Grace is on fire

Grace Collier in The Weekend Australia is must and good reading. Today she is simply magnificent. Some tasters:

However, both the government and the opposition do a brilliant job of hiding or disguising any consistently meaningful contribution they may be making to our nation.

Lately one could be forgiven for imagining that our politicians sit around late at night, dreaming up the various ways they can smash us down by taking more of our own money off us with new taxes, or just generally making our lives harder with new regulation.

Our current crop of politicians seem on a constant, desperate hunt for any undiscovered enclaves of wealth so they can confiscate as much of it as they possibly can while demonising the people who created it.

When she is not dreaming up ways to destroy the superannuation system or attending high-level meetings about trolls on Twitter, the minister must spend her time thinking of ways to make life harder for small business owners.

 

 

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25 Responses to Grace is on fire

  1. Brett

    Great to hear someone saying what must be said; but there is no way to force meaningful change in either the political culture or course of government. It is simply too late; we are on this train to the inevitable wreck.

    I used to read in history about revolutions past and wonder what brought the actors to the point of action; now I understand because i feel completely powerless in a system that clearly broken and now mostly harmful.

  2. notafan

    Kelly thinks the only person who should be in charge of your money is her.

    She is all your money belongs to me personified

  3. stackja

    MT/BS are the problem today.

  4. Dr Fred Lenin

    Thinking that our polliemuppets sit around working out ways to screw us and enhance their importance is wrong ,most of these clowns have never had an original thought in their miserable lives ,follow the leader is the game ,like lemmings. Though lemmings don’t actually commit mass suicide in real life. Politicians do! Let’s live in hope .

  5. Outraged

    A dividend is a portion of the company profit passed on to a part owner of the company. That recipient of the dividend might be an individual, trust or other company. The income is received not by the company but by the recipient of the dividend. As such the dividend is assessable income for the recipient and taxed at their marginal rate.

    Franking credits are when the company had already paid tax on the company income (like PAYG withholding). If the tax already paid is less than that owning the recipient of the dividend needs to make up the shortfall (pay the difference). If the recipient owes less tax on the dividend than that already withheld then they are entitled to a refund.

    Just like if a PAYG taxpayer who has had more or less tax withheld than owing.

    Pretty simple really and when properly understood Labor’s proposed changes start to look more and more like common theft.

    But it’s no use explaining this here on Catallaxy, it needs to be explained to all and sundry out there – in voter land.

  6. Andrew Deakin

    Taxes are the price we pay to live in this country. How much should the average person pay for decent defence, border control, an efficient legal system, and infrastructure where it can’t be billed to users? Surely not a quarter or more of their income. Why do we pay so much?

  7. Rafe Champion

    It would be great to have a collection of her columns in paper or electronic form.
    Here are some of them.

  8. OneWorldGovernment

    Rafe Champion
    #2663035, posted on March 17, 2018 at 3:40 pm

    It would be great to have a collection of her columns in paper or electronic form.
    Here are some of them.

    +1000

  9. Tel

    However, both the government and the opposition do a brilliant job of hiding or disguising any consistently meaningful contribution they may be making to our nation.

    Turnbull’s lack of achievement *IS* his meaningful contribution.

    Every time he does something, it gets much worse. The best thing about him is that he doesn’t do much.

    I fear that a Shorten government would be similar to Gillard and measure their performance in RPM (regulations per minute). Remember you must compare what you do see with what could be there as an alternative.

  10. John Constantine

    No thinking, just the feelz.

    Governing according to the vibe of the thing.

    Eye rolling, snarky disdain for the deplorableness of the proles.

    Their shorten looting cartel will show us how much damage can be done with calculated, malicious and driven phobic loathing of old Australia.

    Where do you want your end to come, through neglected exposure in a roadside ditch in the winter of Death under their turnbullites debacle team, or slave whipped to death during the construction of their Great Pyramid of shorten?.

  11. Squirrel

    The organising principle (sic) of all the major/longer-established parties is that they know what’s best for us and our money. They disagree over some of the details, and that’s basically what politics is about in contemporary Straya.

    The disconnect between those who are cocooned and cosseted in the public sector (even if they do not feel so, because pay rises and promotions aren’t what they once were) and those who are not, is growing ever wider – and dangerously so.

