Wednesday Forum: March 14, 2018

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1,584 Responses to Wednesday Forum: March 14, 2018

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  1. C.L.

    Ay caramba.
    I’m not sure one of my (many) sisters would have told us boys about such an episode back in the day – out of sheer concern for the trio’s welfare. For there would be blood.

  2. None

    That is the first Susie O’Brien piece that I could read in its entirety, probably because she did not mention herself or her vacuous opinions once. She’s such an airhead – but that was well written.

  3. cohenite

    How plausible is it to create a single gun free town or a single gun free state in USA?

    Leslie Fish, I’m a musician and writer, and history is my hobby.
    Answered Mon

    It’s been done. More than 30 years ago, a town called Morton Grove, Illinois (go look it up) decided to go “gun-free”, and passed a law forbidding anyone (except police and govt. officials, of course) to own a firearm, no exceptions. I vividly remember the protests, how the town’s citizens massed in front of city hall, and howled in protest when the city council passed the law. The incident made headlines all across the country.

    Partly in response to that, the town govt. of Kennesaw, Georgia (go look it up) — which had almost exactly the same population, demographics, economics and average income — passed a law stating just the opposite: *requiring* every household to possess and maintain at least one working firearm. This law *did* allow exceptions for “religious pacifists”, which made it more lenient than the Morton Grove law.
    In other words, these two towns set themselves up to be a real-life experiment in gun-ownership and crime-rates. They’ve kept the experiment going for the last 30 years and more.

    The results were undeniable, which is why the gun-control movement never mentions them. Morton Grove promptly saw its crime rate (general and violent) go up, and climb steadily ever since. Kennesaw saw its crime rate (general and violent) drop like a rock, and continue dropping ever since.
    This real-life experiment, though carefully not mentioned by the media, is one of the reasons why the attitudes of most of the population (52% to 71%, depending on whether you trust the Gallup or Pew surveys) of the US turned against the gun-control agenda. Yes, most Americans *do* believe that private citizens should be able to own guns for self-defense. There are only arguments about what degree of “control” is “sensible” — especially when most of the “common sense” controls people are asking for *are already on the books*, just badly or irregularly enforced.

    Morton Grove, Illinois, and Kennesaw, Georgia. Go look them up.

  4. None

    Mrd Dolittle. They need to be held accountable. They need to apologise, pay for a new phone plus compo for injury. That is how the world works. They knew what they were doing. Don’t back down on that.

  5. None

    This is how stupid schools are and why they should never be trusted with discipline. A couple of years ago I had a guy doing some work for me over a few days so I got to know him a little and he showed me pictures of his wife -a police woman- and his young kids, whom he clearly adored. While he had stopped for lunch one day he got a phone call from his youngest boys’ school. Apparently his boy had taken his birthday money to school even though that was agsinst school policy (no money allowed) and another boy had stolen it
    Fortunately the other boy was found out and monet recoveted and he was suspended. The teacher was ringing not just to complain that his son broke the rules by bringing money to school, but to blame his son for now getting a kid expelled. I could hear this guy just sort of agree and aterwards when he told me what happened I actually blew my stack and said no, your son should of course be told off for bringing money to school but he is by no means responsible for somebody else stealing it. In fact in an ideal world he should be able to take the entire family fortune to school. The guy looked at me like he’d had an epiphany.

  6. calli

    I still think scrubbing out the loos with toothbrushes is just punishment.

  7. dopey

    SA Election: Howard Hollow by a nose from Anna Tree.

  8. OldOzzie

    ADAM CREIGHTON – South Australia could lead nation with nuclear power development

    South Australia is crying out for a new industry to replace car manufacturing and give a once-great state some self-respect and influence again. South Australian wine is great, but it hasn’t been enough to wrench Adelaide out of the orbit of Melbourne and Sydney, which have progressively bought out its biggest companies, sucking away much of its managerial and professional class.

