Monday Forum: March 12, 2018

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1,776 Responses to Monday Forum: March 12, 2018

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  1. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Forgot to mention alcohol. It is of course a tonic, and you can dose up on it as required, taking into account the cautions about moderation and periods of abstention, which you have just so you know how much good it is doing you when you crack open the champers once more.

  2. thefrollickingmole

    Awwww Dan Andrews has a sad…

    Daniel Andrews blasts Turnbull after losing $5bn defence contract
    Victorian premier says Coalition has ‘turned its back on Australia’s second biggest state’ by giving Queensland the work

    The real story being we could buy off the shelf from our allies, do the maintenance ourselves and save billions of dollars.
    But black hand votes and Pyne class seaman tubes come first every time.

  3. Slayer of Memes

    MCG car park to close for major sporting events

    Cars will be blocked from parking at major sporting events at the MCG in an effort to strengthen security against vehicular terror attacks.

    Yarra Park will be closed for marquee matches, including the Richmond-Carlton AFL season opener next week.

    The move, aimed at keeping fans away from cars, comes in the wake of terror attacks overseas where vehicles have plowed into crowds.

    Melbourne Cricket Club chief executive officer Stuart Fox acknowledged in a statement that the changes would inconvenience “a small number” of fans but said the focus was on ensuring a safe environment for punters.

    “Ongoing events both around the world and closer to home clearly demonstrate that we need to minimise the risk of interactions between vehicles and pedestrians, especially in crowded places such as outside the MCG,” he said.

    The AFL is predicting a crowd of more than 90,000 for the Richmond-Carlton clash, and with service disruption on the Hurstbridge, Cranbourne and Pakenham lines as well as other public transport delays, many have taken to social media to express their discontent with the changes.

    PTV has confirmed that they will be adding additional replacement buses on these lines to deal with the crowds.

    “It seems I shall get home at 2 or even 3 am now,” said James Walshe in a comment on the MCG’s Facebook page.

    Others on social media were concerned about the stadium’s accessibility.

    “Makes it very difficult for my 92-year-old dad to come. He can no longer walk from the station,” Jennifer Glanville wrote on Facebook.

    The ban was first implemented for the 2017-18 Boxing Day Ashes Test, and will continue throughout the AFL season. Matches including the Essendon-Collingwood Anzac Day blockbuster, Queen’s Birthday and Dreamtime at the ‘G will see Yarra Park closed.

    Other games, “subject to weather and the condition of the park”, will see an 80-metre “exclusion zone” introduced around the stadium, reducing capacity by a third – to approximately 2000 cars.

    Remember when all those politicians stood up and said “We will not let terrorists dictate how Australians can go about our day-to-day lives”…?

    …just before they authorised the installation of ‘public safety bollards’ all over our once beautiful cities.

    Now decent law-abiding Australians cannot drive their cars anywhere due to parking restrictions caused by fears of terrorists with IED-laden vehicles.

    Can Malcontent Termite et al explain to me how this is not having the manner in which we go about our day-to-day lives dictated to as a result of terrorism??

  4. I see Trump’s rally in support of Saccone in Pennsylvania did not prevent yet another electoral defeat in a deeply red district. What a loser!

  5. Mitch M.

    Gyms are extremely boring too.

    When I was young I got around that problem. The gym owner was kind enough to give me the keys so I would roll up when the gym was closed, set up all the equipment, and burst through in 40 minutes. I am thinking about going to the local 24 hour gym so I can emulate how I trained in my youth. Strength training boosts growth hormones, aerobic doesn’t. Strength training also helps prevents falls, strengthens bones, and may(uncertain) ward of sarcopenia, a serious muscle wasting problem that occurs all too often for those over 70 years of age.

    Most health nuts do far too much exercise, it is a net negative. There are a number of studies highlighting potential cardiovascular risks for endurance athletes and the running craze has been a boon for orthopedic surgeons. Brisk walking is a good idea and strength training also has benefits.

  6. Brian of Moorabbin

    BREAKING

    Groundbreaking scientist Stephen Hawking has died aged 76.

    Professor Hawking’s children, Lucy, Robert and Tim said in a statement: “We are deeply saddened that our beloved father passed away today.”

