Open Forum: March 17, 2018

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1,338 Responses to Open Forum: March 17, 2018

  1. Entropy

    The Hon Catherine King MP

    Social worker

    You know that thing where they put “social” in front of a word to reverse its meaning?

  2. H B Bear

    Can’t the LNP do just a little better?

    No. That’s the problem.

  3. Roger.

    Is 127/68 5 pulse per minute good or bad?

    127/68 is in the ideal range, Stimps. 5 pulse per minute a typo?

  4. None

    Xenaphon was assured by the polls, the media and his own vanity that he would be the next SA premier.

    he didn’t want to be premier, but just to hold balance of power. He wants power without responsibility. That’s the way he has operated for years. He’s an a-hole. I hope he and his cronies get nowhere.

  5. zyconoclast

    IRS Documented 1.3M Identity Thefts by Illegal Aliens; Can’t Say It Referred Any for Prosecution

    (CNSNews.com) – The Internal Revenue Service in 2011 through 2016 documented more than 1.3 million cases of identity theft perpetrated by illegal aliens whom the IRS had given Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers (ITIN), which are only given to people who are ineligible to work in the United States or receive Social Security Numbers, according to information published by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA).

    However, in response to inquiries from CNSNews.com, the IRS could not say if it had referred even one of these cases for criminal prosecution.

    ‘Shall Be Guilty of a Felony’

    Using a stolen or fake Social Security Number is a felony.

    “The Social Security Act,” TIGTA has noted, “provides that whoever, with the intent to deceive, falsely represents a number to be his or her SSN when, in fact, that number was not assigned to that person, shall be guilty of a felony and subject to a fine, imprisonment, or both. This includes using a false SSN to obtain employment.”

    A Policy to “‘Legalize’ Illegal Aliens”

    A January 2004 TIGTA report said: “The IRS Office of Chief Counsel determined that, ‘the group of persons with United States federal tax obligations who are not eligible to obtain an SSN is limited to non-citizens who either do not reside in the United States or reside here illegally.”

    In 1999, TIGTA released a report warning that with its ITIN program the IRS had embraced a policy to “‘legalize’ illegal aliens” that “increases the potential for fraud.”

    Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers (Photo/ICE)
    In a follow-up report in 2004, TIGTA concluded that ITIN holders who filed tax returns using a Social Security Number were in fact illegal aliens.

  6. Stimpson J. Cat

    5 pulse per minute a typo?

    No this is the reading off the machine with the armband thing.

  7. RobK

    Stimpy,
    Pressures seem fine. Id be a bit concerned about 1 beat every 12 seconds.. i suspect it’s a mis-count. 55+ would be more nornal. (Perhaps you have a heart like pharlap)

  8. zyconoclast

    California appoints first undocumented immigrant to official post

    California has appointed an unauthorised immigrant to an official state post, a first that also functions as the state’s latest act of defiance against Donald Trump.

    State Senate President pro Tem Kevin de León, a Los Angeles Democrat who is running for the US Senate on an anti-Trump platform, announced that 33-year-old attorney Lizbeth Mateo would serve as a member of the California Student Opportunity and Access Program Project Grant Advisory Committee. The appointment is unpaid.

  9. Tom

    Is 127/68 5 pulse per minute good or bad?

    Stimson, you have no business being a hypochondriac when you’re punching out doctor’s-pet numbers like that.

    Get over here at once and go running with your psycho brother Arky.

  10. zyconoclast

    Illegal Voting in Pennsylvania Congressional Race

    By Rick Oltman, March 15, 2018

    Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District had a special election Tuesday to fill a recently vacated seat until the November election.

    As of this writing, the vote is so close that neither candidate has been declared the winner by the Pennsylvania Secretary of State. But one thing we can reasonably surmise is that there were illegal votes cast in that election, and enough to determine the outcome.

    The district, in western Pennsylvania, currently includes parts of Greene, Washington, Westmoreland, and Allegheny Counties.

    The Center for Immigration Studies’ map of sanctuary cities, counties, and states lists Westmoreland County as a sanctuary county, which almost guarantees that illegal aliens have been registered to vote.

    J. Christian Adams, President of the Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF), presented research and information on illegal voting by noncitizens at the September, 2017 Social Contract Writers’ Workshop in Washington, D.C., and recently filed a lawsuit against the state of Pennsylvania that notes:

    A Philadelphia official added before the Assembly that early figures of noncitizen PennDOT customers and registered voters revealed more than 100,000 current matches.

    That’s 100,000 noncitizens registered to vote in Pennsylvania that their Department of Transportation knows about.

  11. egg_

    He wants power without responsibility

    Narc

  12. zyconoclast

    Illegal Alien Acquitted of Murdering Kate Steinle Sues Feds for ‘Vindictive Prosecution’

    Jose Inez Garcia-Zarate, the illegal alien acquitted last year of murdering 32-year-old Kate Steinle in July 2015, has sued the federal government, demanding that it produce documents “pertaining to vindictive prosecution and collusion” with the state government in its prosecution against him.

  13. Oh come on

    Great look by Weatherdill, implying that he is going to sue a protester of his government’s energy policies. Weatherdill apparently said of the protester’s sign something like ‘I hope you’ve got deep pockets because that’s defamatory’.

  14. H B Bear

    I’m fuelling up on Tim Tams for my live blogging park run this arvo.
    … I will attempt to bring you all: lap times, total distance run, injury status and descriptions of hot bitches sighted.

    Don’t forget your Fitbit stats and any nice skins for Graegooglery.

  15. Leigh Lowe

    Big day.
    FBI flunky McCabe fired with 1 day to go before retirement.
    Pension of $1.8m forfeited.
    And Strzok is besties with the FISA judge who recused himself from Flynn’s case after the guilty plea entered.

  16. Mitch M.

    Around 30kg overweight and Montyless, I will attempt to bring you all: lap times, total distance run, injury status and descriptions of hot bitches sighted.

    If you want to lose some weight try lecithin granules. I picked some up a couple of months ago because I suspected I was choline deficient. I immediately noticed my weight drop off so checked the literature. Sure enough choline very much promotes weight loss, some athletes use it to trim down before a competition. It’s cheap and works fast. I sprinkle it on my vegetables. I won’t use it continually but for weight loss it certainly works. It also explains why eggs, despite being energy dense, don’t contribute to weight gain because eggs are an optimal source of choline. Choline promotes fat burning. I don’t know how it does that. It is also an essential substrate for acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that is very important for our health, especially as we get older. The drugs they use to treat Alzheimer’s are attempts to increase acetylcholine because that falls away with Alzheimer’s.

  17. zyconoclast

    Swedish Lady on Trial for Saying Migrants ‘Drop IQ to Goldfish Level’ – Report

    Recently, several reports have indicated falling IQs in Scandinavia, leaving the public to ponder the implications of it. A far less scientific speculation by a Swedish lady who argued that continued immigration would result in a further drop of intelligence has, however, landed her in court.

    A 65-year-old woman from the city of Jönköping has been charged with inciting hatred against a certain group of people for claiming that continued immigration will lead to lower IQ levels in the Nordic country, Swedish Radio reported.

  18. Leigh Lowe

    Uh-oh.
    Talk now that they have got McCabe on criminal charges including …. ha, ha … lying to the FBI.
    DoJ statement talks about McCabe “not being fully candid under oath”.
    He’s fucked.
    mUnter’s domino theory is coming to pass.

  19. H B Bear

    Illegal Voting in Pennsylvania Congressional Race

    The US voting process would not pass muster if it was used in an African shithole election. It is the first and most visible breakdown in the rule of law in that country.

  20. Zatara

    Strzok is besties with the FISA judge who recused himself from Flynn’s case after the guilty plea entered.

    Not just one of the FISA Judges, one of the three FISA Judges who could have possibly signed the original wiretap warrants. Any bets on whether it was him?

  21. zyconoclast

    Mexican flags fly at San Diego anti-Trump rally and press tries to hide it

    Waving the flag of the country they’d do anything to avoid being sent back to, DREAMers were out in force as President Trump’s plane touched down in San Diego. The Mexican flags flew, and the hate-Trump chants pounded from the left.

    Don’t expect the rest of the media to notice any of this. Or the chants of “¡sí se puede!” or the Che banners and t-shirts, the foul language, or the scads of ethnic Mexican clothing to demonstrate the absence of assimilation. Nope, most of the press did its level best to keep such images out of the news and present only the most sanitized versions of the anti-Trump protesters to the public.

  22. Bruce of Newcastle

    FBI flunky McCabe fired with 1 day to go before retirement.

    Nice move, but unlikely to succeed.
    It’ll be overturned in the courts because lefty.

  23. Tekweni

    Our family Whatsapp has been running hot between those of us living here and in NZ and our large extended family in South Africa. First cousin and husband in sixties moving off farm into a gated community. Say this morning it’s just got too dangerous to continue to live on the farm. No news yet of invasions or expropriations. Nobody really knows what to do though.

  24. zyconoclast

    Why mass immigration explains the housing crisis
    It’s the one reason for this worsening problem that blinkered liberals choose to ignore

    Oxford demographer David Coleman estimates that 85 per cent of the UK’s population increase from 2000 to 2015 is explained by migrants and their children. All these new people have to live somewhere. The pressure on housing, among many other social provisions, is intensified by the fact that on average foreign-born mothers have more children (2.06 in 2016) than women born in Britain (only 1.75). Fertility among foreign-born mothers has certainly dropped. Yet the high proportion of incomers in their reproductive years means the absolute number of babies with foreign mothers continues to rise. Thus the ONS asserts that in England and Wales in 2016 a staggering 28.2 per cent of births were to foreign-born women, ‘the highest level on record’. In 1970, that figure was 12 per cent.

  25. Roger.

    No this is the reading off the machine with the armband thing.

    That’s either a misread or you’re a medical marvel!

    Odds on the former 😉

  26. notafan

    What are they doing with the farm Tekweni?

  27. dopey

    273 Glebe Point Rd passed in at $2.2m Very little interest.

  28. Stimpson J. Cat

    It’s cheap and works fast.

    What source is it derived from?

  29. Rae

    5 pulse per minute a typo?

    My resting heart rate is often in the low 50s per minute. It was down to 47 per minute at one time a week ago.

  30. H B Bear

    273 Glebe Point Rd passed in at $2.2m Very little interest.

    Bottom end of the Sydney market slowing at last?

  31. Leigh Lowe

    Bruce of Newcastle

    #2662879, posted on March 17, 2018 at 1:14 pm

    FBI flunky McCabe fired with 1 day to go before retirement.

    Nice move, but unlikely to succeed.
    It’ll be overturned in the courts because lefty.

    Good.
    Let’s have it in court.
    Remember … he has been fired on the recommendation of the FBI/DoJ professional standards and ethics committee (exact name escapes me).
    This is not a political sacking… it is procedural and done from within the FBI/DoJ.
    The statement released by DoJ on the firing talks about “lack of candour under oath”. That is, lying to the FBI.
    The very same stuff that they pushed Flynn into.
    Oh, rhe ironing.

  32. Des Deskperson

    According to the Oz – for some reason not thiis time paywall-protected – Ex Commissioner Quaedvlieg’s girlfriend has resigned after receiving a letter from the ABF asking her to demonstrate why she should not be sacked, having ­allegedly obtained her job through her relationship with Mr Quaedvlieg.

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/national-security/exabf-chief-roman-quaedvliegs-girlfriend-quits-job/news-story/eecca95f3a819c0e652e26d9f6fb6105

    I assume that she was being threatened with breaches of the APS Code of Conduct and in particular , those sections covering failure to disclose details of any material personal interest of the employee in connection with the employee’s APS employment.

  33. Mitch M.

    What source is it derived from?

    Mine is soy based. I know people sweat about soy based products but I’m not worried about that because it isn’t perpetual use. I’m not even sure soy is the big danger people make it out to be.

  34. C.L.

    And Strzok is besties with the FISA judge who recused himself from Flynn’s case after the guilty plea entered.

    Strzok and his mistress texted about setting up a secret meeting with the judge. Those texts have been leaked to the The Federalist blog and published today. Matt Drudge – who no longer gets these things – is not running this gargantuan story.