    Becoming the state that ­powers the nation would be one way to restore self-esteem. The big disappointment in South Australia’s election campaign is that none of the major political parties has had the courage to declare South Australia a perfect site for Australia’s first electricity-generating nuclear reactor, one that could help power the eastern states.

    Let’s face it, whoever wins the state election tomorrow won’t make much difference to the state’s long-term fortunes. A look at the major parties’ electoral platforms reveals the same rats-and-mice populist so-called policies that animate most state elections. Erode the payroll tax base here, a few tokenistic handouts there.

    There’s not much difference between Liberal and Labor on ­energy. The Weatherill government wants to subsidise a big ­battery, the Liberal opposition wants subsidised small ones, ­having announced a $100 million plan to help households buy them.

    Any of the three parties could have declared South Australia’s economic renaissance lay not in wind turbines and batteries, giant or small, but in a hi-tech nuclear reactor with a research facility hooked into the University of ­Adelaide. The bigger the better, ensuring the power could for ­generations provide no-emission, readily available energy to the ­National Electricity Market.

    States have lost much of their financial clout to Canberra, but they do have freedom to zone, commission and subsidise.

    South Australia could lobby the federal government to end the crazy law that makes Australia the only G20 country with a ban on nuclear energy, despite having among the largest uranium ­reserves in the world.

    It could make the commonwealth’s life a lot easier by volunteering a site for a nuclear reactor. It could pick, say, Port Augusta, which would provide any reactor water access. It would also provide scope in decades to build or host a nuclear submarine fleet, if geo­politics developments required it. Port Augusta is a city suffering from huge economic and social problems, which could be allayed by the construction and operation of a state-of-the-art reactor.

    None of the three major parties have even mentioned the “n” word in their policy platforms. Yet it’s not the political poison some think. A 2017 survey of households conducted by the Australian ­National University — the Beliefs and Attitudes Towards Science Survey — showed more than 41 per cent of Australians were in favour of nuclear power plants to generate electricity. Only 25 per cent were “strongly opposed”, and less than half were “against”. You read that correctly.

    Remarkably, only 16 per cent of respondents were in favour of ­increased use of fracking, and ­almost 50 per cent were strongly against it. So why are we pursuing fracking and coal-seam gas?

    A nuclear power station would cut long-term carbon emissions (some smarter Greens might even support it), bolster high-income STEM jobs, enhancing Australia’s national security and diversifying our energy supply. SA Labor had the foresight to have a royal ­commission into ­nuclear power. Its 2016 report sadly excited much debate. “The commission did not find that ­nuclear power is ‘too expensive’ to be viable or that it is ‘yesterday’s technology’. Rather, it found that a nuclear power plant of currently available size at current costs of construction would not be viable in the South Australian market under current market rules,” it ­reported. Nuclear energy isn’t being phased out. Nuclear power generation makes up a fifth of US electricity supply. China has 37 plans in operation and 20 under construction. About 40 new countries are showing strong interest in launching a nuclear power program for the first time, according to the World Nuclear Association.

    Bangladesh has already poured concrete for its first nuclear reactor — with know-how supplied by Russia. Wouldn’t it have been nice if Australian engineers were being put to good use in that country of 170 million people? Of course, Britain is building nuclear reactors too.

    Yes it’s expensive. But so are the subsidies to renewable energy, which don’t show up on government budgets but are no less real. The cost of federal and state subsidies to renewable energy are very hard to quantify in dollars, but they are large. And they are certainly large enough to have paid for construction of a nuclear power station by now, which would have solved many of our energy problems.

    To build Australia’s first major nuclear reactor might even attract cut-price offers from firms eager for the knowledge. Nuclear energy is it’s 100 per cent reliable and 100 per cent emission-free. This is why countries like France, a big chunk of whose electricity is powered by nuclear fission, has such low per capita emissions and can sanctimoniously host summits about reducing global emissions.

