Wednesday Forum: March 14, 2018

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1,584 Responses to Wednesday Forum: March 14, 2018

  1. egg_

    Title: The Elephant in the Room: A “Grown-Up” Conversation about Whiteness

    Gandhi’s fight was with Rich Old White Men and didn’t care about blacks; feminazis fight is with Rich Old White Men and don’t care about blacks and coloureds.
    Common denominator?

  2. Rae

    I thought that Stephen Hawking had Motor Neurone Disease.

    He actually had Lou Gehrigs Disease.

  3. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The Truth About Broken Britain

  4. John Comnenus

    Just landed after watching John Malkoviches latest fil in flight – recommended. Thanks re the support for master Comnenus. He will survive & prosper – he is a small government pro private sector kind of guy like his elder brother studying business in the chess pit of ANU.

  5. Shy Ted

    From Breitbart – Philippine President Duterte: Human Rights Investigators Should Be Fed to Crocodiles
    We’ve got lots of crocodiles. We’ve got lots of Human Rights types. Just saying.

  6. Bruce in WA

    She’s got quite good bozomas.

    Yep, a tribute to brassiere engineers and — quite possibly — plastic surgeons.

  7. John Comnenus

    Did I say chess pit? No one at ANU is up for chess, I meant cesspit.

  8. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Jordan suspends free trade agreement with Turkey

    The government says the 2011 deal has lead to an increase in the imports of Turkish products and causes significant harm to Jordanian businesses, which are unable to compete with Turkish products that receive subsidies from the Turkish authorities

  9. egg_

    Hillary Clinton slips twice while being helped down the stairs in India.

    Her Depends gave way?

  10. Dave in Marybrook

    Has anyone yet pointed out that Professor Hawking entered into an innapropriate sexual relationship with a subordinate?

  11. Muddy

    I don’t normally post links to random ‘cute stuff’ but if you’re a dog lover and a military supporter, some of these photos might appeal. I like the tenth one down: German Shepherd who lost a leg in Afghanistan.

  12. egg_

    First Peanut Head last week and now Plibbers is in Perth getting a tummy rub from Nanna Hutchison at ALPBC radio. Wakey wakey Lord Waffleworth and the election winning machine aka the Waffleworth Coalition Team (formerly known as the Lieborals) the election campaign has started and Liars know exactly where to begin. Lieborals will lose 3 or 4 seats in WA alone.

    Meanwhile Trumble is busy building a renewballs website?
    Clown Universe.

  13. Infidel Tiger

    Derryn Hinch must be back on the piss full time.

    Brain trauma from a “fall”.

  14. Myrddin Seren

    Derryn Hinch must be back on the piss full time.

    Brain trauma from a “fall”.

    Hard to get behind a Paywall, but yes, Derryn is well and truly back on the piss.

    Poor Derryn Hinch’s Second Liver. Fight, you bastard, fight for all of us !

  15. C.L.

    The bloke who invented the modern toilet achieved more for humanity than Hawking.
    And it’s not even close. Total fabulist and bullshit artist.

  16. Infidel Tiger

    The bloke who invented the modern toilet achieved more for humanity than Hawking.
    And it’s not even close. Total fabulist and bullshit artist.

    The bloke who invented ring pull cans has him covered by the length of the straight.

  17. Snoopy

    Hawking was like Obama. Without their distinctive voices they’d each be FA.

  18. Yes I too would like to know how not annihilating particles near black holes have helped advance civilization.

  19. Has anyone yet pointed out that Professor Hawking entered into an innapropriate sexual relationship with a subordinate?

    Held her down & had his way with her?

  20. Muddy

    Some good news at last:

    The Norwegian male recruits became less sexist, the study concluded, just as previous racial “contact theory” studies have shown that racism decreases with familiarity among those assigned equal status.

    “These findings demonstrate that men’s gendered attitudes are not fixed, but can change through interaction with women,” the study stated. “Chemical castration of male recruits may only be necessary in cases of obstinate resistance.”

    [OK, so I may have added something extra there as well].

  21. Myrddin Seren

    The Norwegian male recruits became less sexist, the study concluded, just as previous racial “contact theory” studies have shown that racism decreases with familiarity among those assigned equal status.

    Can they close with and kill the enemy ?

    Of course, I joke. This is a modern European state. The idea of fighting can be left to the sexist, racist Americans.

  22. Mitch M.

    I thought that Stephen Hawking had Motor Neurone Disease.
    He actually had Lou Gehrigs Disease.

    Motor Neurone Disease (MND) is the name given to the group of diseases in which the motor neurones undergo degeneration and die. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Progressive Muscular Atrophy (PMA), Progressive Bulbar Palsy (PBP) and Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS) are all subtypes of motor neurone disease.

    Although MND is the widely used generic term in the United Kingdom, Australia and parts of Europe, ALS is used more generically in the United States, Canada and South America.
    MND is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease in the US after a famous baseball player who died of the disease.

  23. C.L.

    I see Pell’s QC beat up a retired “academic” for Broken Rites today over his admission that he had offered to go to police about Pell on behalf of a “complainant”. Robert Richter accused Bernard Barrett of “big-noting” himself and being keen to get Pell’s scalp.
    ——-
    Report.
    ——-

    STOP PRESS: Report by Miranda Devine in the SHM from 2002.

    Even though he was cleared this week by an independent church inquiry, you would think Sydney’s Catholic Archbishop George Pell must be angry about the drawn-out, damaging impact of an accusation of sexual abuse 40 years ago…

    One witness to emerge from the inquiry was “B”, who helps the Broken Rites abuse victim lobby group, whom the complainant first approached.

    Dr Bernard Barrett, the former Victorian state historian who assists Broken Rites and first interviewed the complainant, was last week identified as “B” by columnist Andrew Bolt of Melbourne’s Herald-Sun.

    Bolt published sections of the inquiry transcript, which have thus far not been made public, although Pell is pushing for their release.

    Bolt reported that the complainant, codenamed X, told the inquiry Barrett said “he could write a terrific victim impact statement” that would earn X least $50,000.

    Barrett denied this but told the inquiry he “offered to show [X] how to do it [write a victim impact statement]” and had told X that the church’s compensation scheme ranged up to $50,000.

    It was after X took his complaint to the church that the defamatory article by “Xavier O’Byrne” appeared on the internet.

    X told the inquiry he wasn’t happy about the publicity: “I was crook on Barrett because I thought, still think, that Barrett leaked this.”

    What an incredible coincidence.

  24. zyconoclast

    egg_
    #2660870, posted on March 14, 2018 at 9:52 pm

    Thanks egg.
    One of my favourites.

  25. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Poor Derryn Hinch’s Second Liver. Fight, you bastard, fight for all of us !

    Clementine Churchill, to Winston Churchill, in “Darkest Hour.”

    “How much have you had to drink, this morning?”

  26. My kidney pain has eased. I am not eating full meals yet. Pity, because tonight the wife did a cracking roast chicken.

  27. Leigh Lowe

    Clementine Churchill, to Winston Churchill, in “Darkest Hour.”

    “How much have you had to drink, this morning?”

    “I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I will be sober and you will still be ugly.”

  28. Muddy

    Mitch M.
    Interesting. Thanks. I enjoy reading your medical posts, even though I struggle to understand some of them.

  29. calli

    I thought that was Lady Astor.

  30. Leigh Lowe

    My kidney pain has eased. I am not eating full meals yet. Pity, because tonight the wife did a cracking roast chicken.

    JC has nobbled you.

  31. Leigh Lowe

    Correct Calli
    That was Churchill’s response to Lady Astor’s accusation that Winston was pissed in the House.

  32. Snoopy

    I am not eating full meals yet. Pity, because tonight the wife did a cracking roast chicken.

    She’s evil, but I like her.

  33. calli

    Here’s another:

    Nancy Astor: “Sir, if you were my husband, I’d poison your tea.”
    Winston Churchill: “Madame, if you were my wife, I’d drink it!”
    (Exchange with Winston Churchill)”
    ― Nancy Astor the Viscountess Astor

    😃

  34. Arky

    My kidney pain has eased.

    ..
    Who gives a shit.

  35. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Correct Calli
    That was Churchill’s response to Lady Astor’s accusation that Winston was pissed in the House.

    Indeed.

    “Winston, you are drunk.”

    “Indeed Madam, and you are ugly. In the morning I will be sober, and you will still be ugly.”

  36. areff

    Xavier O’Byrne coverage in the Age, 2002

    https://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/08/20/1029114108374.html

    Interestingly, the alleged method of goosing — a ruckman’s big meaty hand down a youngsters pyjamas or bathers — re-surfaced again in Ballarat, where Pell is alleged to have played roving hands in the swimming pool.

    Even if you overlook the dubious provenance of the described groping, how exactly does a big hand get down the front of ‘trunks secured with a tight drawstruck, and a wet drawstring at that?

    It would just about impossible unless you tore the trunks right off. Same with pyjamas of the drawstring kind.

  37. DrBeauGan

    It was a labour mp called Bessie Braddock who was walking up the staircase when Churchill was going down, who said:

    “Winston, you are drunk!”

    To which he replied:

    “And you, Bessie, are ugly. But I shall be sober in the morning.”

  38. egg_

    egg_
    #2337517, posted on March 26, 2017 at 8:19 pm
    Physicists may have observed Hawking radiation for the first time

    Related to SoG’s post about the behaviour of supercooled helium

  39. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It was a labour mp called Bessie Braddock who was walking up the staircase when Churchill was going down, who said:

    Quite correct, Doctor BG. Quite correct, indeed.

    FWIW, I have a sweatshirt embossed with Churchill’s quote about socialism being the politics of envy, the gospel of failure and the creed of despair. (IIRC)

    I wore it down the street to cast my vote at the last Federal election, and guess who nearly got into a fight with the fool handing out Labor HTV cards?

  40. egg_

    Senile Old Guy
    #2335811, posted on March 24, 2017 at 6:44 pm

    What I have read about recent discoveries and theories in physics is so weird, I don’t know what to believe: Helium and black holes.

  41. You’d almost think a certain X was just a bit too helpful.

  42. zyconoclast

    Adapted from: Sue, Derald Wing, Microaggressions in Everyday Life: Race, Gender and Sexual Orientation, Wiley & Sons, 2010.

    Tool: Recognizing Microaggressions and the Messages They Send (2 page pdf)

  43. EvilElvis

    FMD. Union ad on telly, change the rules.org, authorised by Sally McManus.

    Go on, change the fucking rules and watch the crying numpty single mum go downhill fast when the little work she has, is evaporated!

    Lesbian.Marxist.Scum

  44. egg_

    Lesbian.Marxist.Scum

    Men who look like old lesbians Lesbians who look like old men

  45. Knuckle Dragger

    How the hell did Merkel get herself a fourth term? She should be in a shallow grave by now next to her bunker, lover at her side, both burnt to smithereens before burial underneath a Prussian parade ground.

  46. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    How the hell did Merkel get herself a fourth term? She should be in a shallow grave by now next to her bunker, lover at her side, both burnt to smithereens before burial underneath a Prussian parade ground.

    Did you know that the lover had written a book about playing golf?

    “How to get out of a bunker with one shot?”

  47. EvilElvis

    The whole argument against Shortens super tax grab is lost. The stupid fucking liberals are running with the same narrative, calling it a ‘tax refund’. It’s a fucking tax return you morons, as in you’ve paid to much tax!!! Who are the media advisors???

  48. OneWorldGovernment

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2660947, posted on March 15, 2018 at 12:05 am

    How the hell did Merkel get herself a fourth term? She should be in a shallow grave by now next to her bunker, lover at her side, both burnt to smithereens before burial underneath a Prussian parade ground.

    Did you know that the lover had written a book about playing golf?

    “How to get out of a bunker with one shot?”

    LOL

  49. zyconoclast

    The whole argument against Shortens super tax grab is lost. The stupid fucking liberals are running with the same narrative, calling it a ‘tax refund’. It’s a fucking tax return you morons, as in you’ve paid to much tax!!! Who are the media advisors???

    The problem might be their tax advisors.

  50. zyconoclast

    UK to expel Russian diplomats in response to ex-spy’s attempted murder
    Britain will expel 23 Russian diplomats, in the biggest such sanction in more than three decades, in response to the attempted murder of ex Russian spy Sergei Skripal.

    Quick to expel 23 innocent until proven Russian diplomats, Brittany Pettibone + Friend and Lauren Southern.

    Expel EU: No
    Expel: 40 years worth of murder, torture [email protected] gangs of young girls: No
    Expel returning jihadis: No

    Good job UK. NOT.

  51. zyconoclast

    Wilfred star Jason Gann ordered to pay $750,000 over 2007 assault
    The Australian comedian who found international fame after playing a bong-smoking dog on SBS’s breakout comedy Wilfred has been ordered to pay more than $750,000 to a former bus driver.
    A judgment handed down by the Superior Court of California on Tuesday, local time, is expected to be the final chapter in a saga that began on Derby Day more than a decade ago.

  52. OneWorldGovernment

    My comment on David’s Snowy Mountain 2.0 thread

    I disagree with your whole summary.

    It is the so called Commonwealth of Australia taking control of one of Australia’s largest infrastructures from The States of NSW and Victoria.

    Something that the Canberra ‘mandarins’ have been trying to do for years and at least since the 1980’s.

    The Commonwealth then control who gets the water!

    You can kiss the Riverina Rice Industry goodbye.

    Forget about dairying in the Murray Valley.

    Forget the electricity bit. That’s just the excuse.

  53. Knuckle Dragger

    Zulu,

    It took me 20 shots to get out of a greenside bunker at Kingston Heath in Melbourne one day. Bunkers to the left and right, and ti tree behind me. The bunker lip was over my head. 20 goes to get out of it, and still didn’t shoot myself. So by that rationale, I’m better than Hitler.

  54. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Clementine Churchill, to Winston Churchill, in “Darkest Hour.”

    I’m a strictly amateur historian, watching Gary Oldman in “Darkest Hour.” I’ve read a biography of Lord Halifax, and how determined he was to make peace, but the film is the first indication that Nevile Chamberlain was part of any peace faction? Any references?

