Monday Forum: March 12, 2018

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1,776 Responses to Monday Forum: March 12, 2018

  1. John Constantine

    200,000 self managed Superfund owners.

    We will import that many voters between now and Christmas, let alone by the next election.

    Import the voteherds, fund them from superannuation of racists.

    Eternal political victory, Comrades.

  2. JC

    leigh

    You gotta have a least 40% offshore. The Liars Party has gone bolivarian. I’m trying to talk wifey into moving back to the US, but she doesn’t want to leave her 4 sisters. Madness.

  3. Leigh Lowe

    the largest of which have been claiming up to $2.5 million in cash rebates

    What horseshit.
    If the one largest fund is a problem, set a threshold at $100,000 refund, or $200,000. Don’t impose a double-tax on everybody (and the failure to rebate is a double tax).
    Fuck me … if the fund was in pension phase (ie zero tax rate) you would need $6 m in dividends to generate a $2.5 m rebate. Given a yield of about 6% on bank shares, you would need a portfolio of $100 m to generate that sort of rebate. If the fund is in accumulation phase (15% tax rate) you would need double that.
    Of course, the MSM are spinning this hard that it is a “loophole” and that people are just gaming the system through some accounting trickery to “steal” from Treasury.
    Classic Liar’s Pardy …
    Cite the extreme example, make the case to “tax da rich”, then tax everybody.

  4. Bruce of Newcastle

    Leigh – Shorten has already promised to partly remove the capital gains tax discount. You can bet your boots he’ll also remove negative gearing deductions from non-union superannuation accounts too.

    I have heard nothing about that but he’s already talked about the unfairness of negative gearing and it is a simple step from the dividend imputation thing to this one.

    Shorten policy hits tax breaks for negative gearing and capital gains (Feb 2016)

  5. Chris

    If the Coalition can’t kick Whining William from here to Hell and back on this issue, they deserve to be out of office for a long, long time.

    Place your bets.

  6. Rae

    If the one largest fund is a problem, set a threshold at $100,000 refund, or $200,000. Don’t impose a double-tax on everybody (and the failure to rebate is a double tax).

    It’s not a refund. It’s a payment in excess of tax actually paid.

  7. stackja

    Kulaks were targeted. Then others. Then many. BS doesn’t want people to remember history.

  8. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    We will import that many voters between now and Christmas, let alone by the next election.

    According to figures in the MSM we imported 400,000 last year. This figure amounts to close to 20% of the population every decade, up from 10% a few years ago. Australia will be split between the punjabi and the chicoms later this century.

  9. Didn’t happen,

    Indeed. The whole thing was made up.

    Being able to differentiate between a medical intervention to save a life and murder is worth discussing, I say.

    Not only is it worth discussing, but the principles involved are used daily in hospitals, by armed forces, etc.

  10. OSC;

    All of the PML panellists support the sacking of the Trinity Grammar teacher who cut a schoolboy’s hair.

    Thus demonstrating the degree of detachment from social norms that is mirrored by film critics.

  11. stackja

    Chris – MT by some way will help BS.

  12. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    how many angels could dance on the head of a pin,

    Ooops, Winston. That will bring Dover down like a ton of feathers, which of course is equivalent to a ton of bricks, but less worrying. For this is apparently a made-up thing, these angels dancing and the debate thereupon. However, as a metaphor, it is well known and well used and quite useful.

    And now we’re on to metaphors as well as allegories. When will it ever end? It starts in the philosophy of Referential Language (denotation and connotation), extends into Parables, and then there is Apostrophe, which I mentioned the other day but no-one noticed I went beyond commas; my reference encompassed what the Greeks knew as the External Chorus, a personification of some abstraction to push the story along.

    Roger, that link of yours regarding allegory was red hot; I’ve bookmarked it. Thank you.

    Now I’m thinking more about witches:

    In medieval times witches used to fly through the air on domestic phallic symbols and were seen as pure evil, wild pagan women out of place in a Christian world. In pagan times witches were Valkyries, riding on cats. Deep in the mythology of Scandinavia, brewing also in Ireland and Britain, is a folkloric tale about felines, which later transferred to the familiars of witches. I am uncovering hints of this tale – the Welsh myth of Arthur’s hunt for Palug’s Cat; Gildas’s leopard that never changes its spots; his tawny lioness devouring Britain; the multitude of cat heads carved into the ceremonial cart on the Viking Osberg ship; the Brythonnic word for battle also being ‘cat’; Yvain, le chevalier au lion: all tantalizing remnants of a bigger story, now lost. Pieces of an Arthurian puzzle.

  13. Rae, your incomplete knowledge and assumptions could be improved by a simple Google search which would find this:
    According to the novel, Starling attended the University of Virginia as a double major in psychology and criminology.

    Your claim that Clarice Starling was not a psychiatrist. She was a student at the FBI Academy. could do with a little editing.

  14. Leigh Lowe

    Bruce of Newcastle

    #2659290, posted on March 13, 2018 at 11:00 am

    Leigh – Shorten has already promised to partly remove the capital gains tax discount. You can bet your boots he’ll also remove negative gearing deductions from non-union superannuation accounts too.

    Negative gearing doesn’t worry me Bruce.
    I am solely looking for income.
    And I am in the zone where I can pull my super out tax free (which will happen the minute Trumble goes to visit the GG). Mrs L is somewhat younger, but her balance is not quite as high as mine, so we can probably fumble through that one. Getting my hands on 60% of our super assets opens up a world of opportunity. One thing is for sure … I will not be paying these xunts one cent more than they can wring out of me.
    And that is the thing. In ten minutes flat people are already coming up with strategies to tweak their investments to get around Billy.

  15. Leigh Lowe

    Scrollin’, scrollin’, scrollin’

  16. notafan

    Latham is blunt

    Real Mark Latham

    @RealMarkLatham
    16h16 hours ago
    More Real Mark Latham Retweeted Tim Soutphommasane
    I love the monthly update.
    In this one, Tony Abbott calls for a cut to immigration levels without mentioning race. Soupie responded by saying it might “license prejudice or intolerance”.
    You can’t make this stuff up.
    Eats, sleeps and shits racism, this bloke.

    commenting on

    Tim SoutphommasaneVerified account
    @timsout Here’s my monthly update —featuring foreign influence and immigration debates, multicultural communities & First Peoples, @ItStopsWithMe, and cultural diversity & leadership …https://racediscriminationcommissioner.wordpress.com

  17. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Ah, I was called away before I could post the above, Winston, and I see a multitude has arrived before me to put you right about those dancing angels.

  18. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    NATIONAL AFFAIRS
    Scott Morrison accuses Bill Shorten of wanting to ‘steal’ from retirees who invest in stock markets

    The Australian
    10:48AM March 13, 2018

    Greg Brown
    Journalist
    Canberra
    @gregbrown_TheOz

    Scott Morrison has accused Bill Shorten of wanting to “steal” money from pensioners and retirees who invest in the stock market, declaring Labor keeps “jacking taxes up” because the party cannot control its spending.

    The Treasurer attacked Labor’s policy of axing cash payments for franking credits by calling it a “brutal and cruel blow” for retirees and pensioners.

    He said the policy would force pensioners to keep their money in the bank in a low interest rate environment rather than encouraging them to earn more money in the share market.

    He said the dividend imputation system was designed so shareholders did not pay tax twice: through their dividend earnings and on the tax of the companies they have a stake in.

    “(Labor) are not dealing with loopholes here, what they’re doing is creating them,” Mr Morrison said.

    “It is unfair to steal someone’s tax refund, I wouldn’t do it on your tax refund as a normal income tax payer and I’m not going to do it for pensioners and retirees who are simply making smart decisions in an environment like this where they can get a better return on buying shares,” Mr Morrison said

    “What do you want them to do, go and live on 2 per cent and put it in the bank?

    “That is what they are going them to do and I don’t think that is smart, I don’t think they have thought it through, it is a brutal tax grab.”

    Mr Morrison likened the policy to “theft” because it forced shareholders to pay tax twice.

    “That just shows a Labor Party that has an insatiable appetite for higher taxes, their only attitude towards the budget is higher taxes, that is all they ever talk about, let the spending rip uncontrollably …because you can always keep on jacking up taxes,” he said.

    “Bill Shorten has made something crystal clear today to the Australian public: if you want higher taxes, vote Labor, if you want lower taxes vote Liberal and National

    From the Oz. What’s happened, to cause someone from the Coalition to finally show some spine?

  19. Knuckle Dragger

    JC,

    I thoroughly debunked your assertions last night. Repeating them hoping to find a different audience later in the morning is poor darts. And again, you misquoted me and relied on it, so I won’t enter into the ‘debate’ further other than to say to don’t create countries with kind words, open borders and handshakes. In any event, most of the duchies and principalities clamoured to join the growing Germany once they got a sense of its growing economic and military power. Assimilation was not a problem. Go back and read them again if some of the points I made eluded you.

    Tell you what – I’ll listen to your posts on shares, bonds and cryptocurrencies, and similar things you seem to know about. I’m no master historian, but I do know about this subject, so if we could agree to not ignorantly bark at others with experience in fields of particular endeavour…….

    I’ve never done it to you, so I’d appreciate the same courtesy.

  20. Leigh Lowe

    JC

    #2659302, posted on March 13, 2018 at 11:16 am

    3D printed home. Cost $10,000 and likely fall to $4,000.

    Saw something similar on one of those renovation/design shows on TV a while back.
    The concrete was laid in layers using a monster “cake icing bag” thingy.
    I did wonder what happens when you get to the door and window lintels, though.
    I assume a crew just inserts a pre-fab one when it reaches that height, or inserts a temporary boxing frame to support it until it dries.
    Limited to single story at the moment.

  21. stackja

    Leigh Lowe
    #2659305, posted on March 13, 2018 at 11:17 am
    Scrollin’, scrollin’, scrollin’

    Blues Bros Rawhide

  22. Senile Old Guy

    Rae, your incomplete knowledge and assumptions could be improved by a simple Google search which would find this:
    According to the novel, Starling attended the University of Virginia as a double major in psychology and criminology.

    Further, her mentor at the FBI is “Agent-in-Charge of the Behavioural Science Unit”. So Starling studied psychology and was being mentored by the head of the FBI psychology unit.

  23. H B Bear

    Scott Morrison accuses Bill Shorten of wanting to ‘steal’ from retirees who invest in stock markets

    Unlike the Lieborals who just want to tax their superannuation fund directly.

  24. H B Bear

    Socks off to a bad start today.

  25. JC

    Knucklehead

    You’ve debunked nothing. Touting Bismarck (fatso) as some hotshot nation builder is idiotic and presents you as low IQ. Sadly, there’s nothing you can do about it, but hopefully, some time in the future, you will be able to have a brain implant.
    Unfortunately, it’s too late for Ronery.

  26. Leigh Lowe

    H B Bear

    #2659316, posted on March 13, 2018 at 11:29 am

    Scott Morrison accuses Bill Shorten of wanting to ‘steal’ from retirees who invest in stock markets

    Unlike the Lieborals who just want to tax their superannuation fund directly.

    That is what the Senior Labour Camp Master wants.
    Do it by stealth and call it a “tax on da rich” so the low information voters don’t cotton on.

  27. JC

    Knucklehead

    Military power is not the way to measure how a nation is doing. It’s certainly important to protect oneself, but it’s a dead weight loss, albeit a necessary one. It’s only rising living standards that counts. Spending x% of GDP on the military is x% taken away from consumption and investment.

    A united Germany came as an enormous cost to the world. Nothing good came from unification especially under the jackboot of those Prussian swine.

  28. feelthebern

    A question for Cats this morning.
    Last year, a certain grey nurse fornicating Cat made mention of how he’d just finished off his smsf tax return.
    At the time, I thought that was odd as that is usually something completed by the auditor/accountant.
    That aside, said Cat has made a big song & dance how he isn’t a tax eating public servant.

    This morning with the speculation surround the release of Labors policy, a certain Cat has been pretty benign on the subject & sniping those who are clearly anti the policy.

    That would lead me to believe they are not impacted, therefore are on some defined benefit (old school) government plan & therefore dont have a smsf.

    Am I on the right track?

  29. H B Bear

    From Teh Australian,

    Ten Network’s Sunday night news program hosted by Lisa Wilkinson has lost half its viewers since she joined.

    Great move by Channel Nien to bone Mrs Pirate Pete. Cut their salary costs, dump her on Channel Ten and pick up their viewers and remind the rest of the TV bimbos how completely replaceable they all are. All j’ism sprayers need to realise they are modern candle-stick makers and part of a declining industry.

  30. Mother Lode

    Scott Morrison accuses Bill Shorten of wanting to ‘steal’ from retirees who invest in stock markets

    And so, having once made a single, conspicuous, token defence of retirees…Morro will never mention it again.

    And, inevitably, Shorten’s cash grab will slip into law without the lease perturbation and while the Libs on the opposition issue press releases denouncing this unheard of attack.

  31. notafan

    Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, February 23) — The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) said a principal suspect in the murder of overseas Filipino worker Joanna Demafelis is now in the custody of Lebanese authorities.

    Abuse of foreign workers is no doubt endemic in the ME

    Having a ‘strongman’ president in the Philippines appears to be of some use

  32. feelthebern

    It not just stock markets.
    It’s any investment in a profitable, tax paying asset.

  33. Rae

    Old School Conservative #2659303, posted on March 13, 2018 at 11:17 am

    Rae, your incomplete knowledge and assumptions could be improved by a simple Google search which would find this:

    According to the novel, Starling attended the University of Virginia as a double major in psychology and criminology.

    Your claim that Clarice Starling was not a psychiatrist. She was a student at the FBI Academy. could do with a little editing.

    Once again, old man, you do poorly when trying to split hairs about something I’ve said.

    And once again I have bolded the relevant words for you. Nice of me again, huh?

    As to editing, perhaps you could change “psychology” to “psychiatry” in your piss-poor little gotcha attempt. But that still leaves you well and truly face-planted. Again.

    Never mind, old man. Keep trying.

  34. Stimpson J. Cat

    Not to put it too delicately, is a woman who has had four children likely to have a tighter vagina than one who has had sex with multiple men?

    What the f$ck is going on here?

    Wamen, control yourselves.

    Standards must be maintained.

    Jesus Christ why do I always have to be the voice of reason.

    Every.
    Single.
    Time.

  35. notafan

    Who knows what goes on on those minds FTB?

    Taking apparently inconsistent positions on matters seems to be standard operating procedure, probably because all that matters is the needling of others.

    There is something about demanding the maximum possible sentence for killing a grey nurse shark while being a no holds barred supporter of abortion that is difficult to fathom.

  36. Stimpson J. Cat

    “The lobster was angry that day my friends…”

  37. v_maet

    Zulu @11:20am.

    ScoMo smells the blood in the water with 28 bad newspolls and is tilting to be the next head of the libs.

  38. H B Bear

    Grey nurse are people too.

  39. C.L.

    I’m no aeronautical engineer but that Stratolaunch (somebody, above) is just wrong.

  40. JC

    No kidding, if Larry Kudlow replaces Cohn, stocks are going to 78 trillion. The Dow will go past several galaxies.

    Larry used to work as chief economist at Bear Stern in the 90’s, but got the boot for overdoing the nasal talcum powder and showing up to a client conference totally wasted …. in the morning !

    If trump chooses him and Larry manages to pass a drug test nobody would be better than him to steer the orange one to better economic policies.
    http://ibankcoin.com/flyblog/2018/03/12/larry-america-kudlow-rumored-top-contender-replace-globalist-gary-cohn/#sthash.Vhv06MvH.dpbs

  41. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Just reading way back thread to catch up.

    CL – of course Perpetua was referring to was St. Christopher not St. Anthony. Christopher is also the name of Hairy’s brother, so how could I get it so mixed up? A slip of the mind late a night. Hairy told me the unusual name of Perpetua was taken from a part of the Latin Mass. Perpetua confirmed this but also confirmed she was named after St. Perpetua. Now, not only to her dismay has she had the Vatican dismiss St. Christopher and her hotline, they have added insult to injury by changing Perpetua’s Saint’s Day so that her birthday is now two days out from it. But I guess a Magisterium can do that.