    South Australia couldn’t ­become a nuclear hub overnight. It’s a long-term goal. But preparation for it would lift the state’s importance within the country.

  9. Roger.

    In fact in an ideal world he should be able to take the entire family fortune to school.

    But we don’t live in an ideal world due to original sin.

    Furthermore, we don’t even live in a fallen world where the 10 Commandments are taught as a curb against the inherent evil in the human heart, as in previous generations.

  10. calli

    They should also be made to tip their boaters to every young lady they pass.

    Small steps on the road to gentlemanliness.

  11. Roger.

    The cost of federal and state subsidies to renewable energy are very hard to quantify in dollars, but they are large.

    Sanjeev Gupta & Elon Musk may be able to help re their monetary value.

  12. Just twigged who Kevin Bailey is.

    Saw him speak once at a local parish, perhaps for a Thanksgiving renewal campaign?

    Indeed he seems a top bloke.

    I’m working or I’d have scurried over in a second.

    Hope all goes well.

    I actually would rather see Labor over the line than the bully Greens.

  13. OldOzzie

    LEGAL AFFAIRS – Judges who want to politicise the bench should run for office – SIMON BREHENY

    Serving judges have no business inserting themselves into contemporary political debates.

    If they simply can’t help themselves they should leave the bench, and, if they truly want to pursue their political ambitions, become politicians.

    For years, judges have been sharing their well considered and important thoughts on weighty matters of public interest with other members of the legal fraternity and the public at large.

    At law school functions and at law conference gala dinners, ­judges are often called upon as speakers and guests of honour. General rules of judicial conduct dictate that judges ought not to comment publicly on issues that might come before them.

    Practically, this requirement is in place to avoid a judge being ­disqualified for bias.

    Preconceptions about matters before the court would breach the archetypal judicial character ­described by Edmund Burke in 1794 — “the cold neutrality of an ­impartial judge”.

    Or, as decided by the High Court in Johnson v Johnson in the context of apprehended bias, “whether a fair-minded lay ­observer might reasonably apprehend that the judge might not bring an impartial and unprejudiced mind to the resolution of the question the judge is required to decide”.

    The obvious problem faced by judges when intervening in public debate is that it’s not obvious how the rule against bias might apply to a future case at the time such an intervention is made. Often the statement becomes legally problematic only after the fact.

    Of course, there is a simple ­answer: don’t be a participant in political debate.

    Avoiding judicial entanglement in the realm of politics is also a good idea in general. More ­distinct lines between the arms of government help individual ­participants better understand their role and their place in our democratic system.

    There are a number of recent examples of where judges have not lived up to this standard.

    Last month at the constitutional law dinner 2018, organised by the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law, West ­Australian Supreme Court Chief Justice Wayne Stewart Martin gave an extraordinary speech for such a senior judicial officer.

    His honour spoke about the ­recent cases heard before the High Court under section 44 of the Australian constitution, ­making clear his view that dual citizens should be allowed to take their seats in the parliament. His honour even referred to “the draconian operation of section 44”.

    In relation to the ongoing ­debate on the matter of constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, his honour said it wasn’t his purpose “to suggest which of these ­competing arguments is to be ­preferred”.

    But it is hard to see how the Chief Justice of the WA Supreme Court does not have a clear view on the issue when he says in the following paragraph: “As one who sees first hand and all too often the disastrous consequences of colonisation and our continuing failure to properly and meaningfully recognise Aboriginal people, the consequences of which are played out every day in police stations, courts, hospitals and prisons all around Australia, I sincerely hope the movement for constitutional recognition of Aboriginal people does not suffer a similar fate.”

    As if the use of a politically loaded term like “colonisation” is not enough, the WA Chief ­Justice’s views on the substantive matter of whether the constitution should be changed to ­recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders could not be more obvious.

    Perhaps his honour believes he will never have to hear cases ­regarding the constitutional ­matters he addressed last month. Given that High Court Justice James Edelman won’t be forced to retire until 2044, it’s possible ­Martin believes the West Australian quota has been filled.

