It’s just not cricket

The expression “it’s just not cricket” is old-time Australian slang about the importance of fair play. This was a sport where the values of sportsmanship, fair play and honesty were paramount. That’s why breaching those values – as captain Steve Smith, vice captain David Warner and player Cameron Bancroft did during the third test in South Africa is so odious. As with the 1981 underarm bowling outrage involving Greg and Trevor Chappell, the punishment should be swift and brutal. This is particularly so given the Australian conceit of being the nation of fair play. That may have been the case during the Don Bradman era, but sadly it has long passed.

Sadly ethics and honesty are undervalued attributes, with today’s young people being inculcated with the importance of diversity and equality of cultures while being embarrassed by traditional western values held tight from the Enlightenment.

A key role of a board of directors is to set and uphold the values of an organisation, to ensure the continued good reputation of the organisation. In this Cricket Australia has failed miserably. On what planet is it considered alright to cheat – for that is exactly what the ball tampering is – provided it is not discovered? The tone of the organisation is set from the top, which is why Smith and Warner should take responsibility. But so should all of the board members: David Peever, Earl Eddings, Bob Every, John Harnden, Tony Harrison, Jacquie Hey, Michael Kasprowicz, Mark Taylor and Michelle Tredenick.

The board should have set a zero tolerance policy for cheating, with swift and brutal punishment. Given the disrepute that the Australian cricket team has brought upon Australia the punishment should be a life ban. The board of Cricket Australia should now come out and clearly articulate that cheating is unacceptable, will not be tolerated and that any player who engages in cheating, or turns a blind eye to cheating, will never play again.

Instead we have the board obfuscate by refusing to use  the ‘cheating’ word – it’s a minor infraction, and the players’ judgement was wrong is the official line.

That doesn’t wash. Cricket Australia should come clean and acknowledge that it was cheating and that the players involved deliberately did not uphold the values to which Cricket Australia subscribes.

And it’s about time that the ridiculous amounts of money paid to players is brought under control. This and the pampering of the players has helped build their egos and sense of entitlement and thus the hubris that they are above the law and above the norms of society. If cricketers can be paid such vast sums, the game needs to receive no taxpayer subsidy. Yet about $300 million a year of taxpayers’ money goes to the Australian Sports Commission. Then we have the stadiums built and maintained by governments and other transfers from the taxpayer, but not collecting sufficient revenue from sports to meet ongoing maintenance let alone to pay back the capital cost of construction.

If taxpayers’ money is involved, the maximum salary should be set to the public sector rates, which are already high by world standards. As it stands the taxpayer subsidises the sport, the taxpayer builds and maintains the sporting facility, and the patron pays a high ticket fee just to fund a luxury lifestyle for sportsmen which are so out of touch from the average taxpayer to be in the top 0.0001% of the income distribution.

 

About Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

I'm a retired general who occasionally gets called back to save the republic before returning to my plough.
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96 Responses to It’s just not cricket

  1. Nathan

    Bancroft is an opening batsman, not a bowler.

  2. mareeS

    LQC, we seem to have gotten fairly wealthy on ethics, honesty and integrity, and our kids are following a similar path in good work.

    We used to worry that cheating and deception was the way to go in our careers, but the more we stuck to integrity, the better the returns. We have never been out of contracts, nor have our son and daughter, we still bat work away and name our price.

    Integrity and honesty are everything.

  3. mancer

    Darren Lehmann needs to go, always has a dodgy look on his face, I’ve never liked him. The fact that he isn’t going points to 2 possibilites; 1. that he has no honour or integrity to sack himself because he is a shady person OR and the more likely is that 2. he has dirt on people maybe on the board or other, most likely IMO relating to fixing games, for that he can’t be touched.

  4. jupes

    The board should have set a zero tolerance policy for cheating, with swift and brutal punishment. Given the disrepute that the Australian cricket team has brought upon Australia the punishment should be a life ban.

    Fuck off you knob jockey. Get a sense of proportion. This has been debated here for days so you are a bit late to the argument so I guess you missed out on this: ICC punishments for ball tampering:

    Atherton (94) – fined $3,700

    Younis (00) – 1 match

    Dravid (04) – 50% match fee

    Afridi (10) – 2 T20 matches

    Du Plessis (13) – 50% match fee

    Du Plessis (16) – 100% match fee

    But yeah, ban our blokes for life you gormless twit. FMD

  5. Leigh Lowe

    OK.
    Pending confirmation.
    It appears we are now talking about sandpaper.
    Not tape with a bit of dirt attached (which always sounded a bit suss).
    I played a lot of cricket.
    Never ever packed a sheet of 3M 80 grit in my kitbag.
    Anyome care to defend Davey on that one?

  6. Infidel Tiger

    Lucius you are an embarrassment to this site.