  55. Knuckle Dragger

    I’m not sure Merkel and her coterie realise they are about one step away from being dragged out from their offices by the Wehrmacht and shot in front of the Reichstag. Ordinary Germans have had enough of this nonsense. The nongs in Brussels will be next.

  56. EvilElvis

    The problem might be their tax advisors.

    No doubt there zyco, but when you’ve conceded the narrative to a side that knows how and has the means to ram it home you have no chance of breaking through to the plebs.

  57. EvilElvis

    The new policy from the mining industry lobby group explicitly says energy policy should aim to “reduce energy costs”. And it says a “technology-neutral approach should be adopted for all low emissions energy sources” where no single technology is favoured over others.

    The MCA. Put a Y in front and at least you’ve got somewhere fun to stay.

    The two quoted parts above, FMD, are not even remotely compatible.

  58. classical_hero

    I like how BS said that it’s not fair that some people are given government money. Of course he was talking about the superannuation scheme. He really thinks all our money belongs to the government. I doubt that the measure will raise the amount of money it said. But I’m sure it will be spent before it’s collected.

  59. classical_hero

    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/973759034145759232.html

    Shame he’s a cuck on this issue because he’s great regarding military matters, but human matters.

  60. Beachcomber

    I’m not sure Merkel and her coterie realise they are about one step away from being dragged out from their offices by the Wehrmacht and shot in front of the Reichstag.

    Won’t happen. Decades of cultural Marxism feeding on and exploiting war guilt have cowed the Germans into submission.

  61. None

    Good catch C.L. Agree Areff. Pell is innocent until proven guilty but I know he is innocent. If this goes to trial just consider Victorian police and legal system corrupt.

  62. Fisky

    Wow. The US Libertarian Party is openly supporting anti-second amendment protests. The “libertarian” movement is now just an auxiliary force of the Left.

    Libertarian Party

    @LPNational
    19m
    19 minutes ago

    (1/2) To all of the students walking out today, we admire you for standing up for political change.

    Based on past results, old party politicians will ignore your pleas for change as soon as the news cycle moves on and the cameras turn off.

  63. None

    Pell the victim of cruel treatment

    By Miranda Devine
    October 17 2002

    Even though he was cleared this week by an independent church inquiry, you would think Sydney’s Catholic Archbishop George Pell must be angry about the drawn-out, damaging impact of an accusation of sexual abuse 40 years ago.

    But in his booklined private study on Tuesday, he shrugged off suggestions that enemies had tried to bring him down, and had used the complaint for that end.

    “There were no doubt a variety of people who were delighted” by his predicament, he said. “There are people who strongly disagree with the moral positions I hold.”

    But he said he had also been “surprised by the number of people who had strongly different points of view who spoke up about the appalling lack of due process. Most Australians believe in the fair go.”

    And most people realise that Pell’s treatment was anything but a fair go. For one thing, he was not told for two months about the complaint that had been made against him, while many others in the church in Melbourne and in Sydney had known since June, including his own auxiliary bishop in Sydney, Geoffrey Robinson, who has only just returned to work after extended sick leave with pneumonia.

    “If there are procedures in the Towards Healing process we should follow them,” said Pell. “The [accused] person should be informed as soon as possible.”

    The first Pell knew about the allegations was on August 8, when his lawyers told him that they had appeared in an article written on a left-wing indymedia website under the byline “Xavier O’Byrne, Parramatta”.

    The complainant, a former altar boy, reformed alcoholic and convicted criminal, had claimed Pell had molested him at a church camp in 1961 or 1962, when he was 11 or 12 and Pell 19 or 20.

    According to the findings of the church inquiry headed by retired Victorian Supreme Court judge Alec Southwell, QC, the complainant alleged Pell put his hand down his pants and got “a good handful” of his penis and testicles on a number of occasions during the camp.

    Southwell said he was not persuaded the complainant was a liar but that “long delay produces somewhat unreliable recollection”.

    Pell “gave me the impression that he was speaking the truth”, Southwell wrote in his final report, released on Monday, concluding: “I am not satisfied that the complaint has been established.”

    One witness to emerge from the inquiry was “B”, who helps the Broken Rites abuse victim lobby group, whom the complainant first approached.

    Dr Bernard Barrett, the former Victorian state historian who assists Broken Rites and first interviewed the complainant, was last week identified as “B” by columnist Andrew Bolt of Melbourne’s Herald-Sun.

    Bolt published sections of the inquiry transcript, which have thus far not been made public, although Pell is pushing for their release.

    Bolt reported that the complainant, codenamed X, told the inquiry Barrett said “he could write a terrific victim impact statement” that would earn X least $50,000.

    Barrett denied this but told the inquiry he “offered to show [X] how to do it [write a victim impact statement]” and had told X that the church’s compensation scheme ranged up to $50,000.

    It was after X took his complaint to the church that the defamatory article by “Xavier O’Byrne” appeared on the internet.

    X told the inquiry he wasn’t happy about the publicity: “I was crook on Barrett because I thought, still think, that Barrett leaked this.”

    In the inquiry, and again on the phone yesterday, Barrett firmly rejected any suggestion that he was Xavier O’Byrne, and said he would be calling my editor.

    The mystery of who wrote the “Xavier O’Byrne” story is discussed in a biography of Pell to be published this month by a Brisbane journalist, Tess Livingstone, who writes that it is impossible to rule out that it was based on material leaked by someone with access to the church’s internal investigation process.

    Livingstone also outlines in fascinating detail the long battles Pell, a Rome favourite who holds an Oxford doctorate, has fought for the soul of the Catholic Church in Australia, making powerful enemies of its liberal factions.

    Pell, writes Livingstone, is fighting “minority forces in Australian Catholicism who want to subordinate gospel morality to individual conscience”.

    Pell’s refusal to give communion to overtly gay activists from the Rainbow Sash movement enraged them and has been a constant source of controversy

    ah all the usual suspects. Collapsed Catholics and the Gaystapo.

  64. None

    The “libertarian” movement is now just an auxiliary force of the Left.

    nNow? Always has been.

  65. Tom

    Mark Knight on the demise of Melbourne Lord Mayor (and Stupid.Fucking.Liberal) Robert Doyle.

  66. Boris

    The “libertarian” movement is now just an auxiliary force of the Left.

    And why do you come and infest the libertarian blog exactly?

  67. Boris

    Another Putin critic found dead in London. I actually knew of this guy, Nikolay Glushkov. He was a colleague of a friend. Let’s see if his death is also suspicious.

    The reason Putin chose to kill Skripal in such a brazen way is show how impotent the British are. He has.

  68. Snoopy

    The reason Putin chose to kill Skripal in such a brazen way is show how impotent the British are. He has.

    The Brits aren’t impotent when it comes to Islam.

    Ms May has joined forces with the leaders of France and Italy to urge social media companies to do more to remove extremist content.

  69. nemkat

    Plenty of people finding reasons why the allegations against George Pell couldn’t have happened.
    His hands being too large to fit down a pair of Speedos is the most novel, so far.
    The one thing that no one has said:
    George Pell isn’t the type of bloke who would do that.

  70. Snoopy

    Banning Britain First from Facebook might inconvenience Pop and Nanna but it won’t worry chan users.

  71. Snoopy

    The one thing that no one has said:
    George Pell isn’t the type of bloke who would do that.

    Bullshit. Stop lying.

  72. nemkat

    Point to where anyone has said that, Snoopy.
    Reading upthread, it sounds like Pell has got on the wrong side of Church politics, and they’re out to get him.

    If these allegations are factual, it might explain his lack of action against Fr. Ridsdale and some others.

  73. Snoopy

    You’re just trolling.

  74. nemkat

    I’m not trolling anyone.
    You don’t want to discuss the Elephant in the room, and are trying to shout me down.

    These allegations have been around for a long time, he agreed to Mediation with one bloke about 15 years ago. That bloke was at that youth camp in the early sixties, but declined to join the current complainants.

  75. Snoopy

    Go for your life. Display your ignorance. I don’t give a shit.

  76. Knuckle Dragger

    George Pell at his peak was well over six foot three and 16 stone in the old money. He played senior football in Ballarat and surrounds as a ruckman and was renowned for dishing out summary punishment on the field to blokes of his own size and bigger. Somewhat unusual for a man of his vocation, and the exact opposite in my professional experience of child molesters, who were and are;
    a. Ingratiating, to the point of being smarmish;
    b. Terrified of any resounding physical contact with others;
    c. Much smaller in physical stature;
    d. Physically, very unfit; and
    e. Loners who have little to do with society at large.

    Ridsdale’s matters were stymied by Archbishop Frank Little, as he and Risdale were close friends. There was another incident in Mildura that went nowhere in about 1970 because of a ‘Catholic Mafia’ of senior cops there at the time. A detective was brought in from elsewhere top take over the job but the top cops squashed it

    As someone earlier upthread said, it is very hard for a large adult hand (which in Pell’s case were the size of dinner plates – have a look at them next time you see him on TV) down the front of an 11 or 12 year old’s pants, and harder if the pants are wet.

    Why do you think he has so many supporters? Ridsdale et al didn’t have them at their court appearances. They’re not rusted-on Catholics, but most are from Ballarat and are the same ones that condemned the others publicly. They know the man, how he operates and trust him implicitly where they wouldn’t others of the same cloth, that’s why.

    I’ve said before I’m no fan of Richter QC, but I hope he burns the bungled, political prosecution in this matter to a fiery mess and spreads the ashes in the Yarra.

    I went to a Catholic boarding school in Ballarat in the 1980s. Some of the Christian Brothers you wouldn’t go near (or they wouldn’t as I proved to be too big and strong to be a target) but one of them was exemplary, both in word and deed. He was head of one the Year 12 dorms, again quite a good sportsman, eschewed the sus characters in his peers and treated the boys like pre-men, which I suppose we were.

    If this bloke was under the same scrutiny as Pell I’d be out the front of the court in support as well. And I’ve lapsed to the point where I’ve only ever been to church for weddings, baptisms and funerals since 1987.

    So, to summarise – piss off nemkat. You’d say the sky was green if someone told you it was blue.

  77. Herodotus

    This place is becoming troll and sock central. If that’s libertarianism at work I’m not impressed.

  78. cynical1

    We need a couple of KGB agents to wash up in the Thames.

    What do we get? A fucking World Cup boycott or something?

    Well, that will upset the tournament.

    Until the end of the first round when they will be out anyway.

    No wonder the poms are mulling over a black or gay James Bond.

    Just make him a black,gay, Muslim, climate change warrior and be done with it.

  79. stackja

    Border Force Australia boss Roman Quaedvlieg to be sacked by Governor-General Peter Cosgrove
    SHARRI MARKSON, National Political Editor, The Daily Telegraph
    March 15, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only
    SIDELINED Border Force boss Roman Quaedvlieg is set to be sacked today by the Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove during a meeting of the Federal Executive Council in Canberra.

    The decision to terminate Mr Quaedvlieg’s $618,000-a-year contract is likely to lead to an unfair dismissal battle, with the Border Force Commissioner vehemently denying he was in a relationship with his current girlfriend at the time she got a job in his organisation at Sydney Airport in December 2016.

    A spokeswoman for the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet said that there would be no comment on the timing or agenda of the meeting in line with usual practice.

    The investigation into Mr Quaedvlieg has spanned 10 months. The powerful anti-corruption agency, Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity, is understood to have accessed the salacious communications between Mr Quaedvlieg and his girlfriend during the course of its investigation.

    It made no corruption findings but is understood to have passed the information from its investigation onto Dr Parkinson, who examined it for any breaches of the public service Code of Conduct.

  80. stackja

    Senator Derryn Hinch suffers brain trauma after nasty fall in Melbourne
    ROB HARRIS, National politics reporter, Herald Sun
    March 14, 2018 9:00pm
    Subscriber only
    DERRYN Hinch has suffered brain trauma after falling and hitting his head on St Kilda Road after drinking “two glasses of wine” on a night out.

    The liver transplant recipient will undergo medical tests on Thursday after initial concerns his heart may have contributed to his collapse while stepping out of an Uber on Monday night.

    “I’d had two glasses of wine at dinner — I hadn’t overindulged. But it’s the obvious question … I don’t blame people for thinking that,” he said.

    A stunned witness told the Herald Sun he saw a man lying on the ground near the intersection with Toorak Rd about 11.30pm.

    “I just saw someone lying there and went to see what was happening, the Uber driver was taking forever to call an ambulance so we did,” The witness said.

    “He was out for a few minutes but he started to wake up as the paramedics arrived and we helped them get him on to a stretcher. He didn’t have any obvious injury but he was pretty confused about what was happening.”

    Senator Hinch said he’d “come a cropper” outside his apartment after stumbling on a “dodgy” knee when getting out of the Uber.

    “I’m OK but I’m booked in to have some tests. I was hooked up to a heart machine but I’ll have some more tests on my blood pressure,” he said.

    “It has nothing to do with the liver … to tell you the truth I think I was just tired and I’d been up since early for breakfast TV.”

    Senator Hinch thanked his Uber driver and passers-by for coming to his aid calling an ambulance. He was diagnosed with “minor brain trauma” from the fall but it had not broken the skin.

    He flew to Canberra on Wednesday to attend an event at the Australian War Memorial and said he would be “fighting fit” to return to parliament later this month.

  81. zyconoclast

    Senator Derryn Hinch suffers brain trauma after nasty fall in Melbourne

    Odds on that it won’t make his voting in the Senate any worse than it already was.
    If he can’t continue, who will replace him?

  82. OldOzzie

    Batman Labor voters vent fury over Shorten tax grab

    Lifelong Labor voters living in Batman have called Bill Shorten’s radical tax plan the “final straw” ending their support for the ALP as the party road-tests new superannuation changes days ahead of a critical by-election.

    Pensioners and low-income retirees living in the north Melbourne electorate say the latest ALP plan to abolish cash rebates for tax credits on shares held by retirees, investors and ordinary taxpayers will hurt those who can ill afford it. “Apparently it won’t affect me that much because I only hold shares through my super fund, but it’s possible those returns will go down and that hurts,” retired marine engineer Jim Robertson told The Australian yesterday. The 78-year-old, on a full pension supplemented by a small amount of super in an ­industry fund, has voted Labor in every state and federal election bar one since emigrating from Scotland more than 50 years ago.