    But potential future appointments, and potential questions of bias aside, his comments could be interpreted as an intrusion by a member of the judiciary into the realm of politics.

    Victorian Supreme Court judge Lex Lasry found himself in hot water earlier this year after ­directing criticism at Home ­Affairs Minister Peter Dutton. Lasry eventually deleted tweets directed at Dutton, following the minister’s comments on criminal behaviour in Victoria.

    Despite the apparent willingness of judges to dip in and out of political debates when it suits them, they don’t like it when the shoe is on the other foot. Federal ministers Greg Hunt, Alan Tudge and Michael Sukkar discovered this when they made reasonable comments — later retracted after the Victorian ­Supreme Court of Appeal considered ­contempt of court proceedings against them — about what they saw as soft sentencing of terrorism in Victoria.

    This looks awfully like a one-way street.

    Whatever the reason, the ­developing trend of judges participating in political debate must end, especially given their demands for the protections from criticism ­afforded to the judiciary.

    If judges want to be politicians, they should join the branch of government that does politics.

    Simon Breheny is director of policy at the Institute of Public Affairs

  14. Gab

    https://www.spectator.com.au/2018/03/stuck-down-a-one-way-street/

    Thanks for posting that excellent article. The author is very brave to write all those truths and facts. No doubt he’ll be howled down as a racist because that’s the only come-back the Left has these days.

  15. DrBeauGan

    When I was fourteenn or thereabouts, I used to see two redheaded twin girls on a regular walk. At the time I found girls mysterious, fascinating and terrifying, so I studiously ignored them. One day they hid away, and as I walked past, one twin pushed the other hard right into me. Having good reflexes I automatically jumped aside, and the pushee cannoned into someone else, so I walked on fast.

    Looking back on it, I was foolish and should have grabbed her in my arms and enjoyed it. But I was young and foolish and as socially inept as they were.

    Arky would no doubt wanted me to have them expelled from school and possibly imprisoned lest they turned into homicidal maniacs.

  16. Rae

    I wonder who picked up the tab for that mish-mash of trendtucker?

    Who cares? I daresay it was delicious. Haven’t been to the Bridge Room, but after reading the menu we will be lunching there soon.

  17. OldOzzie

    Quibbler
    #2662454, posted on March 16, 2018 at 9:15 pm
    https://www.spectator.com.au/2018/03/stuck-down-a-one-way-street/

    Might work this time!

    Agree with Gab – excellent article and the truth of the matter

  18. Tel

    ADAM CREIGHTON – South Australia could lead nation with nuclear power development

    The repeatedly failed to operate a car industry… would you trust them with nukes?

    Write a contract, post it off to India, figure out some deal with temporary work visas. You know it’s the right answer. Get some insurance just in case.

  19. Arky

    Arky would no doubt wanted me to have them expelled from school and possibly imprisoned lest they turned into homicidal maniacs.

    ..
    No.
    I want you executed.
    Or at least castrated.

  20. Motelier

    Arky would no doubt wanted me to have them expelled from school and possibly imprisoned lest they turned into homicidal maniacs.

    Sorry, but you will probably misunderstand this.

    You stupid idiot. What a dumb thing to do on so many levels.

    1. 14 ( hormones streaming through your body)
    2. Twins! enough said?
    3. Redheads. Once you go red in bed etc

    NURSE!

  21. Muddy

    South Australia could lead nation with nuclear power development

    Is Homer Simpson available?

  22. C.L.

    Thanks for posting that excellent article. The author is very brave to write all those truths and facts. No doubt he’ll be howled down as a racist because that’s the only come-back the Left has these days.

    Not so.
    They also have “sexist,” “Islamophobic,” “transphobic” and “homophobic.”

  23. Gab

    Oh okay, I stand corrected, CL.