  35. H B Bear

    5 beats per minute sounds more like Mothers after an hour or two of furious CPR from Graeoogs (but have a look at those Fitbit numbers!) and the fatigue has set in.

  36. Arky

    I’m at the park.
    And so it begins.

  37. testpattern

    Aust Gov letter of protest re National Geographic article and OCEANA report.

    Letter to Sarah Gibbens, journalist at National Geographic, regarding the article How Illegal Fishing Is Being Tracked From Space
    15 March 2018

    14 March 2018

    Dear Sarah

    The Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA) read with interest the article published by National Geographic, and would like the opportunity to provide you with information which changes the foundation for the story, and the report.

    http://www.afma.gov.au/letter-sarah-gibbens-journalist-national-geographic-regarding-article-illegal-fishing-tracked-space/

    Oceana has highlighted what it sees as a problem with the ability of ships to hide their location from the public, highlighting the example of Australian vessel, the Corinthian Bay, which repeatedly turned off its AIS near the Heard Island and McDonald Islands Marine Reserve.

    “During the period from July 2015 through September 2016, the vessel appeared to turn off its AIS before entering the protected area, and appeared to immediately turn it back on after exiting on 10 separate occasions,” the report said.

    http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/conservation/deeply-offensive-austral-fisheries-ceo-slams-advocacy-group-over-raising-suspicion-of-disappearing-ships/news-story/4c06b10717bbf0050b7c3d6041351aba

  38. “The Member has more than once brushed past my breast,”

    Ok, Ok, that’s a keeper.

    A quick look at Wikepedia shows Hugh McDermott has courted much controversy.
    Branch stacking, fabricating aspects of his military service, misleading Parliament about his level of promotion in the Army Reserves, and wearing a medal he didn’t earn are all listed on his Wiki page.

    Why do smart people act with such disregard of society?

  39. calli

    Interesting about the lecithin, Mitch. I’ve chomped my way through two month’s of keto and the weight is dropping away faster than I expected. At my age, losing weight is like trying to row the Titanic.

    I might give the lecithin a try to speed things up a bit more. 🙂

    The walking, swimming and gym are doing their bit too.

  40. calli
    #2662916, posted on March 17, 2018 at 1:45 pm
    I’ve chomped my way through two month’s of keto and the weight is dropping away faster than I expected

    Trying to do the same but the twin attractions of baked potatoes and cold beers keeps luring me away from my good intentions.

  41. Top Ender

    Top End Report from Top Ender

    Cyclone has now passed over the top of Darwin. Points of interest:

    – some sort of minor explosion in Darwin CBD. Someone was filming in that direction and caught it. Looks like a power sub-station
    – lots of reports of trees down everywhere
    – older suburbs have lost power – they have strung lines whereas the newer suburbs have underground power
    – falling tree hit a gas tanker truck and it’s spewing gas everywhere
    – triple trailer road train on its side south of Darwin, completely blocking the Stuart Highway in both directions
    – all businesses shut
    – wind gusts where we are up to about 90kph on occasion but most of the time only to about 40kph, with light blown rain.

  42. Arky

    Zinc cream. Check.
    Gay hat. Check.
    XXL shorts. Check.
    You didn’t ask for it.
    I promised it.
    Monty wouldn’t show for it.
    Each lap is 2.2 Km.
    We aim to “run” 11km.
    Five laps.
    Say a minimum half running at 10km/hr half walking/ limping. Average 8km:hr. Should take ummmmm,
    Maybe an hour twenty.
    80 minutes divide by 5= 16 minutes per lap. That is shit I used to go round in ten.
    add 1 minute for because I have short legs.
    Now is 1:50.
    This phone is a pain in the arse. Do I hold it or pocket it?

  43. Stimpson J. Cat

    Odds on the former 😉

    I don’t go to the gym, I don’t do cardio, I don’t do hippy f$cking diets, the only weird thing I do is only eat one meal a day, dinner during the week.
    Weekends sometimes lunch.
    Lots of body weight exercises though.
    No soft drink.
    Lots of water.

  44. Stimpson J. Cat

    Do I hold it or pocket it?

    If you hold it and run past hot chicks not a good look.

  45. Leigh Lowe

    Bruce of Newcastle

    #2662879, posted on March 17, 2018 at 1:14 pm

    FBI flunky McCabe fired with 1 day to go before retirement.

    Nice move, but unlikely to succeed.
    It’ll be overturned in the courts because lefty.

    Good.
    Let’s have it in court.

    Bruce … the body which sacked McCabe is the Office of Professional Responsibilty (OPR) not Sessions or Trump.
    As far as a wrongful dismissal suit goes, that is why I say “bring it on”.
    Allan Dershowitz (hardly an alt-right type) just pointed out on Fox that suing is high risk for McCabe.
    As Dershowitz says, that opens a whole gamut of discovery, not to mention potential testimony under oath.

  46. OneWorldGovernment

    Arky,

    Do you have the para-medics on standby?

  47. OneWorldGovernment

    $2 billion on trains that are too wide for the tunnels
    Well, what do you know? California isn’t the worst governed state in the universe after all. We self-centered Americans think we have the market cornered on incompetence. Hah!

    Meet our friends in New South Wales, Australia. They just spent $2 billion on railcars that are too wide for their tunnels.

    They came up with an interesting solution.

    They will just lower their safety standards.

    No problem.

    http://donsurber.blogspot.com/2018/03/2-billion-on-trains-that-are-too-wide.html

  48. Mitch M.

    the only weird thing I do is only eat one meal a day, dinner during the week.

    I rate that strategy as good as any special diet. I follow the same pattern. There are studies pointing to significant benefits in restricting eating times. So each day, apart from coffee, usually without sugar, I aim for a 15-18 hour fast.

    Not sure about the lots of water. That 8 glasses a day was rubbish. My concern is that lots of water and subsequent urination frequency may lead to a washing out of water soluble nutrients. That’s a guess Stimps.

  49. Delta A

    This phone is a pain in the arse.

    Then take it out and put it in your pocket.

  50. Roger.

    I don’t go to the gym, I don’t do cardio, I don’t do hippy f$cking diets, the only weird thing I do is only eat one meal a day, dinner during the week. Weekends sometimes lunch. Lots of body weight exercises though. No soft drink. Lots of water.

    Keep it up! Your general fitness no doubt accounts for you excellent blood pressure reading, but a pulse rate of 5 bpm is quite an anomaly given the normal range of 60-100 bpm – odds are something’s gone awry in the reading. If the person taking the reading was medically trained they should have noted it. Can you repeat it?

  51. C.L.

    Mike Flynn Jr tweets up a storm of delight over sacking of disgraced criminal Andrew McCabe.

  52. Leigh Lowe

    Sorry, to be precise, Sessions signed the order to sack McCabe, but based on an unequivocal recommendation from the OPR.

  53. Arky

    1 lap oh shit it hustd ehats me time?

  54. Arky

    Gonna walk a bit.
    Its worse than I thought

  55. Stimpson J. Cat

    I rate that strategy as good as any special diet.

    Although I do work seven days a week and from the moment I start in the morning until the evening I don’t really stop moving or sit down.
    This would probably explain how I can get away with no cardio.

  56. Stimpson J. Cat

    This phone is a pain in the arse.

    Then keep it in your pocket instead.

  57. Stimpson J. Cat

    Goddamn it Delta!

  58. zyconoclast

    Engineer of Florida Bridge reported crack days before collapse

    Miami: An engineer reported cracks on a newly installed Florida pedestrian bridge two days before it collapsed on a busy roadway here, killing at least six people, state officials said Friday.

    The report, by the lead engineer with the company in charge of the bridge’s design, was made in a voicemail message for a Florida Department of Transportation employee. That employee was out of the office, however, and did not receive it until Friday, a day after the collapse.

    The cracking was on the north end of the span, according to the message, but the company did not consider it a safety concern, according to a transcript released by the transportation department.

    “We’ve taken a look at it and, uh, obviously some repairs or whatever will have to be done, but from a safety perspective we don’t see that there’s any issue there so we’re not concerned about it from that perspective,” said the engineer, W. Denney Pate. “Although obviously the cracking is not good and something’s going to have to be, you know, done to repair that.”
    A spokesman for Pate’s company, Figg Bridge Group, did not immediately comment on the transcript.

    “The responsibility to identify and address life-safety issues and properly communicate them is the sole responsibility of the FIU design-build team,” the transportation department said, referring to Florida International University, the owner of the bridge project. “At no point during any of the communications above did Figg or any member of the FIU design-build team ever communicate a life-safety issue.”

  59. Leigh Lowe

    C.L.

    #2662935, posted on March 17, 2018 at 2:03 pm

    Mike Flynn Jr tweets up a storm of delight over sacking of disgraced criminal Andrew McCabe.

    That is the beautiful ironing.
    McCabe and Co stitched Flynn up on “lying to the FBI” on peripheral inconsequential details.
    McCabe is now certain to face charges of lying on matters central to an internal ethics investigation.
    The DoJ statement explicitly says this.
    In further ironing, McCabe and Co tried to financially break Flynn through lawfare to extract a pissweak plea to a non-charge.
    McCabe now has no superannuation to fund any wrongful dismissal claim.
    Monty … where are you?

  60. egg_

    “The responsibility to identify and address life-safety issues and properly communicate them is the sole responsibility of the FIU design-build team,” the transportation department said, referring to Florida International University, the owner of the bridge project. “At no point during any of the communications above did Figg or any member of the FIU design-build team ever communicate a life-safety issue.”

    The ole quote about Scientists vs Engineers and bridges.

  61. Arky

    achilles and shin splints down to. shuffle til numbs off

  62. zyconoclast

    Is there nothing climate change can’t be blamed for?

    Earth Hour 2018: Lisa Roet’s giant gibbon to cry out across Beijing

    In 2010, stories began circulating of a sneezing monkey high in the mountain forests along the Chinese Myanmar border. Conservationists had heard similar sounds before. Snubnose monkeys sneeze due to an inverted nose cavity. Rain seeps in and irritates their sinuses. But the villagers had uncovered a new subspecies whose sneeze was compounded by melting snow and precipitation.

  63. Tintarella di Luna

    Boambee John
    #2662697, posted on March 17, 2018 at 10:24 am

    But only after a big payout and a nominal reinstatement.

    Yep use the pile driver to drive home the point

  64. Stimpson J. Cat

    a pulse rate of 5 bpm is quite an anomaly given the normal range of 60-100 bpm – odds are something’s gone awry in the reading. If the person taking the reading was medically trained they should have noted it. Can you repeat it?

    OK I looked at the machine again and it said 51.
    Stupid f$cking robots with their stupid robot displays.

  65. Nick

    A quick look at Wikepedia shows Hugh McDermott has courted much controversy.
    Branch stacking, fabricating aspects of his military service, misleading Parliament about his level of promotion in the Army Reserves, and wearing a medal he didn’t earn are all listed on his Wiki page.

    What a country. Do all of those things and remain in the job. Allegedly brush a boob and you’re a gorner.

  66. Arky

    36 minutes to go 4.4 Km.
    7.3333 km/hr.
    Its barely a brisk walk.
    Shiiiit.

  67. Arky

    I’m going to have some water and walk a lap.
    Jesus, It will probably be faster.

  68. calli

    On the fasting, yes. I’m doing 18/6 too.

    Never felt better!

  69. Boambee John

    Tekweni at 1316

    Nobody really knows what to do though.

    Get out. They can always start again with their lives. No fresh start once dead or maimed.

  70. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Get out. They can always start again with their lives. No fresh start once dead or maimed.

    Sound advice.

  71. struth

    The great thing about low carb is that you don’t want to eat.

    The problem with dieting is always feeling hungry.

    You have energy all day, feel great, but the really great thing about low carb is you really do feel “full”.
    You’re not fighting hunger at all.
    So either Stimpson just doesn’t get hungry or has excellent will power, for those of us that aren’t in that superhuman category, low carb can bring out the inner Stimpy in all of us

  72. Arky
    #2662939, posted on March 17, 2018 at 2:08 pm

    Gonna walk a bit.
    Its worse than I thought

    Arky, you dick head.
    Don’t run, just walk. Running is no good fer ya.

