Abbott also commented on the Barnaby Joyce love-child scandal.

    “Barnaby has certainly had a pretty messy time of things.”

    Ray, “Please tell me that your jaw dropped as you either read or were told what he was saying in Fairfax newspapers on the weekend?”

    “I think that was a pretty common reaction and I shared the common reaction.”

    MP3 download linky

  87. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    That Diversity Council team picture here.

    wha’ts the problem, it’s quite diverse, there’s a ranga, a plethora of brunettes and the token blondes.

    Maybe more blondes?

  88. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2652376, posted on March 5, 2018 at 11:14 am

    Commissioner Mick Gooda said the evidence — some of which went beyond the inquiry’s terms of reference — had been included in its final report because the issues involved were so severe.

    Mr Gooda said child safety should be the priority and where risks could not be “removed from the child, the child must be removed from the risk”, but called for a case-by-case examination.

    Where’s Kev? Child stealing condoned?

  89. thefrollickingmole

    “Neglect creates the conditions for sexual abuse to occur,”

    In a lot of outside the family abuse this is correct.
    The couple of cases Ive been exposed to were drugged/drunk or mentally incapable parent/s and predators moving in on easy targets.

    2 Aboriginal, one white families all what youd term “underclass”.

  90. Mother Lode

    As Bolta points out, while the ‘standard’ set by Trumble to oust Abbott is measured in terms on ‘number’ of polls, more significant is the amount of time of losing polls. Trumble has out-unpopulared Abbott long since.

    I think a person would have to have a heart of stone not to enjoy what must be incomprehensible discomfort for that self-conceited fathead and his patricianly presumptuous wife.

  91. Mark A

    C.L.
    #2652370, posted on March 5, 2018 at 11:03 am

    That Diversity Council team picture here.

    Why is that ME bloke crying?

  92. Baldrick

    The Oscars Red Carpet fashion seems rather unremarkable this year, more so because I’ve never heard of 90% of the starlets.

  93. johanna

    Dr Bath said the data was extremely worrying. “Neglect creates the conditions for sexual abuse to occur,” he said. “It’s not that there are any more nasty predators running around (in ­remote communities); it’s that there’s often easier access and less supervision.

    And this is why nothing ever gets better. Nobody is prepared to call a spade a spade.

    Dr Bath, there demonstrably are more predators running around in these communities than in other parts of the country. We are not talking about, say, 50% more risk or 100% more risk for these children. We are talking about 2000%+ more risk of them being sexually abused, getting STDs and so on. If what you say is true, there must a handful of predators abusing 24/7 to generate those figures.

    The mealy mouthed responses to this national disgrace are absolutely shameful. I read last week that some local Aborigines in Tennant Creek want to set up a body consisting of themselves, paid no doubt by us, to consider individual cases and find ‘culturally appropriate’ solutions. Not one journalist or politician ever has the guts to ask these hypocrites why they are not doing something about it already – they live there, it’s a small place, they allegedly have all the connections and information. The fact is, they haven’t got the stomach to take it on, but wouldn’t mind another gravy train for themselves.

  94. thefrollickingmole

    Why is that ME bloke crying?

    Elastrator ring kicking in on the new hire… Can take some getting used to.

  95. John Constantine

    Big Australia of fifty million imported people that rent houses and can’t buy cars because of the congestion road tax.

    Perfect for Qantas to fly them back to the home country every year for family holidays.

    Big congested Australia, just means more Qantas customers.Faster the population grows, faster the customers queue up.

    Wear your Qantas diversity decoder ring always, Comrades.

  96. johanna

    The Oscars are all about gun control this year.

    We will draw a veil over the 500 armed police and security staff protecting the precious snowflakes so that they can virtue signal and try to deny ordinary people the same protection.

  97. Boambee John

    johanna at 1140

    some local Aborigines in Tennant Creek want to set up a body consisting of themselves, paid no doubt by us, to consider individual cases and find ‘culturally appropriate’ solutions.

    If the ‘culturally appropriate’ solutions were to involve a spear in the guts or a waddy applied with maximum force to the skull, I might be open to persuasion. Purely in the spirit of diversity, of course.