    🙂

  24. Arky

    Yes.
    Dr, BG obviously hasn’t been using those balls to good effect and won’t be needing them.
    There are lesbians who could put those balls to good use as a hacky sack.

  25. H B Bear

    No-one needs to. It’s a loan, and it’s repayable. So, what is your point?

    Are you saying the project cannot obtain commercial debt financing despite it’s billionaire backers then sock-knuckle?

  26. DrBeauGan

    ..
    No.
    I want you executed.
    Or at least castrated.

    I know better now, Arky, motelier. At that age I had no idea of what exactly I was supposed to do. If I’d had your advice at the time, motelier, I would have been horrified. Having urges to do things with only the vaguest notion of what exactly is disorienting.

    Don’t worry, I figured it out eventually. But I still feel pity for the socially incompetent young.

  27. OneWorldGovernment

    All due respect to South Australian Cats but Sth Australia, Tasmania, NT and the ACT should be stripped of ALL Federal representation.

    Their Local Councils should be made to turn up at the local Federal Equivalent of States Centrelink.

    If you don’t like it then leave the joint.

  28. Eyrie

    cohenite, Leslie Fish, near as I can tell is an extreme libertarian or maybe anarchist. Search for her album “Lock and Load” and listen to “Flight 93”. Also search Youtube for “Hosedown”. DO NOT break into this lady’s house when she is at home. Besides, she wrote “Hope Eyrie”. Also “Black Powder and Alcohol”. See here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_Fish
    I’m certain Leslie Fish believes gun control means using both hands.

  29. Rebel with cause

    At my school we were subject to a whole of school dressing down if a member of the public reported seeing a boy outside of school grounds without his blazer on. I simply cannot imagine the sort of fury that would have been unleashed if a public assault on a young girl had been reported.

    Mind you, this was a school that was famous for using the strap right up until the very last so discipline was something of a high priority. Like all schools, it is no longer as it used to be.

  30. Motelier

    But I still feel pity for the socially incompetent young.

    Interesting social experiment to do.

    I did lotsa sports at school. Swimming, SLSC, golf, cricket, and League/ Union. The coed sports allowed mixed sex travel and competition, so socially I was used to the “fairer” sex early on. The friends that concentrated on single sex sports needed a shove at school dances to find a dance partner.

    Just a theory.

  31. Arky

    But I still feel pity for the socially incompetent young

    ..
    Boys get socially retarded by the presence of evil females until the age of 16 or 17 when they begin to overtake them.

  32. OneWorldGovernment

    Rebel with cause
    #2662476, posted on March 16, 2018 at 9:52 pm

    At my school we were subject to a whole of school dressing down if a member of the public reported seeing a boy outside of school grounds without his blazer on.

    I simply cannot imagine the sort of fury that would have been unleashed if a public assault on a young girl had been reported.

    Different times.

  33. Rae

    Are you saying the project cannot obtain commercial debt financing despite it’s billionaire backers

    I’m saying it doesn’t have to. The SA Government is providing loans to get the infrastructure it wants built. Again, what is your point?

  34. DrBeauGan

    Motelier, I went to a boy’s school and girls scared me for a long time. I thought and still think team sports ridiculous and I suspected they were for poofs. While the others were playing rugger, I did judo and fencing. I felt learning how to kill people might come in handy one day, while throwing and kicking a ball looked pointless. Chess looked more useful and indeed is.

  35. JC

    Doc

    How many cigars are you smoking per day?

  36. Dunno who these guys are, but wow.

    Sorry, but that links to a playlist. You’ll never find wow.

  37. cohenite

    The cost of federal and state subsidies to renewable energy are very hard to quantify in dollars, but they are large.

    Renewables, wind and solar, cost $500 million per 100MW. There’s about 10000 MW of wind and solar in Australia; that’s $50 billion, not including grid connection and upgrading to handle the intermittent surge power from the stupid things. Noone knows what that has cost. I reckon another $20 billion. Almost all of that $70 billion comes in the forms of direct and indirect government subsidies. No wind or solar installation, big or small, has ever made a profit.