  7. Infidel Tiger

    Nearly every single pro would have sandpaper on their kit for their bats.

    Sandpaper, linseed oil and a copy of Picture.

  8. RobK

    “it’s just not cricket” 
    It’s only just not cricket.
    Its amazing that ball tampering is proving to be the most talked about element of cricket. Everyone is ignoring the finer details of bale rests on the wickets themselves. Nobody wants to talk about it.

  9. Cpt Seahawks

    Cricket Australia have mishandled this.

  10. Leigh Lowe

    Umm .. calling bullshit on the sandpaper as a standard item thing.
    One report talked about using sandpaper to remove sponsors stickers … which happens once every two years, or maybe at the start of each tour.
    And batsmen sanding and oiling bats?
    Really?
    They are consumables.
    They have them delivered, they use them, and when they break, they throw them away.
    Bill Lawry was the last bloke to sand and oil a bat.

  11. Infidel Tiger

    Not true at all. Even these days you hang on to favourite bats as long as possible.

    Sandpaper is in every cricket changeroom and every pro’s kit.

  12. Leigh Lowe

    Cpt Seahawks.
    Correct.
    The most monumental fuck-up of all time.
    Sutherland is a wimpy clerk totally out of his depth.

  13. Leigh Lowe

    Sandpaper is in every cricket changeroom and every pro’s kit

    But probably not in your pocket on the ground?

  14. Infidel Tiger

    But probably not in your pocket on the ground?

    Certainly not. Bottle tops and mints only on field.

  15. Leigh Lowe

    Certainly not. Bottle tops and mints only on field.

    We are only talking about the amount of planning and premeditation here (words I hesitate to use with reference to Davey).
    The point is that sandpaper is way more destructive than tape + dirt.

  16. Infidel Tiger

    Such idiots. Hard to fathom how they thought they could get away with it.

  17. Leigh Lowe

    If they used sandpaper WTF was the bright yellow tape about.
    Ethically and morally a complete fail.
    And an insult to professional cheats who put time and efgort into their work.

  18. Bad Samaritan

    The whole reaction to the ball-tampering is crap. All the snowflakes who’ve been triggered should immediately don their pussy hats (maybe the whole pussy outfit) and head for a safe space, and have a good sob with a grief counsellors. You flamin’ wusses!

    OK, so tonight in the NRL and AFL there’ll be a host of penalties awarded for rule-breaking. At the soccer there’ll be free kicks and penalties by the bushell. Over at the tennis they take penalty points or games. At the golf penalty strokes. At the motor racing grid and time penalties. Etc Etc Etc.

    Meanwhile a host of Cats are crying into their pretzels ’cause the fellas they’re having bro (or ro) mances with have broken the rules.. Boo f’ing’ hoo. Toughen up princesses. Fine ’em or suspend them for a match or two. Put ’em in the sin bin, like every other sport does FFS. And get over yourselves Catsters.

    If you can’t, then Sinc will simply have to start a second blog; Pussyllaxy; for you ridiculous crybabies. That is all.

    BTW. In the upcoming Soccer World Cup will the Oz Soccer Federation need to have the ethical standards command on the sideline lest the Socceroos feign (and receive) a match-winning penalty, seconds from fulltime? Oh the shame of it, I tell’s ya. The disgrace if that should happen eh?

  19. BorisG

    Hard to fathom how they thought they could get away with it.

    They are now banned for a year. Which is a fair punishment for monumental stupidity.

  20. BorisG

    Cricket Australia is over-reacted and LQC thinks it’s not enough.

  21. BorisG

    People do ball tempering at all levels. premeditated makes it worse, but the ban is over the top and disproportional to same offences by other players.

  22. Bad Samaritan

    Another thing….

    Current Betfair back odds on the 4th Test starting 6PM Sydney Time 30th March, in Jo’burg;

    SA $1.59 (63%) Draw $5.70 (17.5%) Aus $5.20 (19.3%).
    Current matched bets; $1.17 million; $980,000 SA (87%) Draw $52,000 (5%) Aus $89,000 (8%)

    Something wrong here?

  23. Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

    IT – it’s the Australian team and supporters who have the conceit that Australia is the exemplar of fair play. Therefore the enforcement of the rules should be draconian for Australia.

  24. MichelLasouris

    “And it’s about time that the ridiculous amounts of money paid to players is brought under control. This and the pampering of the players has helped build their egos and sense of entitlement and thus the hubris that they are above the law and above the norms of society. If cricketers can be paid such vast sums, the game needs to receive no taxpayer subsidy. Yet about $300 million a year of taxpayers’ money goes to the Australian Sports Commission. Then we have the stadiums built and maintained by governments and other transfers from the taxpayer, but not collecting sufficient revenue from sports to meet ongoing maintenance let alone to pay back the capital cost of construction.