  12. manalive

    I became self employed in the early eighties because as a PAYE taxpayer it bugged me that the government decided what my liability was before I got a cent and that ‘possession was nine-tenths of the law’.
    Keating almost stymied that idea with the Prescribed Payments System which treated self-employed contractors in construction etc. as good as PAYE taxpayers, fortunately it didn’t apply to my services.
    The “transparency of taxation debts” amendment as described by Grace Collier would certainly cause me think again if I were forty years younger and thinking of doing the same.

  13. O’Dwyer unchains tax office bullies 17Mar18 Grace Collier

    Deep troughs, large snouts and rank hypocrisy. It was an affront this week to read how former prime minister Paul Keating — who must live the life of the super-rich on a taxpayer-funded pension of about $272,000 a year — thinks it is a good idea that other elderly people, who have funded their own retirements and may live quite meagrely, should suffer reduced incomes and pay more in tax.

    To be honest with you, the close observation of politics and politicians can be an unpleasant pastime. This is purely because of the low calibre of individuals involved and their unimpressive antics and idiotic policy propositions, which they seem to inflict on us with all the glee of deranged, sociopathic torturers.

    Every week, before I put fingers to keyboard over the latest scandal, proposed law or the planned financial pillaging of a group of citizens, I examine the issue in detail. This can be about as inspiring as staring closely at, say, a steaming plate of dog vomit.

    This is not to say that important work doesn’t go on in Canberra. It must. And of course there are quality people there doing their best with good intention. However, both the government and the opposition do a brilliant job of hiding or disguising any consistently meaningful contribution they may be making to our nation. And despite all the frenetic activity, every week government debt continues to rise.

    Via the media, we witness our political leaders swanning around the country or, indeed, the world, drinking bubbly and posing for photos, on a grand frolic of their own making, or “taking the piss”, as many Australians would say. Did you know, for example, that politicians have staff members who are paid more than $100k a year simply to tweet and post on Facebook on their behalf?

    Lately one could be forgiven for imagining that our politicians sit around late at night, dreaming up the various ways they can smash us down by taking more of our own money off us with new taxes, or just generally making our lives harder with new regulation.

    Sometimes, it really appears our government is determined to prevent the creation of wealth. They don’t want people to end up on the old age pension, but they also don’t want people to be too rich, either. Being too rich, in this country, appears to be a hideous, vile sin, and it must be prevented at all costs. Our current crop of politicians seem on a constant, desperate hunt for any undiscovered enclaves of wealth so they can confiscate as much of it as they possibly can while demonising the people who created it.

    Take, for example, Kelly O’Dwyer, Minister for Revenue and Financial Services, Minister for Women, and Minister for Assisting the Prime Minister for the Public Service. Periodically, unsolicited emails from O’Dwyer’s office land in my inbox. Mostly, they read like the ignorant rantings of a leftist student. One, titled “I’m angry”, contained a tirade about how angry O’Dwyer was about several issues, including that some large companies were not paying that much tax.

    Another, received recently, and titled “Working towards equality for all”, was so manifestly inane that it beggared belief. It talked about “the importance of making sure women feel safe and respected”. Because “perpetrators of violence against women often use technology to control, coerce, stalk and harass their victims”, the minister is going to, wait for it, have “new regular meetings with Facebook, Twitter and other online media”.

    When she is not dreaming up ways to destroy the superannuation system or attending high-level meetings about trolls on Twitter, the minister must spend her time thinking of ways to make life harder for small business owners.

    In mid-January, O’Dywer released a new draft amendment to our tax law — “Transparency of taxation debts”. This will authorise the Australian Taxation Office to disclose small business tax debts to credit reporting bureaus. This sounds harmless enough, except for the following information contained in a written submission opposing the amendment, written by “Self-Employed Australia”.

    In the submission, SEA says the ATO can form an opinion that a person owes a tax debt, and that opinion is enough to make that debt real and collectable, even if the opinion is wrong. Then, it says, the ATO can inflate the original amount of the alleged debt by 90 per cent by imposing penalties and take action to collect the lot.

    To collect the entire alleged debt, which, remember, is just an opinion formed by a public servant, plus penalties, the ATO can, says the SEA, without a warrant, raid a person’s home, garnishee a person’s bank account, sell a person’s house and send them into bankruptcy.

    All individuals placed in these positions do have the right to contact the ATO and discuss the matter fully.

    Self Employed Australia has put forward case studies to support its claims that the ATO routinely “abuses” its power to “bully and harass small business people into paying alleged tax debts that are often false or poorly supported by the evidence”.