    Of course the expense includes businesses closing down due to expensive electricity and the flow ons from that. The total must be upwards of $100 billion. For nothing.

  38. P

    Reading through the above comments and thinking of St Patrick’s Day tomorrow, I thought of
    Kirsty MacColl and how she gave her life for her child.

    On 18 December 2000 she and her sons went diving at the Chankanaab reef, part of the National Marine Park of Cozumel, in a designated diving area that watercraft were restricted from entering. With the group was a local veteran divemaster, Iván Díaz. As the group were surfacing from a dive, a powerboat moving at high speed entered the restricted area. MacColl saw the boat coming before her sons did; Louis (then 13) was not in its path, but Jamie (then 15) was. She was able to push him out of the way (he sustained minor head and rib injuries), but she was struck by the boat which ran over her. MacColl suffered severe chest injuries and died instantly.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirsty_MacColl

    Live, St Pat’s Day 1988

  39. Muddy

    The Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT), was ratified by the United States in 1994. Article 1 of the CAT defines “torture” as:

    any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity. It does not include pain or suffering arising only from, inherent in or incidental to lawful sanctions.

    Sexist much?
    #womencanbetorturedtoo

    Oh, and as this report mentions, U.S. Navy Seals are exposed to a form of waterboarding as part of their basic training.

  40. Arky

    Kids at school seemed to have invented a new sport today that involved kicking a soccer ball as high as possible and seeing if you can hit it with a frisbee.
    Beats the hell out of AFL.

  41. Muddy

    Perspectives on Enhanced Interrogation Techniques by Anne Daugherty Miles.

    Bedtime reading.
    Romance and fairytales are for weirdos.

  42. DrBeauGan

    JC
    #2662486, posted on March 16, 2018 at 10:11 pm
    Doc

    How many cigars are you smoking per day?

    Four, JC, unless I’m writing when it goes down to three.

  43. OneWorldGovernment

    cohenite
    #2662488, posted on March 16, 2018 at 10:12 pm

    The cost of federal and state subsidies to renewable energy are very hard to quantify in dollars, but they are large.

    Renewables, wind and solar, cost $500 million per 100MW. There’s about 10000 MW of wind and solar in Australia; that’s $50 billion, not including grid connection and upgrading to handle the intermittent surge power from the stupid things. Noone knows what that has cost. I reckon another $20 billion. Almost all of that $70 billion comes in the forms of direct and indirect government subsidies. No wind or solar installation, big or small, has ever made a profit.

    Of course the expense includes businesses closing down due to expensive electricity and the flow ons from that. The total must be upwards of $100 billion. For nothing.

    I believe you could attribute Australia’s total gross deficit of +$600billion to renewable unicorn farts.

    Federal, State and so called Local Government.

    But the true cost would be double that when you consider major business’ that has just shut down.

  44. Rae

    thinking of St Patrick’s Day tomorrow

    Time to plant the sweet peas. But we haven’t for a few years now. So, we probably won’t.

  45. OneWorldGovernment

    Rae
    #2662483, posted on March 16, 2018 at 10:03 pm

    Are you saying the project cannot obtain commercial debt financing despite it’s billionaire backers

    I’m saying it doesn’t have to. The SA Government is providing loans to get the infrastructure it wants built. Again, what is your point?

    I’ll respond this time.

    That is patently false that Sth Australia can supply loans.

    They are a mendicant State and can’t even look after themselves.

  46. OneWorldGovernment

    The “State” of South Australia has a GDP of about AUD$25,000.

  47. H B Bear

    The SA Government is providing loans to get the infrastructure it wants built.

    Just like all those co-investment in the car industry eh? How did that work out again?

  48. OneWorldGovernment

    Take out Federal, State and so called Local Government payments and the “State” of Western Australia is only worth the wine, wheat, minerals and fish it can sell.