    They’ve left St. Patrick alone though, and he is rather sketchy too, with some believing a number of men so named worked in Ireland over that period. That’s a theory that fits well with some of my views and findings about the fifth century conversion process in Britain and Ireland, so I’ll go with it. Clearly only one man wrote the Confessio, so that’s a link to something solid which maybe won the day when many fifth century British saint were turfed out.

  42. In medieval times witches used to fly through the air on domestic phallic symbols and were seen as pure evil, wild pagan women out of place in a Christian world.

    What medieval times are we talking about here? The 14th onwards? That would put it in the late medieval period. However, the imagery above seems early 19th C.

  43. H B Bear

    ScoMo is vanishing before our eyes. He is diminished by every promotion and every media appearance. No wonder he is the least visible Treasurer in a couple of decades.

  44. C.L.

    Good Lord. This is actually a bit sad.

    Hillary Clinton stumbles on a staircase again – twice – despite two carers.

    Video via DRUDGE.

  45. Infidel Tiger

    ScoMo smells the blood in the water with 28 bad newspolls and is tilting to be the next head of the libs.

    I’d prefer Turnbull every day of the week.

  46. Rae

    Et tu Senile Old Guy:

    So Starling studied psychology and was being mentored by the head of the FBI psychology unit.

    But, Starling was not a psychiatrist. As I said.

  47. feelthebern

    PVO on the Oz website likes the Labor policy re franking credits.
    That is a surprise…

  48. bundyrum

    I wonder if there is a brown bag full of dosh floating somewhere & one or both of the next newspolls go positive for Trumble?

  49. zyconoclast

    Iran scolds NSW on ‘immoral’ treatment of mentally ill man

    Known for legal reasons as Patient A, the 59-year-old refugee left Iran in 1979 and has lived in psychiatric care since lighting a deadly fire in 2002.
    He renounced his Australian citizenship last August, to protest forced medication injections and other treatment, and has now sought to return to his homeland.
    But the NSW Mental Health Review Tribunal would only allow his release if Iran promised to keep him in a secure mental health facility – a condition Iran has rejected as “immoral”.

    Why is it the business of NSW to tell a foreign citizen/government how to receive/treat a mental patient?
    Let him go.

  50. Leigh Lowe

    Hillary Clinton stumbles on a staircase again – twice – despite two carers.

    Gin and Tonic for breakfast will do that.
    To think the MSM were hand-wringing about Trump’s medical and obsessed about his Maccas and Diet Coke consumption.

  51. Stimpson J. Cat

    Larry used to work as chief economist at Bear Stern in the 90’s, but got the boot for overdoing the nasal talcum powder and showing up to a client conference totally wasted …. in the morning !

    We’ve all been there JC.

  52. LNP insider

    Delta – I’m well networked with many prominent LNP identities – elected and unelected. I cross reference what I hear from various sources to figure it out. My information has proven correct for years. I only recently started sharing with the Cat due to my own frustration with the repeated mistakes of the LNP. The focus on internal fights over winning electoons. The betrayal of their grassroots membership.

    Rock Doctor. I haven’t heard Jones linked to the senate spot. The moderate Turnbull types want him back in Herbert. I doubt state council would support him as a senate candidate as its rather conservative leaning. Despite what you’ve stated I heard good things about the Townsville candidate from the state election. She got one of the better swings in a strong Labor seat. They may even consider her for Herbert.

    I could drop a north Queensland name or two in but am waiting confirmation from a few more people before I do. The names probably don’t mean much outside the LNP to be honest.

  53. C.L.

    In Clinton’s defence, her chaperone is walking too fast. That’s where the trouble started.

  54. JC

    Good Lord. This is actually a bit sad.

    No time for softcockery, as she fucking deserves it and more.

  55. zyconoclast

    ‘We’ll be left behind’: Greens want 2030 ban on fossil-fuel car sales

    All sales of new petrol and diesel-powered cars would be banned by 2030 to spur the take-up of electric vehicles, according to a Greens policy aimed at winning over voters in this weekend’s byelection in the Melbourne electorate of Batman.
    Such a goal would bring Australia into line with nations such as India and the Netherlands – which have targets of phasing out sales of new cars powered by combustion engines by 2030 – and slice deeply into a net import fuel bill now running at about $16 billion a year, the Electric Vehicle Council said.

  56. Donald J. Trump @realDonaldTrump
    THE HOUSE INTELLIGENCE COMMITTEE HAS, AFTER A 14 MONTH LONG IN-DEPTH INVESTIGATION, FOUND NO EVIDENCE OF COLLUSION OR COORDINATION BETWEEN THE TRUMP CAMPAIGN AND RUSSIA TO INFLUENCE THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.
    11:49am · 13 Mar 2018 · Twitter for iPhone

    The President of the United States of America is shouting like a crazy person.

  57. JC

    I haven’t Stimson. It’s not because I was a goody two shoes. I knew if I ever tried coke, I be hooked and there would be no going back.

  58. C.L.

    Kate Perry may or may not be a bitch but don’t fall for the nuns’ spin re that property.
    Those sisters went hippie rogue wacko in the 1970s and the Archdiocese of LA dealt with them.
    The property isn’t theirs to sell.

  59. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’d prefer Turnbull every day of the week.

    Why not cut to the chase and invite Elon to be PM?

    Greens push to ban petrol, diesel cars by 2030

    THE Greens have announced a push to ban all petrol- and diesel-engined cars from sale by 2030, and use a hike in the luxury car tax to make battery-powered vehicles up to $10,000 cheaper.

    The pre-election policy, which mirrors overseas efforts to ban petrol and diesel cars, aims to make electric versions more affordable to buyers, and more accessible. The Greens’ power play also comes after several car companies lambasted the Turnbull Government, which will need to call a federal election by early 2019, for not doing enough to support the low-emissions technology.

    One wonders where they think the electricity will come from.

  60. feelthebern

    Hillary reminds me of an old boxer who should have retired 5 fights earlier.
    Sad.

  61. Stimpson J. Cat

    Good Lord. This is actually a bit sad.

    Stop it C.L.
    No mercy for Kuru contaminated cannibal reptilians.
    Ever.

  62. Bruce of Newcastle

    Zyco beat me, alas.

  63. JC

    He’s a little on the crazy side, monst, but so what. There’s no reason to be so judgemental.

  64. Stimpson J. Cat

    I haven’t Stimson. It’s not because I was a goody two shoes. I knew if I ever tried coke, I be hooked and there would be no going back.

    Good man.
    Also you are already addicted to trading.
    One major addiction is enough for anyone.

  65. Bruce of Newcastle

    The President of the United States of America is shouting like a crazy person.

    M0nty – Hillary is not the President, you do know that don’t you?

  66. Rae

    Socks off to a bad start today.

    Premature ejaculation, Bear.

  67. Stimpson J. Cat

    The President of the United States of America is shouting like a crazy person.

    How exactly do crazy people shout Fatboy?
    Don’t be so Goddamned racist.

  68. dopey

    ABC News. Royal Commission : Victims of financial services sector to give evidence.
    Shouldn’t that be ‘survivors.’

  69. C.L.

    “Study” and “proof” and “numbers” about things that have never happened:

    Aussie gun laws averted 16 mass shootings, study shows
    The NRA is wrong about the effect of John Howard’s gun law reform. The proof is in the numbers.

    Congratulations to the SMH for finally working out how to block Google entry to their copy, by the way.

  70. notafan

    You are right about the speed CL

    I’d have taken those stairs most gingerly

    Rough steep steps, possibly narrow as well, without a hand rail,

    Nightmare.

  71. Senile Old Guy

    All sales of new petrol and diesel-powered cars would be banned by 2030 to spur the take-up of electric vehicles, according to a Greens policy aimed at winning over voters in this weekend’s byelection in the Melbourne electorate of Batman.

    Exactly how you recharge an electric car outside a major city is not obvious, or relevant to the inner city greens. Nor is how you get the electricity without the evil fossil fuel.

  72. C.L.

    ABC News. Royal Commission : Victims of financial services sector to give evidence.
    Shouldn’t that be ‘survivors.’

    Pell stole my Christmas savings account one day at the pool.

  73. Stimpson J. Cat

    Those sisters went hippie rogue wacko in the 1970s and the Archdiocese of LA dealt with them.
    The property isn’t theirs to sell.

    If they are hippies then it’s fine C.L.
    Witches vs Hippies – who would win?

  74. Chris

    LNP Insider, nice to have your contributions.
    I remember the first letter I got from the Libs when I joined was to tell me I couldn’t vote for a certain time, clearly new membership was primarily seen as a branch stacking tool. Even before that as I sought to join I was steered away from my nearest branch to one that actually had meetings – my branch was a Trojan Horse for getting an extra preselection delegate, I imagine. All subsequent letters were selling tickets to champagne breakfasts.
    The best was tickets to a Leaders Breakfast though, where I got to meet John Howard.

  75. JC

    You know, it’s a pretty fucking amazing world. I’m 30,000 feet up just over the desert and the vast expanse of the US…. and I can trade. I just traded doll-yen. You just want to live forever.

  76. zyconoclast

    8 Ways US college student views on free speech are evolving

    1. Free expression is important, but so is diversity
    2. Students support free speech, but increasingly favor limits
    3. Confidence in the security of First Amendment rights is dropping
    4. Political conservatives are seen as less able to express their views
    5. Some students say shouting down speakers and using violence is sometimes acceptable
    6. Social media can stifle free expression
    7. Students believe social media companies should be responsible for limiting hate speech
    8. Trust in the media varies depending on political affiliation

  77. feelthebern

    JC, if you were on a Qantas flight from Sydney to Melbourne you would not be able to.

  78. Tom

    Ten Network’s Sunday night news program hosted by Lisa Wilkinson has lost half its viewers since she joined.

    Ahahahahahaha!!!

    Stupid TV managements still haven’t twigged that leftism always destroys media businesses. Under CBS, Ten is still hurtling greenward under the delusion that the ABC, with its guaranteed billion-dollar budget that is immune from ratings failure, is a viable commercial market.

    They also haven’t worked out that Bandana Boy’s missus was ratings poison at Nein, which is why they ditched her for much younger (and cheaper) eye candy to support Nein’s morning ratings star Stefanovic.

  79. zyconoclast

    OPERATION DINGO – RHODESIAN RAID ON CHIMOIO AND TEMBUÉ 1977/11/23

    Startling in its innovation and daringly suicidal, Operation Dingo was not only the Fireforce concept writ large but the prototype for all the major Rhodesian airborne attacks on the external bases of Rhodesian African nationalist insurgents in the neighbouring territories of Mozambique and Zambia until such operations ceased in late 1979.

    Fireforce as a military concept is a ‘vertical envelopment’ of the enemy (first practised by SAS paratroopers in Mozambique in 1973), with the 20mm cannon being the principle weapon of attack, mounted in an Alouette III K-Car (‘Killer car’), flown by the air force commander, with the army commander on board directing his ground troops deployed from G-Cars (Alouette III troop-carrying gunships and latterly Bell ‘Hueys’ in 1979) and parachuted from DC-3 Dakotas. In support would be propeller-driven ground-attack aircraft and on call would be Canberra bombers, Hawker Hunter and Vampire jets.

    RTWT

  80. Leigh Lowe

    Rough steep steps, possibly narrow as well, without a hand rail,

    Nightmare.

    Particularly with a bottle of Bombay Sapphire in the handbag

  81. Stimpson J. Cat

    You are right about the speed CL
    I’d have taken those stairs most gingerly
    Rough steep steps, possibly narrow as well, without a hand rail,
    Nightmare.

    The difference between you and Hillary, notafan, is that you would have been wearing sensible shoes, no one would want you to fall, and no one would let you fall.
    That said India is incredibly dangerous, and I am only talking about the sidewalks, drains, stairs, and roads.
    Don’t get me started on shaking hands.

  82. Roger.

    Good Lord. This is actually a bit sad.

    At her age and in her condition she shouldn’t be traipsing around India.

  83. zyconoclast

    Calls for inquiry into abuse of up to 1,000 children in Telford

    Girls as young as 11 are believed to have been drugged, beaten and abused in Telford with allegations dating back to the 1980s.

  84. zyconoclast

    Illegal immigrant suspected in fatal hit-and-run is on the loose after police bailed him just minutes before ICE officers could detain him

    An undocumented immigrant suspected in a fatal hit-and-run was bonded out of jail before he could be detained by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

    Ivan Gerardo Zamarripa-Castaneda, 26, was booked at Denver Jail on Sunday on charges of vehicular homicide following a car crash on the eastbound lanes of I-70.

    The Denver Sheriff’s Department alerted ICE in response to a request for release notification it received, but not until 6.33pm. The suspect was bonded out at 5.28pm, reported KDVR.

  85. Stimpson J. Cat

    At her age and in her condition she shouldn’t be traipsing around India.

    She’s been sent there by the Cuban Canadian to try and repair his costume clusterf$ckery.

  86. H B Bear

    Hillary reminds me of an old boxer who should have retired 5 fights earlier.
    Sad.

    The Democrats have been holding her up her entire career.

    Where is the big black guy with the elephant juice to keep the old crone going?

  87. Mother Lode

    One wonders where they think the electricity will come from.

    It will be produced by tourism. The miracle industry that can sustain everything.

    Any Green will tell you.

  88. C.L.

    I can’t believe Gorgi Coghlan was bumped out of the way by Lisa Wilkinson.
    Coghlan seems like a fun bird and she’s very bright (B.Sc. pharm).
    More popular with the yoof, one would have readily concluded were one not a Ten network nimrod.

  89. zyconoclast

    Brexit: Too many older Leave voters nostalgic for ‘white’ Britain, says Cable

    Too many older people who voted for Brexit were “driven by nostalgia” for a world where “faces were white,” Sir Vince Cable has said.

    The Lib Dem leader said the votes of the older generation had “crushed the hopes and aspirations of young people for years to come.”

  90. JC

    At her age and in her condition she shouldn’t be traipsing around India.

    Lol

    You know what I reckon. The corrupt princess was wearing flat leather sandals. On smoothed our steps that’s a potential killer.

    Wtf is she doing there? She should be getting ready for Rikers.

  91. notafan

    Sadly I never think to pack a bottle of Bombay

    Mum traveled to Europe with us until she was 80, the more I look back, the more amazing I think she was, because we dragged her up hill and down dale.

  92. C.L.

    Where is the big black guy with the elephant juice to keep the old crone going?

    New gig. Julie Bishop.

  93. Chris

    JC, if you were on a Qantas flight from Sydney to Melbourne you would not be able to.

    I got to try in-flight internet on Qantas when they gave us a bigger plane for the Monday flight. It’s happening.

  94. zyconoclast

    Cutting welfare to illegal aliens would pay for Trump’s wall

    Mexico won’t have to pay for the wall, after all. US taxpayers won’t have to pick up the tab, either. The controversial barrier, rather, will cover its own cost just by closing the border to illegal immigrants who tend to go on the federal dole.

    That’s the finding of recent immigration studies showing the $18 billion wall President Trump plans to build along the southern border will pay for itself by curbing the importation of not only crime and drugs, but poverty.

    “The wall could pay for itself even if it only modestly reduced illegal crossings and drug smuggling,” Steven A. Camarota, director of research at the Center for Immigration Studies, told The Post.

    Federal data shows that a wall would work. A two-story corrugated metal fence in El Paso, Texas, first erected under the Bush administration has already curtailed illegal border crossings there by more than 89 percent over the five-year period during which it was built.

  95. Stimpson J. Cat

    New gig. Julie Bishop.

    No it’s not Julie.
    Julie only gets fed once every two weeks intravenously through her belly button.

  96. Roger.

    Calls for inquiry into abuse of up to 1,000 children in Telford

    Yet another Pakistani Muslim grooming racket.

    Words fail.

  97. Chris

    New gig. Julie Bishop.

    Julie may have become one of Grig’s skinsuits. She certainly hasn’t launched any new initiatives or Brilliant Ideas(tm) recently, despite 30 Newspolls.

  98. H B Bear

    Wonder if CBS were involved in parachuting Mrs Pirate Pete into Channel 10? If they were they are off to a bad start. I wonder if they know whether Channel 10 is where careers go to die?