  98. Boambee John

    Changing whistlecock to no-cock as an initiation ceremony might also be a useful ‘culturally appropriate’ solution as well.

  99. OldOzzie

    Tale of two Sydneys

    The Haywoods in Erskine Park own a five bedroom home, have four children, two Toyotas and a dog called Tygah (named in honour of their favourite footy team, Wests Tigers, and the daughter of their favourite singer, INXS’s Michael Hutchence). They live in a cul-de-sac that sports a caravan and a concrete koala, where kids, not cars, rule.

    Sixty kilometres away in Randwick, where the record summer temperature was five degrees cooler at 42 degrees back in 1926, the Ruys family rents a two bedroom Art Deco apartment in which the three children share one bedroom.

    They also share their leafy green backyard – complete with a treehouse, a trampoline, a homemade go-kart, worm farm and compost bin – with two other tenants and their cat called Henry. They have rented here in one of Sydney’s most densely populated suburbs for eight years.

  100. Slim Cognito

    That Silvio Berlusconi gets all the fun. I voted on the weekend and no one got their tits out at the ballot box for me. What am I doing wrong?

  101. Des Deskperson

    Here is the Diversity Council of Australia’s Board.

    https://www.dca.org.au/about-dca/our-board

    The Chair is one LTGEN (retired) David Morrison AO,

  102. Boambee John

    Des D at 1201

    Once these characters get a taste for power and OPM, they can never let go.

    Stop any taxpayer funded pensions while they stay on the gravy train, see where their priorities really lie!

  103. Baldrick

    The Chair is one LTGEN (retired) David Morrison AO

    Diversity status confirmed. An aging busybody turned lesbian.

  104. zyconoclast

    We will draw a veil over the 500 armed police and security staff protecting the precious snowflakes so that they can virtue signal and try to deny ordinary people the same protection.

    I thought this was the headline for the Cardinal Pell trial.

  105. zyconoclast

    That Silvio Berlusconi gets all the fun. I voted on the weekend and no one got their tits out at the ballot box for me. What am I doing wrong?

    Several billion Euro might have something to do with it.

  106. duncanm

    I’ve pretty much stopped flying Qantas over the last few years due to their shit service, but this will ensure I never fly Qantas again.

    Bye bye.

  107. Des Deskperson

    It costs $1,645 pa for a small business to join the DCA; larger businesses pay up to $10,000.

    In return you get all this wonderful stuff, including::

    Premium access to findings of DCA’s ‘ground-breaking research’ projects
    Support for diversity efforts through DCA advocacy campaigns and submissions grounded in this research evidence.
    ‘Inspiring events’.
    Opportunities for relationship building and networking with a community of other leading diversity employers.
    Discounted attendance at flagship events including the Annual Diversity Debate,

    Wowsers!!

  108. DrBeauGan

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    Given the feminist fatuities in the article, manterruptions are entirely reasonable. The idea that men should sit quietly and listen to this crap is offensive.

  109. Mitch M.

    And this is why nothing ever gets better. Nobody is prepared to call a spade a spade.

    Infuriating Johanna. This issue has been known for decades but no-one wants to raise it because they will be squashed by the slamming down of the racism card. It is one reason why I believe remote communities and preserving a stone age culture are ridiculous ideas promulgated by fools.

  110. egg_

    please Bolt, spare us your sanctimonious hypocrisy.

    Seems to be a Leftoid affliction.

  111. EvilElvis

    Tale of two Sydneys

    Did I miss the point here or are all Sydney dwellers public servants, just some marginally less annoying and normal than the others?

  112. egg_

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    Time to throw the head poove overboard.

  113. egg_

    Time to throw the head poove overboard.

    /off a tall building.

    NADT

  114. EvilElvis

    Mao Ze Dog?

    Sounds like Pepe Le Pews poor Chinese cousin.

  115. Leigh Lowe

    Territory Families took just five sex abuse victims into temporary protective custody between 2012-13 and 2015-16 despite substantiating 232 abuse cases, according to data compiled by a royal commission.