    Also, throw away those expensive soft runners, they’re no good.
    When walking briskly (say 4-5Km/hr) your heels are supposed to feel pressure hence pumping some blood back up the leg, helping your heart and circulation. Barefoot is best but presents infection potential and nicks n’ cuts.
    Getcher self some Dunlop Volley Internationals and a pair of Slazenger sports socks.

    As far as attracting the ladeees is concerned, do what I did successfully for many years.
    You run some water down the back of your trackie dackies making it look like you’re sweating out of your arse. The ladeees find that irresistable and inevitably want to be close to yer.

    Yer welcome.

  73. Tintarella di Luna

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2662745, posted on March 17, 2018 at 11:12 am

    Malicious envy is a curse

  74. Hey Arky have you heard of the limited heartbeat theory?
    It says you only get so many in a lifetime, so don’t waste ’em.

  75. Stimpson J. Cat

    On the fasting, yes. I’m doing 18/6 too.

    What the hell is that?

  76. Mitch M.

    You have energy all day, feel great, but the really great thing about low carb is you really do feel “full”.
    You’re not fighting hunger at all.

    Leptin resistance. Leptin is the satiety hormone, released when we eat. If we are eating all the time we can develop leptin resistance so always feel hungry. A vicious cycle. Leptin is also an inflammatory driver. Fats do much more to quell appetite than carbs. That’s one reason I keep an assortment of nuts in the house. Very nutritious. In relation to Aussies it is worth thinking about Brazil nuts because they are a very rich source of selenium, an essential nutrient and Australian soils are low in selenium. Only a few Brazil nuts a day are enough.

  77. Was it WC Fields who said: “I had the urge to exercise once. But I lay down until the urge passed.”
    Or something like that.

  78. H B Bear

    Real estate p*wn:

    CL not taking any chances with the spaminator.

  79. Arky

    at this point we aee down to thecsame pace as two old ladies strolling the cottage garden.
    Legs have numbed off nicely

  80. Mitch M.

    Arky, you dick head.
    Don’t run, just walk. Running is no good fer ya.

    Inclined to agree. Running wears out the joints too much.
    Numerous studies point to the value of HIIT: high intensity interval training. A fancy name for what I called “wind sprints”. Sprint for 30-50 meters, walk back, go again. The advantage of HIIT is that it is very brief and produces results that do not require so much work. Catalyst had an interesting look at it.

  81. struth

    Arky, if you want to attract the “ladies” stick a rolled up pair of socks down your shorts.

    Just make sure you put them down the FRONT of your shorts.

  82. Zatara

    Church forced to remove the word ‘Jesus’ from its Easter advertising as the word is considered to be offensive to non-Christians

    ‘Jesus’ is offensive to non-Christians. Who knew? By all accounts he was a pretty decent bloke.

    Pastor Martin Duffy told 2GB radio that shopping centre manager Lendlease objected to the signs and forced them to be changed to read ‘Risen Christ’ instead of ‘Jesus’.

    Apparently the ensuing sh*tstorm caused Lendlease to reconsider.

    ‘It was an error of judgment to ask Elim Church to change its messaging, and we apologise unreservedly.

  83. Tintarella di Luna

    here at Petersonallaxy

    Yes, it’s my new home away from home. Professor Peterson signed my book on Thursday night. He shook my hand, I wanted to be cheeky and give him a hug but he looked too tired, after all it was almost pumpkin time — I only just made it back to the car.

  84. struth

    Don’t buy Easter eggs without the word Easter on them.
    Chocolate companies are having a bet each way this year, proving the war isn’t lost.

    Lendlease should now be on a list of SJW companies we should be collating here at the Cat, for social media publication when we are done, reasons attached.

    Lendlease…offended by Jesus.

    Qantas………………where do you stat?

  85. DrBeauGan

    5 pulse per minute a typo?

    No this is the reading off the machine with the armband thing.

    It means you’re dead. Or can’t read.

  86. Boambee John

    LL at 1414

    McCabe and Co stitched Flynn up on “lying to the FBI” on peripheral inconsequential details.
    McCabe is now certain to face charges of lying on matters central to an internal ethics investigation.

    m0nty thought that this was an entirely reasonable tactic when used against Flynn, rejecting criticisms of the tactic by many Cats (me included).

    I still think it is a form of entrapment, and McCabe had many other things hanging around for a keen investigator, but I wonder what m0nty thinks now.

  87. Arky

    ahhhh
    Right.
    Need to pick up the pace.
    gonna do the old run two poles walk one for this lap

  88. struth

    need a leak

    Be careful you don’t grab the socks instead of your tackle.
    Sorry, forgot to mention that.

  89. Tintarella di Luna

    Oh noes, Wonder Woman has been outed as an ableist.
    Have we reached peak stupid yet?

    Did you know that there is a visceral dislike of people who are ‘abled’ because by being ‘abled’ they are by the very being dissing the ‘disabled’. A bit like being a white person is oppression of black people. It is this kind of crap that drives me totally spare — This magnificent man co-founded the Able Movement – He is criticised up hill and down dale by those who are well up Peak Stupid. He is doing fantastic work, we need more like him and less twittering twatters, shriekers and stone-throwers.

  90. Boambee John

    testpattern
    #2662979, posted on March 17, 2018 at 2:45 pm
    South African cartoon of Dutton

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DYZEq64VwAEAsnh.jpg

    Why aren’t the South Africans pleased at the thought of losing all those white racists? Surely they should be happy to get rid of them, thus making it easier to confiscate the vacant farms.

    Oh, something about needing their skills to feed the nation?

  91. Stimpson J. Cat

    Malicious envy is a curse

    I disagree.
    I think it is a blessing.
    The more kids and adults are told not to follow or read or watch Peterson, the more his audience will grow.

    Buckle up Buckos!

  92. Knuckle Dragger

    Accurate report TE, re Marcus. The immediate danger appears to have passed, but trees will be dropping like flies over the next few days.

    There are, of course, the resident idiots. People insist on riding out cyclones on 6 metre boats in the harbour. Naturally they broke free of the anchors and started ramming each other. On one boat was a bloke with a heart condition who experienced some sort of medical condition, requiring police on jetskis to go out in 3 metre waves and somehow recover him.

    In spite of literally sideways rain and 130kpg gusts, I saw a bloke driving past the front of my place – at about 20kph, and at a 45 degree angle. No doubt these morons will be the first to shout for help, only to be told to piss off until it’s safe enough for the cops and ambos to get back on the road.

  93. C.L.

    The report, by the lead engineer with the company in charge of the bridge’s design, was made in a voicemail message for a Florida Department of Transportation employee. That employee was out of the office, however, and did not receive it until Friday, a day after the collapse.

    *BEEEEEP*

    Yeah Bob, Jack here.
    Listen, the bridge has a crack in it and may fall down and stuff.
    Anyway, catch ya later.

    WATTBA.*
    ————-
    *What a time to be alive.

  94. Boambee John

    struth at 1456

    Lendlease…offended by Jesus.

    Ca we assume that all non-Christian staff at LendLease will be working on Good Friday and Easter Monday, with no penalty rates paid? No? Thought not.

  95. C.L.

    Real estate p*wn:
    ——–
    CL not taking any chances with the spaminator.

    Bear missing nothing.

  96. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Why aren’t the South Africans pleased at the thought of losing all those white racists? Surely they should be happy to get rid of them, thus making it easier to confiscate the vacant farms.

    Can we do a deal with the Seth Efricans? We’ll trade them Taneena Onus Williams, and the Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance? It might enlighten them to see the aftermath of the destruction of a settler society.

  97. C.L.

    Pastor Martin Duffy told 2GB radio that shopping centre manager Lendlease objected to the signs and forced them to be changed to read ‘Risen Christ’ instead of ‘Jesus’.

    I saw this earlier today. It made so little sense that I have to conclude it’s click-bait baloney.
    If anything, the forced ‘suggestion’ is far better, theologically, than the original – and far more Paschal.

  98. Leigh Lowe

    I still think it is a form of entrapment, and McCabe had many other things hanging around for a keen investigator, but I wonder what m0nty thinks now.

    Boambee.
    I wonder if “lying to the FBI” should be an offence equivalent to, or carrying higher culpability, than perjury in court.
    However, the offence exists.
    The point is that Flynn was pinged on a technical “lie” or peripheral inconsistency which had no legal import.
    It seems McCabe has been pinged on something far more central than merely whether it was a Tuesday or a Wednesday last July that he met someone, or whether he was wearing black shoes or brown shoes.
    McCabe is fucked, and I suspect he is shackled to Stzok and his (ahem) “lttle mate” the FISC court judge.

  99. Stimpy;

    Is 127/68 5 pulse per minute good or bad?

    It’s bloody great if you’ve got a freshly signed certificate of death being added to your notes.

  100. Arky

    Final outcome:
    11km.
    1 minute 36 minutes.
    Average speed: around 6 and a half kph.
    Fitness level: extremely shit.
    I’m going to walk a warmdown lap just so I can tell myself at least I’m still going around after 2 hours

  101. MsDolittle

    Fun out here in Preston handing out how to vote cards for AC. Been here since 7:30. Thanks Mark of Melb and others that bostered moral. Definitely Green votes from girls and those with ink.

  102. MsDolittle

    AC had the best sandwich boards. Other parties’ all blew over v flimsy

  103. JMH

    Well done, MsD. I hope a good percentage of votes go to AC.

  104. egg_

    State Distances Itself from Bridge Collapse

    TALLAHASSEE
    The Florida Department of Transportation distanced itself from the bridge construction and collapse late Thursday, saying that the company hired by FIU’s design team to provide “an independent, secondary design check” had not been pre-qualified* for the job. That design check is often a technicality but is required by the state.

    *WTF that means.

  105. Stimpson J. Cat

    Is 127/68 5 pulse per minute good or bad?

    Yeah OK I can’t read, the robot tricked me with it f$cking digital gibberish. .

    What does 127/68 51 pulse per minute mean then?

  106. Gab

    What does 127/68 51 pulse per minute mean then?

    Yeah, what Stimpy said. Do you mean your blood pressure, Arky? Are you running around with a BP cuff and pump thing?

  107. Please don’t feed the troll.

    Cheers.

    Hi Tom, I don’t “feed” the trolls. I come in and browse from time to time, make a comment occasionally, and go off to do productive things with my day. The insults of the dim don’t actually annoy me, replying occasionally is fun, and one can offer them the further opportunity to look even more silly than they already have.

    It’s an amusement, nothing more. It’s not like they actually matter.

    Besides, who knows, one day a small snippet of common sense might filter through, and light a dim glimmer of comprehension and enlightenment in the dark recesses of their minds.

  108. Arky

    What does 127/68 51 pulse per minute mean then?

    ..
    Eh?
    That wan’t me.
    I’m gunna push on for another lap cos 15km is almost respectable no matter how slow.

  109. Boambee John

    Top Ender

    Check your email.

  110. stackja

    egg_
    #2663043, posted on March 17, 2018 at 3:49 pm
    had not been pre-qualified

    Rubber stamped by some bureaucrat.

  111. Tintarella di Luna

    Church forced to remove the word ‘Jesus’ from its Easter advertising as the word is considered to be offensive to non-Christians

    ‘Jesus’ is offensive to non-Christians. Who knew? By all accounts he was a pretty decent bloke.

    Pastor Martin Duffy told 2GB radio that shopping centre manager Lendlease objected to the signs and forced them to be changed to read ‘Risen Christ’ instead of ‘Jesus’.

    Apparently the ensuing sh*tstorm caused Lendlease to reconsider.

    ‘It was an error of judgment to ask Elim Church to change its messaging, and we apologise unreservedly.

    That’s what happens when an organisation hires 23 year old university graduates to work in any position where you actually need someone who’d 50, who’s run a business/raised some kids/and had a bit of life experience, you need an adult not a snowflake to do an adult’s job. Twenty-three-year-old university graduates have been indoctrinated NOT educated, they should be counting staples and emptying waste-paper bins.

  112. C.L.

    Rest up, Ark, and hit it again in a couple of days.

  113. Stimpson J. Cat

    Yeah, what Stimpy said. Do you mean your blood pressure, Arky? Are you running around with a BP cuff and pump thing?

    No that’s mine.
    I posted it wrong the first time and now I need someone to explain what it means because I read it wrong because of an evil robot.

  114. C.L.

    Here:

    Resting Heart Rate Table.