  99. JC

    Chris

    HomoAir has been trying it out for ages. I recall a few years ago monst was telling us he was using it to troll the Cat over the pacific and the US. I used it just after that and then it stopped. Just like that. I’ll believe it when I see it.

  100. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    End came swiftly for crew

    A new report into a doomed WWI Australian submarine paints a compelling picture of the crew’s desperate attempts to avoid disaster.

    By Stephen Fitzpatrick
    March 13th, 20183 min read

    Crew members of doomed World War I Australian submarine AE1 were locked in a battle to make their vessel resurface when it suffered a catastrophic failure off the Duke of York Islands in 1914, a ­report into the disaster has found.

    Key trim settings were changed but the attempts were complicated by the fact only one of the boat’s twin props was operating, which the report found would have been insufficient to arrest the descent once it began.

    Crew mistakes could have contributed, with the report identifying “a design failure, material failure, operator error or combinations thereof” as being responsible for the vessel’s bow tipping forwards and down.

    As the sub gathered speed and slid past about 100m, a forward section imploded, generating a powerful shockwave that would have killed the 35 men instantly.

    Rear Admiral Peter Briggs, who led the expedition that finally found AE1 last December in Papua New Guinea waters, said it would have been like a “truck-bomb going off in the middle of the control room” and that there was at least some comfort the men “didn’t know what hit them”.

    “From the available evidence, it is clear that the crew met their end swiftly and did not die a slow, lingering death on the sea floor,” the report finds, noting that a further expedition would be required if the cause of the loss were to be ascertained — and even then, final answers are not guaranteed.

    The report was delivered in Sydney last night to crew descendants including Vera Ryan, whose uncle Jack Messenger served on AE1, and Robyn Rosenstrauss, whose great-uncle James Fettes also died in the accident.

    Commissioned by the Find AE1 organisation, which conducted the successful search, it recommends against any attempt to enter the hull since it is the men’s final resting place and “deserves the sanctity due to a gravesite”.

    It paints a compelling picture of their attempt to avoid disaster, with the sub’s hydroplanes set “hard to rise”, meaning it “had forward way and was endeavouring to return to the surface”.

    “This would have to have been a deliberate action,” the report says. “Operated by a rack-and-­pinion mechanism and designed to operate against maximum ­design speed, the planes could not have drifted into their current ­positions.”

    The report says it is possible the boat had been undertaking a late-afternoon practice dive while heading home to Rabaul, and that although her crew had been operating together for more than a year, “their opportunity to practise dived operations (ballasting, trimming, depth-keeping etc) had been limited

    From the Oz, far nautical Cats.

  101. Baldrick

    SCROLL THE TROLL

    Remember scrolly scrolly past the trollys everyone.
    Every pixel in reply is a another stroke on the sockmeisters oily shaft. – thefrolickingmole

  102. H B Bear

    Yet another Pakistani Muslim grooming racket.
    Words fail.

    Amazing what happens when police stop enforcing the law because waaaacism.

  103. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    TREASURY
    Shorten’s class-war $59bn tax on wealthy shareholders, retirees, super funds

    The Australian
    12:27PM March 13, 2018

    Simon Benson
    National Political Editor
    Sydney
    @simonbenson
    Greg Brown
    Journalist
    Canberra
    @gregbrown_TheOz

    Bill Shorten has flagged the potential for “tax relief” for low and middle income earners before the next election because of the $59 billion crackdown on dividend imputation.

    The Opposition Leader said this morning his push to axe cash payments for franked dividends would give the opposition a better fiscal position than the government and leave the door open for income tax cuts.

    “Labor has a much better fiscal position, full stop, than the government. Because, remember, this government is still persisting with their $65 billion corporate tax giveaway,” Mr Shorten said this morning.

    “Labor is making hard budget decisions which will allow us to do three things – improve the budget position, make sure that we can have a proper safety net of schools and hospitals and aged care and public transport, and, also, this serious and genuine reform, today’s action, will allow us the option of offering tax relief to low- and middle-income Australians before the next election.”

    Mr Shorten said Labor was trying to reform a tax system which was skewed in favour of the rich.

    “I think all fair-minded observers of Australia’s tax system know that the current tax system has advantages in it which are weighted to the very wealthy and to large corporations,” Mr Shorten said.

    “What we want to do is put the weight back in the economy and government to looking after middle- and working-class Australians.”

    He hit back at Scott Morrison for saying the proposed dividend imputation changes would target pensioners, saying only 1 per cent of full pensioners would be impacted.

    From the Oz. Whining William plays the “politics of envy” card, to the full

  104. lotocoti

    She should be getting ready for Rikers.

    It should be Leavenworth.
    Just image: Hill starring in a remake of The Hill.

  105. Leigh Lowe

    H B Bear

    #2659405, posted on March 13, 2018 at 12:38 pm

    Wonder if CBS were involved in parachuting Mrs Pirate Pete into Channel 10? If they were they are off to a bad start. I wonder if they know whether Channel 10 is where careers go to die?

    The one beautiful piece of collateral damage is that the arrival of Mrs Bandana apparently caused Jessica Rowe’s head to explode, to the point that the daily tanty’s became intolerable.

  106. Roger.

    Amazing what happens when police stop enforcing the law because waaaacism.

    The authorities have no excuse not to act.

    They need to put the safety and rights of citizens ahead of concern for minorities and racism.

    Lock the bastards up and have an inquiry into the police.

    Any dual citizens who can be deported should be.

    Assuming this type of criminality exists in these communities should henceforth be the police starting point and they should be on the front foot in identifying the existence of these rings rather than being merely reactive or, worse, covering them up.

    This is a massive failure.

  107. rickw

    The Lib Dem leader said the votes of the older generation had “crushed the hopes and aspirations of young people for years to come.”

    Because they don’t like paki pack rape whilst being lectured by Brussels.

    I am glad I got to see the dying embers of White Britain. It sure was something.

  108. rickw

    Lock the bastards up and have an inquiry into the police.

    More likely that they will be shot and hung as traitors in the inevitable civil war.

  109. mh

    I give 4 Corners 6.5 out of 10 for it’s program last night, but the subject matter was worth covering.

    The Australian newspaper recently told it’s reader’s that the size of Australia’s immigration program was not up for debate. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

  110. Roger.

    The Australian newspaper recently told it’s reader’s that the size of Australia’s immigration program was not up for debate.

    BS. In a democracy everything is up for debate.

  111. Eddystone

    C.L.
    #2659372, posted on March 13, 2018 at 12:15 pm

    “Study” and “proof” and “numbers” about things that have never happened:

    Aussie gun laws averted 16 mass shootings, study shows
    The NRA is wrong about the effect of John Howard’s gun law reform. The proof is in the numbers.

    Here’s the SMH report.

    Comments are not open on this article

    And here’s the “study”.

    Simon Chapman is an emeritus professor at the Sydney School of Public Health Anti-Gun Propaganda, University of Sydney.

    Chapman, Alpers et al, ad nauseum

  112. Roger.

    And the job of newspapers is to facilitate that debate, not shut it down.

  113. Boambee John

    m0nty at 0943

    Nunes deserves significant gaol time.

    More or less than Shrillary?

  114. Jessie

    Earlier someone posted a link to a Canberra news piece on the STI story. A leading researcher interviewed researchers interviewed is from a South Australian Institute.

    “It’s incredibly competitive area, but we are happy with the progress we have made so far through collaborating with the universities.”

    “SAHMRI’s annual turnover is now at $60 million with our commercial income at $18 million.

    “That is income through engagement with pharmaceuticals, contract research royalty and clinical research paid for by other external parties.”

    Commercialisation of research into products and therapies remains an ultimate aim and there are partnerships with organisations like BioSA to pursue a statewide model that integrates research from all three universities and SAHMRI.

    Source: SAHMRI stays on course with Steve Wesselingh reappointed as executive director

    And equally impressive the question to be answered from data collection is the SAHMRI won NHMRC funded grant research of 24/68 ‘trial clusters’ 2013-2017 and the various funded subsidiary projects hiving. In >16 yr olds+.

    Presumably that leaves any child <16yrs of age as a potential pool of infection.

    And SAHMRI does PREVALENCE, whereas Marcia speaks INCIDENCE, if she were in a responsible position.

    Project: STI in remote communities: improved and enhanced primary health care (STRIVE) study protocol: a cluster randomised controlled trial comparing ‘usual practice’ STI care to enhanced care in remote primary health care services in Australia.

    Baseline activities conducted with participating health services

    At enrolment, all participating primary care services undertake three preparatory steps, supported by one of the STRIVE study coordinators, each of whom works on a regional basis. Step 1 is a site assessment to provide information on the health service context (staffing, location, pathology provider, patient information management system) and both current and past sexual health activities; Step 2 involves the development and installation of an upgraded STI template within the service’s patient information management system. Step 3 involves provision by the coordinator of training and support to conduct a STI prevalence survey with the service

    And bonus payments if identified indicators achieved. That’s STI indicators.
    Source: STI in remote communities…………..
    Main page author achievements https://www.sahmriresearch.org/our-research/themes/infection-immunity/our-team/assoc-professor-james-ward

  115. H B Bear

    Amazing what happens when police stop enforcing the law because waaaacism.

    Of course it helps if you are dealing with a bunch of foreigners who owe no allegiance to their country of abode, share no common cultural heritage and whose medieval religion allows infidel women and girls to be treated as chattels.

  116. Mother Lode

    Premature ejaculation, Bear.

    Even with the sock on.

    Maybe look at the women’s underwear in the Aldi catalogue – I predict that such strange garments will take the edge of Grroooglly’s grunting sweaty ardour.

    Closing the drawer might help too -all those skanky hose.

  117. mh

    Roger, the Australian did actually say that though. OldOzzie posted the Editorial following Tony Abbott’s recent speech on immigration. The ABC’s 4 Corners has just proven the Editor of the Australian was so, so wrong.

  118. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    At her age and in her condition she shouldn’t be traipsing around India.

    India is the perfect place. They worship and revere useless old cows there.

  119. Did anyone else notice the news story the ABC where running yesterday following comments by faux conservative, Christian Porter, about the Catholic Church allegedly holding back the proposed compensation scheme recommended by the RC. You know, the Church that was first to the party ferreting out child abusers and compensating victims a quarter of a century before the state was roused by the prospect of using this issue to beat conservative Catholics with, and that has since forked out over a quarter of billion dollars in compensation to victims, yeah that one.

  120. H B Bear

    The Australian newspaper recently told it’s reader’s that the size of Australia’s immigration program was not up for debate. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

    Wong, Wong, Wong?

  121. Roger.

    Of course it helps if you are dealing with a bunch of foreigners who owe no allegiance to their country of abode, share no common cultural heritage and whose medieval religion allows infidel women and girls to be treated as chattels.

    Along with a docile native population brought up in dysfunctional families with mostly absent fathers, all the result of the social and moral “revolution” [i.e. devolution] of the late 1960s underwritten by government policies and welfare.

  122. Eddystone

    Of course, if Chapman and Alpers had included 2014, instead of stopping at 2013, they would have had to include the Lockhart shooting, which may or may not have changed the conclusion, depending upon how they tweaked the data.

    There were, of course, eight mass murders of 5 or more people since Port Arthur, but only one was carried out with a firearm, so that’s good.

  123. Jessie

    Oops………..
    A leading researcher interviewed is from a South Australian Institute.

  124. Top Ender

    Top Ender’s war with Telstra Part 903.

    This is an article I am contemplating sending to a few newspapers:

    Telstra have a new way of getting money out you!

    First, they cut your email service off for no apparent reason.

    Then, their technical department cannot restore it.

    But help is at hand. If you sign up to “Telstra Platinum”, then their super-techs can fix your problem. For only another $180 a year.

    It must be admitted, this is a great business model. Imagine it applied to cars. “Mmm – mysterious. We do have our range of mechanics Level 1. Yes they are fairly useless. But for A Few Dollars More” you can have Level 5.

    Actually the cowboy title is particularly apt. Telstra are turning into a cowboy outfit. You have a problem with their service? They put you through to a bunch of cowboys in another country. These people don’t actually know what they’re talking about: they simply read through scripts. “Are you sitting in front of your computer?” If not, then do so. If yes, then proceed. “Is it turned on?” And so on down through the flowchart.

    My email service has been suspended numerous times since November. Telstra say it might be because of spam emanating from my address. When asked to show their server records showing the relevant emails travelling from my computer through their servers, they can’t. After various frustrating attempts at restoration, including being without email for three days, I was offered Telstra Platinum.

    Here you can speak to real live technicians who actually seem to know something about Information Technology. Having taught computing at all levels up to and including adults for many years I can understand what they’re doing as they log into my computer and manipulate matters on the screen in front of me. Most of the time it consists of changing aspects of my profile and restarting.

    But after a few months of getting the service for free – and still getting the occasional block – Telstra reckon I now have to start paying for their “Platinum” service. What a racket.

    Their latest suggestion has been to change my email address. This is an identity I’ve had for 20 years, and which is linked to business cards and the like. Their complaints person – who signs her emails with “Warm regards” – is obviously a tough hombre who has a policy position to stick to: get the money out of the suckers at all costs.

    One of their best responses has been: “The BigPond email is a free service that you are currently not paying for. What customers do with their email account, what they browse online and the security measures they have in place is out of Telstra’s hands.”

    What this actually means I have no idea.

    But given I pay for my Bigpond service it sounds like a breach of contract to me. Maybe they should retitle it “Bogpond.”

  125. Roger.

    Roger, the Australian did actually say that though.

    I know, mh. My anger at them for saying it is only assuaged a little by my having long since cancelled my subscription and told them why.

  126. calli

    Lewis (and no other writer) never attempted anything like this.

    The Silmarillian is a great read. I have much loved a first edition on the shelf. And a leatherbound rice paper LOTR with all the Appendices that I foolishly spilled tea on and spoiled some of the gold leaf.

    Which reminds me, have you read Tree and Leaf? Tolkien writes a wonderful allegory around a character called Niggle. It is also autobiographical, but in a very unusual way. What Niggle discovers at the end of his journey is what every creative person longs for.

  127. Roger.

    India is the perfect place. They worship and revere useless old cows there.

    LOL.

    Beautiful work, I.T..

  128. Leigh Lowe

    Has Julie Bishop consulted Beyoncé about dividend imputation yet?

  129. Jessie

    Looking forward to Marcia’s proposal of *INCIDENCE treatment including the ongoing cost-analysis.

    If I were in a responsible position, I would ask the Office of Health Protection to co-operate with the ­Aboriginal medical services bodies, such as Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and the Northern Territory and Queensland health departments, and put together medical teams to test and treat Aboriginal children in the affected areas in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia.

    (today’s The Australian)

    However Uni of Melb is already involved. Surely the Melb School of Population and Global Health were across the ethics of the STI research trial project? Find An Expert

    STRIVE is managed by the Kirby Institute (Kirby) of the University of New South Wales, and is conducted in partnership with the Menzies School of Health Research, and in collaboration with the Northern Territory Department of Health, the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory, the University of Melbourne, Apunipima Cape York Health Council, the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, the Western Australian Department of Health, the University of South Australia, and the University of Western Australia.

    MBS
    1. Pharmaceuticals for treatment
    ?Cost
    Transport in and from remote communities
    * Planes
    *Staff wages and allowances
    * Accommodation
    * Local vehicles/OPAL/tyres/repairs for the bush education trips etc
    * Pathology equipment, taking of and transport thereof
    * Electrickery and water
    * Antibiotics and appropriate storage of and necessity in taking full curses, and then follow-up to determine adequately treated
    * Culturally appropriate teaching material printed and then delivered in ALL the languages for the ages 2-16years
    * Wages for culturally appropriate personnel which could be envisioned as training and then economic development projects.

    MBS Category 6 Pathology
    Treponema
    693874 $15.65
    69387 $29.00
    http://www9.health.gov.au/mbs/fullDisplay.cfm?type=item&q=69387&qt=item
    Chlamydia
    69316 $28.65
    Microscopy and culture to detect pathogenic micro-organisms from urethra, vagina, cervix or rectum (except for faecal pathogens), including (if performed):
    69312 #33.75

  130. Leigh Lowe

    mh

    #2659440, posted on March 13, 2018 at 1:15 pm

    Where’s Billy?