    “What’s the solution? We keep sticking Band-Aids on the amputation, hoping to Christ that it will stop the bleeding over time. But it’s simply not good enough,” he said. “Unless a child’s situation is truly bad or they are particularly young, there’s minimal chance that the child will see any form of government protection come their way.

    Apparently it has to be “truly bad” child rape to warrant action.
    Fair enough.
    We don’t want kids taken out of the family shithole for routine or minor incidences of child rape.

  116. H B Bear

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    Given how many homos QANTAS has mincing up and down the aisles I don’t even want to know what that is. Particularly after Mardi Gras has got them all worked up for another years buggery.

  117. John Comnenus

    Des,

    I take your point re the code covering people working together and employing each other. But when the relationship occurs after the person is employed then it is clearly more problematic.

    One or two drinks on a date does not necessarily mean people are partnered. When does one morph from associate to friend to girlfriend to partner? Good luck defining that transition. But once Campion clearly became the ‘partner’ she was moved to another office, which seems the appropriate thing to do.

    In such a circumstance normal employment law requires the employer to look for alternative employment. I understand and support the Code precluding employment in the first place. But I doubt you can sack someone who was employed properly and was presumably doing a good job just because they fell in love on the job.

    Bolt and others made much ado about the pregnancy – remember this is why this tawdry affair was outed in the first place. But you cannot sack someone because they are pregnant, especially if she is not pregnant to Joyce, which amply highlights why people should mind their own business in the first place.

    No one can tell me that Lucy Turnbull hasn’t got a few gigs because of he husband or that their son in law hasn’t seemed to land in a plum job as well – all in Government paid or sponsored positions. Who can forget Blanche D’Alpuget getting plenty of patronage whilst having an affair with Bob Hawke who campaigned widely with Hazel despite the fact that he was having an affair. Who can forget, well apparently Wikipedia which sheds no light on the courtship of Bob and Blanche. They have almost no detail on their affair onWikipedia which is probably some pretty recent airbrushing given a range of contemporary issues.

    I don’t say any of the above with the Turnbulls or Hawkes is or was improper or wrong. I just wonder why Campion and Joyce are held to a moral purity standard never applied to anyone else? To me it looks discriminatory, hypocritical and is a form of bullying. It is all designed to publicly humiliate Joyce and be damned the damage it does to his estranged family, Campion and the expected son. On this issue I think Bolt, Markson and the moral police are a disgrace who should ply their moral purity in Saudi Arabia or Iran. Consenting adults should be able to make their own moral choices within the law and we should respect peoples privacy. No one seems to be suggesting anyone broke the law. So its time to but out and shut up.

  118. thefrollickingmole

    Never change gruinaid…

    why cant Gruniad grammar?

    Commoners revolt at outdated of princes and princesses

    Good to see some things are immutable, the gruiniads spelling and composition being one of them.
    Especially when its their letters “headline”.

  119. EvilElvis

    Infuriating Johanna. This issue has been known for decades but no-one wants to raise it because they will be squashed by the slamming down of the racism card. It is one reason why I believe remote communities and preserving a stone age culture are ridiculous ideas promulgated by fools.

    Someone needs to just sell this politically. Bash together figures for child sex abuse in religious institutions and play to the fawning, nodding ABC press gallery and then whack them with the figures for Aboriginal community abuse. The only way to win on any subject (aboriginal abuse, energy, etc) is to bait then blind with facts! Embarrass the media and left and keep kicking. Marginalising the white enablers is the key.

  120. egg_

    I very much doubt that Joyce would have said that without Campion’s permission. In some ways I don’t blame them even if it is tacky and tawdry from our point of view. Markson’s email to Joyce’s COS did not paint a halo around her head neither did her interview on The Project so I could even enjoy it if they now began trolling the media except for the fact that there is an innocent young boy who will have to read all this when he grows up (and who also deserves to know his biological father by the way).
    I just want to add a note about the moralising drones like Julia Baird and Jenna Price: you can’t spend your lives touting for sexual liberation of women and now cry you want the Virgin birth. You can’t spend your lives extolling s***** attitudes and behaviour as somehow indicative of women’s liberation and now cry slut-shaming. You can’t spend your lives telling us it is a woman’s right to kill her own children and now cry because a woman made a choice of which you don’t approve. No one is under any illusions that the media is anything but utterly hypocritical and self serving in this matter, most of all you.