    Categorised for men and women and according to age.

  115. Twostix

    School is one of the things that is supposed to prepare us for adult life.

    Lol at the idea that the daycare inspired bugman incubators which are modern schools in any way resemble or “prepare” people for adult life.

    Though in a way you may be right if you’re saying adult life consists of soft handed fried brained beta males using authority to invade the private space of people banned from resisting their advances.

  116. Health Minister Greg Hunt says he will never lift the ban on e-cigarettes despite an ongoing Senate inquiry into their use.

    Minister Hunt told Hack: “It’s not going to be happening on my watch as far as I’m concerned.”

    Of course e-cigs won’t be legalised on “his watch” (or any other for that matter). It’s the tobacco that’s taxed, not the nicotine.

    Not going to forgo the revenue.

    Not going to let the smoking public have a choice that’s actually less a danger to their health, either.

    Grubs.

  117. C.L.

    Donald J. [email protected]

    Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working men and women of the FBI – A great day for Democracy. Sanctimonious James Comey was his boss and made McCabe look like a choirboy. He knew all about the lies and corruption going on at the highest levels of the FBI!

  118. egg_

    Rubber stamped by some bureaucrat.

    Yeah, not sure that will hold water with the Coroner/ME.

  119. Further to that, of course, why is he making that announcement while the senate inquiry is still underway?

    I thought the better/proper form was to decide the outcome beforehand, but leave the actual announcement until after the inquiry was done and dusted.

  120. Stimpson J. Cat

    Thanks C. L.
    Athlete might be a huge f$cking stretch though.
    Agile, yes.

  121. Twostix

    Did the teacher ring the parents asking permission to give their boy a haircut?

    Conservatives really are dumbos at times supporting things like this. Completely schizophrenic.

  122. Neil

    Of course e-cigs won’t be legalised on “his watch” (or any other for that matter). It’s the tobacco that’s taxed, not the nicotine.

    I have heard bad things about e-cigs. They are very addictive and cause many problems. Just google e-cigs and addiction

  123. stackja

    egg_
    #2663071, posted on March 17, 2018 at 4:17 pm
    Rubber stamped by some bureaucrat.

    Yeah, not sure that will hold water with the Coroner/ME.

    Dem ME?

  124. calli

    Sorry Stimps. 18/6 or intermittent fasting. Just a fancy way of going without a meal and eating for only six hours in the day. For me it’s breakfast (horror), but for others it might be supper. Just depends on your schedule.

    Lendlease…offended by Jesus.

    Funny about that. It’s the go-to name when people stub their toes or hammer their thumb. And possibly on Lend Lease sites too.

  125. stackja

    Twostix
    #2663077, posted on March 17, 2018 at 4:23 pm
    Did the teacher ring the parents asking permission to give their boy a haircut?

    Conservatives really are dumbos at times supporting things like this. Completely schizophrenic.

    1950s parents expected children to behave or get belted by teacher. Then came ‘experts’. Anarchy. Just let children break any rule.

  126. calli

    Oh good. Gab’s here. And suitably dressed for the occasion.

    Happy St Pat’s! 🍀🍀🍀🍀

  127. Arky

    OK.
    I’m done.
    Old, floppy bummed j-wish women are overtaking me on a regular basis now.

  128. egg_

    Jane and Lily (Fonda and Tomlin) on NBC News Today Show – Fonda has no bottom lip – it must have been tucked into her mouth to pull in the wrinkles – freak show.

  129. Twostix

    Theres a story being pushed that the teacher let off two kids for smoking, it’s framed as an “aw shucks what a great guy” piece of propaganda because he didn’t let go a kid with them who he claimed lied. (Thiugh we note that the story about how rad a teacher he is told by one of the kids he let off for smoking at school).

    So smoking at school is a-ok having a slightly long fringe – it’s cutting time boy!

  130. stackja

    Green wigs and hats, Guinness and Baileys at friend’s retirement village.

  131. stackja

    Twostix
    #2663086, posted on March 17, 2018 at 4:30 pm

    Anarchy rules OK.

  132. calli

    Conservatives really are dumbos at times supporting things like this. Completely schizophrenic.

    Why thank you ‘stix. We also shell out a small fortune in fees to pay for the privilege. When you enrol a child at a private school you are told the rules and you accept them. If you don’t you are perfectly free to take your child elsewhere.

  133. Eyrie

    Nobody is forcing you to use them, Neil. Statist dickhead.

  134. Stimpson J. Cat

    Did the teacher ring the parents asking permission to give their boy a haircut?

    Did the parents of the boy know the hair length and styles that were permitted as outlined in the school rules that they were given and expected to read upon enrolling their child?
    Why didn’t they cut his f$cking hair?
    Were they blind?
    If they are blind how do they live?
    Why didn’t they ask their guide dog to cut or chew off his f$cking hair?
    Why didn’t they ask someone to read the school rules to them?
    How f$cking hard is it?

  135. JohnA

    struth #2662993, posted on March 17, 2018, at 2:56 pm

    Don’t buy Easter eggs without the word Easter on them.
    Chocolate companies are having a bet each way this year, proving the war isn’t lost.

    And tell those chocolate companies that it’s all a scam – those seeking halal don’t celebrate Easter.

  136. John Constantine

    Nearly beer o’clock.

    All those tasty, empty carbs about to slide down the gullet, sweet as the anguish of an animal activist trapped downwind of a sausage sizzle.

  137. Stimpson J. Cat

    So smoking at school is a-ok having a slightly long fringe – it’s cutting time boy!

    Yes.
    Hippies bad, smoking good.
    Only cigarettes mind you.
    None of those funny fags.

  138. Stimpson J. Cat

    The real issue these days is gratuitous fringe flicking.
    It used to be confined to wamen and girls but now boys and men have started to spread this cancer.
    It is f$cking outrageous.

  139. Neil

    Nobody is forcing you to use them, Neil. Statist dickhead

    What would U say if Hunt legilised heroin? There are lots of problems with e-cigs.

  140. Stimpson J. Cat

    Nearly beer o’clock.

    You convinced me John.
    Cheers to Grolsch.

  141. C.L.

    Did the parents of the boy know the hair length and styles that were permitted as outlined in the school rules that they were given and expected to read upon enrolling their child?

    That’s really not the point.
    The point is that “Browny” the suspiciously popular-with-students teacher doesn’t have the right to fiddle with boys’ hair. He sounds like a total dickhead with a Delilah-like complex to me. The lad probably had a bit of vim and old Browny wanted to level him off.

  142. Bruce of Newcastle

    Latest Hillary Clinton News

    She’s soldiering on, you have to give her that.

    It takes a village: Hillary Clinton layers a scarf, shawl and custom kurta with extra-long sleeve to hide broken wrist after hotel tub fall while touring Jaipur

    Sounds like she really really needs all those speaking fees and book sales.

  143. Here’s a thought.
    Would a Pensioner be able to borrow against the superannuation account?
    Would there be superannuation/tax benefits in doing so?

  144. C.L.

    The point made about Greg Hunt is that he has decided to subsidise an incredibly expensive drug whose only purpose is to treat the known, foreseeable and avoidable consequences of sodomy. But he won’t lift the ban on e-cigarettes because smoking is dangerous. An exact reverse analogy would be a health minister subsidising Marlboro Reds for smokers but banning condoms for homosexuals.

  145. Infidel Tiger

    What would U say if Hunt legilised heroin? There are lots of problems with e-cigs.

    Heroin and e-cigs? Nice comparison cockhead.

  146. Stimpson J. Cat

    That’s really not the point.
    The point is that “Browny” the suspiciously popular-with-students teacher doesn’t have the right to fiddle with boys’ hair. He sounds like a total dickhead with a Delilah-like complex to me. The lad probably had a bit of vim and old Browny wanted to level him off.

    It’s the kind of school rules joke that kids, parents, and teachers find funny until squares get involved.
    If he offered a choice of consequences to the kid then that is fair enough.
    The kid chose.
    Life’s about choices.
    As everyone involved is discovering.
    So it’s really a teaching moment, with something in it for all of us.

  147. Twostix

    1950s parents expected children to behave or get belted by teacher. Then came ‘experts’. Anarchy. Just let children break any rule.

    1950’s schools raised baby boomers who as soon as they left that system staged a massive revolt and gave us the most degenerate period in western history. 1950s schools also used to be full of sadistic pedos who as we now know raped young boys by the thousand (and thoroughly enjoyed caning boys bottoms with full parental permission.). Well done to that whole plan.

    If a male teacher ever laid his beta male weirdo hand on any of my sons I’d smack his creepo head in.

  148. Top Ender

    Vandals have used a rock and a glass of paint to smash a window at Immigration Minister’s Peter Dutton’s electorate office.

    A police spokeswoman said a man and a woman threw the objects through the window of Mr Dutton’s office at Strathpine, north of Brisbane, around 9:45pm on Friday.

    Three people were inside the office at the time but none were injured.

    Police are investigating the incident.

    From the Oz

  149. calli

    All those tasty, empty carbs about to slide down the gullet, sweet as the anguish of an animal activist trapped downwind of a sausage sizzle.

    Pure evil! 😄

  150. Stimpson J. Cat

    If a male teacher ever laid his beta male weirdo hand on any of my sons I’d smack his creepo head in.

    What if your son flicked his potentially ridiculously long fringe that was against school rules and it wrapped around his own throat and started choking him and his male teacher heard him choking and couldn’t unwrap the tangled matted hippy mess so he had to cut it free to remove it allowing your son to breath again thus saving his life.

    Would you still hit him then?

  151. egg_

    the anguish of an animal activist trapped downwind of a sausage sizzle.

    Bunnings’ secret deterrent?

  152. C.L.

    Well done:

    Olton Enterprise newspaper criticised for removing gay husband from mother’s obituary.

    (At ABC Online, of course).

    A newspaper has been slammed for removing a reference to a man’s husband from his mother’s obituary.

    The Olton Enterprise published the obituary to Brenda Light in its paper on February 23, but edited the original tribute sent to the publication.

    The obituary said: “Those left to cherish her memories include her son, Barry Giles, and his husband, John Gambill, of Dallas.”

    But the published version had no reference to Mr Gambill, and said: “Those left to cherish her memories include her son, Barry Giles of Dallas”.

    According to Dallas Voice, Mr Gambill contacted the editor of the Olton Enterprise, Philip Hamilton, questioning whether the newspaper received the tribute in full.

    Mr Hamilton told him he intentionally left Mr Gambill out of the obituary…

    In a statement to Fox News, Mr Hamilton, a bi-vocational Baptist pastor, said the decision to remove the reference to Mr Gambill aligned with his religious values.

    “It is my religious conviction that a male cannot have a husband. It is also my belief that to publish anything contrary to God’s Word on this issue would be to publish something in the newspaper that is not true,” he said.

    Mr Hamilton claimed it would be “unethical to publish a news item that is known by the editor to be false”.

    “Based on the truth found in the Word of God, I could not in good conscience identify Mr Gambill as the husband of Mr Giles.”

  153. Infidel Tiger

    Vandals have used a rock and a glass of paint to smash a window at Immigration Minister’s Peter Dutton’s electorate office.

    Good. Dutton is a chinless fraud who is flooding this country with third world filth.

    A great pity it missed him.

  154. nemkat

    Did the parents of the boy know the hair length and styles that were permitted as outlined in the school rules that they were given and expected to read upon enrolling their child?

    Trinity Grammar isn’t a Christian Brothers College circa 1970, darl.
    Although that’s probably where Good Ol’ Brownie did his schooling.

  155. JC

    Great head kick while he’s down. Better than UFC.

    Donald J. [email protected]

    Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working men and women of the FBI – A great day for Democracy. Sanctimonious James Comey was his boss and made McCabe look like a choirboy. He knew all about the lies and corruption going on at the highest levels of the FBI!

  156. C.L.

    How they must laugh at us …
    Retrial ordered because prosecution referred to accused Muslim rapists as predators …

    [Chief Justice Wayne Martin] argued that evoking the analogy was prejudicial — and comparing the men to hyenas and vultures was “ill-advised” and could evoke “notions of racial prejudice against the accused and sympathy for the complainant”…

    Rape retrial after Middle Eastern men ‘racially stereotyped’ in court.