    Not much as it currently stands.

  49. OneWorldGovernment

    woops
    South Australia.

    appologies Western Australia.
    LOL

  50. Crossie

    calli
    #2662449, posted on March 16, 2018 at 9:10 pm
    They should also be made to tip their boaters to every young lady they pass.

    Small steps on the road to gentlemanliness.

    Ah, these days young ladies are as rare as hens’ teeth.

  51. Mitch M.

    U.S. Navy Seals are exposed to a form of waterboarding as part of their basic training.

    Like this?

  52. Rae

    The SA Government is providing loans to get the infrastructure it wants built.

    Just like all those co-investment in the car industry eh? How did that work out again?

    You’ll have to define what you mean by “co-investment”. And clarify what part of “co-investment” was affected by the Commonwealths withdrawal of funding for Australian manufacturing.

    Oh, and you might also clarify how your “co-investment ” applies to an infrastructure loan.

  53. OneWorldGovernment

    You could sack every single so called ‘public servant’ in Sth Australia and run the joint from a call centre in India or the Philippines.

    How worse could it be than what is now provided?

  54. hzhousewife

    Perhaps if more girls were treated like young ladies, more would develop, and then there being more young ladies in the world, there would be more lads interested in becoming young gentlemen, ad infinitum …..
    faint hope, I suppose.

  55. Top Ender

    At my school we were subject to a whole of school dressing down if a member of the public reported seeing a boy outside of school grounds without his blazer on.

    Unfortunately for us, Hobart was full of Old Boys, who would phone the school if they saw a boy without hat or blazer on correctly.

    Our school also suffered – still does – under the name of St Virgils, so we had battles to fight against the eagle eyes of adults, as well as students from other schools with name-calling.

  56. OneWorldGovernment

    I wan’t COAG disbanded.

  57. Dave in Marybrook

    Looks like entry-level soccer ball kicking and Frisbee throw-n-catch just weren’t doing it for the kids any more eh Arky?
    Aussie rules training with over 35s. The camaraderie and genuine respect for anyone who can bring a running dropkick to the party is heartwarming.
    Either that or it’s cardiac arrest- I’d forgotten how much of a drag the constant running is.

  58. Ooh.

    Joe Scarborough @JoeNBC
    BREAKING: @MichaelAvenatti tells @morningmika that his client, Stormy Daniels, was physically threatened to remain quiet about her relationship with Donald Trump. #morningjoe
    10:35pm · 16 Mar 2018 · Twitter for iPhone

    That seems like an escalation.

  59. Chris

    …Or she will commit Arkancide Monty?

  60. hzhousewife

    I dobbed in the lads who had set the windscreen wiper sprayers to spray right over their car onto our windscreen when in stop-go traffic in the US. Their car was liberally stickered with the school crest and sports team logos, so easy to identify. I got through to the Headmaster in minutes, he worked out very quickly who the culprits were due to my description, and he called the next day to reassure us that the lads and their families had been briefed over the incident and that the boys were banned from driving to school for three months, owing to their inability to behave in public. Military school too, no doubt the parents were not impressed by their offspring. It was hi-jinks, but dangerous. 1984 however !

  61. Arky

    Either that or it’s cardiac arrest- I’d forgotten how much of a drag the constant running is.

    ..
    Good on you.
    But for me, AFL looks like running a half marathon with lots of random hugging.

  62. OneWorldGovernment

    Rae
    #2662508, posted on March 16, 2018 at 10:41 pm

    The SA Government is providing loans to get the infrastructure it wants built.

    Just like all those co-investment in the car industry eh? How did that work out again?

    You’ll have to define what you mean by “co-investment”. And clarify what part of “co-investment” was affected by the Commonwealths withdrawal of funding for Australian manufacturing.

    Oh, and you might also clarify how your “co-investment ” applies to an infrastructure loan.