  131. Viva

    Imho Scott Morrison like some others on the front bench have been tainted by the need to fit in with the Turnbull style of non government

    He scrubs up much better when he is let off the leash

    For example he performed very well on Paul Murray some months back

  132. John Constantine

    Will we double australias population by 2030 or 2040 or 2050?.

    That is the question.

    We have gone from being lectured that we will never fill the MCG to having a conversation about how quickly we can wipe settler outpost colonialist racist Australia from the face of the earth.

  133. cohenite

    There were, of course, eight mass murders of 5 or more people since Port Arthur, but only one was carried out with a firearm, so that’s good.

    Cars featured in at least two.

    But Chapman’s report is effective because it is readily digestible by the msm. Before and after 1996, guns and gun deaths. No matter that gun ownership has risen markedly in that time. This includes semi-auto handguns. Illegal semi-auto handguns are behind the spike in gun crimes in the inner West and Western Sydney suburbs which correlate perfectly with muslim congregations.

  134. mh

    Where’s Billy?

    Hillary would have asked that question many times.

  135. John Constantine

    America doesn’t use dividend imputation, they just capitalise profits into the shareprices by running regular buybacks of their own shares instead of paying dividends.

  136. egg_

    Roger, the Australian did actually say that though.

    I know, mh. My anger at them for saying it is only assuaged a little by my having long since cancelled my subscription and told them why.

    How is their circulation since their Leftward shift?
    Devine probably cost them more than her salary with the Delcon remark.
    #MOGA
    Make Oz Great Again

  137. egg_

    The Australian newspaper recently told it’s reader’s that the size of Australia’s immigration program was not up for debate. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

    Two Wongs make a white?

  138. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Will we double australias population by 2030 or 2040 or 2050?.

    That is the question.

    Australia will have double the population but it won’t be Australian.

    That can only happen with natural birth rates.

  139. Rae

    Premature ejaculation, Bear.

    Even with the sock on.

    He didn’t say. But nights can be cold in Freo, especially for the elderly. So, maybe he wears bed socks.

  140. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist. To Rise Above Our Past, We Must Acknowledge It

    We asked a preeminent historian to investigate our coverage of people of color in the U.S. and abroad. Here’s what he found.

    In a full-issue article on Australia that ran in 1916, Aboriginal Australians were called “savages” who “rank lowest in intelligence of all human beings.”

    the horror, surely some other group must be lower?

    NatGeo must immediately kowtow to the politically correct viewfact that no cultures are inferior or superior to any other, and noall people are identical, low ave IQ or not.

  141. Hydra

    No. The proposed Labor change to dividend imputation cannot result in the payment of additional tax. It will simply stop cash payments being made to persons in excess of the tax they have actually paid.

    I’ve not been around much lately but I assume you are a recent addition as a troll?

    If so, welcome.

    Regardless, you obviously do not know how taxes work. If my grandparents don’t get their tax refund (for tax already paid on dividends – they do not meet the minimum threshold for tax payment and thus receive a refund each year) – then this is a tax hike and thus this is double taxation.

    It is a tax increase. Get it through your head.

    Any additional raising of revenue is a tax increase.

    A tax increase, by definition, is the raising of additional revenue.

    When there is a tax increase, somebody is paying more taxes.

    When somebody is paying more taxes, they have to live more off the system.

    Living off the system requires more tax increases.

    More tax increases makes more people live of the system.

    As a result, everyone is poorer.

    It is a never ending circle. It is a trap. Get. It. Through. Your. Skull. You. Are. Wrong.

  142. Chris

    I was intrigued by that gun laws study – but unsurprised to learn that Simon Chapman was behind it. How far can the SMH sink? And how are these turds allowed to be stealing oxygen that could be supporting a drug criminal or a colony of crab lice?

  143. egg_

    Is That Wong Chap a white supremacist?
    Both kids are white – no mixed blood?

  144. Rossini

    Hydra
    #2659458, posted on March 13, 2018 at 1:33 pm
    +(what ever additional tax I’ll have to pay)

  145. Senile Old Guy

    The Silmarillian is a great read. I have much loved a first edition on the shelf. And a leatherbound rice paper LOTR with all the Appendices that I foolishly spilled tea on and spoiled some of the gold leaf.

    I struggled with The Silmarillian, because of the style, but my LOTR is a large, nicely printed, tome with illustrations by Alan Lee. I shall have to read it again. I also have the dramatisation by the BBC and it is very good.

    Which reminds me, have you read Tree and Leaf? Tolkien writes a wonderful allegory around a character called Niggle. It is also autobiographical, but in a very unusual way. What Niggle discovers at the end of his journey is what every creative person longs for.

    I have read it, long ago, but nothing compares to LOTR! A work colleague, back when I was doing part-time work while at school, was a huge fan of Tree and Leaf and quoted from it constantly.

  146. Mother Lode

    Is That Wong Chap a white supremacist?

    You know why they call her a banana, don’t you?

    Because she is bent.

    (Apols for the blockquote.)

  147. Leigh Lowe

    John Constantine

    #2659451, posted on March 13, 2018 at 1:24 pm

    America doesn’t use dividend imputation, they just capitalise profits into the shareprices by running regular buybacks of their own shares instead of paying dividends.

    It occurred to me this morning.
    If there are ASX companies with strong cash-flows and mountains of franking credits which will become less valuable under the SLF regime, the obvious answer is a discounted off-market buyback with a low capital component and a high dividend, executed before SLF takes office.
    Typically the discount to market is up to 14%.
    The end result is cheap capital rationalisation for the company and high franking credits for the shareholder, along with a bank of carry forward losses.
    At a shareholder tax rate of zero they are great.
    At a tax rate of 15% you have to do the numbers case-by-case.
    These would be really attractive

  148. egg_

    Hannah Mouncey must be proof that God has a sense-of-humour with respect to the AWFL
    Frankenstein meets the wymmins league.

  149. Leigh Lowe

    Regardless, you obviously do not know how taxes work. If my grandparents don’t get their tax refund (for tax already paid on dividends – they do not meet the minimum threshold for tax payment and thus receive a refund each year) – then this is a tax hike and thus this is double taxation.

    Correct.
    Someone with other investment income equal to or greater than the imputation credit gets full benefit.
    Another taxpayer with other investment income lower than the imputation credit gets limited or no benefit.
    So the tax credit payable on one class of asset is dependent upon the performance of another class of asset.

  150. OldOzzie

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2659361, posted on March 13, 2018 at 12:10 pm

    Greens push to ban petrol, diesel cars by 2030

    THE Greens have announced a push to ban all petrol- and diesel-engined cars from sale by 2030, and use a hike in the luxury car tax to make battery-powered vehicles up to $10,000 cheaper.

    The pre-election policy, which mirrors overseas efforts to ban petrol and diesel cars, aims to make electric versions more affordable to buyers, and more accessible. The Greens’ power play also comes after several car companies lambasted the Turnbull Government, which will need to call a federal election by early 2019, for not doing enough to support the low-emissions technology.

    One wonders where they think the electricity will come from.

    Especially since

    OldOzzie

    #2657091, posted on March 10, 2018 at 5:35 pm
    How ‘Green” are Electric Cars

    Porsche’s learnings from Tesla
    German brand ready to leapfrog electric car pioneer

    But one fact that can’t be matched is the German maker’s 300kW/h charging stations that it will begin to roll out in Europe and the US before Australia, that makes the most of the 800-volt architecture for super-fast charging times.

    “When we have a high charging station it’s over 300kW, the Mission E will be able to recharge in 15 minutes for 400km range,” said Blume.

    300 Kw/hr charging station – 75Kw for 15 mins – B’Hell – I now feel a virtuous “Greenie” running my 1.25Kw pool motor for 8 hours between 2300-0700 – total 10Kw

    Can someone explain to me where all this electric power is going to come from to charge these vehicles?

  151. testpattern

    ‘a docile native population brought up in dysfunctional families with mostly absent fathers’

    1030h 13/3/18 I detected the spoor of runaway pet bigot and reported to Pauline. Decided to go halves in finders fee bounty with Hansel und Gretel Racist Meme Hunters, after their famous interception of the Snow White gang. Ace Datura T.Pattern – Bigot Detective.

  152. stackja

    Kyle and Jackie O’s shock ratings drop
    KRISTOFER CRANE, The Daily Telegraph
    March 13, 2018 10:53am
    Subscriber only

    IT’S the two very different tales for Sydney’s radio kings as the first audience ratings of 2018 were released today.

    Survey 1 for this year has been released and as usual it is the all important breakfast timeslot which is the focus of the industry.

    While 2GB’s Alan Jones made even more headway over his competitors, the KIIS FM show anchored by Kyle Sandilands and Jackie O Henderson had a surprising significant drop in audience numbers.

    According to the results The Kyle and Jackie O Show lost 2.1 points, which equates to more than 17% of their listeners since the last survey taken back at the end of 2017.

    This was the biggest drop of any show broadcast in the 5:30am-9.00am timeslot. They still hold the top spot of FM shows over their competitors, but could this be a sign of the end of King Kyle’s reign?

  153. OldOzzie

    It is such a Simple Idea – Why have Restaurants not adopted it?

    Qantas Napkins in Business Class have always had a button hole in one corner

    Simple, for Slobs like myself, to put it onto my top shirt button and in today’s case, stop the Greek Yoghurt exploding onto my shirt when I pulled the top off the container, got the napkin instead.

    Qantas Business napkins have always had a button since Qantas introduced Business class to the World

  154. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The President of the United States of America is shouting like a crazy person.

    He needs to do more than shout. the socialist criminal cartel needs to be locked up.

  155. thefrollickingmole

    FrankenVage?

    Had an interesting chat from our sales department bloke today.

    Apparently in the doledrums of the GFC you could charter a cape class cargo ship for about $8000 a day.
    Now its about $300,000.
    The pissy little 30,000 tonne jobs we hire are about $30,000 a day, up from around $5000.

    Price of salt has jumped (on spot sales) by about 30% due to India getting washed out and Mexico having “political and labor problems”, and China demand nearly doubling.

    That adds up to shippers making huge bucks as the 30% price increase is 2/3 eaten up in shipping costs.

    Interesting info I thought.

  156. H B Bear

    It is such a Simple Idea – Why have Restaurants not adopted it?

    Because anyone who can’t eat in a restaurant without a napkin covering themselves shouldn’t be eating in public.

  157. thefrollickingmole

    Heres the next big step for Coles/Woolies innovation.

    From the Uk

    Bargain

    ..

    Not so much…

    Its clever in a “Oh you bastards Ill never shop here again” way.

  158. OldOzzie

    Bob Carr backs Tony Abbott’s call to scale back immigration

    Bob Carr says he has been a “lonely voice” in the past when calling for a lower immigration rate to tackle population growth, as he backed Tony Abbott’s recent push for a reduction in the annual intake.

    The former NSW Premier told ABC’s Q&A the growing pains associated with Australia’s ballooning population needed to be linked to immigration levels and said studies have shown the country’s skilled migration program had failed.

    “I’m interested that the first poll I have seen indicates a big shift in public attitudes on this, it came out in recent months. It shows 74 per cent of Australians think there is enough of us already and someone who has been talking on ecological and economic grounds for less immigration rather than more, I find that interesting. That is the first breakthrough,” he said.

    “I think politicians and business leaders ought to be acknowledging that it has finally sunk in – I thought it was a lonely voice for the long time.”

    In a controversial speech several weeks ago, federal MP and former prime minister Tony Abbott called for the annual immigration ­intake to be reduced from 190,000 to 110,000. He was quickly criticised by other members of cabinet.

    But Mr Abbott tweeted on Monday night, prior to population-themed Q&A episode: “It’s economics 101 that more supply means downward pressure on prices and more demand means upward pressure.

    “Very high immigration means stagnant wages and unaffordable housing. That’s why the numbers need to be scaled back now. We shouldn’t be afraid of the debate.”

    Mr Carr said the majority of Australians wanted more time to absorb the increase in people settling in the country.

    “Immigration is our character, 37 per cent of the population of Sydney was born overseas, we celebrate it, but even those people, those born overseas are still asking whether we can achieve the same benefits at a less dramatic pace. It is the highest in the world. It’s the highest in the world. Do we really want to be adding a million to our population every three-and-a-half years? Would it be such a departure from God’s eternal plan for this continent if we took six years about acquiring an extra six million?”

    Later in the program, when Mr Carr brought immigration into a debate about the struggles of the working class, both John Daley, the chief executive of the Grattan Institute, and Jiyoung Song from the Asia Institute of the University of Melbourne, began to shake their head.

    Ms Song, who moved to Australia two years ago on a 457 skilled migrant visa before successfully applying for permanent residency, said he was off the mark.

    “You keep going on about migration, the issue is the infrastructure,” said Ms Song.

    “Not with wages,” said Mr Carr. “That has nothing to do with wages. We are talking about downward pressure on wages.”

    “They pay tax and create jobs,” replied Ms Song.

    “That is not the issue,” said Mr Carr.

    “What is the issue then?” snapped Ms Song.

    Host Tony Jones stepped in, inviting Mr Daley to comment.

    “The issue is not about immigration,” he added. “They come in, most of them, 60 per cent of them, are skilled migrants. And … the list is updated, so they are doing a good job to keep checking the Australian businesses who need skills shortages in certain industries. We still need those skilled migrants who can contribute to our society.”

    But Mr Carr disagreed.

    “A very quick response is about the failure of our Skilled Migration Program, the most recent study that I read shows that you could abolish it tomorrow without any employers seeing the difference. We are importing professionals, and we are importing professionals who are unemployed. Now, we’ve got to reassess the notion we hold that the Skilled Migration Program is delivering relief.”

    Others on the panel weighed into the population debate with concerns about the lack of forward planning from successive state and federal governments.

    Chief Councillor of the Climate Council Tim Flannery said complacency has been an issue, and suggested a novel approach to dealing with the problems in the future.

    “Having lived through government after government that has promised to fix them with decentralisation or new projects – it’s never happened. You asked are politicians, do they understand how angry people are? There’s an underlying issue there which is about why is this problem occurring? It’s because politicians with very few exceptions, such as Bob, none of them want a smaller constituency, none of our church leaders want a smaller congregation, so unless we, the people, speak up on this, and are heard and control the agenda, special interest groups will see population growth continue,” he said.

    “It really worries me… we have left it to the experts, to politicians and we have ended up with a mess. I have got enormous faith in the common-sense of just average Australians. I can’t think of a better way of dealing with this than to put the power back into the hands of well-informed Australians, through something like a jury system. 200 of us chosen at random and given access to all the facts and asked to make a decision and given a time to do it and paid to do it would come up with a decision that would be representative of what Australians want.”

    From the Comments

    – The only thing I have ever agreed with Bob Carr about.

    We need to shut this immigration conveyor belt down NOW.

    – I’ve no objection to immigration per se, but in appropriate numbers. As it is at the moment, we’re losing our distinctive European Christian heritage too quickly and our national identity is so blurred that it’s indeterminate. For instance, the Melbourne CBD at times looks like downtown Hong Kong. The Japanese have the right idea. We should be proud to maintain the ethnic, cultural and religious identity of our nation [yes, including our aboriginal citizens!], but exercise discretion with charity in welcoming potential immigrants, mostly only in cases of necessity and emergency.

    – It’s funny how when Tony Abbott raised the issue of immigration a few weeks ago all the right thinking people rubbished him and called him racist but now what he said is the cause de jour.

    – Mr Flannery said “… I can’t think of a better way of dealing with this than to put the power back into the hands of well-informed Australians, through something like a jury system. 200 of us chosen at random and given access to all the facts and asked to make a decision and given a time to do it and paid to do it would come up with a decision that would be representative of what Australians want.”

    I assume Mr Flannery intends to write the facts to be considered by a jury selected at random the same way the independent Q&A audience is selected?

    What could possibly go wrong?

  159. OldOzzie

    H B Bear
    #2659476, posted on March 13, 2018 at 1:53 pm
    It is such a Simple Idea – Why have Restaurants not adopted it?

    Because anyone who can’t eat in a restaurant without a napkin covering themselves shouldn’t be eating in public.

    Sorry, totally disagree – as a Natural Slob, who enjoys eating in Fine Restaurants – I demand my Rights

  160. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    In medieval times witches used to fly through the air on domestic phallic symbols and were seen as pure evil, wild pagan women out of place in a Christian world.