  7. President Donald Trump’s longtime personal aide John McEntee was fired because he is currently under investigation by the Department of Homeland Security for serious financial crimes, a source familiar with his firing told CNN.

    Every Trumpkin is a crook.

  8. Bruce in WA

    Remember all those claims about the number of firearms seized by AFP and other agencies in 2007? Almost 6000, as reported. Remember Cats here querying the veracity of those claims? ‘Twould seem they were correct — as usual:

    YOU DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT –TRUTH EXPOSED AFTER SSAA EXPOSES AFP GUN HAUL CLAIMS
    13 March 2018 / In Politics
    AFP commissioner Andrew Colvin’s dig at the Australian Shooter as captured in the Hansard.

    In October 2017 during Senate Estimates, where public servants front up to Parliament House to answer questions about government departments, the Australian Federal Police (AFP) was quizzed about gun seizures. Claims and news stories that its national gang-fighting squad had seized an impressive haul of 5600 illegal firearms were put directly to the commissioner by Liberal Democrats Senator David Leyonhjelm, an avid shooter and pro-gun advocate.

    Senator Leyonhjelm quoted an Australian Shooter article that revealed this figure overwhelmingly included firearm parts and frames. In the June 2017 magazine, our SSAA Legislative Action department also revealed the vast majority of these items were actually seized some 15,000 kilometres away by authorities in the US. The reality of the seized items was uncovered following months of inquiries, emails and phone calls to the AFP and former Justice Minister Michael Keenan’s office.

    While the mainstream media published the figures from the Minister’s press release, and a similar co-branded AFP release from Victoria Police verbatim, the SSAA followed the fundamental press principle of accuracy. That is, we fact-checked the claim instead of publishing unverified and inaccurate information.

    Unfortunately, AFP commissioner Andrew Colvin felt it necessary to cast doubt on whether the official publication of Australia’s premier shooting body was a reliable source. He told the committee on October 24, 2017: “I will make the point, though, that I’m not necessarily going to take it as a given that what was in the Australian Shooter magazine is accurate. I will just have to take on notice what the 5600 illegal firearms that were announced in March comprised.”

    The AFP was requested to provide an answer to the Legal and Constitutional Affairs committee by December 8, 2017. More than two months later, the question remained unanswered, despite the AFP providing written answers to no less than 14 other questions.

    During Additional Estimates hearing on February 27 this year, which the SSAA-LA attended, Senator Leyonhjelm again asked the AFP about the “exaggerated claims”, pointing out that: “I’ve had no answers to those questions, despite a considerable elapse of time.” An unapologetic Mr Colvin confirmed he was now ready to answer the questions, and finally confirmed the figures published by the SSAA more than 18 months ago were correct.

    The commissioner confirmed that 4785 items, of which only six were fully operational firearms, were seized in the US. Just 303 firearm parts were seized in Australia. None of the items seized in Australia were complete operational firearms, as the SSAA previously reported.

    It also appears the AFP and the then-Minister announced the same seizure on two different occasions, leading the public to believe there had in fact been two separate seizures of more than 5600 firearms. “I interpret that as suggesting we were double counting the 5600 and 5700,” Senator Leyonhjelm rightly stated.

    But what came as a shock to the SSAA, was the revelation that the AFP does not distinguish between a firearm and a firearm part: a firearm part is recorded as a functioning firearm. “In total, that operation (Operation Ironsight) resulted in the seizure of 5088 firearms, including parts – we don’t necessarily distinguish between a full firearm and a part,” Mr Colvin said. This raises concerns about the level of data the AFP is collating and offers insight into why the 5600 figure claim was outrageously overstated.

  9. tgs

    Strength training boosts growth hormones, aerobic doesn’t. Strength training also helps prevents falls, strengthens bones, and may(uncertain) ward of sarcopenia, a serious muscle wasting problem that occurs all too often for those over 70 years of age.

    The feeling when you successfully pick up a heavier thing then you’ve ever picked up before is always a good one.

    Hit a 200kg deadlift a few weeks ago. Didn’t matter what else happened that day, it was still a good day.

  10. Mitch M.

    The feeling when you successfully pick up a heavier thing then you’ve ever picked up before is always a good one.
    Hit a 200kg deadlift a few weeks ago. Didn’t matter what else happened that day, it was still a good day.