    I’m fronting up to the Sth Australian “government” on Monday and I’m going to ask them to ‘co-invest’, as in give me money, so I can build a bigger battery than the other 2 wimps.

    My battery will drive a pump to keep Lake Eyre full of water all year round and I will have the rights to the land for over 200km all around the circumference of the Lake.

    I will name the main Highway in your name.

    That’s co-invest.

  63. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    calli
    #2662449, posted on March 16, 2018 at 9:10 pm
    They should also be made to tip their boaters to every young lady they pass.

    I was complimented on my manners by the winsome young lady, behind the checkout at my local supermarket some time ago.

    She had never served anyone, who thought it etiquette, to take off his hat when speaking to a lady..

  64. H B Bear

    Why the fvck am I talking to a sockwit?

  65. areff

    It’s going to be hot, hot, hot in NSW, Vic and SA tomorrow. Wouldn’t it be oh-so-funny if Adelaide blacks out as votes are cast.

  66. Dave in Marybrook

    Etiquette should be updated to remind the youngsters to remove their sunglasses while talking, especially to a new acquaintance. It’s a slovenly scourge which I’m sure is leading to the explosion in Autism.

  67. areff

    Unfortunately for us, Hobart was full of Old Boys, who would phone the school if they saw a boy without hat or blazer on correctly.

    Basic precaution when lighting a fag on the way home from school: don another school’s tie.

  68. P

    Family taking me out tomorrow for St Patrick’s Day celebrations.
    I told them I’m not up to it, but was ignored.
    With the atmosphere and a few drinks they assured me I’d not only get through but would enjoy myself.
    I guess I’ve enough Irish in me to muddle my way through the day.

  69. OneWorldGovernment

    areff
    #2662524, posted on March 16, 2018 at 11:15 pm

    It’s going to be hot, hot, hot in NSW, Vic and SA tomorrow. Wouldn’t it be oh-so-funny if Adelaide blacks out as votes are cast.

    Talk about ROFL.

  70. OneWorldGovernment

    H B Bear
    #2662522, posted on March 16, 2018 at 11:09 pm

    Why the fvck am I talking to a sockwit?

    Haven’t you ever watched an episode of The Walking Dead?

    There’s a kinda horror fascination.

  71. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It’s going to be hot, hot, hot in NSW, Vic and SA tomorrow. Wouldn’t it be oh-so-funny if Adelaide blacks out as votes are cast.

    Talk about ROFL.

    Poetic justice. Serves you Crow eaters right. You may be readmitted to the Federation when you stop bludging off the Western Australian taxpayers.

  72. Muddy

    Hahaha. Funny, Mitch M. I like it. The voice of the lead character reminds me of that Son of Zorn animated series. Except less violent.

  73. OneWorldGovernment

    Now don’t forget you Celtic Sth Australians that tomorrow is St Patricks Day.

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x35ij96

  74. OneWorldGovernment

    areff

    If you happen to be talking to Anthony Dillon (Quadrant – Death by Myth and Platitude) would you kindly tell him that he does not walk alone.

  75. areff

    OWG: spoke to him this afternoon. Like all of us, he knows the sensible majority aren’t swayed by the identitarian rhetoric and posturing. It’s just that those turkeys get the headlines, the attaention and, when they urge Australia be burned down, the police protection.

    I’ll pass on your regards.

  76. Top Ender

    Here in the Top End we’re now at Category Two for Cyclone Marcus.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-17/tropical-cyclone-marcus/9558706

    The BOM shows a nice radar pic of it approaching Darwin:

    http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDR634.loop.shtml#skip

  77. Drink-Up Socrates

    Does anyone know of any groups forming to oppose the CMFEU’s destruction of self managed super funds.
    I have a need to carry a placard and to throw something.
    Of course I am grateful to Prime Minister Lucy for standing up for retirees rights and opposing Marxist control of the superannuation industry. He is ….isn’t he?

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