    You are right Dover that the archetype version is that of the nineteenth century illustrators, the height of this imagery being expressed in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ movie. But the archetype found there can be traced to various ‘faery tales’ that were being collated from the eighteenth century onwards all around Europe. These faery tales also reflected long-standing village traditions about witches and their habits, their sexual proclivities and their mode of flight, as well as their supposed ‘gatherings’. We see this in the mediaeval ‘Malleus Maleficarum’ (late 1400’s), later used by witchfinders, and even that inflects much earlier traditions. ”Faery’ was a term applied to many aspects of a much older culture, the stone monuments, tombs and the barrows that date back to the Bronze Age or the Neolithic. The folklore surrounding witches emerges from the myths of a highly proscribed anterior cosmology to the Christian cosmology. Previously have put up the origin of the term Leprechaun here (don’t have my notes handy to do so again), linguistically coming as it does from the ancient deity Lug, during a long period of diminution (i.e. miniturisation). Similar previousl cosmological aetiologies abound in old tales and names.

  161. cohenite

    England has gone:

    London Closes 500 Churches; Opens 423 New Mosques

    Baxter Dmitry YourNewsWire.com March 5, 2018

    The city of London has closed 500 churches and opened 423 new mosques, and now allows sharia courts to operate in the city. The creeping Islamization of London is almost complete, with hundreds of official sharia courts operating in the capital, and mosques opening where famous Christian churches have stood for many hundreds of years.

    “London is more Islamic than many Muslim countries put together“, according to Maulana Syed Raza Rizvi, one of the Islamic preachers who now lead “Londonistan“, as the journalist Melanie Phillips has called the English capital. No, Rizvi is not a right-wing extremist.

    Nobel Laureate for Literature,Wole Soyinka, was less generous. He called the UK “a cesspit for Islamists“.

    “Terrorists can not stand London multiculturalism“, London’s mayor Sadiq Khan said after the deadly terror attack at Westminster last year. The opposite is true: British multiculturalists are feeding Islamic fundamentalism.

    Above all, Londonistan, with its 423 new mosques, is being built on the sad ruins of English Christianity. Many iconic Christian churches in London have been converted into mosques.

    Gatestone Institute reports: The Hyatt United Church was bought by the Egyptian community to be converted to a mosque. St Peter’s Church has been converted into the Madina Mosque. The Brick Lane Mosque was built on a former Methodist church. Not only buildings are converted, but also people. The number of converts to Islam has doubled; often they embrace radical Islam, as with Khalid Masood, the terrorist who struck Westminster.

    The Daily Mail published photographs of a church and a mosque a few meters from each other in the heart of London. At the Church of San Giorgio, designed to accommodate 1,230 worshipers, only 12 people gathered to celebrate Mass. At the Church of Santa Maria, there were 20.

    The nearby Brune Street Estate mosque has a different problem: overcrowding. Its small room and can contain only 100. On Friday, the faithful must pour into the street to pray. Given the current trends, Christianity in England is becoming a relic, while Islam will be the religion of the future.

    In Birmingham, the second-largest British city, where many jihadists live and orchestrate their attacks, an Islamic minaret dominates the sky. There are petitions to allow British mosques to call the Islamic faithful to prayer on loudspeakers three times a day.

    By 2020, estimates are that the number of Muslims attending prayers will reach at least 683,000, while the number of Christians attending weekly Mass will drop to 679,000. “The new cultural landscape of English cities has arrived; the homogenised, Christian landscape of state religion is in retreat”, said Ceri Peachof Oxford University. While nearly half of British Muslims are under the age of 25, a quarter of Christians are over 65. “In another 20 years there are going to be more active Muslims than there are churchgoers,” said Keith Porteous Wood, director of the National Secular Society.

    Since 2001, 500 London churches of all denominations have been turned into private homes. During the same period, British mosques have been proliferating. Between 2012 and 2014, the proportion of Britons who identify themselves as Anglicans fell from 21% to 17%, a decrease of 1.7 million people, while, according to a survey conducted by the respected NatCen Social Research Institute, the number of Muslims has grown by almost a million. Churchgoers are declining at a rate that within a generation, their number will be three times lower than that of Muslims who go regularly to mosque on Friday.

    Demographically, Britain has been acquiring an increasingly an Islamic face, in places such as Birmingham, Bradford, Derby, Dewsbury, Leeds, Leicester, Liverpool, Luton, Manchester, Sheffield, Waltham Forest and Tower Hamlets. In 2015, an analysis of the most common name in England showed it was Mohammed, including spelling variations such as Muhammad and Mohammad.

    Most important cities have huge Muslim populations: Manchester (15.8%), Birmingham (21.8%) and Bradford (24.7%). In Birmingham, the police just dismantled a terrorist cell; there is also a greater probability that a child will be born into a Muslim family than into a Christian one. In Bradford and Leicester, half the children are Muslim. Muslims do not need to become the majority in the UK; they just need gradually to Islamize the most important cities. The change is already taking place. “Londonistan” is not a Muslim majority nightmare; it is a cultural, demographic and religious hybrid in which Christianity declines and Islam advances.

    According to Innes Bowen, writing in The Spectator, only two of the 1,700 mosques in Britain today follow the modernist interpretation of Islam, compared with 56% in the United States. The Wahhabis control six percent of mosques in the UK, while the fundamentalist Deobandi control up to 45%. According to a survey from the Knowledge Center, a third of UK Muslims do not feel “part of British culture.”

    https://www.facebook.com/dallas.beaufort/posts/10155529040434370

  162. cohenite

    England has gone: a good read about mosques replacing churches, sharia law and population trends:

    https://www.facebook.com/dallas.beaufort/posts/10155529040434370

  163. Fisky

    Good LORD. This is even worse than the “basket of deplorables” quote. Hillary is now basically saying that ALL Trump voters are racist!

  164. Fisky

    https://www.hannity.com/media-room/clinton-goes-nuclear-hillary-says-white-women-were-forced-to-vote-for-trump-by-their-husbands/

    Hillary Clinton took her international excuses tour to a new low over the weekend; telling a packed audience at a conference in India that ‘white women’ overwhelmingly voted for Donald Trump simply because their husbands forced them to.

    The former Secretary of State was speaking to the India Today Conclave event on Saturday when she found yet another excuse for her 2016 defeat to Donald Trump; this time blaming ‘white women’ of both political parties who would have voted for her otherwise.

    “[Democrats] do not do well with white men and we don’t do well with married, white women,” Clinton explained. “And part of that is an identification with the Republican Party, and a sort of ongoing pressure to vote the way that your husband, your boss, your son, whoever, believes you should,” said Clinton.

    HAHAHAHAHA!

    Great candidate, m0nster! Good call.

  165. struth

    Racist, supremist white man fighting for what he sees as the downtrodden because they are aboriginal,Testes…………….his guilt projected on others.

    He is the leader of the RSPCAbos, and they are just the animals in his eyes he points to on the farm, ribs showing through, so he can live and glorify himself due to their misery.
    The farmer is held responsible and much fury and gnashing of virtue signalling teeth is exhibited, yet the farmer wanted those animals to be able to graze with the other animals in the paddock the other side of the welfare fence, but the RSPCAbo wouldn’t allow that.
    There’d be nothing to point at.

  166. Knuckle Dragger

    Old Ozzie – sort of like:

    ‘Just one more mint, monsieur? It is but wafer-thin….’

  167. Tom

    I said a few weeks ago that wannabe media mogul Craig Hutchison was destroying Australia’s only sports radio franchise after taking over Melbourne’s SEN at the start of the year, sacking many of its stars and regulars and introducing as its new star Their ABC’s Gerard Whateley, who proceeded to introduce Ol’ Leathery Bawwie Cassidy in a green-left politics segment to rail against Trump – at a fucking SPORTS station!

    Sure enough, the year’s first ratings survey, released this morning, shows SEN has tanked in almost all daily sessions compared not only with the end of last year, but also against Survey 1 last year (which covers the early months before SEN’s bread and butter, AFL, resumes).

    SEN has been very profitable for many years because it has a strong commercial/sales department. But I predict that is about to end because: a) lower ratings lower advertising rates b) I believe Hutchison’s parent company Croc Media will use all sorts of dodgy, legal transfer pricing to repatriate SEN cash flow to Croc Media after flooding SEN with many of his el cheapo Croc Media hires.

    I hope I’m wrong. There is a market in sports-mad Australia for sports radio, even though it has never had America’s media culture, where ever city with a million people – and even some smaller regional cities – has a sports radio station.

    But Hutchison, who has never run a radio station before, is a bull in a china shop.

  168. Rebel with cause

    I see Huma Abedin still shadowing Hillary Clinton. Time Magazine 2010 “40 Under 40 – Rising Stars of US Politics” piece on Huma now unintentionally hilarious.

  169. Knuckle Dragger

    Struth,

    Persactly.

    Testes the Big Man, glorifying himself as a Messiah and profiting from other people’s misery.

    Still no commentary on the culture that allowed a two year old to be raped in Tennant Creek, nor on the age of consent in the fantabulous Aboriginal culture, but that’s OK because sand stocks somewhere in the Kimberleys are up 0.03% this quarter.

  170. Mother Lode

    could this be a sign of the end of King Kyle’s reign?

    I imagine his cardiologist hopes so.

    His high ratings seem to have been accompanied by massive weight gain.

    I suspect that he has a tiny fragment of conscience still lodged in his skull and the only thing that drowns out that insistent voice of reproach is the sound of chips crunching between his monstrously powerful jaws, the smacking sounds of cakes and lollies being milled and kneaded against encrusted teeth, and burps from out-gassing gallons of coke sloshing around the vast cauldron of foods and acids below his slave-driven liver and above his weight-compressed bowels.

  171. Knuckle Dragger

    Tom,

    Used to love SEN back in the day – it was a permanent fixture on my dial.

    Sad to see it’s apparently gone to the pack, and it was preventable.

  172. OldOzzie

    Shorten’s class-war $59bn tax on wealthy shareholders, retirees, super funds

    Bill Shorten says his new plan to give tax deductions to businesses when they buy assets worth more than $20,000 was inspired by Donald Trump.

    The Opposition Leader said he had “studied” the economic upturn in the United States and decided it was the President’s policies allowing businesses to write-off capital expenditure that had been a bigger driver of economic growth than business tax cuts.

    “That’s the piece which Malcolm Turnbull loves. You can’t stop him talking about the Donald and corporate tax reduction. But what the government has missed is what I think experts in America say is driving job creation in America is actually depreciation,” Mr Shorten said.

    “The great irony is we’ve studied what’s happened in America, but we’ve always believed that the best thing you can do is if you’re going to provide a taxpayer support to a business, it’s got to come with conditions, it’s got to come with strings attached.

    “I think just giving away $65 billion out of the nation’s (budget) to big business, 60 per cent which will go overseas, it’s a mug’s strategy.”

    Under Labor’s plan announced today, business will be able to receive a 20 per cent tax reduction on assets worth more than $20,000 in a policy worth $10 billion over a decade.

    The policy has been branded the Australian Investment Guarantee, effectively expanding the instant write-off policy which allows small business to write off assets worth less than $20,000.

    Mr Shorten has promised all businesses would be able to deduct 20 per cent of any eligible asset, such as machinery, trucks and utes.

    He said it would help grow business investment which had “collapsed by 20 per cent”.

    “Under Labor’s Australian Investment Guarantee, only companies that make the decision to invest in Australia will benefit from this tax relief — while up to 60 per cent of the conservatives’ company tax handout goes directly to foreign shareholders,” Mr Shorten said. “Unlike previous asset write-off schemes, Labor’s Australian Investment Guarantee is permanent — that means businesses can continue to take advantage of the immediate tax deductibility whenever they make a new investment in an eligible asset.”

    Labor flags tax relief for lower paid

    The Labor leader also flagged the potential for “tax relief” for low and middle income earners before the next election because of his $59 billion crackdown on dividend imputation.

    The Opposition Leader said this morning his push to axe cash payments for franked dividends would give the opposition a better fiscal position than the government and leave the door open for income tax cuts.

    “Labor has a much better fiscal position, full stop, than the government. Because, remember, this government is still persisting with their $65 billion corporate tax giveaway,” Mr Shorten said.

    “Labor is making hard budget decisions which will allow us to do three things — improve the budget position, make sure that we can have a proper safety net of schools and hospitals and aged care and public transport, and, also, this serious and genuine reform, today’s action, will allow us the option of offering tax relief to low- and middle-income Australians before the next election.”

    Mr Shorten said Labor was trying to reform a tax system which was skewed in favour of the rich. “I think all fair-minded observers of Australia’s tax system know that the current tax system has advantages in it which are weighted to the very wealthy and to large corporations,” he said.

    “What we want to do is put the weight back in the economy and government to looking after middle- and working-class Australians.”

    He hit back at Scott Morrison for saying the proposed dividend imputation changes would target pensioners, saying only 1 per cent of full pensioners would be impacted.

    “The reality is that 50 per cent of all of the funds that come out of the budget in cash bonuses to people go to the top 10 per cent of SMSFs,” Mr Shorten said.

    “I think most Australians would be surprised and appalled to discover that they go to work and pay their taxes, and that some self-managed super funds are able to get $2.5 million of cash bonus from the government. That’s not what people pay their taxes for. So, Mr Morrison can run all the scare campaigns he likes. We’ve got an unsustainable tax concession. What we’re doing is we’re clearing the decks to make sure that we have a stronger budget position, to make sure that we can fund our schools and hospitals, and to make sure that we can offer tax relief for low and middle income Australians.”

    Shorten’s $59bn tax hit on rich

    Mr Shorten’s policy announcements were made in a speech to the Chifley Institute at the KPMG offices in Sydney where he opened a new front in his class-war tax grab on the wealthy.

    Unwinding a superannuation measure introduced by the Howard government, Mr Shorten said a Labor government will abolish the rebate component of the ­imputation credits system that benefits primarily high-wealth shareholders and self-managed super funds by allowing them to cash in unused imputation credits.

    Mr Shorten claims that the chief target of the policy is about 200,000 of the 600,000 self-­managed super funds in the ­country, the largest of which have been claiming up to $2.5 million in cash rebates under the imputation credit system. Labor says the policy will not apply to 92 per cent of the 12.8 million Australians who lodge annual tax returns.

    While 90 per cent of the tax hit is directed at self-managed super funds, a small number of “low-income, high-wealth” retirees could also be caught in the net if, for example, they had other assets held in tax-free superannuation funds.

    A small number of large retail and industry super funds, which have millions of average Australians as members, could also be ­affected, with the policy claiming 10 per cent of refunds were accrued by APRA-regulated funds.

    Presently, shareholders are able to use imputation credits to reduce their tax or claim it as a cash refund if the value of the credits exceeds their tax liabilities. Under Labor’s policy, the credits can be used only to reduce tax liabilities and cash refunds will not be paid. The Turnbull government is likely to seize on the measure as a class-war tax raid on the retirement savings of average Australians.

    Mr Shorten claims that average Australians and wage earners will not be hit by the changes to a system that he says has become an unsustainable taxpayer-funded loophole being exploited by only the very wealthy.

    The move will open a war chest estimated to be worth $11bn in the final two years of the four-year budget forward estimates that the opposition is likely to put towards income tax cuts to match or ­exceed any commitment made by the Turnbull government.

    Over the 10-year medium term the budget savings, however, would equate to $59bn, which is almost of equal value to the cost of the Turnbull government’s $65bn corporate tax cuts.

    Labor believes the savings would also give it “wriggle room” potentially to shift its position on corporate tax cuts, with the possibility it may move to support them for businesses under $2m a year in turnover and potentially keeping the currently legislated cuts for those with up to $50m a year.

    “Every dollar that slips through these loopholes is a dollar that cannot be invested in the Australian people and their potential,” a copy of Mr Shorten’s speech says.

    “Every dollar allocated to tidy little arrangements for people who already have millions of ­dollars, is a dollar that can’t be used to repair the budget and bring Australia back to surplus.