    Definitely. I used to focus on calf raises so much I bounced along when walking. Increased strength makes so many things easier. Dead Lifts are a great exercise.

  11. Brian of Moorabbin

    Strength training boosts growth hormones, aerobic doesn’t. Strength training also helps prevents falls, strengthens bones, and may(uncertain) ward of sarcopenia, a serious muscle wasting problem that occurs all too often for those over 70 years of age.

    Strength training also aids in cardiovascular health, and can lessen the risk of heart attacks (particularly in obese males)…

    Something else for Monty to consider

  12. egg_

    Groundbreaking scientist Stephen Hawking has died aged 76.

    A Brief History of His Time?
    A good innings, considering his illness.

  13. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ah M0nty, quoting CNN again.

    Did you know that Elon is headhunting Onion employees for a new venture? What’s the bet it is for a news channel in competition with CNN?

  14. testpattern

    ‘Marcia Langton made the point in today’s paper that STIs aren’t necessarily sexually transmitted, it’s just part of living in overcrowded squalor.’

    She did not. She was verballed by racists like you deliberately conflating separate issues. Here’s what she actually wrote. Nothing about ‘it’s just part of living in overcrowded squalor’

    ‘The varying incidence of sexually transmitted infections in the ­Aboriginal populations in remote Australia presents a number of challenges to the Australian health system. The identification of persons with STIs is not straightforward — and sometimes extremely difficult — in remote areas. The diseases range from rare and difficult to treat, to endemic and even more difficult to treat. Those that are easy to treat remain a problem because of the ways in which the infectious burden develops in these populations.

    These are difficult, long-term issues that only a few dedicated services are tackling. These ser­vices are not helped by prurient and muddled media interest, the ­Aboriginal men and women who for their own reasons deny the existence of these problems and retreat to life-threatening but comfortable slogans, and least of all, the negligence of successive governments whose responsible leaders have responded too slowly and with too few resources for an effective response by the frontline workers.

    It is wrong to conflate the incidence of STIs with sexual abuse. To make this clear: it is not the case that all cases of STIs in ­minors are the result of sexual contact or abuse. The rush to recommend removal of Aboriginal children from their families is an unwarranted response, and has become the catchcry of those building their careers on serious health issues that have become salacious fodder for the media and very significant threats to developing protocols for treating these continuing disease threats to ­extremely vulnerable people.

    The question of whether to remove children is secondary to the question of immediate medical treatment.
    Ascertaining how the STIs are being spread — by interviewing children — is the work of professionals and needs to be undertaken with caution and care. Some proportion of the sexual activity involves only children and not adults. When only children are involved, different steps need to be taken. When adults are involved in sexual activities with children, a different set of steps must be under­taken. Is the adult offender living in the household? Visiting the household? In what circumstances does the offender gain access to the child?

    It would be ridiculous to have a one-size-fits-all approach to this very difficult problem. Medicos working in the Territory under the Northern Territory Emergency Response schemes were well aware of these problems but unable to speak because of the issues of confidentiality of patients and maintaining the confidence of ­patients and communities to present to clinics. The rates of STIs among Aboriginal children in the NT must be treated as a medical matter for professionals. In the absence of a Centre for Disease Control (as recommended by the Australian Medical Association), the Office of Health Protection in the federal Department of Health has some responsibility for communicable diseases.

    If I were in a responsible position, I would ask the Office of Health Protection to co-operate with the ­Aboriginal medical ser­vices bodies, such as Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and the Northern Territory and Queensland health departments, and put together medical teams to test and treat Aboriginal children in the affected areas in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia. All children in school should have sex education and STI education, and the educational material should be in their own languages. They and their parents need to be aware of the consequences of untreated STIs: infertility, mortality, brain damage and others. Other infectious diseases, such as trachoma, have been treated with similar approaches involving better co-ordination of existing services. The Federal, Northern Territory and Queensland governments are negligent in the extreme in allowing this situation to worsen over the past 10 years. It has been reported regularly and extensively in the past decade by medical professionals from various health entities, including the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, and the responsible ministers and officers run for cover rather than taking the necessary steps to treat children for these diseases.