    Well said.

    It’s all about power with politics and the meeja – you’ll get rank hypocrisy at every step, particularly with virtue signalling meeja whores.

  121. egg_

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    Stewards cock-a-hoop behind the curtain?

  122. egg_

    I would put the case to virtue signalling retard Frightbat Caro that the parents are working on furthering Joyce’s career post the upcoming Turnbull apocalypse, playing the long game.

  123. Boambee John

    egg ar 1241

    Cock a la hoop?

  124. egg_

    They were also desperately trying to turn him into a serial offender and a habitual drunkard.

    That was the intimation from Windsor, that women weren’t safe around him after a few drinks.

  125. egg_

    An aging busybody turned lesbian.

    “I love Lucy” looks like a woman who looks like a man who looks like an old lesbian.

  126. egg_

    Like a bloke doing a Diane Keaton drag act.

  127. johanna

    Honestly, you would think that everything in Australia subject to government policy is perfect, what with all the airtime and column inches devoted to the sex lives of politicians and their staff over the last few weeks. I suppose that it makes for plenty of filler in our increasingly vacuous and content-free MSM, and of course no facts are required in order to spout opinions.

    But, apart from aesthetic considerations (I don’t even want to think about the image of 99% of our politicians having sex – bleagh!) it just shows how superficial and dumb most ‘journalists’ are. Heaven forfend that they do the hard graft of researching policy issues or proper investigative journalism.

    I learn a lot more about substantive issues reading blogs like this one and links in comments than from the MSM, which is practically a fact-free zone these days.

  128. Tintarella di Luna

    That Diversity Council team picture here.

    LOL.

    Where are the men?

  129. Leigh Lowe

    Des Deskperson

    #2652322, posted on March 5, 2018 at 10:07 am

    ‘But he didn’t appoint his girlfriend to a job in his office.
    She became his gf after she got the job.’

    Surely a mere technicality. If the aim of the standard is to avoid real and perceived conflicts of interest involving a Minister working with his/her partner, then surely it has to cover relationships that occur after the appointments, otherwise it doesn’t work.

    I agree Des to a large extent.
    There needs to be two arms to this policy …
    (1) Do not employ your current root;
    (2) If an employee transitions to become your current root during the course of employment, disclose the fact immediately, and act within a reasonable time to remove the conflict.
    This is where Trumble is an idiot.
    He could have run the line that the Code of Conduct didn’t really address this precise case as Bananaby didn’t set out to get his girlfriend a job in the first instance. Therefore there was a need to address the conflict as expeditiously as possible, but without disrupting the business of gummint and without throwing a pregnant woman out of a job.
    This latter point would have shut down the screeching in five minutes if pursued aggresively … “I am not in the business of putting pregnant women out of the workforce. Next question.”

  130. Myrddin Seren

    Lomborg links to a new research paper on ‘Energy Efficiency’ programmes:

    Energy efficiency doesn’t actually pay
    Upfront investment costs = 2x actual energy savings
    Modeled savings 3x exaggerate
    Rate of return: negative 7.8%/yr

    Of course the Australian experience saw 200 homes burnt down and four people killed.

    So – we can probably ‘trump’ the Michigan experience in terms of Negative RoR.

  131. Boambee John

    Where is test pattern whenever severe cases of misbehaviour in indigenous communitues are being discussed? It’s almost as if he doesn’t want to know. Sgt Schultz syndrome?

  132. duncanm

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

  133. Leigh Lowe

    BrettW

    #2652368, posted on March 5, 2018 at 11:01 am

    Just checked Diversity Council web page.

    Their Our Team page shows their top 13 staff. Only two are male and not much “diversity” in the 13 at all. Not even an Aboriginal !

    Hypocrites.

    And there is the “diverse” career backgrounds as well.
    Almost down to the last frump, they are “HR Perfessionals”.

  134. Leigh Lowe

    Boambee John

    #2652471, posted on March 5, 2018 at 1:15 pm

    Where is test pattern whenever severe cases of misbehaviour in indigenous communitues are being discussed?