    The submission says the ATO “routinely destroys the business, personal lives and often the mental health of small business people”. Now O’Dwyer intends to give the ATO more power, to report alleged debts, which are just opinions, to credit rating agencies, which would “further extend the ATO’s ability to bully, harass and destroy small business people”.

    The submission points out that the ATO is not subject to proper oversight because there are no bodies that can order the staff of the ATO to stop any abuses of its powers.

    In recent years, the situation with the ATO has been made even worse because O’Dwyer, instead of reining it in, has let it off the leash and appears to be egging it on.

  14. Crossie

    I used to read in history about revolutions past and wonder what brought the actors to the point of action; now I understand because i feel completely powerless in a system that clearly broken and now mostly harmful.

    It’s the powerlessness that is poisonous, no matter how you vote the lowlife still ends up in power and their main objective is to grind the populace into the dirt.

    Having Grace Collier describe it so well helps to some degree, makes me think perhaps if enough people recognise our situation for what it is someone may come up with a workaround for Canberra and Macquarie Street.

  15. H B Bear

    Shame the compulsory voting system in Australia always elects the UniParty.

  16. As a late-working-age self-employed person just trying to keep myself and my disabled spouse off any kind of pension/benefits, I find this sort of threatened excessive intrusion and imposition obscene. Maybe there are a few unscrupulous bods out there that this sort of legislation and amendment might be able to catch, but it just adds to the depressing and defeating load continuously heaped onto little people like me who are just trying to keep our heads above water and stay out of the clutches of centrelink or the NDIS debacle. My books are straight and honest, I don’t engage in any “black market” or cash deals, it’s all above board. Maybe I’m a fool to be so, but that’s the way I am. To have the likes of this cow who’ll probably never know want again in her life due to current excessive pay and “allowances”, parliamentary pensions etc., making such unnecessary and onerous laws is an outright insult.

  17. It’s the powerlessness that is poisonous, no matter how you vote the lowlife still ends up in power and their main objective is to grind the populace into the dirt.

    Yes Crossie, I’ve often wondered that of late. Just how much does it take for people to actually boil over into open rebellion, sufficient to give the politicians/rulers pause to reconsider what they’re doing? Aussies as a whole aren’t angry or demonstrative or rebellious folks. We tend to cop a lot before we arc up and bop an interfering idiot on the nose. We’re difficult to corral into aggregated action – mostly because those of us who can see the need to “rise up” are all too busy earning our living to spare the time, not to mention to travel the distances necessary to be actually in the faces of the grubs who come up with this rubbish.

  18. Roger.

    The “transparency of taxation debts” amendment as described by Grace Collier would certainly cause me think again if I were forty years younger and thinking of doing the same.

    Disputes with the ATO ought not be registered in the credit reporting system unless and until they are well and truly resolved in the negative, and even then if the small business owner should be given a break if a repayment undertaking is in place.

    O’Dwyer should be hounded out of the Liberal Party for merely proposing this.

  19. Crossie

    O’Dwyer should be hounded out of the Liberal Party for merely proposing this.

    O’Dwyer is Peter Costello’s F you to the Liberals and the rest of Australia for not making him a PM. She had to have been as effective as a staffer as she is a minister so Costello knew what he was inflicting on us.

  20. H B Bear

    Interesting theory Crossie. The political equivalent of a reverse kanga. Makes sense.

  21. Roger.

    O’Dwyer is Peter Costello’s F you to the Liberals and the rest of Australia for not making him a PM.

    But he only had himself to blame.

    Costello could be a dickhead, but he never struck me as one who exhibited that level of narcissism.

  22. EvilElvis

    It’s a beautifully perfect bureaucratic system that gives you a timeframe to perform a task, breaks down or is unserviceable so frequently that you can’t perform said task then penalises you for the pleasure. Now it will have a lot more impact on the poor bastards who employ the fucking voteherds.

    On the plus side, this shit is slowly sinking in to some people’s heads who’ve remained oblivious to political stupidity, it’s still to slow a realisation though.

  23. classical_hero

    Both parties view all money you earn as government money. Australia is a socialist hell hole.

  24. JohnA

    This is not to say that important work doesn’t go on in Canberra. It must. And of course there are quality people there doing their best with good intention. However, both the government and the opposition do a brilliant job of hiding or disguising any consistently meaningful contribution they may be making to our nation. And despite all the frenetic activity, every week government debt continues to rise.

    The weak point. More hope than observation, I fear.

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