    If taxpayers’ money is involved, the maximum salary should be set to the public sector rates, which are already high by world standards. As it stands the taxpayer subsidises the sport, the taxpayer builds and maintains the sporting facility, and the patron pays a high ticket fee just to fund a luxury lifestyle for sportsmen which are so out of touch from the average taxpayer to be in the top 0.0001% of the income distribution.”
    AND let us not forget the countless involuntary supporters of the “flannelled fools” who tip in huge amounts of money that Manufacturers who SPONSOR cricket add onto every item we buy from them. Were the shareholders ever asked IF they wanted their dividends ripped from them due to un-voted decisions of backroom “marketing ‘ goons? Well, were they?
    The most distressing aspect for me is the gratuitous insults that these low intellect sportspersons spew. I want to see cricketers wired for sound so that every little barb and insult in recorded and analysed. Did you hear the cricket ‘legends’ acknowledge that the Game is always played “hard ” ….which is code for allowing insults and physical intimidation to go unchecked? ENOUGH

  25. Entropy

    Anyone who thinks this punishment is disproportionate is required to go to an English/South African/New Zealand pub at least once in the next ten years.

    As for what other countries did or did not do to punish their players when they were caught similar, who gives a shit? They aren’t Australia.

  26. stackja

    So they all should be sent to the arena and get thrown to the lions?

  27. Awake

    Samaritan,
    This is not just breaking the rules, this goes to the principle of what sport is about, like what LQC said.

    Ban the person that did the act for one year . The pocket is where to hit him. Working in the kitchen of a restaurant he might have a use for his sandpaper, scrubbing stubborn stains.

  28. Diogenes

    patron pays a high ticket fee just to fund a luxury lifestyle for sportsmen which are so out of touch from the average taxpayer to be in the top 0.0001% of the income distribution.”

    They are being paid their perceived worth to their employers (CA, sponsors, IPL etc) . Whether the valuation is correct is another matter, and as many sponsors are said to have pulled their sponsorship, it may be argued that they are now being precisely what they are worth.

    That said I agree there should be no subsidy from the taxpayer to ANY sport in any form. And for years I refused to buy milo and wheat bix because they were heavily promoting their cricket ties and using cricket stars to flog their product, just as I have not eaten any KFC as they sponsor the sport.

  29. cynical1

    Atherton (94) – fined $3,700

    Younis (00) – 1 match

    Dravid (04) – 50% match fee

    Afridi (10) – 2 T20 matches

    Du Plessis (13) – 50% match fee

    Du Plessis (16) – 100% match fee

    All denied it.

    None involved in a conspiracy with others.

  30. If cricketers can be paid such vast sums, the game needs to receive no taxpayer subsidy. Yet about $300 million a year of taxpayers’ money goes to the Australian Sports Commission.

    Let’s get some facts into the hysteria.
    How much taxpayers money goes to cricketers’ salaries? Lucius’ implication that it is a huge amount helps build the over-reaction to the ball tampering incident.

  31. None involved in a conspiracy with others.

    Of course there was.
    Every bowler knows the potential benefits of changing the ball shape/shine/scuff.
    Every captain knows the same.
    Every player knows the same facts.

    So of course the shining/scuffing is done by players and captains as the bowler walks back to his mark in full knowledge of the bowler. That then is a conspiracy.

    Which bring me to my next point – I assume “reverse swing” is an aspect of modern cricket.
    Which suggests that ball tampering has led to the new phenomenon of reverse swing.
    Smith is being hung out to dry by lilly livered pantywaists, and is taking the fall for all ball tampering by all cricketers that preceded him.

    I wish him all the best in his exile. Hopefully he will do a Profumo and do good works until he can play again.

  32. lily

    With all the pressure that is on the Australian cricketers by the media at the moment, I just wish they would ease up on them.
    Have the media stopped to consider that if they push to hard the same thing could happen to these young men as happened to James Hird from the Essendon football club.

  33. min

    Heard a sound clip where Lehman talks about ball tampering going on said it was ICC to deal out the punishment . This they did ,about the same as they gave to other ball tamperers . Where was he at lunch break not coaching, helping to plan strategies when they were in dire straits . Warner thought probably this was the best strategy and if caught no big deal miss a game and forfeit match fees like all the others that got caught.

  34. Robbo

    mancer
    #2672860, posted on March 28, 2018 at 11:59 pm
    Darren Lehmann needs to go, always has a dodgy look on his face, I’ve never liked him.

    So that’s a good enough reason to sack him. You idiotic tosser.

  35. dopey

    Second Test Lord’s 1972.
    Bob Massie 16 – 137 for the match. No ball tampering.