    “Assisting Police with their enquiries”?

  135. Leigh Lowe

    DrBeauGan

    #2652425, posted on March 5, 2018 at 12:23 pm

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    Right.
    So, let’s assume a female flight-crew member is rattling through her checklist, and her male colleague notices that she has missed a couple of key items.
    Does he …
    (1) Risk being hauled before HR for “manterrupting”?; or
    (2) Let them all spear in?
    Tough one.

  136. EvilElvis

    Where is test pattern whenever severe cases of misbehaviour in indigenous communitues are being discussed? It’s almost as if he doesn’t want to know. Sgt Schultz syndrome?

    No need for the white indigenous among us to focus on current self inflicted attrocities when there is so many Dreamtime related massacres to draw attention to, BJ.

  137. Mother Lode

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    This just gets weirder and weirder.

    It seems everything a man does is by immediately impermissible.

    What most beggars the imagination, though, is the companies that line up behind this garbage.

    I opened up the ANZ internet banking page the other day and they inserted rainbow ‘Y’s in their logo.

    What do they really think would happen if they just sat these insane fads out? Do they believe people would open up a banking application and suddenly freeze “Hey! Where is the solidarity with QWERTY people?”

  138. duncanm

    Almost down to the last frump, they are “HR Perfessionals”.

    the most useless, disruptive, and downright corrosive form of business process ever devised.

  139. egg_

    “HR Perfessionals”.

    I.e. no discernable qualifications whatsoever.

  140. Des Deskperson

    “I take your point re the code covering people working together and employing each other. But when the relationship occurs after the person is employed then it is clearly more problematic.”

    John I agree that it is tricky. However, If an employee, for whatever reasons, becomes unable to comply with the the ethical requirements of a particular job, then I don’t believe that there is an obligation to find them another one.

    Loss of essential qualifications can be grounds for termination under employment law, and the FWA has made it clear that ‘qualifications’ goes well beyond academic or professional credentials. Not being the partner of the Minister was an essential qualification for the job. Given this and the very slender tenure protections that MOPS staff have anyway, I suggest that it could have been legally possible to terminate Campion on the spot.

    But, as you point out, this would certainly have been perceived to be, and probably would have been, harsh and arbitrary , and I agree that it would have been quite appropriate for her to be moved sideways. The issue than turns around whether she filled an existing vacancy or whether a job was invented for her. I myself finding hard to believe that Drum, at any rate, needed the services of a Senior Media Advisor.

    So far as I am aware, she never actually filled any of the jobs, since she was on stress leave between leaving Joyce’s office and resigning earlier this year. It would be interesting to know if anyone acted in those jobs while she was off.

  141. Slayer of Memes

    28 failed Newspolls in a row… just 2 more to go

    I do so hope, for the Doomlord and aussiepundit’s sakes, that we see at least a flicker of Potential Greatness(tm) from Malcontent Termite within the next 3 weeks… before he hits the brickwall he built for himself with his ’30 bad polls’ benchmark…

    Oh if only SOMEONE had predicted how Malcontent Termite would perform as PM, based on his previous performance as Opposition Leader…. perhaps Godwin Grech, who could have posted about Mal’s cunning stunt effort to oust KRudd…

    (PS. Can anyone page Philippa to the thread for an update on Mal-lotto? I want to see how my predicition is looking so far…)

  142. Atoms for Peace

    Another reason to fly Virgin

  143. Roger.

    Dr Bath said the data was extremely worrying. “Neglect creates the conditions for sexual abuse to occur,” he said. “It’s not that there are any more nasty predators running around (in ­remote communities); it’s that there’s often easier access and less supervision.”

    So the neglect of parents or carers facilitates the abuse yet by admission the authorities leave most of the kids with their families. Child welfare swamped by a tsunami of cases, responsible ministers fell helpless.

    The politically incorrect solution: shut the remote communities and/or send the kids to boarding schools in the south.

  144. egg_

    QANTAS has told its employees to be mindful of “manterruptions”

    Attention Joyce:
    10 ‘manterruptions’ = 1 Frightbat banshee interruption

  145. Roger.

    It seems everything a man does is by immediately impermissible.