  157. C.L.

    How they must laugh at us …
    Retrial ordered because prosecution referred to accused Muslim r*pists as predators …

    [Chief Justice Wayne Martin] argued that evoking the analogy was prejudicial — and comparing the men to hyenas and vultures was “ill-advised” and could evoke “notions of racial prejudice against the accused and sympathy for the complainant”…

    Rape retrial after Middle Eastern men ‘racially stereotyped’ in court.

  158. C.L.

    How they must laugh at us …
    Retrial ordered because prosecution referred to accused Muslim r*pists as predators …

    [Chief Justice Wayne Martin] argued that evoking the analogy was prejudicial — and comparing the men to hyenas and vultures was “ill-advised” and could evoke “notions of racial prejudice against the accused and sympathy for the complainant”…

    R*pe retrial after Middle Eastern men ‘racially stereotyped’ in court.

  159. Woolfe

    I see Matt Damon is not moving to Australia, his accounts probably told him what our tax rate is.

  160. Nick

    Vandals have used a rock and a glass of paint to smash a window at Immigration Minister’s Peter Dutton’s electorate office.

    Indigenous and Western protest technology working in tandem. Greens were involved.

  161. C.L.

    How they must laugh at us …
    Retrial ordered because prosecution referred to accused Muslim r*p1-ts as predators …

    [Chief Justice Wayne Martin] argued that evoking the analogy was prejudicial — and comparing the men to hyenas and vultures was “ill-advised” and could evoke “notions of racial prejudice against the accused and sympathy for the complainant”…

    R—etrial after Middle Eastern men ‘racially stereotyped’ in court.

  162. Jo Smyth

    I must be getting really old. Just listening to all the reporters at the booths in the SA elections. They look and sound as if they are not old enough to vote and what the heck do they know about issues that affect the vast majority of the voters.

  163. MsDolittle

    Batman vapes according to a sign indicating each parties’ stance on vaping. AC is OK with it. ALA nut jobs are against.

  164. Twostix

    Schools exist for the benefit of the parents. That is all. The school administrator who is now exclusively a middling bugman, like medical administrators , has decided to elevate himself and his industry to a Grand Societal Institution above parent, church and state. He has done this by hijacking school compusion and the lingering cultural respect that people have for these things as they were 100 years ago (when men used to think male teachers a bit queer, but useful) and now assumes to tell us we exist to present our children to his increasingly degenerate temple at his discretion, to abide by his arbitrarily enforced anarcho-tyranny rules (the young white boy ges his fringe cut after the young maori kid tells a teacher to fuck off for the tenth time today) with zero input from parents accepted. For we are mere individuals, and they are a priesthood.

  165. Des Deskperson

    According to Ten News, there is an election scandal unfolding in Batman, with elderly residents claiming that they had been contacted by telephone and told that if they were over 70, they were not required to vote.

    This would, of course disadvantage Labor.

    If true, it probably means – and certainly should mean – that the poll must be declared invalid.

  166. Arky

    Home and showered.
    For sure I am still a fat bastard, but a fat bastard who did 15.4 km.
    On the couch with a nice little exercise buzz and a glass of Sweppes ginger ale.
    See? Not so hard Monty.
    So sort your shit out and front up next week, you weak and useless individual.

  167. DrBeauGan

    A newspaper has been slammed for removing a reference to a man’s husband from his mother’s obituary.

    The Olton Enterprise published the obituary to Brenda Light in its paper on February 23, but edited the original tribute sent to the publication.

    The obituary said: “Those left to cherish her memories include her son, Barry Giles, and his husband, John Gambill, of Dallas.”

    But the published version had no reference to Mr Gambill, and said: “Those left to cherish her memories include her son, Barry Giles of Dallas”.

    According to Dallas Voice, Mr Gambill contacted the editor of the Olton Enterprise, Philip Hamilton, questioning whether the newspaper received the tribute in full.

    Mr Hamilton told him he intentionally left Mr Gambill out of the obituary…

    In a statement to Fox News, Mr Hamilton, a bi-vocational Baptist pastor, said the decision to remove the reference to Mr Gambill aligned with his religious values.

    “It is my religious conviction that a male cannot have a husband. It is also my belief that to publish anything contrary to God’s Word on this issue would be to publish something in the newspaper that is not true,” he said.

    Mr Hamilton claimed it would be “unethical to publish a news item that is known by the editor to be false”.

    “Based on the truth found in the Word of God, I could not in good conscience identify Mr Gambill as the husband of Mr Giles.”

    Quite right too.

  168. DrBeauGan

    Actually, it doesn’t take the word of God, just an appreciation that nobody gave the state the right to change the English language for the benefit of twisted sickos.

  169. Nick

    I must be getting really old. Just listening to all the reporters at the booths in the SA elections. They look and sound as if they are not old enough to vote and what the heck do they know about issues that affect the vast majority of the voters.

    My niece and her boyfriend live in Adelaide and attend top level Uni courses there. Neither know of Sarah Hanson-Young or Tania Pliebersek.

  170. Whalehunt Fun

    Beautifully put

  171. Stimpson J. Cat

    For we are mere individuals, and they are a priesthood.

    There is always home schooling and bad haircuts, am I right?

  172. Some History

    “Most ‘super agers’ smoke, drink, gain weight, drink coffee, never retire and even have dementia tangles in their brains – but they have better brain function than people in their 50s.
    Scientists are baffled by the paradox which has emerged from the famed 90+ study, analyzing people aged 80 to 100 who seem resilient to cognitive decline.
    To their surprise, they found the people in this unique group do not have an over-expression of the APOE 22 gene, which was thought to be protective against dementia.
    But they did all share a more positive outlook on life than their peers, they cared more about close relationships, they were very active – and diet seemed to have little to do with it.
    New scans also reveal these super agers have a higher proportion in their brain of a rare neuron called von Economo, a ‘social’ neurons which tends to be dysfunctional in people with autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.”
    “Dr Claudia Kawas, professor of neurology at the University of California, Irvine, said the findings are challenging everything she has ever known after decades in the field.
    ‘I almost think we should stop doing research and just start using our bodies and brains more,’ she quipped.
    ‘These people are inspiring – they drink wine, drink coffee, gain weight, but they exercise and use their brains. Maybe that can tell us something.’

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5405355/Positive-outlook-life-slows-ageing-brain.html

  173. jupes

    For sure I am still a fat bastard, but a fat bastard who did 15.4 km.

    Good effort.

  174. miltonf

    According to Latho, Trumble has given away $30 mil to help Asian cities get better planning outcomes or sumpthin. Just one thing after another with them. Interesting about the secret ETS too- I had forgotten about that. Boy oh boy, the LNP really does despise their (former) supporters.

  175. Rae

    Latest Hillary Clinton News

    She’s soldiering on, you have to give her that.

    Hairline fracture. Barely worth a mention.

  176. H B Bear

    It takes a village: Hillary Clinton layers a scarf, shawl and custom kurta with extra-long sleeve to hide broken wrist after hotel tub fall while touring Jaipur

    If only the Hilldebeast could have layered all that corruption and criminality during the Presidential campaign instead of letting it all hang out with that pant suit. Good to see that muzzy, dick photographing perverts missus back on the ol’ horse too. I wonder what is in it for her roping herself to this clapped-out relic?

  177. EvilElvis

    With a heart like that Stimpy, you may have outed yourself.

  178. miltonf

    The foreign citizen in parliament thing seems to have gone very quiet- has the uniparty declared a truce?

  179. Some History

    Forgot to include this in earlier posts.

    Pop….pop….. POP Is that the sound of misocapnist heads exploding?

    Despite having one of the strongest deranged hate campaigns against smokers, Australia has seen tobacco consumption increase for the first time in 14 years.

    https://www.thelondoneconomic.com/lifestyle/health/increase-in-tobacco-use-in-australia-re-ignites-harm-reduction-debate/15/03/

    And that’s not including contraband consumption.

  180. nemkat

    You wouldn’t know whether Trinity had a haircut policy or not, Stimpson.
    My guess is that there hasn’t been one for 20 years. Herr Brownie has been getting away with Fascist shit there for 30 years, and he’s finally got his comeuppance.

  181. Stimpson J. Cat

    For sure I am still a fat bastard, but a fat bastard who did 15.4 km.

    And people call me crazy.
    I only run if I’m being chased by women, lesbians, ethnics, or police.

  182. John Constantine

    The free trade deal Australia seeks with the soulless,godless commo globalist obscenity that is their European Union.

    Do we suspect their turnbullites will happily sign a deal to undermine Brexit and the Trumpnado, even if it screws Australia?.

  183. John Constantine

    Open borders with their European Union.

    So the caliphate can simply hop onto European soil, then get flown straight to melbournibad.

    Big decolonised totalitarian Australia Comrades, that will cut away at Brexit and Trump.

  184. egg_

    Vandals have used a rock and a glass of paint to smash a window at Immigration Minister’s Peter Dutton’s electorate office.

    Indigenous and Western protest technology working in tandem. Greens were involved.

    Apes throwing their faeces.

  185. Stimpson J. Cat

    New scans also reveal these super agers have a higher proportion in their brain of a rare neuron called von Economo, a ‘social’ neurons which tends to be dysfunctional in people with autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Well that’s some cheery f$cking news.
    Who the f$ck names a neuron Von Economo?

    Jesus Christ.

  186. miltonf

    Do we suspect their turnbullites will happily sign a deal to undermine Brexit and the Trumpnado, even if it screws Australia?.

    Steve Ciobo gave us a hint last week.

  187. ArthurB

    Attached is a link to an article on our indigenous brothers and sisters. It would never be published in this country. I note that the author writes under a pseudonym.

    http://www.unz.com/article/meet-australian-aborigines-they-make-african-americans-look-like-a-model-minority/

  188. H B Bear

    I was going to ask who Xylophone gave his preferences to on his HTV cards but a quick check of the SA Best website revealed they did not direct preferences. Another piss weak, each way bet by the greasy w0g as he attempts to portray himself as a centrist despite a 90% odd voting pattern with the Greenfilth-Liars in the Senate. And no doubt the dopey denizens of Australia’s 2nd failed State will fall for it.

  189. miltonf

    So the secret ETS was legislated just before Xmas ’15 and no one in the HoR or Senate said boo?

  190. Rae

    I was going to ask who Xylophone gave his preferences to on his HTV cards but a quick check of the SA Best website revealed they did not direct preferences. Another piss weak, each way bet by the greasy w0g as he attempts to portray himself as a centrist despite a 90% odd voting pattern with the Greenfilth-Liars in the Senate. And no doubt the dopey denizens of Australia’s 2nd failed State will fall for it.

    It could be worse. How would you like it if SA Best gave their preferences to Labor, just like the AusCon party is doing in Batman?

  191. calli

    1950s schools also used to be full of sadistic pedos who as we now know raped young boys by the thousand (and thoroughly enjoyed caning boys bottoms with full parental permission.). Well done to that whole plan.

    Yes. The dregs of the Not-So-Greatest Generation.

  192. H B Bear

    The Liars are the most rational choice for preferences in Batman which gives you some indication of what a hipster infested blight it is, even by Victoriastani standards.

  193. OldOzzie

    cohenite
    #2662988, posted on March 17, 2018 at 2:52 pm
    South African cartoon of Dutton

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DYZEq64VwAEAsnh.jpg

    Pissweak.

    from The Australian

    Add new migrants and stir carefully

    If Australia — or any other Western democracy — were able to have a grown-up conversation about immigration and integra­tion, then that conversation would start with difficult questions. One of them would be this: “Who do we not want to join us here?” If there are people who we do want then there must be people we do not want. And if we agree that we cannot take in the world then we must have this conversation.

    As gang violence once again makes itself felt in Melbourne the Australian public will be mulling this matter. But few people in public life — and almost no one in mainstream politics — dares to even talk about this subject, or show they’re thinking about it. For the time being we all have to pretend that 10,000 migrants from sub-Saharan Africa will contribute no differently to a country than 10,000 arrivals from New Zealand. Such cowardly and immature public discussion — across all the Western democracies — is provoking disastrous mistakes.