    GRAPHIC: The real impact on pensioners

    Come polling day on Saturday, he will vote for either the Australian Conservatives or the Australian Liberty Party, saying the tax plan Mr Shorten unveiled in an address to the left-wing Chifley Institute this week was more evidence of Labor ditching traditional values.

    “It wasn’t looking good before, but now I’m even less inclined to vote for Labor,” he said. “It’s like Labor has lost its roots and needs to get back to what it used to stand for: the working man. I don’t think the party of old would have gone about (tax reform) like this.”

    Analysis of the new tax plan conducted by Treasury revealed that more than 610,000 Australians on the lowest annual incomes stand to lose an average of $1200 a year in tax refunds under the proposal to abolish cash rebates for tax credits.

    Analysis of official tax data also showed the largest group of people to be hit by the $59 billion tax grab will be those receiving annual incomes of less than $18,200, the majority of whom receive the Age Pension.

    Within the Batman electorate, voters over 65 make up almost 19 per cent of the voting population. In the last federal election, Labor would have lost the seat if it had sustained a net loss of just 927 voters on the two-party-preferred vote.

    The by-election is a close contest between former ACTU president Ged Kearney for Labor and Greens candidate Alex Bhathal, who is making her sixth attempt on the seat.

    Northcote-based financial planner Anthony Galle fielded calls from clients concerned about the changes. “I had one client who called it ‘political suicide’ because so many people — not just in the electorate, but around the country — are going to be affected,” he said.

    Another Northcote-based planner, Jeff Yacoub, also fielded calls from concerned clients, and said he was personally concerned about how super returns would dip as a result of the policy.

    “Sure, the impacts will be more visible to people with an SMSF, but people with money in super funds will also see returns go down. It might be 4.8 per cent last year and then its 4 per cent this year. It’s less obvious, but they’re still getting hit,” he said.

    “And it’s a bad political stunt because it’s probably going to be supported by people who don’t understand the implications, because they’re not active or direct investors.”

    At Quarries Park in Clifton Hill, self-managed super fund beneficiary Geoff Griffiths fumed at the changes which he said had the potential to drive the price of shares down across the Australian equities market.

    The Clifton Hill resident, who owns a house in Batman but isn’t a resident for voting purposes, said he had been a near lifelong Labor voter, but this had turned him off the party for good.

    “Now I’ll have to vote for whoever will be strongest against Labor,” he said.

    Ms Kearney kept a low profile yesterday.

    In her absence, Greens leader Richard Di Natale said the Greens were wary of unintended consequences for the elderly and pensioners.

    From the Comments

    – At a time when it is generally recognised that the cost of living is causing hardship throughout the community, Shorten is going to cut the incomes of pensioners and retirees. I guess he is doing that because they are no longer working and therefore not part of the group labor claims to represent – the “working man”.

    – Bill, why further complicate an already complex tax and superannuation system? The current imputation credit system is fine. It doesn’t need fixing!

    Shorten is planning on retrospectively slashing self funded retiree’s incomes. For the sake of fairness I assume he will be making adjustments to reduce politician’s and public servant’s pensions as well………………(cicadas chirping)

    – Next we will have no refund for PAYG casual workers under the tax free threshold. Apologists for BS and Bowen were essentially arguing for this position yesterday regarding the holding tax on imputation. It is impossible to believe BS’s backflip or the ability to either afford or make appropriate ongoing compensation to who he considers poorer off.

    – Bill Shonkten thought he was on a winner with this attempted class warfare policy. He must be looking at Chris Bowen saying how did you get the analysis so so wrong.

    It is not a “cash rebate”. It is a tax refund of overpaid taxes. Imagine how you would react if you put in your tax return expecting a refund and the ATO sends back an assessment saying “Yes, we owe you money but you’re not getting it.”

    – Bill Shorten seems determined to penalise those people who have paid taxes all their working lives, raised families, taken care of themselves and saved a little for their retirement.

    Virtually every single person with super, whether working or retired, will be hit by this. If you don’t understand this, you don’t understand superannuation. Oh well, it’s your future.

  83. OldOzzie

    Shorten in scramble to fix flaws in tax plan – SIMON BENSON

    Bill Shorten is considering a supplement payment package for up to 250,000 pensioners to make up for annual cash refunds they stand to lose, as the Opposition Leader comes under mounting pressure over Labor’s plan to scrap $59 billion in refundable tax credits on share dividends.

    As Labor faces pushback from seniors and self-managed super fund lobby groups, The Australian understands that a financial sweetener will be considered for the 10 per cent of pensioners on the lowest annual incomes who may lose their modest imputation credit refunds.

    This would likely come in the form of a payment supplement in addition to Labor’s promise to ­restore the energy supplement linked to the carbon tax, which the Turnbull government scrapped for new welfare and pension recipients.

    “We will make sure that pensioners are OK, full stop,” Mr Shorten said yesterday after hinting that Labor’s budget strategy would ensure pensioners were not left out of pocket.

    National Seniors Australia, the Self-Managed Super Fund ­Association and the Association of Independent Retirees yesterday urged their members to write to Labor MPs and warned of a ­national campaign against Mr Shorten’s tax grab.

    The Opposition Leader yesterday acknowledged his policy would affect about 250,000 pensioners, amid new warnings the changes would force more people onto the Age Pension and possibly undermine the expected revenue gain of $59bn over a decade.

    Mr Shorten’s claim that part pensions would rise to compensate low-income earners for the loss of their rebates was also ­attacked by National Seniors Australia. It declared the comment “incorrect” and argued it showed a fundamental misunderstanding of “how income is calculated for pensioners”.

    National Seniors Australia chief executive Ian Henschke said he wanted Labor to “reconsider the full effect of this policy” and provided research showing that some part-pensioners would be more than $900 worse off once their rebates were removed.

    Analysis provided exclusively to The Australian shows that a single person who qualifies for the part pension under the assets test may be substantially worse off under the Labor plan.

    In one case study, an individual with $451,000 in assets — including $1000 cash from a refundable dividend tax credit — would receive a $3 increase in their fortnightly pension payment (from $302.65 to $305.65) once the refund was scrapped. While this would lift the part-pension payment by $78 a year, it would still leave the individual $922 worse off overall.

    Centrelink makes an assumption about the income that investments will generate. In another case study, the analysis suggests that a single person who qualifies for a part pension under the income test is assumed to receive a return of 1.75 per cent on their first $50,200 of savings and 3.25 per cent on anything over that.

    Changes in the person’s actual income are irrelevant to this calculation, so the abolition of cash imputation refunds would make no difference to the pension, ­although it would directly affect the pensioner’s total income.

    National Seniors Australia’s senior officer Basil La Brooy said: “There doesn’t seem to be an understanding of how income is calculated for pensioners. And this is a policy that’s been in place for many years.”

    Malcolm Turnbull yesterday accused Mr Shorten of launching a targeted attack on lower and middle-income earners in a “Labor cash grab” he said would hit more than 3.5 million superannuation accounts and affect more than one million people, including more than 200,000 pensioners.

    “He’s seeking to take money from pensioners and self-funded retirees, money they’re entitled to,” Mr Turnbull said. “Think about that — 50 per cent of the individuals that will be hurt by this tax grab are on incomes of less than $18,000. These are pensioners and self-funded retirees.

    “This is not a tax loophole or anything like this. This is a case where companies have paid tax, they’ve paid tax. They pay a dividend with a franking credit and if somebody doesn’t have other tax liabilities to offset that, they’re entitled to get the difference in cash. That is completely fair. It’s been the case for nearly 20 years.”

    Writing to The Australian yesterday, former Treasury secretary John Stone backed Mr Turnbull’s criticism.

    Mr Stone said Paul Keating had not gone far enough after introducing dividend imputation relief in 1987 to correct the “injustice” of double taxation whereby “dividend recipients had no or ­insufficient other taxable income against which to offset their ­credits”.

    Mr Stone said this was “finally rectified” by Coalition treasurer Peter Costello in 2001, after the budget had been taken back into surplus. He warned that Mr Shorten’s policy on franking credits would “restore that injustice”.

    The Association of Independent Retirees warned the Labor policy could “push more retirees onto the Aged Pension much earlier than would currently be the case” and “negate the short-term revenue gains anticipated”.

    “You need to engage with your federal member of parliament and bring to their attention the concerns described above that AIR has with Labor’s announced policy on dividend imputation credits,” it said in a letter to its members.

    The Self-Managed Super Fund Association produced figures showing that a single homeowner with $580,000 in superannuation (who had saved enough to forgo the Age Pension) could lose $5357 in franking credits — a reduction in yearly income from $28,357 to $23,000, or a cut of 18.8 per cent.

    SMSF Association head of policy Jordan George said the drop to $23,000 in income was only $112 above the full Age Pension and Age Pension supplement of $22,888 which can be accessed by a homeowning single person with assets of less than $253,750.

    “Self-funded retirees who have assets just above the Age Pension assets test thresholds may be worse off under the Labor proposal than those with less assets but receiving the Age Pension,” Mr George said. “This is a perverse outcome.”

  84. Bruce of Newcastle

    Nemkat – You are looking at the case the wrong way.

    Ask yourself have the ABC and the Left motive, method and opportunity to frame Pell?

    Yes they do. Also unlike Christians they have no moral inhibition against doing that.

    They want to get Pell in the worst way and have for a very long time since he is the epitome of a class-enemy.

    Then there is the money. The Catholic Church is seen as a giant honeypot. Money is the root of all kinds of evil as someone said.

  85. OldOzzie

    Class warfare won’t contain retiree anger at Shorten – SIMON BENSON

    Bill Shorten and Chris Bowen have bet the bank on a $60 billion high stakes tax grab that will ­either ensure a Labor victory within 18-months or revive a battered Turnbull government.

    Gambling with the retirement incomes of pensioners and self-funded retirees by scrapping refundable franking credits, the Opposition Leader and his shadow treasurer have not only risked angering a million people but emasculating their own class-war posturing. It’s crazy brave stuff. Shorten has been privately hinting at a $200 billion war chest for the best part of the last 12 months. Now he finally has one, even if the government rightly argues it’s $200 billion in tax rises.

    But the political risk for Malcolm Turnbull and Scott Morrison is that the debate over fiscal rectitude becomes swamped by Shorten’s ability to outbid them on income tax cuts for middle income earners following the May budget.

    This is almost a certainty.

    Shorten’s wager is that in the washout, many more families will benefit from his income tax cuts than retirees who will lose a refund under a tax loophole that most people didn’t know existed.

    Perhaps. But then the motivation of a person who stands to lose something they already have is a lot stronger than that of a person who might stand to gain something they don’t currently have. And there is still a million people who do know about the refund scheme, because they use it.

    Shorten is clearly counting on two fundamental principles to ride out the political storm that has quickly erupted from his plan to rob retirees of cash to fill Labor’s spending black hole.

    The first is an assumption that most Australians don’t know what an imputation credit is let alone benefit from one; the second being a conviction that Turnbull is incapable of sustaining a political argument for more than a couple of days. It is a calculated political move that shows signs of arrogance, even if partly true.

    The grave miscalculation that Shorten may have made is that it won’t necessarily need to be Turnbull who will be required to maintain the prosecution case against this policy. The government will have the campaign run for it by the one million people who Labor now admits will be affected.

    The battle lines are drawn along competing narratives, with Shorten asking why people who pay no tax should get a refund for anything and the government arguing that it is a reverse tax being imposed on the nest eggs of retirees and pensioners.

    The government believes this could be the game-changer they were looking for. But then it was saying the same thing about energy policy.

    Shorten on the other hand is convinced that while he may take a hit along the way to the budget as angry pensioners vent, his argument in the end will have the greater cut through. But Shorten and Bowen’s belief that they will be able to win on class war tactics and the notion of fairness, as they have done with negative gearing, ignores a central difference between these two groups.

    Property investors represent a diverse group of Australians who have little in common and no collective representation apart from a Coalition government.

    Self-funded retirees and pensioners are one of the most organised and homogenous groups of any voting bloc.

    Morrison discovered this two years ago when the Liberal base erupted over his changes to the tax treatment of super accounts. This is a well organised political constituency with collective representation from at least 10 well- funded lobby groups.

    For this reason, there are those in government who believe Shorten has made a “monumental error”. He ostensibly will be fighting pensioners rather than Tories.

    While there appears to be unintended policy consequences such as the sheer number of low income retirees who stand to lose refunds, such as they may be, there may be other unintended political consequences as well for Labor.

    Shorten may have just driven 300,000 to 400,000 voters of the Liberal’s lost base back into the fold, even if they have to hold their nose along the way. That is about 2000 voters in every electorate.

    If a Coalition government can’t capitalise on this, then there is probably little hope for it.

    From the Comments

    – This policy will reduce the demand for shares and drive the share prices down. What will happen when everyone’s superannuation fund’s valus drops by 10 to 20 percent?

    – I think you are right. The Coalition will not capitalise on this and there really is no hope for them.

    Never under estimate Turnbull’s ability to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

    – Turnbull has been noticed only by his silence. A brief mention of the issue only whilst swanning in it in Queensland basking in the sun whilst pork barrelling. He is almost a big a disgrace as Shorten.

    – Everyone should sell all their shares, take kids out of all private schools, give up all private health insurance , all retirees sell all assets and go on the pension. That what Bill and his cronies want , let’s all be equal . The lucky country , not on your labour Nellie will it be .

    – Both ALP and Libs see old people as cash cows, unable to fight back. Libs have already lost the confidence of pensioners with their tax grabs last year and the year before. Now the ALP does the same.

    The Libs couldn’t fight their way out of a wet paper bag and are incapable of making the case for anything at all.

    So we all suffer because both parties are under the leadership of incompetents.

    Worked hard, went without holidays , graduated to camping holidays with the children, no first homeowners grants, no cheap TVs furniture, started with hand me downs to furnish first home, saved what I could never made enough to invest in shares, but what I have is mine I paid tax on it, what little I have Centrelink assumes a return of 3.7% , where can I get that please, Leave us oldies alone we are not the cash cow Libs and now Lab want.