    The goal is the feminisation of Western society.

  146. Infidel Tiger

    Australia is having a real problem with men named Joyce.

    And we still have our Malcolm problem too.

  147. Mother Lode

    Where is test pattern whenever severe cases of misbehaviour in indigenous communitues are being discussed?

    Probably in intense discussion with a person who already believes the same as himself railing against the bigoty bigots and all the attendant horrible-ness.

    It is not about being right – it is pretty hard to defend the degradation and abuse under discussion, so you tacitly avoid being put on the spot by embarrassing facts and instead fan the flames of rage around some other topic.

    Then, when things calm down a bit, it is possible to re-enter discussions with the broader Cat community with the same unruffled righteousness as if he had been on the side of the angels rainbow serpents all along.

  148. egg_

    28 failed Newspolls in a row… just 2 more to go

    And preferred PM status within the polling noise error margin of short Willy IIRC.
    Malcolm747 in a terminal tailspin.

  149. Mother Lode

    Holy smokes. A one handed dude might be about to get drafted into the NFL:

    Wow.

    Take a lot determination to keep going in the face of that – how many people would have tried to explain ‘the obvious’ to him.

    Good on him.

  150. C.L.

    And this is why nothing ever gets better. Nobody is prepared to call a spade a spade.

    Dr Bath, there demonstrably are more predators running around in these communities than in other parts of the country. We are not talking about, say, 50% more risk or 100% more risk for these children. We are talking about 2000%+ more risk of them being sexually abused, getting STDs and so on. If what you say is true, there must a handful of predators abusing 24/7 to generate those figures.

    The mealy mouthed responses to this national disgrace are absolutely shameful. I read last week that some local Aborigines in Tennant Creek want to set up a body consisting of themselves, paid no doubt by us, to consider individual cases and find ‘culturally appropriate’ solutions. Not one journalist or politician ever has the guts to ask these hypocrites why they are not doing something about it already – they live there, it’s a small place, they allegedly have all the connections and information. The fact is, they haven’t got the stomach to take it on, but wouldn’t mind another gravy train for themselves.

    Indeed.

  151. Infidel Tiger

    Another reason to fly Virgin

    Virgin are much further to the left on manner of nuttiness than Qantas.

    Best to fly with asian carriers where possible. Just make sure the polite eats with a knife and fork and speaks English, preferably with an Australian twang.

  152. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #2652511, posted on March 5, 2018 at 1:49 pm

    Another reason to fly Virgin

    Virgin are much further to the left on manner of nuttiness than Qantas.

    Best to fly with asian carriers where possible. Just make sure the polite eats with a knife and fork and speaks English, preferably with an Australian twang.

    Cathay employs quite a few knife-and-fork types.

  153. Bruce

    Regarding the Ass-angle / Michael Ware “spat”:

    No honour among thieves?

  154. C.L.

    Pell’s lawyers formally accuse Victoria Police of perverting the course of justice. But that’s not the lead. Bizarrely, the prosecution is trying to change its own briefs of evidence to alter dates and details. How very convenient. Pell’s QC says, ‘yeah, nah.’

    Cardinal George Pell’s lawyers have accused Victoria Police of failing to follow procedure in investigating Australia’s most senior Catholic cleric, and of working under the presumption he was guilty.

    Cardinal Pell, 76, fronted a 25-minute administrative hearing at the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court at the start of what is expected to be a month-long committal hearing.

    He is facing historical sexual offence charges involving multiple complainants. Cardinal Pell has denied the allegations.

    The hearing will determine if there is sufficient evidence to warrant a trial.

    Cardinal Pell’s defence barrister, Robert Richter QC, argued for certain statements to remain part of the police brief of evidence against his client, opposing a prosecution application for them to be removed.

    Mr Richter told the court they had supplied the police with about 21 statements from witnesses that could possibly clear Cardinal Pell, but they were not investigated properly.

    “These documents are certainly relevant to the alleged offences. I know they don’t suit the prosecution because they’re exculpatory [favourable to the defendant], but they’re still there and they’re in the possession of the police,” he said.

    Mr Richter also called for a report detailing how police should go about prosecuting prominent people to remain as part of the evidence.