    In recent years I have researched and addressed questions of immigration and identity around the world, but particularly in Europe, whose situation is most similar to that in Australia. And I have often asked these uncomfortable questions. I once pressed an elected British official in public to tell me who they did not want in Britain. The only clear answer I could get was that Britain should not allow in people who had been convicted of war crimes. Which means we have a moral right to keep out about a half-dozen people, all of whom are spending the rest of their lives in jail in The Hague anyway. Is all of the rest of the world really welcome?

    We have stopped ourselves being allowed to think out loud about these matters. The plain reason is that for the time being the social costs of speculating about this in public are just too high. And there are some good reasons. Nobody wants to alienate people who are not alienated already. Plus there are a small number of people around who genuinely hate people of different backgrounds and ethnicities. Nobody wants to provide cover or give succour to such people. But in attempting not to aid them, and while signalling that we are not such people ourselves, we have disabled our ability to have a sane public discussion. Simultaneously, “open borders” fanatics see how afraid everyone else is even of false accusations of bigotry and push their advantage, throwing around accusations of racism for short-term wins towards a long-term political goal.

    Nevertheless, serious questions about immigration and integration will keep finding us out. Today in Europe they are finding us out all the time. Particularly in the aftermath of the German Chancellor’s 2015 decision to say that the world could come if it could make it to Europe.

    In 2015 up to 1.5 million came to Germany in one year alone, adding about 2 per cent to the German population. Nobody thought the matter through. Nobody wanted to admit the consequences. Everyone was fearful of the discussion. But the German public is now living with the consequences. A report commissioned by the German government and released at the start of this year found that a double-digit increase in violent crime had occurred in the years since 2015 and that “more than 90 per cent” of this was due to young male migrants. Three years ago if you said that a huge influx of young male migrants from the developing world might cause an increase in violent crime you would be dismissed as a racist. Today it is clear that — whether you were a racist or not — you also were right in your prediction. Is it wise to depict accurate predictions as racist? Rather than address this conundrum, we shut it down.

    For the time being there remains only one acceptable tone in which to talk about immigration and integration. That is to talk about it as an unending boon and one big success story. Merely signal that there are pros and cons and you land in a whole world of pain.

    Australians are particularly keen to talk about the positive side of the ledger. And to some extent Australians have a right to do this. The country has much to be proud of. What country has coped better with a swiftly changing and pluralistic society? Can any of Australia’s numerous homegrown critics name one? And it has had a political class that has been willing — on occasion — to break the consensus, certainly far more so than its counterparts in Europe.

    For instance, in a recent speech, Citizenship Minister Alan Tudge made one of the most important points that can be made — not only to praise what Australia has done well in the past but also to warn of the consequences of getting things wrong. Because a nation does not remain the same by some law of nature. It does not remain the same whatever you put into it. As with any recipe, change the ingredients and the whole thing will change. Some change may be good. But some may be retrograde. In Europe in recent years politicians have appeared to believe that you can do anything at all to a country — throw in whatever ingredients happen to arrive — and it will remain the same. It is a presumption for which the public — from Rotherham to Cologne — is paying.

    The mistake is based on errors the public can see with our own eyes. For instance we can see that there are essentially only two things that matter in migration: speed and character. The speed matters because if you bring in people too fast then there is almost no chance of integrating them. They will congregate in areas with people like them and will have little or no interaction — or desire to interact with — the rest of the community or country. Anyone visiting the towns of northern England, suburbs of Marseilles or outskirts of Stockholm can see this for themselves. Australia may be coping with this better, but ask anyone in Australia where a particular ethnic community lives and you will get directions. That is not a sign of wholly successful integration but a form of segregation — whether self-imposed or not.

    Yet even harder to discuss than speed of migration is the identity of migrants. But identity matters, because — and here is a great shibboleth to break — some identities are simply easier to integrate than others. There are 67 suburbs in Melbourne and Sydney in which more than half of the residents were born overseas. Melbourne is grappling with the problem of African street gangs. Some of these are refugees from South Sudan. Of these some — including the children of refugees — have been involved in violent home invasions in the city that gave them a home.

    Similar stories occur everywhere. In London there has been a significant rise in knife crime in the past year, much of it gang-related. Last month in London, within a few kilometres of each other, and within just 1½ hours, two young men of Somali origin were stabbed to death in gang fights.

    So some truths need to be considered, even if they are not accepted. One is that members of the Australian public, like members of the public around the world, are right to be concerned about the speed at which immigrants come into the country. The ability of a country to absorb people does not forever increase. And it is not the case that people in Australia become as Australian as the next person simply because they have arrived in Australia.

    That mistaken presumption — the one that has guided (or misguided) Angela Merkel — is disintegrating in every modern liberal state at the moment. But another truth that must be considered, even if not accepted, is that it is unlikely that knife crime in London, or home invasions in Melbourne, would be at the same levels if Britain or Australia had imported the same number of native Scandinavians as they have Somalis or South Sudanese.

    Here everybody gets understandably nervous. Somalia has had a brutal civil war in recent decades and South Sudan has been marked by ethnic conflict. Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed and hundreds of thousands of others have been involved in that violence or seen it first hand, with effects that will never leave them.

    But here is the hard question. At what stage are we helping to save people from Somalia or South Sudan? And at what stage are we at risk of resembling those conflict-torn states ourselves? The hope of our time is that while the first generation may bring problems, the second generation will not. Of course the list of second-generation immigrants in Australia who went to join Islamic State should at least give pause. But fine: if not this generation then the next, or the one after that will be fully integrated. And if many refugees don’t find employment in five years (as is the case in Australia) perhaps the country will find a use for their skills in 10 or 20 years, or some other spot in the future.

    Just one problem in considering this is that it is not a science. There is not a tipping point worked out by careful equation at which one can show that integration stops occurring and tribal and gang violence — as well as many other beliefs and behaviours people bring — begin to make themselves felt. In the absence of such an equation we have only one device to work with, which is the extent to which the public feels happy with the speed of change in society and the agility of the political class to respond to this.

    In Europe the political class knows that it has done mass immigration against the will of its public. Partly as a result, politicians have done everything they can to disable the public’s response mechanisms. They have ignored expressions at the ballot box, ignored manifesto promises, and when something such as the Brexit vote occurs (a vote driven largely by concern about unrestricted immigration) much of the political class continues actively to berate the public.

    It is easy to experiment on people (and even berate them for objecting) if you don’t live with them. In general politicians are able to live away from the situations they create. Few Australian cabinet ministers will have their homes invaded by African gangs. They tend to be luckier in the neighbourhoods they can choose to buy in. Likewise, when Merkel meets a migrant it is in a carefully vetted photo op. Her country’s citizens are not so lucky, as the rise in violent crime — including sex crimes — suggests.

    All the time the public is having to think quietly. We wonder whether integration will ever happen for some groups, and what must be put up with to get to that nirvana. Others wonder whether the destination is worth the journey. Others worry whether some groups just don’t want to be integrated, and wonder what anyone can do if that is the case.

    Though there are plenty of easy mistakes that can be made in thinking through all this, there are few easy answers. Yet what answers do exist, all originate from the same places. The first lies in re-finding the ability to talk all this through honestly, plainly and without fear. The second is to do so in a recognition that most countries aren’t like this. Tolerant, pluralistic liberal democracy is not the default state of humankind. What we have is a blip point in a world of violence and millenniums of chaos. So we should be careful with experiments that cause concerns about our future and develop better remedies for when our experiments go wrong.

    A generation of Australians — like their European counterparts — have been told there is nothing so appalling, oppressive and racist as the society in which they have grown up. The most charitable response to that is to say these critics can never have been anywhere, and have zero idea of how lucky they are. Saving the rest of the world from misery is a precious ambition. But recognising your own good fortune and seeking to preserve it for the next generation is a precious ambition, too — and one that happens to be within the nation’s gift. So tread wisely, Australia.

    Douglas Murray is associate editor of The Spectator and author of The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam.

    433 Comments currently

  194. Mitch M.

    Well that’s some cheery f$cking news.
    Who the f$ck names a neuron Von Economo?

    Also called spindle cells, rare in most mammals and frequent in humans. Sparse but with very long projections throughout the brain.

    Super agers: mostly genetic. Yes, looking after your health can add a few years to your life but it ain’t gonna make that much difference. Remember the 5+2 diet craze? I did some sums on that, if you’re going to spend 30 years being half starved for 2 days out of 7 to add if very lucky several years to your life it’s not worth it.

    Social neurons what bollocks, we don’t know what they do.

    Forget it Stimps. I’m still tracking ASD research and see so many fanciful claims that I’ve lost interest in the social deficits = this or that neural whatever. It’s pretentious crap that makes for good press and another grant. I am finding some very peculiar issues in relation to Vitamin D, glutathione, CRH, folate, and auto-antibodies, and GABA.

  195. Tintarella di Luna

    Latest Hillary Clinton News:
    Arse up in the bathtub, breaks wrist.

    Do you think she’ll do the Bridge Climb while she’s in Sydney?

  196. Stimpson J. Cat

    I’m still tracking ASD research and see so many fanciful claims that I’ve lost interest in the social deficits = this or that neural whatever. It’s pretentious crap that makes for good press and another grant. I am finding some very peculiar issues in relation to Vitamin D, glutathione, CRH, folate, and auto-antibodies, and GABA.

    See if you can find some info on Ritalin, old people, and Alzheimer’s.
    I read a small study once that showed that elderly taking Ritalin had a vastly decreased chance of having a fall.
    The idea of old people running around having less falls and more fun on Ritalin is f$cking amazing.

  197. OldOzzie

    Shorten’s clueless foray into super hostilities – JUDITH SLOAN – Contributing Economics EditorMelbourne

    I’m wondering whether Bill Shorten was absent from Sunday school on the day the lesson on looking before you leap was delivered. Because that’s sure what it looks like given his rash announcement this week that a Labor government would cancel cash rebates for franking credits arising from company dividends.

    The alternative hypothesis is that this is the Opposition Leader’s mining tax moment, emulating the fate of that ill-designed, unworkable muddle of an impost introduced by Labor treasurer Wayne Swan. It lasted but a few years (in a modified form), raised nothing and was ignominiously dumped by the Abbott Coalition government. RIP would be most people’s response.

    But let’s not forget that Swan could soon become president of the Australian Labor Party and that opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen, in his widely unread book (up there with Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time), nominated Swan as the second best ever (or should that be EVA?) Australian treasurer. I kid you not. But, seriously, what is the real explanation for Labor’s brain snap that will have a deleterious effect on many thousands of mums and dads with small shareholdings while leaving the vile rich folk untouched?

    The first point to make is that the union-affiliated industry super funds are almost certainly driving this change because the loss of cash refunds for franking credits will hit self-managed superannuation funds, particularly in the pension phase, hardest of all.

    We have known for some time that the industry super funds regard SMSFs as the main enemy, having effectively knocked off the retail funds foe. (Banks are rapidly retreating from the superannuation space.)

    What annoys the industry super funds is that their members, close to retirement, are often enticed to take their lump sums and set up their own SMSFs. The scope to access limited-recourse borrowing within these SMSFs and to invest in geared property has been part of the appeal.

    It’s not as though industry super funds have really been champing at the bit to get into providing retirement income streams — it’s hard work, it has to be individualised and funds have to be managed for liquidity. But the industry super fund trustees, including the various union officials who sit on the boards, have been none too impressed by the outflow of funds.

    The response has been several-fold. First, most industry super funds now offer limited recourse borrowing as part of their offerings. Second, they have lobbied hard for changes to the negative gearing and capital gains rules to reduce the attractiveness of property investment. Labor, under Shorten and Bowen, has obliged by outlining various proposals to change the associated taxation arrangements.

    The third strand of the strategy has been to convince Labor to abolish cash refunds for franking credits, working on the faulty assumption that these cash refunds overwhelmingly favour those with very large SMSFs. The superficial argument runs that wealthy people in SMSFs in the pension phase are raking in obscene amounts of cash refunds because of the tax-free status of superannuation and this must be stopped. The problem with this argument, which is being run by people too young to have much experience with the real world of retirees, is that it ignores the very large number of people (voters, in other words) with small shareholdings, held within and outside superannuation. These people rely on the cash refunds for franking credits to supplement their modest incomes. Oops, I say.