    “Firstly, this change only affects a very small number of shareholders who currently have no tax liability and use their imputation credits to receive a cash refund. These people will no longer ­receive a cash refund, but they will not be paying any additional tax. Let me repeat that: a small number of people will no longer receive a cash refund — but they will not be paying any additional tax.”

    Mr Shorten claims that the new tax policy would return the imputation system, originally designed to stop double taxation, back to its original design under the Hawke-Keating government in 1987.

    The scheme created imputation (tax) credits for dividends paid to shareholders equal to the tax paid by a company on its profits. The credits can be used to offset a person or entity’s tax liabilities.

    The scheme was expanded by the Howard government in 2000 to allow cash refunds to be paid to those who had amassed imputation credits that exceeded their tax liability or for those with a zero tax liability.

    This was considered a sweetener for controversial changes being considered to the tax treatment of trusts, which were ultimately abandoned.

    The major and direct beneficiaries were those with self-­managed super funds which in pension phase became tax-free.

    Labor claims that further changes in 2006 to the tax treatment of superannuation funds compounded an issue that was then already costing about $550m to the budget bottom line.

    “The Howard-Costello subsidy entirely distorts the original design of the dividend imputation system,” Mr Shorten will say.

    “In fact, it makes Australia the only OECD country with a fully refundable dividend imputation credit system. And every dollar our opponents spend on preserving exemptions for the top end of town is a dollar they have to cut from schools and hospitals, extracted from middle Australia in tax increases or forcing taxpayers to pay more interest on the ­nation’s debt.”

    The opposition’s policy claims that of “the excess imputation credits refunded to SMSFs, 50 per cent of the total benefits go to the wealthiest 10 per cent SMSF balances (which have balances in excess of $2.4m)”.

    It further claims that Parliamentary Budget Office figures from 2015 show that the top 1 per cent of SMSFs received a cash refund of $83,000 on average — with some claiming up to $2.5m.

    “Recipients of cash refunds are typically wealthier retirees who aren’t PAYG taxpayers,” the policy document says. “These are people who typically own their own home and also have other tax-free superannuation assets.”

    From the Comments

    – The only way we the public are going to be able to stop these parasitic politicians (of all persuasions) will be to demand that they can no longer enjoy the largess of the current Parliamentary Pensions scheme. Of to put it in terms that even Simple Bill can understand, its time they had their salaries clipped by 9% and it sent of to their retail super account like all the rest of us. Until that happens, we the people are simply going to be screwed over time and time and time again.

    – Is Shorten for real?

    A public apology to my children – Sorry kids: Bill Shorten has greatly diminished my income in retirement by these new measures and as a result I will likely need to consume all that I presently have in order to live at least reasonably. End result is that I probably won’t have much of anything to pass on in my Will.

    I know as youngsters you’re likely to vote labor because they seem to be more well … “touchy feeling” than the drab old Lib / Nats. I guess you could call it the folly of youth but no doubt you’ll understand in time my sons and daughter.

    The above sums up OldOzzie approach to his kids

    – It is nothing short of a tax grab pure and simple from a crowd that basically got us into this mess. Here’s a thought how about governments spend less money on waffle and rubbish and target spending on things that are needed. I am over it with taking away my hard earned income on the basis they can can spend it better than me. Shorten and Turnbull just go away

    – The Chasers couldn’t have dreamt a better script, Shorten previously referred to Trump as Barking Mad, doubles down on that comment and now channels the wisdom of The Don on taxation ie $20K rebate. Hilarious

    – BS has targeted Self Managed Super Funds. These are Super Funds mostly setup and run by the retirees who have worked hard to save and place their retirement savings under their own control. Why the attack?

    Is it because the Unions cannot get their hands on SMSFs? They cannot control the retirement income of the elderly unless those retirees invest with Unions in the Industry Super Funds they control.

    Yes. This is an attack – not on the wealthy – but on those that have saved all their lives to become self-funded. Just what governments wanted them to do, and now want to change the rules again. Labor wants their Union buddies to take over the retirement benefits of the elderly in SMSFs.

    – Its not just self funded super funds, my Husband & I are both on the aged pension, having retired with very little super because super only started late in our working life. We have a very small share portfolio and the imputation credits are our only tax refund. We use this refund of approx $1900 to have a short holiday each year if we are lucky. I would like to see Shorten and co have a holiday on just $1900.

    – This guy is like a Japanese Car Company, he wouldn’t have an original idea or concept to put together.

  173. egg_

    “I’m interested that the first poll I have seen indicates a big shift in public attitudes on this, it came out in recent months. It shows 74 per cent of Australians think there is enough of us already and someone who has been talking on ecological and economic grounds for less immigration rather than more, I find that interesting. That is the first breakthrough,” he said.

    IIRC Flanners was giving polling of the proles mild support on Q&A.

  174. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    “[Democrats] do not do well with white men and we don’t do well with married, white women,” Clinton explained. “And part of that is an identification with the Republican Party, and a sort of ongoing pressure to vote the way that your husband, your boss, your son, whoever, believes you should,” said Clinton.

    Gee, I wonder why they want open borders?

    Stupidly the Republican party agrees with them.

  175. egg_

    England has gone: a good read about mosques replacing churches, sharia law and population trends:

    https://www.facebook.com/dallas.beaufort/posts/10155529040434370

    There goes the Anglosphere – Oz and Canada the last bastions?

  176. OldOzzie

    Labor faces uphill battle in Batman by-election: Bill Shorten

    Bill Shorten says Labor faces an “uphill battle” to win this weekend’s by-election in the traditional party heartland Melbourne seat of Batman because of a tough contest with the Greens.

    But Labor’s leader today blamed Malcolm Turnbull for effectively aiding the Greens by not running a Liberal candidate.

    “It’s an uphill fight,” he said. “The fact that Mr Turnbull close not to run makes it harder for Labor — because the fact of the matter is that there will be some Liberal voters who will just stay at home. And they won’t allocate their preferences — they just won’t vote.”

    Mr Shorten was speaking in Sydney after a speech to release Labor’s policy on capping tax credits on dividend imputation, a measure he says will provide $11.4bn over four years to help reduce the budget deficit and pay for additional spending if Labor wins the next federal election.

    The Opposition leader claimed Mr Turnbull had already “lost” the weekend by-election caused by the resignation of Shorten ally David Feeney, who quit after conceding he could not prove he had renounced his British citizenship.

    “If he had run, he would have got a lower vote than he would have always got at the last election, so there is already one loser out if it, and I’m very happy with the campaign,” he said.

    Despite conceding the “uphill battle” she faced to hold Batman, Labor’s leader said party candidate Ged Kearney, the departing ACTU president, was giving it “every shot” as a person of integrity, and by targeting her message at electorate issues such as extending the tram line, and securing more funding for schools.

    He said Ms Kearney had also outlined new health measures that Labor would take up if elected.

    Mr Feeney only won his seat at the July 2016 election with a slim margin, after Greens’ candidate Alex Bhathal, who is running again on Saturday, came very close in a competitive contest.

    The Greens already have secured the neighbouring seat of Melbourne from Labor, making the Saturday by-election an important test for the party is it tries to grab the support of voters in traditional ALP heartland.

    Another inner Melbourne also at risk of falling to the Greens at the next election is Melbourne Ports, held by Labor’s Michael Danby.

    Me Danby secured only 27 per cent of the primary vote in 2016, and only fended off a Greens challenge with Liberal and other preferences. The risk ahead for Labor that the loss of Batman and possibly a total of three seats in Melbourne over time poses an existential threat to the party’s inner city base.

    While Mr Shorten’s own position as leader looks secure, a defeat in Batman is likely to raise internal party questions nonetheless about whether he is connecting with voters, and prompt further soul searching about the federal ALP’s direction even as it has shifted to the left — and closer to the Greens on some issues.

  177. OldOzzie

    George Brandis denies responsibility for $500,000 legal aid bill for accused pedophile

    George Brandis has denied responsibility for a decision to grant $500,000 in taxpayer-funded legal advice to accused pedophile and child killer Peter Scully.

    The former attorney-general said officials in his department made the decision to fund Scully’s legal costs, based on the guidelines of the Serious Overseas Criminal Matters Scheme.

    The Australian revealed today that Scully — on trial in the Philippines for child murder, human trafficking, rape and torture — has received taxpayer-funded legal support under the scheme for the past three years.

    Attorney-General Christian Porter said he was reviewing access to the scheme, arguing the support — granted under his predecessor — was out of step with community expectations.

    But Mr Brandis told The Australian that he was not directly involved in the decision.

    “This was a program administered by officials in the Attorney-General’s department. It wasn’t a matter that the Attorney General, in this case me, had to sign off on,” the former attorney-general said.

    “It was administered by officials who no doubt applied the appropriate criteria.”

    Mr Porter said he was looking at changing the scheme to ensure those with histories of sexual offending or relevant convictions would no longer be eligible.

    He has also revealed Scully sought more generous support from the Serious Overseas Criminal Matters Scheme but had been knocked back.

    “Although I understand the support provided falls far short of what has been sought, a fair conclusion is that this expenditure that would be considered out-of-step with community expectations, hence my decision to seek detailed information to consider possible future changes to the Scheme’s criteria to ensure child sex offenders are not being generously supported by the Australian taxpayer.”

    Like Mr Porter, Mr Brandis said he had also inherited the scheme.

    “It was not a scheme established by me. It was a pre-existing scheme administered by officials.”

    The Serious Overseas Criminal Matters Scheme provides legal support for Australians facing the death penalty or jail terms of more than 20 years.

    More than $1.1 million was paid out under the scheme in 2016-17 to an undisclosed number of Australians facing charges overseas.

    The Australian understands Scully, a former Melbourne businessman who fled Australia in 2011 to escape fraud charges, has been receiving taxpayer funds under the scheme since his arrest in 2015.

    Philippines police allege Scully was a cyberporn producer who sold videos of depraved acts on the “dark web” for $10,000 each. He is contesting 75 charges, forcing his victims to undergo the ordeal of testifying against him in court.

    Past recipients of money from the scheme include Schapelle Corby, convicted terror supporter David Hicks and cocaine smuggler Cassie Sainsbury. Bali Nine drug runners Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan also received money from the scheme, before their execution by Indonesian authorities.

    Scully is alleged to have sexually assaulted a 12-year-old girl before strangling her and burying her body in a grave under a house he was renting in the southern Philippines city of Surigao.

    Police and prosecutors wept, according to a Fairfax report, when they viewed one video called Daisy’s Destruction that Scully allegedly sold on the internet showing an 18-month-old girl being sexually assaulted while being tied upside down by the legs. The girl was later found alive but suffers lasting physical and mental injuries.

    Two teenage girls were allegedly found naked and chained in an another apartment he rented.

    Scully faces multiple life terms of imprisonment but has avoided the death penalty, which the Duterte government is trying to reintroduce but only for serious drugs offences.

    Eight girl victims up to the age of 13 at the time of the offences were reportedly being held in witness protection.

    Scully, who has been declared bankrupt twice, fled to The Philippines in 2011 as the Victorian consumer watchdog pursued him in the Supreme Court for unconscionable conduct relating to a dodgy homebuyer scheme.

    Under the program designed by Scully, low-income earners who could not usually qualify for a home loan paid above-market rent for a home owned by an ­investor, with the expectation that they would acquire the title after five years. The Key Result scheme went into liquidation in 2005 owing $2.6m.

    Scully’s former lawyer, Alejandra Jose Pallugna, reportedly said his client treated jail like a holiday and demanded a mobile phone and fresh beef, pork and chicken.

    The Philippines has long ­attracted child-sex offenders, with its widespread poverty ­giving offenders easy access to vulnerable children. Now, it is at the centre of a booming cybersex industry, aided by mobile video technology and growing broadband access.

  178. struth

    Democrats] do not do well with white men and we don’t do well with married, white women,” Clinton explained.

    Lefties don’t do well with western families, and they admit it.

    They are in the process of fixing this problem.

  179. OldOzzie

    George Brandis denies responsibility for $500,000 legal aid bill for accused p***phile

    George Brandis has denied responsibility for a decision to grant $500,000 in taxpayer-funded legal advice to accused p***phile and child killer Peter Scully.

    The former attorney-general said officials in his department made the decision to fund Scully’s legal costs, based on the guidelines of the Serious Overseas Criminal Matters Scheme.

    The Australian revealed today that Scully — on trial in the Philippines for child murder, human trafficking, rape and torture — has received taxpayer-funded legal support under the scheme for the past three years.

    Attorney-General Christian Porter said he was reviewing access to the scheme, arguing the support — granted under his predecessor — was out of step with community expectations.

    But Mr Brandis told The Australian that he was not directly involved in the decision.

    “This was a program administered by officials in the Attorney-General’s department. It wasn’t a matter that the Attorney General, in this case me, had to sign off on,” the former attorney-general said.

    “It was administered by officials who no doubt applied the appropriate criteria.”

    Mr Porter said he was looking at changing the scheme to ensure those with histories of sexual offending or relevant convictions would no longer be eligible.

    He has also revealed Scully sought more generous support from the Serious Overseas Criminal Matters Scheme but had been knocked back.

    “Although I understand the support provided falls far short of what has been sought, a fair conclusion is that this expenditure that would be considered out-of-step with community expectations, hence my decision to seek detailed information to consider possible future changes to the Scheme’s criteria to ensure child sex offenders are not being generously supported by the Australian taxpayer.”

    Like Mr Porter, Mr Brandis said he had also inherited the scheme.

    “It was not a scheme established by me. It was a pre-existing scheme administered by officials.”

    The Serious Overseas Criminal Matters Scheme provides legal support for Australians facing the death penalty or jail terms of more than 20 years.

    More than $1.1 million was paid out under the scheme in 2016-17 to an undisclosed number of Australians facing charges overseas.

    The Australian understands Scully, a former Melbourne businessman who fled Australia in 2011 to escape fraud charges, has been receiving taxpayer funds under the scheme since his arrest in 2015.

    Philippines police allege Scully was a cyberporn producer who sold videos of depraved acts on the “dark web” for $10,000 each. He is contesting 75 charges, forcing his victims to undergo the ordeal of testifying against him in court.

    Past recipients of money from the scheme include Schapelle Corby, convicted terror supporter David Hicks and cocaine smuggler Cassie Sainsbury. Bali Nine drug runners Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan also received money from the scheme, before their execution by Indonesian authorities.

    Scully is alleged to have sexually assaulted a 12-year-old girl before strangling her and burying her body in a grave under a house he was renting in the southern Philippines city of Surigao.

    Police and prosecutors wept, according to a Fairfax report, when they viewed one video called Daisy’s Destruction that Scully allegedly sold on the internet showing an 18-month-old girl being sexually assaulted while being tied upside down by the legs. The girl was later found alive but suffers lasting physical and mental injuries.

    Two teenage girls were allegedly found naked and chained in an another apartment he rented.

    Scully faces multiple life terms of imprisonment but has avoided the death penalty, which the Duterte government is trying to reintroduce but only for serious drugs offences.

    Eight girl victims up to the age of 13 at the time of the offences were reportedly being held in witness protection.

    Scully, who has been declared bankrupt twice, fled to The Philippines in 2011 as the Victorian consumer watchdog pursued him in the Supreme Court for unconscionable conduct relating to a dodgy homebuyer scheme.

    Under the program designed by Scully, low-income earners who could not usually qualify for a home loan paid above-market rent for a home owned by an ­investor, with the expectation that they would acquire the title after five years. The Key Result scheme went into liquidation in 2005 owing $2.6m.

    Scully’s former lawyer, Alejandra Jose Pallugna, reportedly said his client treated jail like a holiday and demanded a mobile phone and fresh beef, pork and chicken.

    The Philippines has long ­attracted child-sex offenders, with its widespread poverty ­giving offenders easy access to vulnerable children. Now, it is at the centre of a booming cybersex industry, aided by mobile video technology and growing broadband access.

  180. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Eat, shit and die commies.
    SCOTTISH scientists have discovered that intelligence is linked to genes in the largest study of its kind ever undertaken.

    Researchers compared variations in the DNA of more than 240,000 people from around the world, and found more than 500 genes they linked to intelligence – ten times more than was previously thought.

    However, their discovery raises the moral issue of gene manipulation leading to “designer babies” in the future, where the rich are able to pay for gene manipulation to make their offspring smarter.