    “We say that was not followed because there was a presumption of guilt,” he said.

    Mr Richter said he intended to cross-examine on those issues.

    Prosecutor Mark Gibson SC said a number of the historical sexual offence charges also needed to be amended to adjust dates and wording.

    George Pell’s lawyer questions police investigation into historical sexual offence allegations.

  155. Infidel Tiger

    An Anglo pilot and an Asian cabin crew is world’s best practice.

    The ground crew are becoming a worry though. I’m reviewing my policy here.

  156. BrettW

    Diversity Council clearly failing at their jobs. How about some of the females give up their jobs to at least
    A Muslim wearing a burkha (could be male or female)
    A handicapped person (wheelchair would look good in the team pics).
    A transgender

    This whole diversity / PC thing is a lucrative career for people like Elizabeth Brodrick and various Sex Discrimination organisations.

  157. C.L.

    Also at that ABC link, one of the complainants will testify alongside his support dog.
    Seriously.

  158. Brian of Moorabbin

    Prosecutor Mark Gibson SC said a number of the historical sexual offence charges also needed to be amended to adjust dates and wording.

    If there is confusion over the dates (and wording), then there is ‘reasonable doubt’ as to whether the offences ever occurred at all…

    Just sayin’…

  159. notafan

    If there is confusion over the dates (and wording), then there is ‘reasonable doubt’ as to whether the offences ever occurred at all…

    The confusion no doubt arises from it now being clear that Cardinal Pell could not have been at the place at the time the complainant claims he was

    So presto chango as it is he said he said just adjust the dates and wording

  160. Tintarella di Luna

    I have taken to reminding people that I have a husband and I am offended when they refer him as my partner.

    #MeToo – I get very very offended too.

  161. C.L.

    If the prosecution is saying the dates upon which charges were built are wrong, they are, in fact, saying the charges are false. They cannot be allowed to chuck in some more promising dates because they’ve since researched where Pell was at particular times. That would clearly be corruption and prosecutorial misconduct.

  162. C.L.

    It’s possible the support dog may be asked to testify.
    ———
    “You understand that you are under oath, Patch?”
    Woof.
    “Was Pell there that day?”
    Woof woof!
    No further questions.

  163. notafan

    They cannot be allowed to chuck in some more promising dates because they’ve since researched where Pell was at particular times.

    More like they have the exculpatory evidence and are scrambling to repair the damage.

    This is what happens when people make stuff up about a public figure whose time is rarely his own.

  164. Infidel Tiger

    Donald J. Trump
    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    I don’t know how much longer I can take this bullshit – so terrible! #Oscars
    11:23 AM · Mar 3, 2014

    There is a Trump tweet for everything.

  165. JC

    All I’ve heard since I’ve been in NYC is whining about Trump and how embarrassing he is. I tell them he’s a national treasure. Man they hate him here. We had dinner and most of it was an anti Trump whine. I loved it.

  166. JC

    One dude told me he stays up every evening to watch Don Lemon show attacking Trump. It’s wonderful as he’s sending NY’ers mad.

  167. notafan

    Andrew Maddox

    OMG, Trump looks sleazier and sleazier as the months go by. Imagine what he’ll look like as we approach 2020

    Kurt Schlichter

    Verified account

    @KurtSchlichter
    8h8 hours ago
    More Kurt Schlichter Retweeted Andrew Maddox
    He’ll look like your president

    Lol

    two more years of demoangst

  168. Zatara

    Trump at tonight’s Gridiron Club dinner:

    After all, you the New York Times are an icon and I’m a New York icon. The only difference is, I still own my buildings.

  169. OneWorldGovernment

    Infidel Tiger
    #2652518, posted on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 pm

    An Anglo pilot and an Asian cabin crew is world’s best practice.

    The ground crew are becoming a worry though. I’m reviewing my policy here.

    Exactly

  170. Myrddin Seren

    JC

    One dude told me he stays up every evening to watch Don Lemon show attacking Trump. It’s wonderful as he’s sending NY’ers mad.