    – There’s another point to this. Everyone will eventually be a retiree or a pensioner at some point. Everyone. So everyone is affected by this lame-brain, lefty-loonie policy.

    And thanks to Shorten, everyone interested in the above will now learn, if they don’t already, what franking credits are. Perhaps this will encourage more people to invest in equities so they can actually benefit from the scheme while it remains in place.

    – PM should collect? er, this is Malcolm Turnbull we are talking about Simon Benson. Dear Malcolm won’t go for the jugular but will mount, at best, a timid, unconvincing response and let Shorten get away with it.

    Just like the 2016 election campaign when Malcolm Turnbull let Shorten get away with his disgraceful Mediscare lies to terrify pensioners.

    Time for Malcolm to dust off his “sycophants” speech for the hypocrite Shorten who pretends to be for the battler. But will he? I very much doubt it.

    Turnbull MIA as usual.

    – here are more involved than the one million directly affected.

    Each one of these “retirees” has family and just based on averages there is likely to be another 2-3 million who will be concerned for their family, and even more so when their parents tell them they will be the ultimate losers as their aggregate inheritances will be reduced by the $60 billion due to Labor’s envy grab.

    Those of us who know how the system works will shift their share base to other forms of investment, or to conspicuous consumption – more income for foreign airlines and hotels – more pressure on the trade balance. Additionally the demand for Australian shares will be reduced and so the price will fall and there will be a loss of capital gains tax as well. The lower attractiveness of Australian shares will make funding more difficult and the companies more subject to take-over.

    These idiots have assumed the oldies are so dumb that they will not change their behaviour – wrong! Like Rudd’s mining tax the collections in later years will be a fraction of what they dream.

    On the expenditure side more retirees will qualify for the pension earlier and social security payments will rise.

  86. stackja

    New study finds two-fold increase in ice-related admissions at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital
    The Daily Telegraph
    March 15, 2018 6:26am
    Subscriber only
    The burden of ice addiction is spreading through entire hospitals, not just the emergency wards, as more users seek treatment for drug-induced psychosis and other health problems, new research suggests.

    Analysis of patient data from Sydney’s Royal Prince Alfred Hospital has identified an alarming three-fold increase in the number of hospital-based psychiatric consultations resulting from the use of psychostimulants (ice, cocaine and ecstasy) between 2012 and 2015, while there was a two-fold increase in admissions related to the use of these drugs.

    Published in the Sax Institute’s journal Public Health Research & Practice, the analysis found consultations resulting from psychostimulants rose from 96 in 2012 to 321 in 2015, and admissions from 60 in 2012 to 141 in 2015.

    Senior author of the paper Professor Paul Haber believes this is a trend likely to be seen at other hospitals offering similar services right across Australia.

    “The impact of ice is spreading throughout the hospital system, we have an increasing burden on mental health units inside the hospital and in the general wards of the hospital,” Professor Haber said.

    Legalise ‘ice’ etc. What could possibly go wrong?

  87. Hard to believe Hinch’s claim that he consumed just two wines.

    I’m calling bullshit.

  88. Farmer Gez

    I agree with Knuckle Dragger as a former Catholic school boy as well.
    Pell was very much a man’s man. Conversation with him was about sport, education and future plans. Nothing creepy about him at all, unlike others.

  89. Some fresh posts at https://righttoclimb.blogspot.com.au for those interested in the freedom to explore natural spaces without myth, superstition and political correctness getting in the way.

  90. stackja

    Has Paul Bongiorno ever faced scrutiny?

  91. Brian of Moorabbin
    #2660579, posted on March 14, 2018 at 3:59 pm
    Well, the guy who played his chief henchman also died in February this year…

    Went to the link.
    Immediately heard in my brain “Z Victor One this is Z Victor Two. Come in Z Victor One”.
    It’s still there, accent and all.
    Pictorial image of Mum and Dad’s Ford Zephyr floats through the synapse too.
    Curse you Brian. (insert smiley emoticon here)

  92. Grig decided to stop having pokes at Cardinal Pell from behind one of his ‘sweet’ socks.

    I don’t know the Cardinal but a family member does, doesn’t believe a word.

    It’s all too little, too late, too vague, too tainted,
    too dollar sign, too vengeful, too agenda, too convenient, too laughable, too vindictive.

    It’s almost as if every sad sack amoral loser that has had fleeting contact has been promised a big bag of money for nothing.

  93. Knuckle Dragger

    TBW,

    I’m with you on the subject of Hinch.

    He’ll tell the media the same thing I tell my doctor:

    ‘Are you still smoking?’
    ‘Yes.’
    ‘How many per day?’
    ‘Oh, 10 – 12’

    Hinch tells the media he has a couple glasses of wine two to three times a week. In both circumstances multiply the amounts by 2.5 and you’re getting close to a realistic answer.

  94. zyconoclast
    #2660933, posted on March 14, 2018 at 11:33 pm
    Tool: Recognizing Microaggressions and the Messages They Send (2 page pdf)

    In one of his interviews on radio yesterday, Professor Peterson was told “Australians won’t go down this pathway. Too laconic. Too anti-authority” (to paraphrase).
    He replied. Yes you will. Just give it time. The authoritarian left will impose it by force and people will accept it to keep their jobs.

  95. Hydra

    Legalise ‘ice’ etc. What could possibly go wrong?

    Don’t be silly. Legalisation of psychotic and other currently illicit drugs will result in better, safer drugs being made as it becomes a for profit enterprise. It will also allow for more accessibility to doctors, pharmacists, and rehabilitation programs. It will move responsibility for actions from the drug to the user.

    People want the high, let companies develop safe ways of getting there rather than people currently consuming shit made in wheelbarrows.

  96. Mother Lode

    Hard to believe Hinch’s claim that he consumed just two wines.

    I thought he said two glasses – obviously referring to the fact that flagons are made of glass.

    But if he said ‘two wines’ then I will take that as meaning Chardonnay and Shiraz.

    Eight bottles of each.

  97. Boambee John

    Hydra at 0846

    People want the high, let companies develop safe ways of getting there rather than people currently consuming shit made in wheelbarrows.

    And make Bill Shortone’s day by taxing the living daylights out of the users.

    Only to cover their medical costs and for their own good, of course!

  98. struth

    Hinch…I had two glasses of wine.
    Witness….he had two bottles.
    Hinch,…… whaddaya think bottles are made from?

  99. Mother Lode

    Hydra, I am not sure there is any way Ice can be purely recreational. It seems to have been synthesised specifically to get its users in its grip.

    Dope and coke, by contrast, are quite different.

    My own attitude is that in a society which has for so long been breeding beeves with minimal sense of risk and responsibility, by means of legislation removing choices and a bewildering number of precedents where courts have shifted responsibility for bad choices off ‘victims’ onto anyone else (parents, TV, society, whiteness etc), means a lot of people will fuck up their lives if they had half the chance – because they are so ill-equipped.

    My preferred society is one where things like these can be legal and commonsense, knowledge, and a sense of responsibility to others guided people’s choices. Some will still screw up, but that is what freedom does. It doesn’t offer guarantees, so it cultivates maturity.

    I don’t think we can do that overnight however because, as I say, we have produced generations whose self has been allowed to atrophy to the point of bovine docility. But it would be a worthwhile target. We start by holding people responsible.

  100. nemkat
    #2660996, posted on March 15, 2018 at 5:50 am
    Plenty of people finding reasons why the allegations against George Pell couldn’t have happened.
    His hands being too large to fit down a pair of Speedos is the most novel, so far.
    The one thing that no one has said:
    George Pell isn’t the type of bloke who would do that.

    Wrong. I have read plenty of support for Cardinal Pell, on this blog and in The Oz comments sections.
    Are you saying he is the type of bloke who would put his hands down a boy’s Speedos?

  101. Kudlow in replacing Cohn. Oh well, the Obama boom was nice while it lasted. There is usually a recession within two years of a Republican getting elected president.

  102. stackja

    No butts about it – times are changing in elite world of surfing
    AMANDA LULHAM
    March 13, 2018 5:40pm

    NO butts about it. The times are changing in surfing.

    Mick Fanning isn’t the only thing set to disappear from the world tour – so too are close-up shots of women’s derrière’s.

    Hot on the heels of the first woman being appointed to run the World Surf League in Sophie Goldschmidt, comes news from the world tour opener that camera men and photographers working for the WSL have apparently been asked to use discretion when filming female surfers with scantily clad bottoms during specific manoevers — duck dives or bottom turns – in competition.

    “All cinematographers have been instructed to exercise discretion while shooting the women’s heats. Cinematographers must be careful to be zoomed out during bottom turns or duck dives,’’ Stab magazine wrote.

    When asked for a response to the story the WSL simply said it “regularly trains its staff in code of conduct and employee enhancement programs. We hold our staff, content, and organisation to high standards across the board.’’

  103. JC

    There is usually a recession within two years of a Republican getting elected president.

    Hahah

    You’re such a sad old lesbian, monst.

  104. Legalisation of psychotic and other currently illicit drugs will result in better, safer drugs being made as it becomes a for profit enterprise

    Ah, Hydra. All those heads but no brains.

  105. Legalisation of psychotic and other currently illicit drugs will result in better, safer drugs being made as it becomes a for profit enterprise. It will also allow for more accessibility to doctors, pharmacists, and rehabilitation programs. It will move responsibility for actions from the drug to the user.

    If you’re on a psychotic drug how can you plausibly be considered responsible?

  106. Bruce of Newcastle

    Mick Fanning isn’t the only thing set to disappear from the world tour – so too are close-up shots of women’s derrière’s.

    Can you surf in a burqa?
    I suppose we’re going to find out.

  107. Good news for you JC, as long as you get out in time. Plenty of buying opportunities.

  108. Monty giving investment advise.

    Hmm

    You have until November for your big fat Republican recession.

    Good luck with that.

  109. Can you surf in a burqa?

    BoN, DFAT will organise and fund the design, production, marketing and compulsory wearing of surfing burqas.
    That’s just for the men.
    Women will be banned from competition.

  110. Anne

    I’ve always been suspicious of Stephen Hawking living so long with ALS.

    At any rate, he was a supporter of Global Totalitarian ‘Beast System’ Central Government and an atheist.

    Diseased of the mind as well as the body.

  111. C.L.

    Bolt has more on Broken Rites’ $50,000-for-Pell bounty hunt.

  112. JC

    Annie

    You reckon he faked it being wheel chair bound all those decades? Wow!

  113. Rae

    Ask yourself have the ABC and the Left motive, method and opportunity to frame Pell?

    Yes they do. Also unlike Christians they have no moral inhibition against doing that.

    They want to get Pell in the worst way and have for a very long time since he is the epitome of a class-enemy.

    Then there is the money. The Catholic Church is seen as a giant honeypot. Money is the root of all kinds of evil as someone said.

    Are you a Tyke, Bruce of Newcastle?

  114. JC

    I like Larry, monst. I think he’s high energy, loves America and capitalism.

  115. What are they going to call that new drug

    Nice Ice?

    It’s very difficult to contemplate responsible use of mind altering drugs.

    Will they stop being brain dead, paranoid, aggressive, and incessantly scratching themselves?

  116. struth

    the Obama boom was nice while it lasted

    The only boom experienced while Obummer was president was in Iran when a plane load of American cash landed.

    Oh, and the Clinton’s bank account with Aussie dollars.

  117. egg_

    The “libertarian” movement is now just an auxiliary force of the Left.

    And why do you come and infest the libertarian blog exactly?

    Chaos rules when the Centre Right have to be anarchists, Bolshy.

    Also typical Leftoid dissembling – as it’s libertarian and Centre-Right – extremists like you can get effed.

  118. egg_

    Batman Labor voters vent fury over Shorten tax grab

    Shortman is wedging himself!
    Only Trumble can out-clusterfvck him!

  119. egg_

    This place is becoming troll and sock central.

    That’s what folk resort to when they can’t perform a decent debate.

  120. Mother Lode

    Thanks for that, nota.

    The simple fact is that ‘God’ and the ‘Devil’ have characters, histories, and traits. They have known motivations, and most importantly their actions are ‘known’ in the world. People reading the book would have found it resonated with a recognisable world view.

    Evil and Light? Here is a poser for that waxing and waning trout, Oprah: Why must evil triumph? Isn’t it really down to the fact that she is on team light? That would be rather selfish. She opposes Evil because it is incompatible with light? Well, that goes the other way, too. If Evil were to prevail then deceit, selfishness etc would be virtues and the inhabitants therein would measure themselves and aspire to them.

    Hollywood, so enthralled by cultural relativism, seems really not to understand what it entails.

  121. Baldrick

    SCROLL THE TROLL

    Remember scrolly scrolly past the trollys everyone.
    Every pixel in reply is a another stroke on the sockmeisters oily shaft. – thefrolickingmole

  122. egg_

    The one thing that no one has said:
    George Pell isn’t the type of bloke who would do that.

    Trollism 101 – put words in others mouths.

  123. JC

    That’s what folk resort to when they can’t perform a decent debate.

    Yep, along with better discussion topics. A decade into 24/7 aboriginal, military, muzz and ethnic Tourettes, along with pubbling and outbacking does that.

  124. C.L.

    Besides heroin, what do heroin addicts need most?

    Broken Rites to “victim”: Hey, have you heard you can pick up 50 large for Pell?

  125. egg_

    Turnbull MIA as usual.

    Trumble can’t outflank Labor on anything as he’s not only in the Canberra bubble, he’s in the Trumble clown world bubble.

  126. candy

    . “Think about that — 50 per cent of the individuals that will be hurt by this tax grab are on incomes of less than $18,000.

    Seems hard to believe.

    A part pension is still granted when person owns a house and about $200,000 in assets? Not sure about the figures, but the system is very geared to the senior part of the population. Concessions on rego, electricity, transport, free medical care.

    This must be IT’s whinging baby boomers born in a more glorious economic time.