    Even the proposition that the cash refunds overwhelmingly go to wealthy people has been undermined by recent developments. Obviously, people with large superannuation balances and a reasonable number of fully franked shares can receive substantial cash refunds. But since the introduction of the transfer balance cap of $1.6 million, which took effect from July 1 last year, the value of these cash refunds was greatly reduced by dint of the limit on tax-free earnings to within the cap.

    The balance of the funds has had to be transferred to accumulation funds where a 15 per cent tax applies on earnings. Moreover, because these funds have a range of assets, there will be other taxable earnings that can be used to make full value of the franking credits. In all likelihood, the evil rich folk will easily be able to rearrange their portfolios, including by selling down Australian shares and purchasing more overseas shares, property and listed trusts, to escape any real impact from Labor’s policy proposal.

    Instead of receiving cash refunds, they simply will use the tax paid on other income streams to receive the full value of the franking credits. It will be a bit inconvenient, but some of these SMSFs arguably have been a bit overweight in Australian shares in any case. But herein lies another weakness of the arguments being peddled to Shorten and Bowen: that there will be huge savings by ditching cash refunds. The young brains behind this policy snafu have been working off 2014-15 taxation statistics, which are out-of-date and well before the changes made to superannuation by the Coalition government, including the transfer balance cap.

    In other words, they are highly misleading because, in effect, the Coalition has done much of the work for Labor by limiting the value of cash refunds for franking credits by restricting the value of tax-free assets.

    When Shorten talks about a SMSF receiving $2.5m in cash refunds for franking credits (which, by the way, implies a shareholding worth over $100m), he is talking of a situation that no longer applies. Moreover, since when does one extreme example constitute a good rationale for changing a policy that affects more than one million Australians?

    The costing of Labor’s policy by the Parliamentary Budget Office should be regarded as uncertain, at best. It is telling that Bowen has declined to release the results of the exercise undertaken by the PBO. If he were to do so, we could see the assumptions that are made to arrive at the figure of $59 billion in savings across 10 years.

    In particular, we would want to see whether any behavioural changes are factored into the figures because the loss of cash refunds will cause a significant restructuring of asset allocation among some funds to achieve value from the franking credits in other ways.

    There also will be changes that will occur in the way companies manage their capital, including the scope to reduce average payout ratios (dividend to profit), which are very high in Australia.

    Shorten naively presumes that any adversely affected age pensioners — they are estimated to be 250,000 in number, mainly part-pensioners — will be compensated automatically for the loss of income associated with the ending of cash refunds.

    He obviously doesn’t understand how the system works, including the income deeming rates applied by Centrelink.

    Certainly, in the short term, many will be just worse off through the loss of cash refunds. According to Treasury estimates, the average cash refund for age pensioners holding shares is $900 a year per person.

    Sensing that he has been sold a pup, Shorten is talking about compensating age pensioners for this loss of income.

    It beggars belief that he would just compensate those with shares, but the cost of any across-the-board lift to the amount of the Age Pension is prohibitive. A modest rise of 4 per cent would mean additional spending of $2bn on the Age Pension a year. (It now costs nearly $50bn and is rising rapidly.) There goes a large chunk of the $6bn a year in saving that Labor wants to splurge on other activities, such as providing small cuts to income tax rates as well as more government spending.

    But here’s the thing: there will be a large group of people who miss out. They are the ones who are just above the Age Pension income and asset thresholds (which were reduced by the Coalition) but who still have relatively modest retirement incomes.

    Within this group, there are probably plenty of Labor voters including ex-teachers, ex-nurses, ex-public servants. This is the group that arguably is most dudded. There will no compensation for them but their take-home incomes will be reduced — in some cases to just above the amount received from the Age Pension.

    Apart from falling into this inadvertent trap set for Shorten and Bowen by the industry super funds to make this change, it is also worth reviewing here the history that led to this bungled policy proposal. Recall that it was Paul Keating as treasurer who introduced dividend imputation of company tax in 1987. It is true that the initial arrangement did not include cash refunds for those who paid no or little tax. But there was never any logic to excluding them; it was just that the budget position did not allow it at the time.

    The inclusion of cash refunds for franking credits in fact has been bipartisan policy for many years. Labor took it to the 1998 election, declaring that cash refunds made the system of dividend imputation much fairer. (No doubt that’s a bit of history that Shorten and Bowen may need to overlook.) The introduction of cash refunds when Peter Costello was treasurer was supported in parliament by Labor.

    To be sure, there are arguments about whether dividend imputation is a good thing. Not many countries have it; some have moved away from it; others have mixed systems. The main arguments in favour of it are that it eliminates double taxation and encourages Australian companies to pay tax and maximise the flow of dividends.

    The average payout ratio rose noticeably when dividend imputation was introduced and sits around 70 per cent. Australians hold an above average proportion of domestic shares compared with many other developed economies. The argument is also made that it is relatively easy for Australian companies to raise capital because large retained earnings tend not to be wasted on poor investment choices.

    But there are arguments ag­ainst dividend imputation. One is the potential discouragement of foreign investment because of the exclusion of foreign investors from the benefits of franking credits. It is also seen as relatively expensive, although Australia raises propor­tionately more from corporate tax relative to total tax revenue than many developed economies and well above the OECD average.

    But what Labor is proposing real­ly has nothing to do with the debate about dividend imputation. Shorten and Bowen are merely proposing to eliminate cash refunds but to keep the system otherwise intact.

    The really interesting question is how the dynamic duo, Shorten and Bowen, could be so misled. Don’t they run into older people with their small holdings of Telstra and Commonwealth Bank shares? These people were never buyers of shares, but through a historical accident they took up the public offerings and have held them ever since.

    They are proud of these small holdings. They look forward to receiving the biannual dividend cheques. They look forward to receiving the cash refund from the Australian Taxation Office, which they can use for some larger expenses such as paying for private health insurance, car rego, home maintenance or a new fridge. But Labor thinks that they won’t mind having those few thousand dollars taken away. They will somehow understand.

    Let’s be clear: many of them are not on the Age Pension. They live on modest incomes but don’t qualify for the Age Pension. There will be no compensation for them. They will just have to suck it up.

    Across a longer timeframe, this further tinkering of the rules on retirement incomes will further undermine trust in the superannuation system. So for all the urging of the industry super funds, the net impact may well be for people to turn their back on superannuation as much as they can and arrange their financial affairs to target receipt of the Age Pension.

    At that point, the mythical savings of $59bn across 10 years will have been completely wiped out by a higher proportion of older people going on the Age Pension. Good one, Bill. Good one, Chris.

    From the Comments

    – I worry that Malcom Turnbull has left the attack on this to Scott Morrison. Does the PM’s silence indicate that he thinks Labor’s proposal isn’t such a bad idea?

    – Shorten and Turnbull…birds of a feather. Both egotistical narcissists with hundreds of ideas when they shower in the morning, and not a skerrick of savvy, grit or common sense. Dare we trust a man, so easily manipulated with obsolete data and faulty maths, to actually run our nation and economy? Shorten was a patsy for the industry super funds, and this is predicted by his union history. We lost big with Turnbull, but with Shorten, our losses will be cataclysmic. What a disaster.

    – Well said Judith-clueless not researched and may well cost him the next election hopefully. It never ceases to amaze that people who are supposed to have a grain of intelligence can be so stupid. Shorten has again demonstrated that not only is he an intellectual midget but certainly not fit to govern this country. Fancy gifting Pauline Hanson a free kick

    – ” In politics, … Bill Shorten ,,,, speaks now for a younger and genuinely aggrieved audience of over-educated renters and gig economy workers.” Adam Creighton

    The reality is this theft of imputation credits will happen, if not by Labor then by the Coalition. High immigration and the snowflake sense of entitlement will soon mean the morality of stealing from pensioners to fund more public servants will be policy of both major parties.

    Australia is no longer being run for Australians and we are all on our own.

    Best to move your investments overseas to avoid sovereign risk from socialist Australian governments and earn better returns at the same time. If you need a little help on where to put some of it heres a clue.. QQQ

    – Seems the plan is to force people to go onto pension, where they have no personal control. When stage two of the plan unfolds, it will be to slash that pension. Better to try to figure out a way to stay out of the grasp of these thieves.

    – All tax is theft!

    – Love your work Judith.

    – I too despair about the clue-less young ones that are going to make policy in Australia (and probably many other western nations) for a long time before they develop common sense.

    We’ll all wear the brunt of the fact they don’t see the holes in things until its too late.

    – The timing days before the Batman byelection is what I find incomprehensible.

    – Bill has been lulled by a MSM that is largely sycophantic or more simply a cheer squad masquerading as journalists. No matter what silly things he says or hypocrisy he exhibits he is generally lauded. It is so bad that after a few days of parroting Bill’s nonsense even The Age has started reporting these proposals are a stinker.

  198. nemkat

    I’m hoping she’ll do the Bridge Climb, Tinta.
    While chained to Kevin Rudd and Malcolm Turnbull.

  199. Stimpson J. Cat

    we all have to pretend that 10,000 migrants from sub-Saharan Africa will contribute no differently to a country than 10,000 arrivals from New Zealand.

    Arky, state your case.
    😁

  200. OldOzzie

    Autonomous car conundrum

    Yes, this is a motoring column but today’s star is a tram. Still reading? Because there’s more to the challenge. We’ll also be talking about ethics and – as any philosophy major or government frontbencher can affirm, that’s very tricky territory.

    Tricky but unavoidable when it comes to our real topic, which is autonomous cars. Their potential for reducing the death toll on the world’s roads is simply too good to pass up. About 1.3 million people die in road accidents every year, and most come down to human error. Replace the faulty “nut behind the wheel” – as the old joke goes – with an infallible computer, and bingo! Fatalities plummet 90 per cent. When it comes to ethical questions, that’s a lay-down misere.

    From there, it gets complicated. Every safety advance – even the seatbelt – has its detractors, and sometimes they have a point. There are very rare occasions when you’d be better off not buckled up.

    Technology can go wrong, too. A faulty airbag can kill you when it should save you. Are we better off with seatbelts? Of course. To the degree that we’re not allowed to make the decision ourselves. Clunk, click, or risk the clink. That raises a scary possibility. If your future car is safer in autonomous mode than with you at the wheel, authorities might be tempted to prevent you driving in certain conditions. Or at all.

    Happily, that possibility is still a long way off. Anywhere-anytime autonomy is decades away and, even if it were fitted to every new car tomorrow, it would be a long time before there was nothing else on the roads. In the meantime, drivers of cars with nascent systems must learn their limitations and be prepared to intervene. The semi-autonomous software already in luxury cars operates within narrow parameters and alerts the driver to resume control if its limits are breached. Even on autonomy easy-street – a clearly marked, divided road in ideal weather – most will demand that the driver resume command after a short time.

    Overconfidence can be fatal. The first known death in a self-driving car – 18 months ago in Florida in a Tesla Model S – occurred when the driver mistakenly left the car in autopilot mode and it failed to detect a huge white truck against a bright sky.

    Even within their limitations, existing systems can throw up surprises. They sometimes follow the wrong road markings, taking an off-ramp instead of staying on a highway. Or read a speed sign that applies to a different stretch of road and start slowing down in the fast lane. Drivers face a steep learning curve and can’t afford to relax. If the autopilot serves up a curveball, is the driver at fault for being unaware of the system’s foibles? If it demands the driver resume control, how much time is reasonable?

    These are thorny questions, and they’ll get harder. Future generations who grow up with autonomous cars will be less experienced behind the wheel, and so less equipped to intervene when it’s needed. And neither will all autonomous systems be created equal – they’ll use different sensors and algorithms. They will learn on the run, feeding their acquired knowledge back to the maker’s database for eventual download to the whole fleet. But that upgrade might not come in time to prevent your accident.

    And when there is a crash, there’ll be the issue of blame. Autonomous systems will rely on super-fine-grained maps, intelligent infrastructure and extremely rapid communication. The question of blame could be very knotty indeed. Lawyers, start your engines.

    In the meantime, drivers of normal cars beware. The California Department of Motor Vehicles, which licenses autonomous testing on public roads, keeps a database of incidents. A lot involve self-driving cars being rear-ended at junctions. Why? Robo-drivers are more conservative than humans and tend to stop unexpectedly. The car behind must cope with a computer-driving-Miss-Daisy.