    From the #Fake News Network’s Chief National Security Correspondent, Dad, New Yorker…

    Trump makes a quip to donors at a private dinner – which is naturally leaked to #FNN:

    The President of the United States on the unelected leader of authoritarian China: “He’s now president for life. President for life. And he’s great,” Trump said. “And look, he was able to do that. I think it’s great. Maybe we’ll give that a shot some day.”

    Read the Tweets that follow. Mass insanity and derangement among the Left may be the most singular reference point of the Trumpocene.

    Going to be very hard for all these people with a white-knuckle grip on their mental health to ever reply to the question ‘Where were you and what were you doing when Trump……?’

  171. Rockdoctor

    Hmm Virgin vs Qantas; my take and I fly a lot of 2 hour legs. Don’t like the Virtue signalling from Qantas though the inflight service has come a long way they still can be quite cantankerous at times, food & drink though OK along with baggage allowances. Have been on flights with a whole 737 with no more than a dozen people so they appear to be less likely to cancel flights. Little bit pricey but everything is included.

    Virgin trying to be a premium service carrier but still having a foot in the budget carrier game, they too have come a long way from the Virgin Blue days but are virtue signalers extraordinaire (Flip through Voyeur) but likely due to the Branson factor. Onboard staff are generally friendly, younger but can be a bit silly, food & drink IMO not at premium carrier standard which seems to push you to the paid menu items, baggage allowance is ok but don’t be 1g overweight or the extra charges kick in they are very ruthless with, flights are commonly cancelled at a whim (i.e. failed sell enough seats) I have been caught by this numerous times to much inconvenience. Cheaper than a Qantas fare but you know where the saving is being made from.

    I generally don’t pay for my fares anyway and so don’t have the choice. Both airlines have their downsides but when I fly personally if I want to save money & know I am going to get the run around I fly Jetstar/Tiger but if I want all the trappings generally Qantas, Virgin just isn’t quite there yet.

  172. Rockdoctor

    Infidel Tiger
    #2652518, posted on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 pm

    An Anglo pilot and an Asian cabin crew is world’s best practice.

    Can concur with this, Jetstar Asia Singapore/Bangkok based crews. Beat any local crew for hospitality hands down.

  173. Bruce

    When I was working in SE Asia a LOT, for a few years, over a decade ago, it very quickly became obvious that QUAINTARSE was not up to scratch on baggage handling. They wanted to force us to transport tens of thousands of dollars worth of film production equipment in the cargo hold. “Mislaying” any item of such equipment would have caused catastrophic delays and huge cost blowouts.

    The nice folk at Thai seemed unconcerned about a small herd of Australians struggling into the cattle-class cabin clutching Arriflex BL cameras, Nagra recorders, field sound mixer, radio microphone systems, telescopic mic. booms and boxes of audio tape and film stock. Usefully, they also assisted in ensuring the film cans, especially AFTER the shoot, were NOT run through a zillion dodgy scanners. Base-fogging is NOT a good thing on your negatives. I only ever “lost” one item, my almost-new Keith Monks boom pole, which I figured would not get too damaged in the cargo hold, as long as its transit case handled any strain.. Well, it wasn’t completely lost, because about eight weeks after arriving home sans pole, their local rep rang my home to tell me it had been found and was awaiting pickup at their airport office. SERVICE!!

    I think I got very close to being arrested once, on return to Oz. A “zealous” customs type wanted to crack open EVERY carefully sealed can of exposed neg., NOT videotape, there, in the brightly-lit arrival area, whilst simultaneously asking me if it were true that film crews were full of druggies. Several weeks of filming mass graves, piles of bones and interviewing survivors of Pol Pots little “social experiment” left me less than inclined to be my usual cheerful self.

    I managed to keep my cool in front of the “thick blue line” and moved on to the next job.

  174. Bruce in WA

    QANTAS = Quickies Available Now (in) Toilets, Ask Steward

  175. Deplorable

    Sometimes workers choose to withdraw labour and we believe that’s a fundamental human right. Even if the law says ‘you can’t, it’s illegal, it’s wrong,’ we think the fact it’s a human right overrides the fact our government has unjust laws and sometimes it’s OK for people to break them.”

    Yep it is the workers right to QUIT and go for another job if you do not like where you are. The rest is thuggery.

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