  127. Delta A

    Bolt links to Roger Franklin’s article on crappy arts grants:

    http://quadrant.org.au/opinion/qed/2018/03/arse-arts-sake/

  128. JC

    Martin Shrekeli got seven years in the clink for fraud. A woman in the very same business -pharma- gets a $500,000 fine and a 10 year ban from being an officer of a company. That is, a slap on the wrist.
    Being a woman certainly helps these days.

    Read on.

    It also helps if your parents are swampers too.

  129. candy

    Diseased of the mind as well as the body.

    I think Anne he would have lived in a lot of pain most of his life. His teeth were going through his upper lip all the time, for one thing. Think of that. Could not control it.
    Anyways, he lived a remarkable life in his career and relationships. I think people saw past the huge disability to his mind and personality. A rare thing. that’s what he brought to the world, is my thoughts.

  130. Delta A

    Sorry, that link was from Tim Blair, not Bolt.

  131. Infidel Tiger

    Martin Shrekeli got seven years in the clink for fraud. A woman in the very same business -pharma- gets a $500,000 fine and a 10 year ban from being an officer of a company. That is, a slap on the wrist.
    Being a woman certainly helps these days.

    The left hated him. He was fucked over.

  132. You have until November for your big fat Republican recession.

    Technically it’s January, but I know what you mean. Then again, if Trump is already losing R+11 districts during a boom with full employment, it wouldn’t take much of an economic slowdown for November to be a historic electoral destroyation of the right.

  133. All that optimism for hot first-quarter economic growth is rapidly fading away

    Back in late January the Atlanta Fed was calling for a 5.4 percent GDP gain, but on Wednesday it said growth likely will be just 1.9 percent.
    The cut comes amid similar reductions from J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs, who now respectively see growth at 2 percent and 1.8 percent.
    Wednesday’s disappointing retail sales number was at the root of the latest reductions.

  134. Mother Lode

    Only Trumble can out-clusterfvck him!

    Right now the ABC is calling that bumbling turd’s office saying that their poll indicates that Labor is just ahead, and what people need to see is a calm, urbane, sophisticated man like him, speak to them to assuage any concerns they might have.

    Trumble, chest swell with pride and convinced that he can save the day, will immediately wing his way down there with his leather jacket to prove he is a man of the people.

    The ABC staff will hang up, slap each other on the back, dispatch a camera team to Batman, and order big bags of ‘The-Peoples-Glorious-Revolution Brand’ Popcorn.

  135. Bruce of Newcastle

    All that optimism for hot first-quarter economic growth is rapidly fading away

    Excellent!
    GDP is bullshit since out of C + I + G + (X − M) the term G is for government spending.
    Since government spending includes borrowing to spend it is dead easy to bloat GDP just by borrowing and spending on crap.
    Conversely if Trump is spending less then GDP will fall.
    Which is a good thing since spending borrowed money is stealing GDP from future generations.
    Thus endeth the economic lesson for M0nty.

  136. Mmyes Bruce, let’s roll the videotape…

    Washington is on track for more government spending and bigger deficits — even under Republican control
    Back in full control of the levers of government, the party that long espoused fiscal prudence is projected to send America’s deficit to record highs.
    The Treasury Department forecasts that it will need to borrow more than $1 trillion in each of the next two fiscal years, driven in part by the expectation of lower revenues from the new tax law Congress rushed to pass last year.
    This is not how Republicans intended to govern when President Trump was inaugurated in 2017.
    Ylan Mui | @ylanmui
    Published 12:20 PM ET Wed, 7 Feb 2018 Updated 3:12 PM ET Wed, 7 Feb 2018

  137. Bruce of Newcastle

    A part pension is still granted when person owns a house and about $200,000 in assets? Not sure about the figures, but the system is very geared to the senior part of the population.

    Candy – If they weren’t allowed a part pension they’d spend the $200,000 or give it to the kids then go on the full pension.
    So it is in the government’s interest to encourage self reliance.
    Shorten is undermining that, which is why screwing over investors via the franking credit thing could well cost the government more than it gains.
    A lot of cruise ship companies would be very happy though.

  138. struth

    Not being an economist, the average man can look at GDP as having nothing to do with the wealth of a nation when looking at what is before his eyes.

  139. Stimpson J. Cat

    Donald J. Trump
    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    We cannot keep a blind eye to the rampant unfair trade practices against our Country!

  140. struth

    The Treasury Department forecasts

    ………………………………..

    Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

  141. Boris

    What do we get? A fucking World Cup boycott or something?

    Not even that. Not player boycott, just by royals and ministers. Oh Putin will be scared /sarc.

  142. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    November to be a historic electoral destroyation of the right.

    Former(?) journo butchers the english language with gay abandon.

  143. Bruce of Newcastle

    Back in full control of the levers of government, the party that long espoused fiscal prudence is projected to send America’s deficit to record highs.

    Monty – I see you are a slow student.

    Government spending contributes to GDP. Government revenue does not. Trump has reduced government revenue. Thus if he reduces revenue more than spending GDP falls but government spending also falls.

    Thus endeth period 2 of the lesson.

    (In period 3 we may address why reducing G causes Y, I and possibly (X – M) to increase.)

  144. Stimpson J. Cat

    It’s very difficult to contemplate responsible use of mind altering drugs.

    Of course it is for people who have never tried them.
    The real question is can you recommend mind altering drugs, or for that matter any illegal drugs to your own children?
    The answer to that question tells you all you need to know.

  145. Infidel Tiger

    Technically it’s January, but I know what you mean. Then again, if Trump is already losing R+11 districts during a boom with full employment, it wouldn’t take much of an economic slowdown for November to be a historic electoral destroyation of the right.

    Hey, if the Dems keep nominating patriotic Marines who support the 1st and 2nd Amendment whole heartedly, then a trump has already made America great again.

    We need normal Dems elected again.

  146. Myrddin Seren

    Wow

    Now here is an interesting twist on the China immigration Ponzi scheme:

    Quebec’s investor immigration program–5 year-$800 K loan to the QC Gov’t gets you a passport ; 80% of the ‘investors’ [mainly from China] end up low-income non-taxpayers living in Vancouver and Toronto

    Note – generally not ‘poor’, given their houses and cars. Just making little-to-no reportable income in Canada.

    ( h/t SDA )

  147. Infidel Tiger

    It’s very difficult to contemplate responsible use of mind altering drugs.

    You realise that paracetamol is a mind altering drug don’t you?

  148. Roger.

    If they weren’t allowed a part pension they’d spend the $200,000 or give it to the kids then go on the full pension.

    A pensioner is limited to $10K a year in gifts and $30K over a 5 year period; over that and the gift will still be counted as your asset for pension assessment terms for a period of 5 years.

  149. JC

    Interesting piece on Jack Ruby, the man who shot Oswald. It basically agrees with the Warren commission report.

    There’s no conspiracy.

    https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/who-was-jack-ruby/

  150. Roger.

    Likewise gifts made 5 years before applying or the pension.

  151. Mark A

    Roger.
    #2661108, posted on March 15, 2018 at 10:15 am
    A pensioner is limited to $10K a year in gifts and $30K over a 5 year period; over that and the gift will still be counted as your asset for pension assessment terms for a period of 5 years.

    True but there are many ways to skin a cat.

  152. I’ve never hallucinated on paracetamol or ibuprofen.

  153. Boris

    Nemkat – You are looking at the case the wrong way.

    Ask yourself have the ABC and the Left motive, method and opportunity to frame Pell?

    Not even that. He is innocent until proven guilty. As much as this principle is flouted in rape and child abuse cases (in more ways than one), one hopes and prays that it is not flouted too much in this sad case.

    And yes it does look like a conspiracy of Church opponents and leftists.

  154. Roger.

    True but there are many ways to skin a cat.

    Family members have come unstuck trying to do just that.

    Human Services will come after you.

  155. EvilElvis

    “Apparently it won’t affect me that much because I only hold shares through my super fund, but it’s possible those returns will go down and that hurts,” retired marine engineer Jim Robertson told The Australian yesterday. The 78-year-old, on a full pension supplemented by a small amount of super in an ­industry fund, has voted Labor in every state and federal election bar one since emigrating from Scotland more than 50 years ago.

    Ever heard of “reap what you sow” you stupid Scottish twat! People like this should get burned by Labor stupidity.

  156. Stimpson J. Cat

    I’ve never hallucinated on paracetamol or ibuprofen.

    Neither have I!
    😁

  157. egg_

    Trumble, chest swell with pride and convinced that he can save the day, will immediately wing his way down there with his leather jacket to prove he is a man of the people.

    “Never fear – Smith is here!”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_ewGNA6Ubk

    IIRC Harris wrote many of his lines himself – he must have modelled Smith’s character on a narc he’d known.
    Mr Fitzhugh of Land of The Giants was the same in the same era and genre – they must have known to avoid such characters in expeditionary parties (there’s an Inuit reference to same IIRC) and there’s an argument that antisocial companion animals are usually put down, yet we have to bear the burden of same in humans – viz the trolls on this blog.
    /NADT

  158. egg_

    The one thing that no one has said:
    George Pell isn’t the type of bloke who would do that.

    Don’t attack the straw men: Straw man fallacies and reductio ad absurdum fallacies

  159. Infidel Tiger

    I’ve never hallucinated on paracetamol or ibuprofen

    Take enough or smoke it and you will.

    I think drug laws need a major overhaul, but it would be pretty hard to imagine ever tolerating methamphetamines ever been decriminalised let alone legalised.

  160. Anne

    Annie

    You reckon he faked it being wheel chair bound all those decades? Wow!

    No.

    Expand your thinking.

    How did he survive 50 years with ALS?

    Who would benefit from a voice like Hawking’s (atheist, global communism) continuing to spew his pitiable genius ?

    What technology do such people have?

  161. egg_

    Now here is an interesting twist on the China immigration Ponzi scheme:

    Note SBS running “News promos” with Janice Petersen – one where she states that reffos aren’t pushing up house prices?

  162. I think drug laws need a major overhaul, but it would be pretty hard to imagine ever tolerating methamphetamines ever been decriminalised let alone legalised.

    Precisely the point of my earlier foray. Hallucinogens impair agency.

  163. EvilElvis

    the franking credit thing could well cost the government more than it gains.

    Cost us, BoN, cost us.

  164. Roger.

    Note SBS running “News promos” with Janice Petersen – one where she states that reffos aren’t pushing up house prices?

    Does she say it’s a supply issue?

    But we have artificial constraints on supply.

    Ergo, under the current regime, migration is pushing up house prices.

  165. Stimpson J. Cat

    Hallucinogens impair agency.

    Exactly.
    Some us hallucinate naturally, and cheaply.
    Thanks brain!!!

  166. C.L.

    Bernie Sanders Addresses Students Marching For Gun-Control — Protected By Armed Capitol Police.

    The audio at that video is actually frightening. Sanders himself looks terrified.

  167. OldOzzie

    Dad left for dead after attack by young thugs in Melbourne

    A father has been left with a crushed femur and broken nose, and will have to undergo months of rehabilitation, after he was bashed by three youths in Melbourne’s southeast.

    Shannon Amendola, 32, was walking through central Dandenong after meeting friends about 6pm last Thursday when he was attacked.

    Police have described two as caucasian, and one man of African appearance who was wearing a fluoro vest.

    They punched him on the side of the head, which caused him to fall to the ground, before bashing him for what he believed was six to seven minutes.

    “I’m lucky to be alive, I’m lucky to come home to my daughter,” Mr Amendola, who has a four-year-old daughter and lives nearby in Hampton Park, told 3AW Radio.

    “I’m not the biggest fella, but I played rugby union for 10 years of my life … I’ve never had a broken nose, never had teeth smashed out, never had anything like this.”

    Mr Amendola’s father, Cameron Byrnes, told The Australian his son had spent almost six days in hospital and would be out of work for roughly nine months.

    “They kicked him half to death,” he said. “They used the handle of a shopping trolley to smash his leg, and broke his femur. That’s an injury you see in car accidents or when you get hit by a bus. It’s lucky he is not dead and not more severely injured.”

    The offenders didn’t demand money or steal anything from Mr Amendola, but simply shouted “Oi” before attacking him from ­behind.

    “He’s not the biggest bloke in the world, he’s not tall, but he’s very well put together, he’s got no body fat. He looks after himself,” said Mr Byrnes. “You just think, if these guys had taken him head-on, I would have backed him, but they didn’t give him a chance.”

    Police said Greater Dandenong Crime Investigation Unit detectives were investigating and have appealed for public assistance. No arrests have been made.

    Mr Byrnes said it was important to publicise such incidents to highlight the problems faced by those living in areas of high crime.

    “The underlying thing now is just anger that it’s allowed to happen and get out of control to this point,” he said. “I lived in Dandenong 20 years ago and had no problem walking around on my own any time of the day or night. I don’t drive through Dandenong now, there is no reason to go out there and I would not walk through Dandenong day or night.

    “The underlying thing is just anger. Anger that it can happen. I feel sorry for him, he might be 32, but he’s still my baby, my firstborn, my son.”

    From the Comments

    – A father has been left with a crushed femur and broken nose, and will have to undergo months of rehabilitation, after he was bashed by three youths in Melbourne’s southeast.

    Shannon Amendola, 32, was walking through central Dandenong after meeting friends about 6pm last Thursday when he was attacked.

    Police have described two as caucasian, and one man of African appearance who was wearing a fluoro vest.

    They punched him on the side of the head, which caused him to fall to the ground, before bashing him for what he believed was six to seven minutes.

    “I’m lucky to be alive, I’m lucky to come home to my daughter,” Mr Amendola, who has a four-year-old daughter and lives nearby in Hampton Park, told 3AW Radio.

    “I’m not the biggest fella, but I played rugby union for 10 years of my life … I’ve never had a broken nose, never had teeth smashed out, never had anything like this.”

    Mr Amendola’s father, Cameron Byrnes, told The Australian his son had spent almost six days in hospital and would be out of work for roughly nine months.

    “They kicked him half to death,” he said. “They used the handle of a shopping trolley to smash his leg, and broke his femur. That’s an injury you see in car accidents or when you get hit by a bus. It’s lucky he is not dead and not more severely injured.”