  181. Rae

    Regardless, you obviously do not know how taxes work. If my grandparents don’t get their tax refund (for tax already paid on dividends – they do not meet the minimum threshold for tax payment and thus receive a refund each year) – then this is a tax hike and thus this is double taxation.

    It is a tax increase. Get it through your head.

    Hello hydra. I’ll ignore rest of your comment as it’s somewhat repetitive.

    I actually know quite a lot about tax, being a taxpayer (hello resident Tax Inspector). And I briefly explained what the Labor proposal affects earlier today. Again:

    The Howard Government amended the dividend imputation arrangements so that people who paid no tax would be paid the value of the franking credits on their investments. This differed significantly from the normal taxing arrangements whereby people can only receive refunds up to the value of the tax they have actually paid. It meant that those non-taxpayers received a bonus payment that is a tax on all the other people who have actually paid tax.

    This is an anomaly that the Labor proposal is intended to correct. It is not an additional tax.

  182. thefrollickingmole

    Figures seem pretty high.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/mar/13/london-central-mosque-given-grade-ii-listed-status-historic-england

    There are estimated to be almost 2,000 mosques and Islamic prayer rooms in the UK, serving 4.1 million Muslims, or 6.3% of the UK population.

  183. OldOzzie

    CAROLINE OVERINGTON – Trinity Grammar faces ‘exquisite dilemma’ over teacher’s sacking

    Why do parents choose private schools for their kids?

    Sometimes, it’s religion.

    Sometimes — let’s be honest — status. They think it gives them a leg-up.

    Sometimes, maybe even often, it’s the discipline.

    They look at the local public school, with the kids in polo shirts and floppy hats, and they compare that to the ultra-expensive private school, with its shirts and ties and boater hats and blazers, and they think: I reckon my kids will get more discipline if we go elite.

    They’ll have to wear an ironed shirt, and pants with a seam down the front.

    They’ll be reminded every day about scuffed shoes.

    They’ll have to be neat, and neatliness — I’m sure this is right — is close to Godliness.

    In the minds of many parents — who could be wrong, but the military agrees — discipline in uniform is linked to discipline in all aspects of a young man’s life.

    It might encourage them to make their beds, and structure their homework, and focus on study, and so on.

    And part of that is keeping their hair neat and trim.

    You can argue up hill and down dale about whether they’re deluded. But you can’t deny that discipline is why so many parents choose those schools.

    Which is also why it makes no sense for Trinity Grammar — up there with the most expensive and exclusive of all the Melbourne private schools — has fired a teacher, Rohan Brown, for trimming one of the boy’s hair, so he could have his school photo taken.

    The boys have to look like they have to look in the school photos.

    This boy looked all shagged-haired and rebellious.

    Parents aren’t paying for all shaggy-haired and rebellious. They are paying for traditional, conservative values, in a disciplined environment.

    Clearly, Brownie — as he’s been known and loved for 30 years; a teacher who loves the boys, in all their delightfulness — shouldn’t have been fired for getting out the clippers to enforce a uniform policy that parents look for, and pay for, when choosing a private school.

    A strict uniform policy is why the parents choose the school.

    They therefore expect the school to enforce it, surely?

    You might think that makes them lame, but it’s not your money and not your choice.

    Now the school has a dilemma.

    Because what the principal says also goes in these schools. He’s the headmaster. Not to be argued with.

    That’s part of why parents choose the school, too.

    It’s an exquisite dilemma for Trinity. They can’t bring Brownie back. But sacking him was a mistake.

  184. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The Labor leader also flagged the potential for “tax relief” for low and middle income earners before the next election because of his $59 billion crackdown on dividend imputation.

    tax relief for those that are net receivers of tax? these forked tongue criminal socialist filth needs to be incarcerate or better still executed. The time for playing ballot box lotto is rapidly coming to an end.

  185. EvilElvis

    He scrubs up much better when he is let off the leash

    Um, no, no he doesn’t. The only time he looked competent was when Abbot was PM, had a plan and backed ScoMo to the hilt.

  186. thefrollickingmole

    Now, it is at the centre of a booming cybersex industry, aided by mobile video technology and growing broadband access.
    There was a show on about this, fairly harrowing, where they trapped some of the mothers pimping the kids, apparently abused to order online is pretty common as well.

    Heres one she did on Cambodia.
    http://documentaryheaven.com/child-trafficking-in-cambodia-stacey-dooley-investigates/

  187. egg_

    “Having lived through government after government that has promised to fix them with decentralisation or new projects – it’s never happened. You asked are politicians, do they understand how angry people are? There’s an underlying issue there which is about why is this problem occurring? It’s because politicians with very few exceptions, such as Bob, none of them want a smaller constituency, none of our church leaders want a smaller congregation, so unless we, the people, speak up on this, and are heard and control the agenda, special interest groups will see population growth continue,” he said.

    Flanners nails the key issues and admits the experts know SFA.
    Song reckons reffos taxes will pay for the required extra infrastructure – when State Govts are busy rebuilding Stadiums*?

    *Sounds like bread and circuses “don’t mind the filth” middle ages stuff.

    /The Life of Malcolm.

  188. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    This is an anomaly that the Labor proposal is intended to correct. It is not an additional tax.

    socialist pricks like you deserve piano wire

  189. Roger.

    It’s an exquisite dilemma for Trinity. They can’t bring Brownie back. But sacking him was a mistake.

    It’s hardly exquisite. It is probably the result of fear of legal action by said boys parents.

    Of course they can re-employ him if he so desires.

    It just means admitting they made a mistake.

  190. cohenite

    There are estimated to be almost 2,000 mosques and Islamic prayer rooms in the UK, serving 4.1 million Muslims, or 6.3% of the UK population.

    The ratio is about right; in Australia there are about 450 mosques for about 550000 of the fuckers. Remember a mosque is not a church it is a military barracks.

  191. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    This boy looked all shagged-haired and rebellious.
    Parents aren’t paying for all shaggy-haired and rebellious. They are paying for traditional, conservative values, in a disciplined environment.

    Absolutely. You can buy shaggy-haired and rebellious in another expensive school, one catering to such middle class kids who are the despair of their parents, or you can get it for free with penis-tucking included at your local public school.

    The sensible thing for the teacher to have done would be to exclude the boy on the basis of inappropriate uniform compliance. Shaggy is not suitable. The issue could then have been thrashed out later, with the result no worse than if young Finn or Oliver had suddenly thrown up over his blazer and pants.

  192. Roger.

    Um, no, no he doesn’t. The only time he looked competent was when Abbot was PM, had a plan and backed ScoMo to the hilt.

    With Angus Campbell running the operational aspect of Sovereign Borders.

    Morrison is only ever as good as the people around him.

    He’s not a leader.

  193. Mother Lode

    It is a paradox (if you are a fan of identity politics and power relationships) that the evil privileged people in these stories are the ones that bestow privilege on the victim groups.

    It was men who gave women the vote.

    Free men who abolished slavery – a human condition mostly not even questioned through most of history.

    White people who voted to grant to Aborigines advantages they themselves do not even enjoy.

    Conservatives providing fora and the legal right for non-conservatives to ply their flawed (but individually held) politics.

    It galls the different victim groups to have to admit that the much despised enemy’s virtue was their salvation, so they build elaborate (well, comical) narratives describing how their righteousness, moral superiority, comradeship and courage compelled change.

    Fucking ingrates.

  194. OldOzzie

    Comment on Andrew Bolt’s Blog on Gillian Triggs sums her up superbly

    Gillian Triggs really was the Typhoid Mary of Australia’s justice system.

  195. C.L.

    “[Democrats] do not do well with white men and we don’t do well with married, white women,” Clinton explained.

    With taxpayers, in other words.

  196. C.L.

    Did anyone else notice the news story the ABC where running yesterday following comments by faux conservative, Christian Porter, about the Catholic Church allegedly holding back the proposed compensation scheme recommended by the RC. You know, the Church that was first to the party ferreting out child abusers and compensating victims a quarter of a century before the state was roused by the prospect of using this issue to beat conservative Catholics with, and that has since forked out over a quarter of billion dollars in compensation to victims, yeah that one.

    Yes I did. Porter is a lying weasel. But that goes without saying. He is, after all, a Liberal.

  197. OldOzzie

    SOUTH AUSTRALIA ELECTION – Nick Xenophon in danger of failing to win Hartley for SA Best

    Nick Xenophon’s bid to return to state politics is in danger of failing, with a new opinion poll showing the former senator suffering a five-point slump in primary support in the seat of Hartley, which he is trying to wrest from sitting Liberal MP Vincent Tarzia.

    A Galaxy poll, conducted for Adelaide daily newspaper The Advertiser, has today revealed Mr Xenophon’s primary vote is 30 per cent, eight points behind Mr Tarzia. Labor’s candidate, former Hartley MP and one-time minister Grace Portolesi, is on 22 per cent.

    Galaxy’s projected two-party preferred vote has Mr Tarzia ahead 51 to 49 per cent, a stunning turnaround from a Galaxy poll in mid-January which had the SA-Best 14 points ahead on 57 to 43 per cent.

    Liberal Opposition Leader Steven Marshall is now clearly preferred as premier by voters in Hartley, in Adelaide inner northeastern suburbs, 34 per cent to Mr Xenophon’s 22 per cent.

    Mr Xenophon in October announced he would quit the Senate and lead his new SA-Best party to the South Australian election on Saturday by personally running in the marginal Liberal-held electorate against Mr Tarzia, a first-term MP.

    On the weekend he said he had stretched himself “too thin” by running 36 SA-Best candidates in the 47-seat House of Assembly.

    In other seat polling by Galaxy published today, Mr Marshall looks set to retain his marginal seat of Dunstan with a six-point lead on a two-party vote.

    The poll has Mr Marshall with a primary vote of 44 per cent, well clear of Labor’s Matt Loader on 30 per cent, and SA-Best’s Jack Noonan at just 15 per cent.

    In the southern suburbs seat of Mawson, Labor frontbencher Leon Bignell is neck-and-neck with Liberal candidate Andy Gilfillan on a two-party-preferred basis, thanks to projected SA-Best preferences.

    But Mr Bignell’s primary vote of 30 per cent is well behind Mr Gilfillan’s 37 per cent, putting him in genuine danger of losing the seat for Labor.

    The safe Labor seat of Taylor in ALP heartland in Adelaide’s northern suburbs is under threat from SA Best, with Labor just ahead 51 to 49 per cent on a two-party basis.

    Mr Xenophon has said that if he was not elected in Hartley he would remain “in the picture”.

    “I’m still going to be around, giving support, mentoring, giving advice, working hard with my colleagues who are elected,” he said.

    The Galaxy poll in Hartley surveyed 590 voters last Saturday.

    Mr Xenophon has previously partly blamed an 11-point primary vote slump in a statewide Newspoll published in The Australian this month on a campaign against him by the ­Australian Hotels Association and the major parties,

    Last week, Mr Xenophon hit out at the Greens for directing preferences away from SA-Best in Saturday’s election in seats such as Heysen and Hartley. SA-Best candidates, including Mr Xenophon, will likely ­require a significant amount of preferences via other candidates to win any seats.

  198. Roger.

    This is an anomaly that the Labor proposal is intended to correct. It is not an additional tax.

    I think I actually heard Shorten describe his “reform” as a “savings measure.”

    The end of this road is the socialisation of all wealth with a universal basic income doled out to everyone.

  199. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    “It was not a scheme established by me. It was a pre-existing scheme administered by officials.”

    Isn’t it the business of Ministers and Attorneys General to be across what goes on in their name?

    And if bad laws are being applied, to refer matters to Parliament; or if poor administrative decisions have been ‘inherited’ to be aware of them and to axe them?

    It’s easy enough to sniff problems out; just follow the money, in most cases.

  200. johanna

    The Hungarians spent centuries fighting off they very same people the UN/EU wants to foist on them without a challenge. I don’t think so.

    Oh yeah. Hungarians are take-no-prisoners types – just look at our own Gab. We have crossed swords many a time, but I respect her. She’s tough and she’s smart. And I’d rather have her in a trench with me than Monty.

    Rest assured, Hungarians will not budge on this issue.

    On another note, I see that young whippersnapper Mark Steyn has finally devoted a column to one of my faves, Ghost Riders in the Sky, on which I have opined and linked numerous times.

    The boy has promise. 🙂

  201. Chris

    socialist pricks like you deserve piano wire

    Much as I am forced to abhor violence, this should be a liberty quote.

  202. Lizzie;

    Ooops, Winston. That will bring Dover down like a ton of feathers, which of course is equivalent to a ton of bricks, but less worrying. For this is apparently a made-up thing, these angels dancing and the debate thereupon. However, as a metaphor, it is well known and well used and quite useful.

    Yes Lizzie – I knew it was a metaphor.
    I was just curious to see the reaction. The waste of intellectual capital remains, but.

  203. Farmer Gez

    The only dilemma that Trinity Grammar faces is the dual one of having a f$cking lawyer write a letter of complaint to the school and having another f$cking lawyer as head of school council.

  204. Neil

    All Labor proposals to repair the budget involve increasing taxation (Liberals are similar).

    Why just can’t we cut govt spending by 5%?

  205. egg_

    It galls the different victim groups to have to admit that the much despised enemy’s virtue was their salvation, so they build elaborate (well, comical) narratives describing how their righteousness, moral superiority, comradeship and courage compelled change.

    YAM’s denialism in a nut shell.
    “Islam is one of the most feminist religions.”
    If you’re going to tell a lie – tell a whopper to discombobulate.

  206. thefrollickingmole

    Has anyone wondered how soul destroying it must be to have to mop up Bill Shortens effusions and regurgitate them in an effort to get responses as a sock puppet of a well known mummie enthusiast?

    I mean its bad enough having your squeals of irrelevance ignored, but lowering yourself to slicking Willies shaft for comments as bait…

    scrolly past trolly…

  207. Arky

    Some ethnic type poet at the school.
    (Multiple choice, /5)
    Guess what he is on about:
    A. How great it is to grow up in Australia.
    B. Shakespeare.
    C. How racist Australians are.
    D. Cars.

  208. OldOzzie

    WEALTH – All investors to suffer hit from Labor policy, says stockpicker Geoff Wilson

    One of the nation’s most respected and successful fund managers, stockpicker Geoff Wilson, has slammed Bill Shorten’s proposed changes to the nation’s dividend imputation system as punishing the “full gamut of Australian investors”.

    Mr Wilson also warned the policy shift announced by the ALP could help feed a property bubble as investors switch from equities to property, both directly and in the form of real estate investment trusts (REITs), with potentially deleterious effects for the economy.

    “There can be unintended consequences of this change — one will be moving money away from corporate structures to structures that don’t pay corporate tax. Those areas are REITs or direct property.’’

    Labor says it will abolish the rebate component of the ­imputation credits system that benefits primarily high-wealth shareholders and self-managed super funds by allowing them to cash in unused imputation credits.

    Mr Wilson, who leads a portfolio of listed investment companies that have more than $2.7 billion invested mainly in Australian shares on behalf of 60,000 investors — many of them retirees — believes the ALP’s new policy is just another case of political parties creating uncertainty by meddling with the rules.

    “This is another example of the moving of the goalposts on Australian retirees. Creating more uncertainty when retirees need certainty,’’ Mr Wilson told The Australian.

    “The majority of our 60,000 shareholders are self-managed superannuation fund trustees. Our shareholders and many like them are dependent on dividend income, of which franking credits play an integral part.”

    Mr Wilson, who this year was named an officer in the general division of the Order of Australia for services to the business and finance sector, professional financial bodies and the community as a supporter of charitable foundations, said all investors could suffer the ALP’s dividend imputation policy, not just retirees.

    “Labor’s planned challenge to the imputation system would see the full gamut of Australian investors hit.”

    He said a more efficacious policy would be corporate tax reform.

    “A better solution to the budget deficit would be to lower the corporate tax rate. This would reduce the burden of government franking payouts and drive investment in the Australian economy.”

    Mr Wilson said other countries were envious of Australia’s dividend policy framework, while our corporate tax rates were much less attractive.

    “Our dividend imputation system is the envy of the world while our corporate tax rate is uncompetitive against our global peers.”