    If, after all this, you remain one of the minority who say they’ll trust self-driving cars, let’s turn, as promised, to the tram. There’s a well-known ethical dilemma called the trolley problem, which goes like this: a trolley (as in tram) is running out of control towards five unwitting workers down the line. You could throw the points and redirect it down a branch track towards a single hapless worker. What do you do? If you fail to act, five workers die instead of one. If you redirect the trolley, you are culpable in a death.

    Autonomous cars will have to deal with dilemmas very similar to this. Suppose the car’s brakes have failed and it’s heading towards a woman with a pram, but if it swerves it takes out an elderly gent. What does its programming tell it to do? It could take just a single tragic trade-off to undermine confidence in the entire autonomy project.

    Maybe you have already come to the conclusion that rare events like this will be a small price to pay for self-driving’s unquestionable safety dividends. It’s hard to argue with that. But change the example above so that the car has to swerve off a bridge to avoid the woman with the pram. Would you buy a car that preferences the safety of others over your own? If the answer is still yes, you’re a rare bird according to the surveys; most drivers would like everyone else to buy altruistic cars, but wouldn’t get one themselves.

    Finally, rerun the thought experiment with multiple prams and your family aboard. Are you willing, or even entitled, to make such a decision on their behalf? That they are willing to be sacrificed when the numbers are against them?

  201. Tekweni

    Notafan, you asked what my cousin was doing about the farm. I have no idea. They want to retire. Have no idea what other assets they have but it was not long ago they bought some adjacent farms. It’s quite difficult and at times a very sensitive issue discussing what any of the family will do. When those of us left in the mid 90’s there was at the time a bit of tension. There were those with businesses, farms and commercial property who swore at the time things would be fine and they would never leave. None of us here want to say “we told you so”. And between my wife and I we have more siblings than most and a couple of dozen first cousins. That’s what happens when both sides are Catholics!

  202. Baldrick

    Do you think she’ll do the Bridge Climb while she’s in Sydney?

    Unlikely, going by the restrictions:

    Health & safety exceptions
    We do our best to help everyone climb, however there are some things that will prevent you from participating in a climb, including:
    a fit or seizure in the last six months
    broken bones
    if you are more than 24 weeks pregnant
    under 8 years of age
    under 1.2 metres tall

  203. Steve trickler.

    I’d be keeping an eye on this David Hogg chap. He’s carrying on like a potential nutter himself.

    The illogical, emotionally driven clap trap will come back and bite him. This guy is protected by twitter and facebook. No critique allowed.

    The first time when in the public sphere ( when he grows some balls ) and allows someone to directly challenge him for his stance on gun control, and the associated babble from his mouth that now beclowns him….he’ll mentally break.

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/03/16/david-hogg-nra-politicians/

  204. Tintarella di Luna

    areff
    #2663113, posted on March 17, 2018 at 5:03 pm

    winston: I think you meant bouncing tits.

    I was sure he meant bouncing tits I could be wrong though

  205. OldOzzie
    #2663185, posted on March 17, 2018 at 6:27 pm

    Autonomous car conundrum

    Yes, this is a motoring column but today’s star is a tram.

    We have doctors, hospitals, workplace elf n’ safety regulations, all manner of things that extend human life.
    We need something that culls the fvcwits from the heard. LEAVE CARS ALONE. They cull millions.

  206. Gab

    Happy St Patrick’s Day, Calli. To my shame, I never knew he wasn’t Irish.

  207. Stimpson J. Cat
    #2663179, posted on March 17, 2018 at 6:23 pm

    See if you can find some info on Ritalin, old people, and Alzheimer’s.
    I read a small study once that showed that elderly taking Ritalin had a vastly decreased chance of having a fall.
    The idea of old people running around having less falls and more fun on Ritalin is f$cking amazing.

    I prefer we supply old timers with more than enough reefer. Than they’ll stay put and have less falls. Not to mention how fascinatingly philosophical they’ll get with the grand kiddies.

  208. Some History

    There’s apparently a lot of cheating in homosexual relationships. Well, Ricky Martin, singer of the autobiographical? “Livin’ La Vida Loca”, has the answer.

    Listen up everyone.

    Singer Ricky Martin says he wants to “normalize” homosexual relationships to the point that each partner has sex with as many others as he or she wishes.

    “We want to normalize … open relationships,” Martin told his Vulture interviewer. “There’s absolutely nothing wrong. We’re just two very self-secure men that are completely in love with each other, that trust each other to the maximum level … ”
    Martin says such promiscuity and unaccountability is a positive, loving thing for homosexuals. “It’s good for the world,” he said. “It’s good for me as a gay man with kids.”
    ….Ricky Martin, 46, was raised Catholic but says he is now “open” to other religions because following one faith is too “limiting.”

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/actor-singer-ricky-martin-open-relationships-should-be-the-norm-for-homosex

  209. C.L.

    Home and showered.
    For sure I am still a fat bastard, but a fat bastard who did 15.4 km.
    On the couch with a nice little exercise buzz and a glass of Sweppes ginger ale.

    Congrats.

  210. Tintarella di Luna

    greasy w0g as he attempts to portray himself as a centrist despite a 90% odd voting pattern with the Greenfilth-Liars in the Senate. And no doubt the dopey denizens of Australia’s 2nd failed State will fall for it.

    That Brylcreme-abuser voted more against Coalition sensible policy than did Labor and the Greens. He’s a low-life opportunist who talks out of both sides of his mouth –

    my dear wish is that he disappear from the national and parochial political scene and hope he attends for fixing up the dilapidating properties he owns and give his tenants an even break which is more than he’s done for the electorate.

  211. miltonf

    ABC started pumping up xylophone’s tyres in the early 2000s when he was in his ‘no pokies’ period.

  212. Tintarella di Luna

    Home and showered.
    For sure I am still a fat bastard, but a fat bastard who did 15.4 km.
    On the couch with a nice little exercise buzz and a glass of Sweppes ginger ale.

    Arky I was going to ask if you’d do my 2.5ks today but I think you’ve done enough. Good on you, you’re an inspiration, I will do some walking tomorrow or maybe the day after.

  213. None

    Early booth data shows Xenophon team running distance third hooray hooray. Bad news: there is some optimism among some Labor types that they might sneak through in South Australia l?god help us. The poor Libs, useless as they are, got 53% of the vote last election and in fact have won the majority for the majority of elections in the last 20 years.

  214. OldOzzie

    areff
    #2663113, posted on March 17, 2018 at 5:03 pm
    winston: I think you meant bouncing tits.
    VS
    Tintarella di Luna
    #2663194, posted on March 17, 2018 at 6:32 pm
    areff
    #2663113, posted on March 17, 2018 at 5:03 pm

    winston: I think you meant bouncing tits.

    I was sure he meant bouncing tits I could be wrong though

    Tintarella di Luna wins

  215. So the secret ETS was legislated just before Xmas ’15 and no one in the HoR or Senate said boo?

    No. The entire Jo Nova post is incorrect. There was no legislation and no vote.
    It is covered by a regulation – National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Safeguard Mechanism) Rule 2015 – which was allowed for in the legislation to repeal the Carbon Tax, and brought into being by Greg Hunt’s signature, as Minister for the Environment, on October 7, 2015.

  216. Rae

    Do you think she’ll do the Bridge Climb while she’s in Sydney?

    Probably not, same as any other visiting politician. I’d venture that not too many Australian pollies have done it either. I’ve done it. How about you, Tinta?

  217. None

    Arky. Stellar effort. I took up running late in life and I had the pleasure of having a couple of Old Timers give me some great tips. Firstly shoes as C.L. said are important . I found out I needed orthotics. Second do one long run a week but never increase the distance more than 10% from week to week. In the intervening days have one day off to give your legs a total rest. At all other times just run the time don’t worry about distance. I started 3 times a week 20 minutes up to 25 and so on until I was running an hour, 5 days a week plus 1 long run on the weekend. The trick there is to listen to your body – walk to warm up, then run only as fast as you can while still being able to maintain a conversation, walk when it gets too much but don’t keep walking so long that your legs cool down, sip water every 20 minutes, run tall, run relaxed. Run from the hips, stretch to warm down. And I would also say vary your route bcause it will soon get very boring running around and a round a track. Ah yes hydrate before a run. I have always run grandma times but I won’t forget the dsy I ran my first 10k non stop. Good luck.

  218. Stimpson J. Cat

    Martin says such promiscuity and unaccountability is a positive, loving thing for homosexuals. “It’s good for the world,” he said. “It’s good for me as a gay man with kids.”

    You f$cking degenerate.
    I will no longer dance to your catchy Latin tunes.
    I hope your repaired septum collapses from excessive cocaine use again.

  219. Tintarella di Luna

    Tintarella di Luna wins</blockquote

    There was only a bounce or too in it though areff

  220. Mitch M.

    I prefer we supply old timers with more than enough reefer. Than they’ll stay put and have less falls.

    IN the US old timers are taking up pot at surprisingly high rates. On youtube there is a clip of a man with severe Parkinson’s who smokes and within minutes the shaking stops. That I cannot understand. Cannabinoids consistently demonstrate neuroprotective properties, even reducing amyloid related toxicity. That I can understand.

  221. miltonf

    So the secret ETS was legislated just before Xmas ’15 and no one in the HoR or Senate said boo?
    No. The entire Jo Nova post is incorrect. There was no legislation and no vote.
    It is covered by a regulation – National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Safeguard Mechanism) Rule 2015 – which was allowed for in the legislation to repeal the Carbon Tax, and brought into being by Greg Hunt’s signature, as Minister for the Environment, on October 7, 2015.

    Noted thanks MV

  222. Tintarella di Luna

    Climbed Ayers Rock as it was then and done the Bridge Climb. Ayers Rock was very very scary. The Bridge Climb not so much

  223. Rae

    Better view from the Bridge.

  224. None

    SA Labor still caring on with the lie Xenophon is a Liberal. SA Best ondist they’re centrist. These politicians really think we are stupid.

  225. Dr Faustus

    Very early counting in Batman shows a swing to the Greens, with Labor just in front on 2PP.

    Bandt:

    “Whatever the result tonight, one thing is now crystal clear: the greens are on the march everywhere, and never again will parties be able to go to an election saying if they beat up on refugees they will win votes, if they open a new coal mine they will win votes.”

    AKA swirling down the pan.

  226. squawkbox

    Didn’t find Ayers Rock at all scary when I did it back in the 80s although I was of course much fitter then. I remember one of our party, an octogenarian, ignored the designated path and simply walked straight to the top as the crow flies, arriving long before anyone else. Turned out he had been an Italian general of mountain troops in WW2.

    Of course, the subsequent discouragement of climbing had f* all to do with aboriginal sensibilities. The local rangers simply became sick of having to rescue less fit and less continent people who collapsed or shitted halfway up.

  227. Tintarella di Luna

    Didn’t find Ayers Rock at all scary when I did it back in the 80s although I was of course much fitter then.

    Squawkbox I climbed it when there was just a corrugated dunny and a little lean-to postcard shop at the bottom. The chain was the scary part for me, then when I got to the top I couldn’t see anyone and there were these white footprints that you were supposed to follow to a little obelisk where there was a book in which you could write your name. I was running following the footsteps thought some bastard had painted random white footprints all over the place. I remember the air was so thin I thought my lungs were bleeding, I found the obelisk, found the book, wrote my name and then ran right back the way I came. I was so glad to get down. Once was too often for me.

  228. Drink-Up Socrates

    Does anyone know of any groups forming to oppose the CMFEU’s destruction of self managed super funds.
    I have a need to carry a placard and to throw something.
    Of course I am grateful to Prime Minister Lucy for standing up for retirees rights and opposing Marxist control of the superannuation industry. He is ….isn’t he?

  229. squawkbox

    OK, no reflections on your nerve Tintarella. I did the climb on a clear dry cold winter morning, so failed to appreciate the nuances. I am sure you are braver than me and I will call you to remove the huntsmen from my bathtub anytime 🙂

  230. Tintarella di Luna

    I hope there’s some re-runs of Columbo tonight – I had to leave the Sunbather listening to the SA election results – the panel is simply an assault on the sight and sound besides the insufferable, unwatchable Black-Handed leader of circle jerk has its mouth open – I used a few choice adjectives and a noun and left

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