    The offenders didn’t demand money or steal anything from Mr Amendola, but simply shouted “Oi” before attacking him from ­behind.

    “He’s not the biggest bloke in the world, he’s not tall, but he’s very well put together, he’s got no body fat. He looks after himself,” said Mr Byrnes. “You just think, if these guys had taken him head-on, I would have backed him, but they didn’t give him a chance.”

    Police said Greater Dandenong Crime Investigation Unit detectives were investigating and have appealed for public assistance. No arrests have been made.

    Mr Byrnes said it was important to publicise such incidents to highlight the problems faced by those living in areas of high crime.

    “The underlying thing now is just anger that it’s allowed to happen and get out of control to this point,” he said. “I lived in Dandenong 20 years ago and had no problem walking around on my own any time of the day or night. I don’t drive through Dandenong now, there is no reason to go out there and I would not walk through Dandenong day or night.

    “The underlying thing is just anger. Anger that it can happen. I feel sorry for him, he might be 32, but he’s still my baby, my firstborn, my son.”

    From the Comments

    – “No arrests have been made.” Hearing that a lot lately.

    – What’s the problem. The youths are simply following the example of thuggery and violence set by the Unions who after all are the premier authority in Victoria. The upsurge of crime and violence in Victoria is a symptom of a sick socialist State.

    – The truly terrible thing about this is that if there was a Liberal govt in power, the media would be all over this.

    Dan the CFA man does not give a rats about this

    – This should be squarely put down to Andrews, his left wing appointments to the judiciary and his union mates in the police force who are more concerned about protecting the perpetrators than protecting the public. How Andrews can still be considered an acceptable premier is beyond me. Victorians appear to be very stupid, rewarding the man who has let the police detoritate to the point where they are largely invisible (not surprising given their generous leave conditions and the enormous number on “stress leave”), who has also loaded the courts with lefties and who refuses to admit that there is a serious law and order issue in Victoria and so is incapable of doing the things needed.

    The people who did this to this man should be sent to jail for life, it was a cowardly three on one attack where they could not give a damn if they killed him or not and so they should be treated as murders.

    – How does Truthful Daniel Andrews deny this one took place?

    – 15ElizabethBrianDavidCraigLIKEREPLY
    Avatar for Michael
    Michael 2 HOURS AGO

  168. EvilElvis

    Janice is up there now with Jenny Brockie, their credibility is tainted and dragged in the sewer by getting involved with the virtue signalling diversity advertising. It’s a shame.

  169. JC

    CBRE is possibly the largest commercial real estate firm in the world doing lots of selling and leasing of commercial real estate. These fuckers just sent me a eulogy for Steven Hawking by email.

    CBRE celebrates the life of one of our generation’s greatest minds, Stephen Hawking. A man who revolutionized the way we view scientific thought.

    Like WTF?

  170. John Constantine

    Yarragrad kleptocracy replaces volunteer local committees dealing with fire and fuel management, mainly volunteer cfa types with paid labor mates.

    CIA can still be represented on new committees as long as they shut up and obey orders.

    Comrades.

    Eternal transformation to the big State.

  171. Knuckle Dragger

    It is possible to OD on paracetamol – but you need about 150 tablets ingested in five minutes. Your liver, through which it is processed waves the white flag and shuts down. Very painful process, apparently, but won’t kill you – you’ll just be attached to various bags and tubes for the rest of your life.

  172. JC

    I replied:

    Guys, why are you sending me a eulogy on Hawking… from a commercial real estate office?

  173. JC

    Very painful process, apparently, but won’t kill you – you’ll just be attached to various bags and tubes for the rest of your life.

    Bullshit. It will kill you must like it killed a freind’s daughter who suicided on that shit. Stop embarrassing us all.

  174. A man who revolutionized the way we view scientific thought.

    No, he didn’t. The over-the-top eulogizing of Hawking is largely the urban bugman class slapping itself on the back and cheering itself up.

  175. Infidel Tiger

    Dover you need to watch the Peterson & Paglia interview on YouTube. Paglia talks about how LSD destroyed all the minds of her generation.

    She never touched the stuff.

  176. min

    Re ice epidemic , granddaughter an intern at large suburban hospital tells me general medicalward is half code grey that is violent drug addicts . Hope they keep them separated from the little old ladies with heart conditions.u

  177. Infidel Tiger

    No, he didn’t. The over-the-top eulogizing of Hawking is largely the urban bugman class slapping itself on the back and cheering itself up.

    Exactly.

    The lady who invented self saucing pudding contributed more to society than that spaz.

  178. John Constantine

    Victoria has branch stacked enough imported vote plantations into Melbourne since the two towers went down to transform the polity.

    Their electoral commission wipes out rural seats and redistributed the parliamentary representatives to the new branch stacked imported leftist gulags.

    Two million votes imported into Melbourne since the two towers went down and a million deaths of obsolete Australian voters means that a creature of the left like Andrews can dig in.

    At least he stopped the rightist shorten from beating turnfailure last election.

  179. Roger.

    Victorians appear to be very stupid, rewarding the man who has let the police detoritate to the point where they are largely invisible

    Newspoll: Labor leads, 52-48 TPP. Dan Andrews 46% approval, 41% disapproval.

    Fact check: True.

  180. OldOzzie

    Shorten in scramble to fix flaws in tax plan

    Bill Shorten is considering a supplement payment package for up to 250,000 pensioners to make up for annual cash refunds they stand to lose, as the Opposition Leader comes under mounting pressure over Labor’s plan to scrap $59 billion in refundable tax credits on share dividends.

    As Labor faces pushback from seniors and self-managed super fund lobby groups, The Australian understands that a financial sweetener will be considered for the 10 per cent of pensioners on the lowest annual incomes who may lose their modest imputation credit refunds.

    This would likely come in the form of a payment supplement in addition to Labor’s promise to ­restore the energy supplement linked to the carbon tax, which the Turnbull government scrapped for new welfare and pension recipients.

    “We will make sure that pensioners are OK, full stop,” Mr Shorten said yesterday after hinting that Labor’s budget strategy would ensure pensioners were not left out of pocket.

    National Seniors Australia, the Self-Managed Super Fund ­Association and the Association of Independent Retirees yesterday urged their members to write to Labor MPs and warned of a ­national campaign against Mr Shorten’s tax grab.

    The Opposition Leader yesterday acknowledged his policy would affect about 250,000 pensioners, amid new warnings the changes would force more people onto the Age Pension and possibly undermine the expected revenue gain of $59bn over a decade.

    Mr Shorten’s claim that part pensions would rise to compensate low-income earners for the loss of their rebates was also ­attacked by National Seniors Australia. It declared the comment “incorrect” and argued it showed a fundamental misunderstanding of “how income is calculated for pensioners”.

    National Seniors Australia chief executive Ian Henschke said he wanted Labor to “reconsider the full effect of this policy” and provided research showing that some part-pensioners would be more than $900 worse off once their rebates were removed.

    Analysis provided exclusively to The Australian shows that a single person who qualifies for the part pension under the assets test may be substantially worse off under the Labor plan.

    In one case study, an individual with $451,000 in assets — including $1000 cash from a refundable dividend tax credit — would receive a $3 increase in their fortnightly pension payment (from $302.65 to $305.65) once the refund was scrapped. While this would lift the part-pension payment by $78 a year, it would still leave the individual $922 worse off overall.

    Centrelink makes an assumption about the income that investments will generate. In another case study, the analysis suggests that a single person who qualifies for a part pension under the income test is assumed to receive a return of 1.75 per cent on their first $50,200 of savings and 3.25 per cent on anything over that.

    Changes in the person’s actual income are irrelevant to this calculation, so the abolition of cash imputation refunds would make no difference to the pension, ­although it would directly affect the pensioner’s total income.

    National Seniors Australia’s senior officer Basil La Brooy said: “There doesn’t seem to be an understanding of how income is calculated for pensioners. And this is a policy that’s been in place for many years.”

    Malcolm Turnbull yesterday accused Mr Shorten of launching a targeted attack on lower and middle-income earners in a “Labor cash grab” he said would hit more than 3.5 million superannuation accounts and affect more than one million people, including more than 200,000 pensioners.

    “He’s seeking to take money from pensioners and self-funded retirees, money they’re entitled to,” Mr Turnbull said. “Think about that — 50 per cent of the individuals that will be hurt by this tax grab are on incomes of less than $18,000. These are pensioners and self-funded retirees.

    “This is not a tax loophole or anything like this. This is a case where companies have paid tax, they’ve paid tax. They pay a dividend with a franking credit and if somebody doesn’t have other tax liabilities to offset that, they’re entitled to get the difference in cash. That is completely fair. It’s been the case for nearly 20 years.”

    Writing to The Australian yesterday, former Treasury secretary John Stone backed Mr Turnbull’s criticism.

    Mr Stone said Paul Keating had not gone far enough after introducing dividend imputation relief in 1987 to correct the “injustice” of double taxation whereby “dividend recipients had no or ­insufficient other taxable income against which to offset their ­credits”.

    Mr Stone said this was “finally rectified” by Coalition treasurer Peter Costello in 2001, after the budget had been taken back into surplus. He warned that Mr Shorten’s policy on franking credits would “restore that injustice”.

    The Association of Independent Retirees warned the Labor policy could “push more retirees onto the Aged Pension much earlier than would currently be the case” and “negate the short-term revenue gains anticipated”.

    “You need to engage with your federal member of parliament and bring to their attention the concerns described above that AIR has with Labor’s announced policy on dividend imputation credits,” it said in a letter to its members.

    The Self-Managed Super Fund Association produced figures showing that a single homeowner with $580,000 in superannuation (who had saved enough to forgo the Age Pension) could lose $5357 in franking credits — a reduction in yearly income from $28,357 to $23,000, or a cut of 18.8 per cent.

    SMSF Association head of policy Jordan George said the drop to $23,000 in income was only $112 above the full Age Pension and Age Pension supplement of $22,888 which can be accessed by a homeowning single person with assets of less than $253,750.

    “Self-funded retirees who have assets just above the Age Pension assets test thresholds may be worse off under the Labor proposal than those with less assets but receiving the Age Pension,” Mr George said. “This is a perverse outcome.”

    From the Comments

    Gawd what a complete moron. Give someone a supplementary payment because they’ve taken away a portion of their already taxed income that is rightfully theirs!! Incredible!

    All those left wing think tanks and no one imagined that the pensioners would be getting franking credits.

    Talk about disconnected.

    – Well Bill you’ve stuffed this one up, well and truly, but you don’t really care do you because pensioners are generally LNP voters and why should you care about them, it wont affect you at the polls. Your Labor voters should also start to worry because your slippery tax grab assaults wont stop here.

    – Just shows the SMSF “brainwave” of Bill’s wasn’t thought through intelligently in the first place.

    Shorten and Bowen don’t have a clue about what they’re doing if they’ve got to start changing it all so soon.

    It was always a disaster from the get-go.

    – Labor would find a lot of easy rorts to end if they seriously looked the spending side of the budget. Superannuation needs to be quarantined from the greedy fingers of politicians.

    I think we should start a campaign for everyone to write on their ballot paper at the next election:

    20% of GDP is your income. Live within it !

    – Sadly Labor is a popularist joke – even more sadly the majority of the self interested population get sucked in.

    Another sadness; a government who keeps shooting themselves in the foot

    I would never vote for a party willing to shaft Grandma and Grandad. (Hmmmm?)

    – The Bill Shorten tax supplement payment package will probably be a special deal for retired workers who agree to join specified branches of the CFMEU and other unions.

    – I cannot believe that so many Australians still apparently want these incompetent muppets to win the next election.

    – Bill Shortenonmics on full display: take from one hand from those who have worked hard and earnt their way to retirement handout free; give more to those who did not and claim the pension. The former subsequently re-jig their investment portfolio and join the latter. Pension costs skyrocket.

    Is BS saving money or is BS, BS?

    Just what we need more public servants to administer a system (more cost to tax payers). This man is pathetic as is his policy think tank. Just leave what we have in place.

    – This is tax policy on the run.

    I suppose those who came up with the flawed franking credits plan

    are also the designers of the modified supplement plan.

    They’re making this up as they go along. You know what the system works but I guess that’s why they have to play around with it

  181. Leigh Lowe

    The lady who invented self saucing pudding contributed more to society than that spaz.

    Yes, but what did she write her recipe on?
    A post-it note, no less.
    I rest my case.

  182. thefrollickingmole

    Sooner or later the penny will drop.
    They allowed boy buggery because NAMBLA types were allowed to stay in the church because of ‘muh feelz”.

    Williams: church’s old views on gay clergy led to desire not to judge sexual activities
    Former archbishop tells child sexual abuse inquiry ‘there was perhaps overcompensation’ for repressive views.

    But the bearded clam blames…. traditional church values…

    The Church of England may have “overcompensated” for earlier repressive attitudes to gay clergy with a reluctance to deal rigorously with priests who sexually abused children, Rowan Williams, the former archbishop of Canterbury, has said.

    Giving evidence to the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse, Williams said an “awkwardness” about the church’s views on homosexuality 30 or 40 years ago may have led to a desire not to be “judgmental about people’s sexual activities”.

    In recent years, “more and more people [are] coming out of the closet. The question of clergy sexuality has been more openly discussed. The change in climate has been quite striking … I think there has been a sea change.”

    He went on: “At a time when people were beginning to feel awkward about traditional closeted attitudes, there was perhaps an overcompensation, [people] saying, ‘Well, we don’t want to be to be judgmental about people’s sexual activities … We must therefore give people a second chance and understand the pressures,’ and so on.”

    He suggested that “a rather paradoxical consequence of the traditional view of homosexuality within the church [is that] you want to overcompensate a bit for it.”

    I blame George Pell.

  183. C.L.

    Hawking revolutionised the coffee table book.
    But not as much as Cosmo Kramer’s coffee table book about coffee tables.

  184. JC

    Who recently went on a plane flight around here?

    I flew back last night on a Dreamliner. First time. What a great plane. Boeing at 330 bucks a share is totally and completely justifiedand should be even higher because the entire fleet will eventually be “dreamlined”. I love this stock almost as much as I love the kids.