    Andrew Porter, from the Group of 100, a peak body representing CFOs of Australia’s biggest companies, said the principle of dividend imputation — that the owner of a company should only be taxed once on its profits — was a sound system and one that has “stood Australian corporates well”.

    Mr Porter, who is also the CFO of the nation’s biggest listed investment company, Australian Foundation Investment Company, said the imputation system helped Australian companies raise capital during the GFC as it fuelled support from all Australian shareholders.

    “Any policy that seeks to reduce the attractiveness of investing in Australian corporates needs to be carefully thought through, both in the interests of the particular class of shareholders that are targeted by this, and for the market as a whole.”

    From the Comments

    – For labor, this is not about doing the right thing by all Australians. It is simply a stunt to feed the envy politics that they peddle. Labor want to create a class divide. It is their master plan that will see this country to continue to fall from its enviable position in the world.

    – Now we have Bill Shorten and Labor fueling Real Estate demand that will make houses even less affordable for low to middle income workers, any increase in pay might buy a coffee but it won’t help your mortgage or rental payments.

    – You would need a financial brain to think about the consequences of this. Something Labour has proven it does not have for many years!

    – He’s spot on; property will be the next thing people will move into!!

    – Must read. Bill Shortens new book. How to loose voters in one fell swoop.

  209. JC

    And I’d rather have her in a trench with me than Monty.

    You’re dreaming. Both of you wouldn’t fit in the same trench unless it was the size of the Pilbara open cut mine.

  210. johanna

    Knuckle Dragger
    #2659031, posted on March 13, 2018 at 2:11 am

    Whoever said ‘strong fences make for good neighbours’ had it nailed.

    That would be Robert Frost, a very good American poet:

    Mending Wall
    By Robert Frost

    Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
    That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
    And spills the upper boulders in the sun;
    And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
    The work of hunters is another thing:
    I have come after them and made repair
    Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
    But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
    To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,
    No one has seen them made or heard them made,
    But at spring mending-time we find them there.
    I let my neighbour know beyond the hill;
    And on a day we meet to walk the line
    And set the wall between us once again.
    We keep the wall between us as we go.
    To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
    And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
    We have to use a spell to make them balance:
    “Stay where you are until our backs are turned!”
    We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
    Oh, just another kind of out-door game,
    One on a side. It comes to little more:
    There where it is we do not need the wall:
    He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
    My apple trees will never get across
    And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
    He only says, “Good fences make good neighbours.”
    Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
    If I could put a notion in his head:
    “Why do they make good neighbours? Isn’t it
    Where there are cows? But here there are no cows.
    Before I built a wall I’d ask to know
    What I was walling in or walling out,
    And to whom I was like to give offence.
    Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
    That wants it down.” I could say “Elves” to him,
    But it’s not elves exactly, and I’d rather
    He said it for himself. I see him there
    Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
    In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
    He moves in darkness as it seems to me,
    Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
    He will not go behind his father’s saying,
    And he likes having thought of it so well
    He says again, “Good fences make good neighbours.”

  211. Herodotus

    I think we all knew (or should have) that Trumble’s tinkering deleteriously with Super opened the door for Labor to take it further and do a cash grab. This is only the beginning.

  212. thefrollickingmole

    Arky

    Great Shakespearean racist Australian cars?

  213. Mother Lode

    It just means admitting they made a mistake.

    Sounds like ‘Brownie’ was the one best epitomising the spirit of the school, both in its traditional values and, less heroic but just sheer practicality, what parents had paid for.

    Impressively, the students are in favour of the guy who instilled discipline – instead of rejoicing in the dismissal of someone who tells them what to do, and the future laxness they might expect to accrue.

    There is hope for the kids.

    The other kids and their fee paying parents are more at one with Brown than the headmaster.

    Re-instate the guy delivering what was promised. Give the pinhead who sacked him 4 weeks to update his CV.

  214. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Good LORD. This is even worse than the “basket of deplorables” quote. Hillary is now basically saying that ALL Trump voters are racist!

    She’s arriving here soon, isn’t she?
    Tempting to be suddenly out of the country; it’s going to be full on misogyny and downtrodden women with racist husbands.
    With their left paying to be earbashed on it and writing about historic moments.
    Wonder if she’s booked to walk down the Opera House forecourt steps.

    If so, might stay in country for that.

  215. Tom

    Hey, JC. Are you stopping over in LA to watch tomorrow’s circus when Trump hits town?

    I had to laugh: Brown, the open borders CA governor, said Trump should be thinking about bridges, not walls.

    I immediately thought of this. Haha!

  216. thefrollickingmole

    OldOzzie

    Hes right about the flood to real estate.
    Australians want one thing.
    Simple low risk, above the rate of inflation returns on their money.

    Government has been closing all avenues for this for the last couple of decades as well as massively increasing the risk associated with starting or running a small business.
    Then they have the hide to be surprised when money floods to the last 2 (now one) areas which have been left unfuckered with.

    Roll on Shitten and a “super home profits tax”, let it all burn.

  217. JC

    Johanna seems appears to suffer from ethnic Tourette’s. Unable to discuss most things because she doesn’t understand and tries to retrace her steps by lying . She forgets she was a tax eater her adult life she and limited to babbling about gardening, bullying females and ethnicity. Funny, because the slob is a foreigner having been born overseas.

  218. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Re-instate the guy delivering what was promised. Give the pinhead who sacked him 4 weeks to update his CV.

    +1

  219. C.L.

    I really hope this Trump portrait makes it into the White House one day.

  220. thefrollickingmole

    C.L.

    Access denied!!!

  221. Leigh Lowe

    Mr Wilson also warned the policy shift announced by the ALP could help feed a property bubble as investors switch from equities to property, both directly and in the form of real estate investment trusts (REITs), with potentially deleterious effects for the economy.

    That was my point this morning.
    If a SMSF is in pension phase (0% tax), a nominal 5% dividend yield is worth a touch over 7% after tax.
    You don’t cut an effective yield from 7% to 5% and expect that investors will sit on their hands.
    Some of them will vote with their feet and my betting is on real estate as the most likely.
    I am seriously thinking about upgrading our principal residence for the next 15 years or so. There may or may not be a lot of capital, appreciation in that, but there sure as shit will be some personal appreciation, and NO TAX.

  222. JC

    I’m in the LA terminal right now , Tom. We’re going straight through as I hate the place. I hope the fucker sends them fucking crazy. Despicable unworldly city and state.

  223. Leigh Lowe

    I had to laugh: Brown, the open borders CA governor, said Trump should be thinking about bridges, not walls.

    I saw someone on Fox yesterday calling him “Linda Rondstadt’s boyfriend”.
    Snort, cackle.

  224. Cactus

    I always thought it was a matter of time before Franking Credits came up for a debt-saddled government looking for ever more revenue. I always thought Franking credits where a very sensible world beating policy. Complicated but elegant once you understand it.

    The thing is – to run a counter argument against what Shorten is doing, is going to be very complicated. It is far easier for Journalists with no financial acumen to say it is closing a loop hole. It is far hard to say in sound bites that will resonate on the news why this is destroying a well functioning tax policy.

    This is also the problem with having no functional right wing party out there. The Greens are running the show, Labor has to move left to fight for their life and the Liberals think moving left will get them votes. Oh how we cry out for a right wing alternative!

  225. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Poetry for a rainy afternoon. Excellent.

    Some walls are stones of freedom; others not.

  226. Leigh Lowe

    I’m in the LA terminal right now , Tom. We’re going straight through as I hate the place. I hope the fucker sends them fucking crazy. Despicable unworldly city and state.

    Had the mother of all blues with Mrs L there in 2016.
    She went off shopping and missed three final calls before wandering back to the lounge.
    We made the gate with seconds to spare.
    She said they wouldn’t leave without us, because bags.
    FFS … I told her that they would unceremoniously pitch your suitcase on the tarmac and push-back if needed … and we would have to buy fresh tickets (insurance don’t cover checked-in misses unless you have a heart attack) … and the new seats would be United cattle class.
    Even then, it makes the Duty Free perfume vewwy expensive.
    I was still fuming as we passed over Hawaii.
    Punctuality has improved on travels since.

  227. egg_

    thefrollickingmole
    #2659532, posted on March 13, 2018 at 2:58 pm

    Slick Willy’s duplicity would keep them busy on two fronts most of the time.

  228. Boambee John

    Knuckle Dragger at 1411

    Testes the Big Man, glorifying himself as a Messiah and profiting from other people’s misery.

    I prefer the corrected version of Zulu’s tag, Pestes = Pestis – he and his ilk are a plague on all aboriginals.

  229. Leigh Lowe

    The thing is – to run a counter argument against what Shorten is doing, is going to be very complicated. It is far easier for Journalists with no financial acumen to say it is closing a loop hole. It is far hard to say in sound bites that will resonate on the news why this is destroying a well functioning tax policy.

    And that is the problem, Cactus.
    Trumble will not be able to resist the temptation to over-explain and confirm his self-anointed “smartest guy in the room status”.
    Morrison has made a reasonable fist of it so far by calling it “theft”.
    They simply need to say that anybody who owns shares or owns a super account with shares will inevitably be affected at some point in their lives … more likely sooner rather than later.
    Let the Liars counter that with their convoluted theoretical Grandma with 10 shares in a zero franking entity.

  230. notafan

    We’re going straight through as I hate the place.

    #metoo

    I made a vow three visits ago to not stop in LA

    Even passing through LAX is bad enough

  231. egg_

    Leigh Lowe
    #2659555, posted on March 13, 2018 at 3:24 pm

    LMFAO!
    LA is yuuuge – when I was there, AA was at Gate 1 for the interconnect, thankfully; on the return flight, Qantas moved Gates to 40 or summut at the last minute and we had to bus out and board the Jumbo via stairs in the dark and wet FFS.

  232. 3D printed home. Cost $10,000 and likely fall to $4,000.

    Fucking useless in Sydney.

    Print land,and on the other hand, and you can become a trillionaire.

  233. egg_

    Trumble will not be able to resist the temptation to over-explain and confirm his self-anointed “smartest guy in the room status”.

    Doesn’t he have a minder to tell him to keep it down to a five word sound bite for breakfast News LIVs?

  234. egg_

    Testes the Big Man, glorifying himself as a Messiah and profiting from other people’s misery.

    The Aboriginal Industry in a nutshell.

  235. Leigh Lowe

    egg_

    #2659560, posted on March 13, 2018 at 3:33 pm

    Leigh Lowe
    #2659555, posted on March 13, 2018 at 3:24 pm

    LMFAO!
    LA is yuuuge – when I was there, AA was at Gate 1 for the interconnect, thankfully; on the return flight, Qantas moved Gates to 40 or summut at the last minute and we had to bus out and board the Jumbo via stairs in the dark and wet FFS.

    The God of Travel loves to fuck with my head.
    Late last year we were coming back via Hong Kong but had a long wait.
    Parked in one of the lounges and waited.
    When the gate came up it was the furthest one at the opposite end of the airport.
    Groan!
    I have to walk past 168 clothes, perfume, joo welry etc stores to get there.
    Took quite some time but I did not let her out of my sight (I did do a bit of creative Forex arithmetic to curtail the shopping expedition).
    “How much is this in AUD?”
    “Oh, a bit over $300”
    (Really about $90).

  236. Leigh Lowe

    Cactus

    #2659553, posted on March 13, 2018 at 3:21 pm

    I always thought it was a matter of time before any personal wealth whatsoever Franking Credits came up for a debt-saddled government looking for ever more revenue.

  237. johanna

    I have no idea whether the allegations are true or not:

    Victorian Nationals MP Tim McCurdy has been charged with multiple fraud offences and has stood down from the Opposition frontbench to fight the charges.

    The shadow sports minister has been charged by police with 10 offences — four counts of making a false document, four counts of using a false document, attempting to obtain property by deception and obtaining property by deception.

    Victoria Police said the charges relate to an investigation into a 2009 alleged fraud.

    In a statement Mr McCurdy said following notification from police this morning he was standing down from his shadow ministry portfolio.

    The offences relate to a property sale he was involved with before he entered Parliament.

    “I am innocent of these allegations and I await the opportunity to defend myself in court and clear my name,” Mr McCurdy said.

    “As I prepare to have these matters heard in court, I am today stepping down from my shadow ministry responsibilities.”

    Point is, how come they have senior figures who could even be in range of these kinds of accusations? FFS, aren’t there decent people with a clean slate around to choose from?

    We may well complain about the rattiness of small party candidates, but the big parties, which have plenty of resources to vet candidates, don’t do much better.

  238. John Constantine

    Nice thought Leigh, above.

    Do a scan for franking credit rich companies with sufficient cashflow to justify a borrowing for a buyback if needed.

    The franking credit bank will become worthless once their shorten looting cartel begins their thousand years of woe, so needs to be passed on in the next year.

    Bit of financial engineering?. watch their turnfailure debacle coalition move to slam that loophole closed.

  239. notafan

    Whoever said ‘strong fences make for good neighbours’ had it nailed.

    Frost was quoting a well known proverb

  240. ‘We’ll be left behind’: Greens want 2030 ban on fossil-fuel car sales

    That’s what lemmings always say.

  241. John Constantine

    Once franking credits lose their value, then the ASX might as well just roll over and become a real gamble exchange, where profit is nowhere as valuable as management chasing rapid growth and capital rerating.

    Debtfunded.

    Comrades.

  242. Leigh Lowe

    John Constantine

    #2659569, posted on March 13, 2018 at 3:48 pm

    Nice thought Leigh, above.

    Do a scan for franking credit rich companies with sufficient cashflow to justify a borrowing for a buyback if needed.

    The franking credit bank will become worthless once their shorten looting cartel begins their thousand years of woe, so needs to be passed on in the next year.

    Bit of financial engineering?. watch their turnfailure debacle coalition move to slam that loophole closed.

    I am on the case.
    Telstra strikes me as a possible.
    Maybe RIO, although they just did one.
    I don’t think the banks will because their capital requirements are a bit of a tightrope walk.
    .
    I don’t reckon Trumble will have to pull the rug on it.
    I will bet the fucking Corporate Social Responsibility xunts within these Corporations will start agitating that a pre-election fully franked buyback is “political interference” and not in the spirit of co-operation with our Socialist overlords.

  243. OldOzzie

    Banks eye ‘loosening the screws’ as number of interest-only loans halve

    The number of people taking out interest-only loans has more than halved since March last year after APRA’s new lending controls came into effect.

    Data released by the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority today shows that of all new loans, the proportion of riskier, interest-only mortgages held by the four major banks plunged to a new low of 15.53 per cent, down from 38.43 per cent in March last year.

    It comes after the banking regulator launched new rules early last year, requiring banks to limit the number of interest-only loans to less than 30 per cent of new business, as part of an attempt to cool the property market by limiting investor lending.

    Banks had hiked up interest-only rates by 60 basis points on average to reduce demand, prompting challenger banks to drop rates for fixed rate interest-only lending.

    Last month, ING, Macquarie Bank and the Bank of Queensland-owned Virgin Money reduced interest-only rates to lure more customers, while Commonwealth Bank chief executive Matt Comyn flagged an intention to get back into the interest-only market, after the bank reduced interest-only flow to 21 per cent of its book.

    According to interest rate comparison website RateCity, average banks are charging 39 basis points more for owner occupiers paying interest-only and 30 basis points more for investors taking out interest-only loans.

    RateCity.com.au money editor Sally Tindall said that the major banks will likely continue dropping rates on interest-only loans, now that they are well below APRA’s 30 per cent cap.

    “Now the banks have proven to APRA they can remain well under the cap, they’re looking to loosen the screws,” she said.

    “This is only the beginning. The banks have overshot the mark by half so we expect they’ll continue dropping interest-only rates to rebalance their books.”

  244. DrBeauGan

    Johanna
    #2659078, posted on March 13, 2018 at 5:45 am
    Dr BG, don’t bother. We have a tag team of literatists (C.L) and Jesuits (Dover) who regard this as a refreshing morning exercise. The latter is especially noted as being full time on uprooting and replanting goalposts.

    I don’t mind debating the catholic tag team, Johanna, when I have time. Watching them tie themselves in quibbles to avoid saying anything politically incorrect by the standards of the middle ages looks very like lefties doing the same. Different religion, but same commitment to the party line. Some people are natural slave material, I guess.

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