    In this context, I have previously said that the complaints from some Aboriginal male leaders about being labelled universally as abusers should be ignored and the complicity of the indigenous sector in protecting their sensitivities and strange complaints that result should also be ignored. If they had taken positions of protecting children rather than outrage at John Howard’s nasty and ridiculous blame game in 2007, we would not have the increased rates (also greatly under-reported) that are reported now. Blatant denialism has contributed to this terrible situation.’

  15. testpattern

    ‘Marcia Langton made the point in today’s paper that STIs aren’t necessarily sexually transmitted, it’s just part of living in overcrowded squalor.’

    She did not. She was verballed by racists like you deliberately conflating separate issues. Nothing about ‘it’s just part of living in overcrowded squalor.’ I have twice tried to post the whole arcticle but the mods delete it.

  16. Slayer of Memes

    Fox News has some Leftist shill on right now, who is literally arguing that the Mueller investigation was NEVER about collusion, even snapping at the show’s host and saying “why do you keep saying collusion?”

    Obviously they have now realised that, since the House Select Committee report has shown that the whole ‘Trump/Russia Collusion’ narrative is dead, they are desperate to pretend that it was never about that…

  17. egg_

    Looks like Kip Thorne with him in the photo – I’m not sure if the group of Physicists were on a sex tour?

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/stephen-hawking-pictured-on-jeffrey-epsteins-sex-slave-caribbean-island-9974955.html

  18. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Senile Old Guy – I think you should drop the senile bit of your tag, for you are clearly not, but I think you should also read more closely the discussion on allegory in Tolkien that followed my comment regarding Johanna’s usual abuse, to which I think I prefer not to respond in future. She can have her views about me, her slanders and her twisting of facts and mocking of my life; she is simply second-rate here when she aggresses against me in this way. That much should be plain to any fair-minded person.

    Johanna did however mention Tolkien. I am not the Tolkien scholar that many here have shown themselves to be. However, I have some interest, particularly due to my various readings in ancient Scandinavian cosmology. I do not dispute that Tolkien at times denied that LOTR was ‘allegory’, for reasons of his own, but anyone reading LOTR should be free to disagree, and I was one of those. If pressed I would have been happy to point out in detail the allegorical elements which I perceive in LOTR, but I didn’t actually want to start writing another review. I’ve also read commentary by ‘others’ re their interpretations, especially re forces of good and evil, light and darkness, and there are many, far too many to put up in a blog. It would take a proper review and I am busy writing other things.

    Roger then linked to this – a very helpful quick overview of allegorical elements in literary works, using a ‘conservative imagination’, an imagination sadly lacking in such as Johanna, but I hope not in you. Read it please.

    Johanna’s unmitigated bile towards me as ‘intellectually flabby’ may be safely ignored. I am well read and have a sharp enough mind as well as a conservative imagination. So I am well ahead. 🙂

  19. Myrddin Seren

    Hah

    Ben Pile in the UK reTweeted Chris Kenny:

    How does a party for workers morph into one that steals from pensioners and hands out cash to renewable energy billionaires?

    Because this statement is applicable across the industrialised world.

  20. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Most health nuts do far too much exercise, it is a net negative. There are a number of studies highlighting potential cardiovascular risks for endurance athletes and the running craze has been a boon for orthopedic surgeons. Brisk walking is a good idea and strength training also has benefits.

    Couldn’t agree more, Mitch. A great way to add some extra strength training is to travel a lot and do it with heavy suitcases. Hairy (who belongs to one of those 24 hr gyms) does a most of the moving of them between taxis into airports, or up and down train stations, or whatever, but I help too. Also, we generally prefer not to let bellhops do our luggage in hotels as it often takes a while to arrive and Da Hairy Neatness Freak is very big on unpacking immediately – so we do some lifting there too. I do some small hand weights in a kick-boxing class I attend. Too much weight training is not good for women. Some is fine.

  21. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    From an evolutionary perspective sodium intake was relatively low and potassium intake much higher compared. That should be a warning.

    Wonder how that gels with the very high seafood diet middens tell us that mainly coastal migratory early homo sapiens ate. Salt levels there would have been quite high. Also from earliest times, salt has been a much desired, eaten and traded commodity.

  22. Eyrie

    Catallaxy to Memory Vault – confirm ops normal?

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