    Australian actor, Robert Taylor – from Netflix Longmire series was next to me on the other side of the aisle. What’s with actors and huge craniums. He has an enormous freaking head – bigger than Steve Martin’s and his was yuge too.

  185. OldOzzie

    South African government hit back at Peter Dutton’s Afrikaans farmers claim

    The South African government has hit back at Peter Dutton’s claim that Afrikaans farmers needed help from a “civilised country” like Australia, declaring white farmers were not facing state-sanctioned persecution in the African nation.

    The South African foreign ministry released a statement to news agency Reuters arguing Mr Dutton had crossed a diplomatic line for suggesting the farmers were facing persecution.

    “That threat does not exist,” the foreign ministry said. “There is no reason for any government in the world to suspect that a section of South Africans is under danger from their own democratically elected government.

    “We regret that the Australian government chose not to use the available diplomatic channels available for them to raise concerns or to seek clarification.”

    Yesterday, Mr Dutton said he had asked his department to look at bringing persecuted white South African farmers to Australia on humanitarian visas.

    “If you look at the footage and read the stories, you hear the accounts, it’s a horrific circumstance they face,” Mr Dutton told The Daily Telegraph.

    “We have the potential to help some of these people that are being persecuted.”

    Mr Dutton said he asked his department to explore whether the farmers can be accepted into Australia through refugee, humanitarian or other visas, including the in-country persecution visa category.

    “I do think on the information that I’ve seen, people do need help, and they need help from a civilised country like ours,” he said.

  186. Bruce of Newcastle

    Here’s one for Sinc’s files:

    Perth baker made plenty of dough smuggling two tonnes of tobacco

    A Perth bakery owner imported more than two tonnes of tobacco illegally into Australia, defrauding the Commonwealth to the tune of almost $2 million, a WA court has heard.

    For the first time, details of the Australian Border Force (ABF) illicit tobacco importation investigation can be revealed.

    The ABF operation in Perth in 2016 led to father of three Ma’ad Abdul Muna’m Al Raziqi copping a five year jail term in the WA District Court after he pleaded guilty to eight charges.

    Amazing Mr Al Raziqi got a custodial sentence given his victimology ranking.

  187. notafan

    Expand your thinking.

    that’s what meth is for

  188. JC

    Seriously, I once read that most male actors a short fucks, or at least it’s a good idea to be on the shorter side if you’re a leading man, as it doesn’t put the sheilas out of height range. Dunno if it’s true, but that’s what I heard. Is there anything about head size – like it’s better for blokes to have big freaking heads? Or perhaps it’s just co-incidence that Martin and Taylor have very large noggins?

  189. Stimpson J. Cat

    Paglia talks about how LSD destroyed all the minds of her generation.

    I used to love acid.
    I loved it so much that I stopped using it because I recognized the danger.
    When people are unable to tell you are on acid in your day to day life it is probably a sign that there is something very wrong.
    It is a very dangerous drug indeed, mainly because by the time you know whether you can handle it or not, it is already way too late.
    The good thing is it actually feels very similar to natural psychosis, so it is a handy yardstick to use to help gauge your state of mind.

  190. OldOzzie

    Derryn Hinch denies he’s jumped of the wagon after post wine fall

    Victorian senator Derryn Hinch has defended his decision to backflip on his promise to give up drinking, declaring: “You’ve got to live your life,” as he explained why he collapsed on Monday after getting out of an Uber.

    The former shock jock, dubbed the “Human Headline”, said he had only two glasses of wine on the evening he collapsed and spent a night in hospital. He attributed the fall to a bad knee and a possible heart problem, insisting he wasn’t back on the booze because he isn’t “stupid or suicidal.”.

    Senator Hinch vowed to never drink again after he had a liver transplant 2011.

    This morning he admitted on Melbourne radio station 3AW: “With my background and my history, (people will think) he is on the piss again.

    “One of the last things I did before I jumped the shark and became a politician was that I interviewed Alex Best, who was George Best’s widow, in London. George Best got a liver transplant, was picked up drink driving within about eight months and was dead within 18 months.

    “I may be a lot of things but I am not stupid and I’m not suicidal.”

    He said he drank in moderation two nights a week, declaring ”you’re not in a monastery” while adding, in a bizarre aside, his donor “had his problems”.

    In a testy interview with 3AW host Neil Mitchell, Senator Hinch acknowledged he had previously vowed to never drink at all.

    “Yes I did but then I thought well you have got to live a life and I do enjoy a glass of wine sometimes with my meals,” he said.

    “And I said on Monday I had two glasses of wine, I could have fudged it and said I didn’t but it is not true because I did.”

    He said he drank small amounts of alcoholic wine a “couple of times a week” and drank non-alcoholic wine “all the time”.

    He also disputed his own account of how he used to drink four bottles of wine a day, calling it an “exaggeration”. He later admitted he used to drink “up to” four bottles of wine a day when he came under pressure from questioning.

    MITCHELL: But it isn’t a good look is it, drinking alcohol at all anytime with a liver transplant?

    HINCH: Well I discussed with my doctor and they said you’ve got to live your life, and you are not in a monastery and not yet in a mausoleum.

    MITCHELL: Yeah but you said you wouldn’t insult the donor by drinking.

    HINCH: Yeah well I don’t want to insult my donor but he had his problems, my donor had his problems which I am not going to go into. But you do have to live a life and I’ve decided that is the way I’m going to live it so I don’t resile from that.

    Senator Hinch denied he was ever an alcoholic because he could go a month without drinking.

    MITCHELL: Yeah but you were drinking four or five bottles of wine a day.

    HINCH: That is bulldust.

    MITCHELL: You wrote that for me when I was at the Herald.

    HINCH: It was an exaggeration

    MITCHELL: You wrote that yourself.

    HINCH: Yeah but I never wrote five and I never wrote six, I see this morning someone on the television saying Hinch used to drink six bottles of wine a day. You would be dead.

    MITCHELL: How much did you drink a day?

    HINCH: There were times when I drank three to four bottles of wine

    MITCHELL: You wrote a column for me when I was editor of the Herald, because I remember being astounded by it, you said you drank four bottles of wine a day.

    HINCH: Well yeah it cold be up to four bottles of wine a day, that is quite true I’m not denying it. I’m not trying to rewrite history.

  191. hzhousewife

    In the coffee queue a couple of times a week are a retired couple, he was a teacher and very left-wing. Well, no longer. This morning he was absolutely spitting chips about Shorten and declared he would never ever vote Labor again. I turned my head and smirked. Something to do with his retirement income I think he said.

  192. Leigh Lowe

    CBRE is possibly the largest commercial real estate firm in the world doing lots of selling and leasing of commercial real estate. These fuckers just sent me a eulogy for Steven Hawking by email.

    Claiming intellectual status vicariously with a sprinkling of common-or-garden virtue signalling.
    I read somewhere that Hawking’s book is in a dead-heat with Joyce’s Ulysses for the lowest completion rate per 100 copies sold.
    But one must have both in one’s library, overtly displayed to signal one’s intellectual superiority.
    FMD, if he had said “burning … coal … is … harmless” they would have pulled the CBs on his voice synthesiser ten years ago and put him in a loonies home.

  193. Leigh Lowe

    He said he drank in moderation two nights a week, declaring ”you’re not in a monastery” while adding, in a bizarre aside, his donor “had his problems”.

    Key among the donor’s problems is that he is dead.
    The other person with problems is the person who missed the liver transplant because they gave it to a ageing piss-head who destroyed his own liver.

  194. Knuckle Dragger

    JC,

    I am very sorry to hear of your friend’s loss. My point was you need a LOT of it. This advice was given to me by a long serving ambo while we were both attending one such case. If his advice is wrong, then I take responsibility for posting what I thought was advice given by a subject matter expert.

  195. notafan

    Now here is an interesting twist on the China immigration Ponzi scheme:

    The print was too small, and some at least too French

    but I am assuming that those low income, not taxpaying Chinese with the big houses and nice cars (and all their similiar looking relatives popping in on tourist visas) are hoovering welfare and free medical care and low priced pharmaceuticals like it is going out of fashion.

    Thanks Canadian taxpayers!

    Gordon said there’s “no doubt” that programs like investor immigration help to “decouple the housing market from the labour market and make housing more unaffordable.”

    seems that way

  196. H B Bear

    Mick Fanning isn’t the only thing set to disappear from the world tour – so too are close-up shots of women’s derrière’s.

    Another example of wymyn wanting the freedom to behave as they want but to avoid any consequences flowing from that behaviour – a point Jordon Peterson has highlighted about aspects of wymyn’s behaviour in the workplace too. For all the talk of grrrl power in women’s surfing it is still largely model-type surfers selling bikinis and lifestyle fantasy to non-surfing grrrls. Their surfing has improved a lot over the years and puts the lezzo league to shame.

  197. JC

    I am very sorry to hear of your friend’s loss.

    Dude, no you’re not.

    My point was you need a LOT of it. This advice was given to me by a long serving ambo while we were both attending one such case. If his advice is wrong, then I take responsibility for posting what I thought was advice given by a subject matter expert.

    Ambos aren’t experts, docs are. It took a few weeks to kill her from what I recall.

    Anything sold over the counter can potentially kill you even at low doses. Any med sold in a pharmacy can kill you.

  198. Boris

    I may be a lot of things but I am not stupid and I’m not suicidal.”

    Not so sure.

  199. Tintarella di Luna

    Dover you need to watch the Peterson & Paglia interview on YouTube. Paglia talks about how LSD destroyed all the minds of her generation.

    Fantastic interview, Paglia is absolutely incandescent with rage at what is happening in the humanities subjects and with the lily-livered university administrations.

  200. JC

    In any event I cared for the parents, but I have no sympathy for anyone taking themselves out. Zero.

  201. OldOzzie

    Bill Shorten’s dividend rebate ban a strange way of helping retirees

    Perhaps the first thing to say about Bill Shorten’s proposal to ditch the cash refund on dividend imputation credits is that it is a long way from becoming law.

    Labor may win the next election, but that is only part of the battle. With trust in the major parties so low, goodness knows what rag bag of individuals will turn up in the Senate who will need to be convinced of the merits of the policy.

    If the new gaggle of Senators have any sense, they will send Mr Shorten back to his white board.

    The status quo may sit uncomfortably with tax purists, given that it effectively allows for a negative tax rate, but it is entirely in keeping with the objective of super – which for a moment I will extend to include the objective of the whole retirement savings system – which is to substitute or supplement the age pension.

    For hundreds of thousands of retirees, the cash refunds they receive on the fully franked shares of Telstra, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and the like, which obtained through the stockmarkets listings of government entities and demutualisations in the 1980s and 1990s, add a few extra dollars a week to their budgets, thereby supplementing the age pension.

    In some cases the refunds, together with the dividend payments, may produce sufficient income to reduce an individual’s Centrelink entitlements, which in turn reduces the government’s pension bill.

    If Labor is serious about wanting to enshrine the objective of super into legislation (which the Coalition seems to have quietly put into the bottom drawer) and say the system should allow Australians to lead a comfortable or adequate lifestyle in retirement, then removing cash refunds on imputation credits is a strange way to go about doing it.

    Mr Shorten’s policy is also at odds with his aim of robbing Peter to pay Paul.

    Wealthy people pay tax and will continue to be able to offset imputation credits against their income. For older Australians, this is more so the case, given the introduction last year of the $1.6 million limit that can be transferred to a tax-free super pension.

    Retirees with that sort of largesse will continue to be able to make use of the imputation system. Retirees must pay 15 per cent tax on earnings on amounts in super in excess of $1.6 million, whereas individuals with less than $1.6 million will cease to benefit from dividend imputation.

    If Mr Shorten wants to continue his class warfare and attack wealthy Australians, there are far more targeted ways he could do this, rather than the general spray revealed this week. Reduce the transfer balance cap if he must. Limit the refund to, say $10,000, so that middle income earners are spared.

    The other problem is that the continuous tinkering with the super rules to plug budget holes undermines confidence in the system.

    No government should underestimate this.

    If the tinkering goes on for too much longer, it might start to discourage some people from saving at all.

    Becoming a self-funded, or nearly self-funded retiree is something that Australians should aspire to and encouraged to become so if they have the means.

    More changes, coming so soon after last year’s reforms, will only act as a deterrent.

    Oh, and just conveniently, putting an end to cash refunds for imputation credits may help Mr Shorten’s industry super fund buddies retain members when they retire by removing a benefit of running a pension account inside a self-managed scheme.

  202. Leigh Lowe

    I flew back last night on a Dreamliner. First time. What a great plane. Boeing at 330 bucks a share is totally and completely justifiedand should be even higher because the entire fleet will eventually be “dreamlined”. I love this stock almost as much as I love the kids.

    So, if you went on an American Airlines Dreamliner, your life would be complete, right?
    Permanent boner for the entire flight.

  203. Infidel Tiger

    Fantastic interview, Paglia is absolutely incandescent with rage at what is happening in the humanities subjects and with the lily-livered university administrations.

    She is brilliant. So weird that so one so smart can still hold so many contrary views.

  204. Knuckle Dragger

    JC,

    On that last point, finally we agree on something.

  205. Tintarella di Luna

    She is brilliant. So weird that so one so smart can still hold so many contrary views.

    She is Italian, so there’s that.

  206. Viva

    From the UK Telegraph. What took them so long?

    Europe’s political uprising is shifting to a second front. Once-silent intellectuals are starting to challenge the core assumption of EU ideology, indicting the project for moral vandalism and a reckless attack on the democratic nation state.

    It is almost as if a counter “doxa” is emerging in the cultural capitals of the Continent. Theorists and professors are proclaiming the virtues of the nation – the precious liberal nation, inspired by the universal and redemptive values of the French and American revolutions – in a way we have hardly heard in recent times.

    They defend it as the only real vehicle of democracy known to man.

  207. Mark A

    Leigh Lowe
    #2661160, posted on March 15, 2018 at 10:59 am

    The lady who invented self saucing pudding contributed more to society than that spaz.

    Yes, but what did she write her recipe on?
    A post-it note, no less.
    I rest my case.

    From wiki

    In 1968, Dr. Spencer Silver, a scientist at 3M in the United States, was attempting to develop a super-strong adhesive. Instead he accidentally created a “low-tack,” reusable, pressure-sensitive adhesive.[1][2][3] For five years, Silver promoted his “solution without a problem” within 3M both informally and through seminars but failed to gain acceptance. In 1974 a colleague who had attended one of his seminars, Art Fry, came up with the idea of using the adhesive to anchor his bookmark in his hymn book.[4][5] Fry then utilized 3M’s officially sanctioned “permitted bootlegging” policy to develop the idea.[5] The original notes’ yellow color was chosen by accident, as the lab next-door to the Post-It team had only yellow scrap paper to use.[6]

  208. OldOzzie

    Ged Kearney tells Batman voters there’s ‘still time’ to review imputation credit hit

    Labor has time to review the impact of its proposal to axe cash dividend imputation credits on low income retirees, the party’s star candidate for Saturday’s Batman by-election, Ged Kearney, said on Wednesday.

    Ms Kearney told a rowdy “town hall” meeting in Preston that although the policy was designed to hit wealthy retirees who paid little tax, she had heard from a number of Batman voters that it could also hit low income retirees who relied on cash credits to bolster their income.

    One voter at the town hall said he had a self-managed superannuation fund and estimated his retirement income could be cut by as much as 25 per cent by Labor’s policy. “It seems unfair”, he said.

    Labor is nervous about the potential for the policy to backfire in the Batman by-election, which betting markets say the Greens are poised to seize from traditional incumbents Labor.

    Labor leader Bill Shorten said on Wednesday that about 200,000 part pensioners and about 14,000 full pensioners could be hit by the policy but in most cases the impact would be modest and if they lose cash imputation credits, their part-pension will increase.

    But Ms Kearney went further at the town hall on Wednesday evening, saying that she was hearing that the policy was not only hitting wealthy SMSF retirees who could spend thousands and thousands of dollars to ensure they paid no tax.

    ‘I am hearing you’

    “That’s what the purpose of it was. That is a good policy. I think everyone would agree with me. But I am hearing what you are saying,” Ms Kearney told the rowdy meeting which was interrupted several times by Macedonian-Australian protesters angered by a Labor pamphlet that used the Greek language instead of Macedonian.

    “I am hearing what you are telling me (as low income self-funded retirees) and all I can say is that we will look at it – we have got time, we have got time.”

    Ms Kearney made a statement at the start of the meeting sincerely apologising for the pamphlet being issued by her campaign office with the Greek language.

    Macedonians say they were expelled by Greece in 1948 with 40,000 children and still face a campaign by the Greek government to change the name of the Republic of Macedonia, which was created in 1991 from the break-up of the former Yugoslavia.

    “I understand the sensitivities around this issue and I apologise unreservedly,” she said to loud applause.

    But when she sought to pivot to bread and butter campaign issues angry Macedonian-Australians continued to heckled her, shouting “That’s not good enough!” and “we will not accept it”.

    Whittlesea councillor Stevan Kozmevski had urged the hecklers in Macedonian to grant the forgiveness Ms Kearney had sought, and federal Labor member for Scullin, Andrew Giles, implored the crowd to allow her to finish her opening statement so that she could take questions.

    The questions traversed the Adani coal mine, Labor’s policy on refugees, education, health, penalty rates, aged care, a treaty with Aboriginal Australians.

    Bring people with us

    On the Adani mine and refugees, where Labor is under pressure from the Greens to harden their opposition to Turnbull government policies of supporting the controversial mine and ending the offshore processing of asylum seekers at Manus Island and Nauru, she said they were not reducible to a “two word slogan” and Labor had to bring people in the regions who disagreed with it with them because otherwise they would just get another Liberal government.

    She said Labor would not provide any funding for the Adani mine. “If there is new environmental evidence we will review it (the federal environmental approval) but is not as simple as a two word slogan and there uis such a thing as sovereign risk.”

    She said the government could be sued for billions of dollars if there was a perception of bias against the project, and had to have alternatives for employing workers in regional Queensland.

    On refugees she said she had been a “strong and loud activist” against offshore processing and “without people like me in a party that can form government there will be no real change”.

    The meeting continued to be be interrupted by hecklers. Angelique Soklev-Tasevski, a construction project manager, said her heart had been broken by the pamphlet because using Greek language under the heading “Macedonia” was like putting Nazi propaganda under the heading “Jewish”.

    “That’s what I feel you have dione to my community,” Ms Soklev-Tasevski said.

    “All I can do is apologise,” Ms Kearney repeated.

  209. Fisky;

    Wow. The US Libertarian Party is openly supporting anti-second amendment protests. The “libertarian” movement is now just an auxiliary force of the Left.

    I never saw that coming…

  210. OldOzzie

    Labor’s franking policy a threat to holding Batman


    Labor leader Bill Shorten has moved to soften anger over his plans to scrap dividend cash refunds as the Greens harnessed unrest among older voters to try to win Saturday’s byelection in Batman.

    Amid anecdotal evidence from the inner-Melbourne seat that the policy could hamper Labor’s marginal prospects of victory on Saturday, Greens leader Richard Di Natale signalled that if Labor won the federal election, his party would demand changes to the policy to protect those on low incomes.

  211. Dr Faustus

    Bill Shorten is considering a supplement payment package for up to 250,000 pensioners to make up for annual cash refunds they stand to lose, as the Opposition Leader comes under mounting pressure over Labor’s plan to scrap $59 billion in refundable tax credits on share dividends.

    Was considering a supplemental payment.

    No pensioner compensation, Labor confirms

    On Wednesday Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said he would make sure they are OK “full stop”.

    A day later he said reports about a compensation scheme for those affected were wrong.

    Once, this sort of dishonest, on-the-fly rubbish would have been described as a horror policy blunder sending shockwaves through Labor ranks.
    Now, meh – just par for the course…

  212. struth

    Theorists and professors are proclaiming the virtues of the nation – the precious liberal nation, inspired by the universal and redemptive values of the French and American revolutions – in a way we have hardly heard in recent times.

    They defend it as the only real vehicle of democracy known to man.

    Cluey bastards aren’t they?

  213. OldOzzie

    Labor’s franking policy will put pressure on age pension: Mark Freeman

    More Australians will be forced on to the age pension under Labor’s “flawed, cynical” plan to deny shareholders refundable franking credits, Australian Foundation Investment Company boss Mark Freeman said.

    He unleashed after a meeting of AFIC shareholders in Melbourne on Wednesday, encouraging investors to complain to their local MPs and threatening to orchestrate a letter-writing campaign.

    Australia needed people to fund themselves in retirement but a Labor government would “end up pushing a lot of people back onto the pension”, he said.

    “I have had people at this meeting tell me that is what they are going to have to look at, so it is a big issue.”

    The major parties went to war over who would suffer if Labor managed to remake the dividend imputation system so that excess franking credits can no longer be converted into cash refunds.

    Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said Labor was penalising pensioners and low-income earners.

    At a press conference in Brisbane he encouraged reporters to speak to their parents about what effect the removal of refundable franking credits would have on their finances.

    Labor Leader Bill Shorten shot back: “We are going to stop multi-millionaire welfare funded by the taxpayers of Australia.”

    Mr Freeman demanded to know whether Labor had consulted retirees.

    “I wonder if they have actually got out and about and spoken to the people like we are seeing here today rather than perhaps what the bureaucrats might be saying some model says to balance the budget,” he said.

    “I think they need to get out there and speak to retirees and find out the real impact this is having.”

    Mr Freeman encouraged those attending the meeting to complain about the policy to local members of parliament, and said AFIC may produce a template letter for shareholders to send to politicians.

    “We are certainly strongly encouraging all our investors and everyone we speak with to contact their local member, make sure you have your say and speak up if you don’t like what you are hearing,” he said.

    “You also want that level playing field between going into an industry fund or going into self-managed, you should have that choice and it should be a fair system.”

    The Institute of Public Accountants said Australia should be looking at every avenue possible to reduce long-term reliance on government funded pensions.

    “Self-funded retirees or prospective self-funded retirees who seek to invest to secure a self-funded retirement plan, alleviating pressure on a government-funded pension system, should be incentivised, not penalised,” IPA chief executive Andrew Conway said.

    “Self-managed superannuation funds are a viable and important part of Australia’s superannuation system and this proposed measure will deter entrants from investing in their future self-funded retirement,” said Mr Conway.

    The peak welfare group has called for the release of “proper” data on who will be affected.

    “Although we’re confident the proposal will mainly affect people with substantial private wealth and, among retirees, those in the top 20 per cent by total income, we need to see a breakdown of the total income and wealth of those affected, both direct investors and those investing through super, and not just their taxable income which is often zero due to over-generous retirement tax-breaks,” the Australian Council of Social Service said.

  214. Leigh Lowe

    Senator Hinch said he’d “come a cropper” outside his apartment after stumbling on a “dodgy” knee when getting out of the Uber.

    Two bottles of Yarra Valley “Come a Cropper” Pinot followed by a bottle of Coonawarra “Dodgy Knee” Shiraz.

  215. OldOzzie

    Ford recalls 1.4 million cars because their steering wheels might come off

    Ford said on Wednesday US time that it was recalling nearly 1.4 million cars in North America after the company discovered that steering wheels in two vehicle models could come off while driving.

    The Michigan-based automaker said bolts on the steering wheel may become loose, leading to a loss of control and an “increased risk of a crash”.

    Ford said it is aware of two accidents, with one injury, allegedly related to the defect.

    The two affected models are the Ford Fusion and the Lincoln MKZ. The vast majority of the recalled cars are in the United States, but nearly 80,000 vehicles are in Canada and Mexico, according to the company.

  216. struth

    If you consume a bottle of red a night, are you an alcoholic?

  217. herodotus

    ZK2A: was Chamberlain part of a peace faction? Here’s Churchill’s summary from his history of WW2 – Volume I, Chapter XII, page 174.

    “His all-pervading hope was to go down to history as the great Peacemaker; and for this he was prepared to strive continually in the teeth of facts and face great risks for himself and his country. Unhappily he ran into tides the force of which he could not measure, and met hurricanes from which he did not flinch, but with which he could not cope.”

    Not necessarily part of a faction, but dedicated nonetheless. Churchill rated Chamberlain as having a better grasp of European politics than Baldwin, but Baldwin the harder-headed politician. He preferred the latter but said neither of them wanted to work with himself except as a last resort!

  218. stackja

    Liberty Quote
    Environmental policy is not driven by tree-hugging activists, earnest liberal bloggers, or ecologically minded citizens. Instead, it flows from the lobbyists and executives of well-connected multinational corporations and built-for-subsidy startups that see profit in the loan guarantees, handouts, mandates, and tax credits Congress creates in the name of saving the planet.

    — Timothy Carney

  219. Tintarella di Luna

    Bill Shorten is to economics as to Stormy Daniels is to virtuous restraint

  220. Dr Faustus

    Unwitting Shorten has played his class warfare ball straight into the long grass:

    Greens leader Richard Di Natale signalled that if Labor won the federal election, his party would demand changes to the policy to protect those on low incomes.

    The Green vampire squid setting itself up for a future in government. There’s 50 years of harm in two terms of Green/CFMEU/ACOSS agenda.

  221. herodotus

    Labor leader Bill Shorten has moved to soften anger over his plans to scrap dividend cash refunds as the Greens harnessed unrest among older voters to try to win Saturday’s bye-election in Batman.

    Said the green Hyena to the lamb “Don’t vote for those Labor monkeys, they’ll steal your food.”

  222. Stimpson J. Cat

    He said he drank in moderation two nights a week, declaring ”you’re not in a monastery” while adding, in a bizarre aside, his donor “had his problems”.

    This bloated unworthy f$cking disgrace needs to be stripped of his liver, and his beard shaved and force-fed to him.

  223. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    If you consume a bottle of red a night, are you an alcoholic?

    An alcoholic is someone who you don’t like, who drinks as much as you do.

  224. herodotus

    If you consume a bottle of red a night, are you an alcoholic?

    Depends how much you had during the day as well. I recall a well-known thriller writer saying that before he reformed himself he was on about his second (or was it third) flagon of plonk by lunchtime.

    If you are French it’s a patriotic duty to consume a bottle of wine a day.

  225. thefrollickingmole

    I wonder just how stupid these people really are.

    “We will fight historical discrimination by engaging in discrimination now…for Justice”???
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/mar/14/guardian-news-and-media-reports-11-point-3-per-cent-gender-pay-gap

    50:50 balance would be achieved by developing, promoting and recruiting more women at every level.Initiatives include fast-tracking women’s progression in middle and senior management roles, and offering a mentoring scheme for all women. Each member of the GNM executive committee will have a personal objective and a departmental plan relating to diversity and gender pay.

    Or as its otherwise known, discrimination.

  226. notafan

    his party would demand changes to the policy to protect those on low incomes.

    One that will ensure a enfattening of the public sector to administer, no doubt

    I reluctantly attended a medicare office yesterday, now wholly contained within the general purpose Human Services office, the first in the queue in front was a Chinese lady who wanted to sign up for private health insurance because she was having an operation in a couple of weeks (good luck with that), o

    The next was an elderly gentlemen who really needed births deaths and marriages, to the CBD you must go

    Facing an hour’s wait I opted for fill in the form and drop it in the box (this was for a $500 cash only on the day hold up the surgery til it’s paid anesthesia bill from last year)

    The next in the line as I left was Mr Tattoo Face who’d had his benefits cut off, had a few problems, last I heard as I raced out the door.

    This on the edge of the very large spot the Aussie shopping centre where one business having a lend has a sign saying

    We speak Chinese!

  227. dopey

    ABC News: Sheep dog trials: A record number of women are competing in this week’s contests.

  228. H B Bear

    Peanut Head making the mistake Abbott never did during the R-G-R debacle. Releasing policies.

    Lord Waffleworth following Emperor Barnett’s game plan – leave the Liars a Bomber Beasley-sized budget black hole and the place up to its eyeballs in debt. Remind me, how did that work out for Barney again?

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