  36. John Michelmore

    Food and circuses keep the population occupied, while the important issues remain unaddressed or continue to go in the wrong direction! Of course government will help fund both with taxpayers money.

  37. Deplorable

    Who gives a toss about the millionaire cricketers I am still angry and concerned that Bull Shitten is planning to confiscate my returns from my SMSF and reduce my income to less than the pension. That’s the most important issue before me.

  38. Senile Old Guy

    So of course the shining/scuffing is done by players and captains as the bowler walks back to his mark in full knowledge of the bowler.

    This is BS. As are other similar comments.

    Shining the ball is within the rules of the game.

    Sutherland also revealed it was sandpaper, not tape as first claimed, that was used to tamper with the ball in the third Test in Cape Town.

    That is not within the rules of the game. Via Wikipedia:

    Under Law 41, subsection 3 of the Laws of Cricket, the ball may be polished without the use of an artificial substance, may be dried with a towel if it is wet, and have mud removed from it under supervision; all other actions which alter the condition of the ball are illegal. These are usually taken to include rubbing the ball on the ground, scuffing with a fingernail or other sharp object, or tampering with the seam of the ball.

    The players are all aware of these rules. Using sandpaper is clearly contrary to the rules and illegal.

    Smith, the “leadership group” and Bancroft all knew this. And they all knew that what they were doing was illegal under the rules. Smith admitted so when interviewed.

    People will have differing views on the penalties. I think those imposed are lenient for premeditated, planned attempts to cheat. This was no spur of the moment, brain implosion on field with seconds to go: it was a premeditated, planned, discussed attempt to cheat. By the “leadership group”, captain and bowler. It was a conspiracy.

    And, if Lehman did not know, then he is incompetent. If he did know, he is telling lies. Either way, he should have resigned. Now, he should be sacked.

  39. dopey
    #2673047, posted on March 29, 2018 at 9:12 am
    Second Test Lord’s 1972.
    Bob Massie 16 – 137 for the match. No ball tampering.

    Went to YouTube for a video of Massie’s heroics on debut.
    Thanks for the reminder!
    Lots of ball-shining on the trousers, an accepted tradition. Massie had the decency to look knackered on several occasions, reflecting the effort he put in. (or perhaps the ill health which led to his retirement/dropping)

  40. Senile Old Guy

    And CA is going on with this:

    CA boss James Sutherland said the scandal had taken a heavy toll on Smith.

    “He is destroyed, very upset,” Sutherland said.

    Really? The whole point of punishment and penalties are to take a “heavy toll”.

    Sutherland is talking as if this is just something that happened to Smith when he wasn’t paying attention. Smith orchestrated the attempt to cheat.

  41. candy

    The media treats child abusers and murderers better than Steve Smith.

    He’s done something wrong and idiotic but a little perspective is needed. It’s sport. He did not kill anybody. Australians seem to need to hate someone these days, and this week or for a week or two it’s Steve Smith.

  42. Senile Old Guy
    #2673073, posted on March 29, 2018 at 9:42 am
    So of course the shining/scuffing is done by players and captains as the bowler walks back to his mark in full knowledge of the bowler.

    This is BS. As are other similar comments.

    Shining the ball is within the rules of the game.

    You are right – shining is done by all players in full approval of the laws.
    However, I still maintain all other actions are still “conspiratorial” because every player has talked about the effects of scuffing or extra shine with other team mates over time.
    For example, the lolly in the mouth was not a spur of the moment action. It was there to help the “ball management” process, as was the dirt in the trousers.
    My point is that conspiracies can be dreamed up in a specific conversation (Warner and Bancroft) and also built up over time (most other occasions).

  43. Infidel Tiger

    Du Plessis was caught rup being the ball on his zip.

    How is that related to shining? He lost his match feee.

    3 Australian cricketers did similar and have had their lives destroyed.

    The mob is not only frothing and hysterical, it knows nothing about cricket.

  44. Leigh Lowe

    Crucifixion is too good for ’em, sir.

  45. Leigh Lowe

    I did harbour some hope that CA would get stuck into the ICC over this and force up penalties all round.
    Maybe insist on tighter conditions on tours of Australia.
    But I wouldn’t trust Sutherland to be able to run a disputed parking ticket case with a rural council.

  46. Spot on IT.
    The mob is being led by the fools at the top of the Australian Cricket Board whose lack of sincerity over the last decade has led us to this situation.
    For example – ACB pays a coach AND a high performance manager. Waste of money due to duplication of goals, process and outcomes.
    The Integrity Manager had no input to complaints about sledging for many years. Another waste of money and an obvious example of featherbedding.
    The coach has allowed sledging to continue, leading to a pervasive attitude of “everything is allowed”.

    But 3 players will wear the sackcloth and ashes for all the officials who allowed this situation to develop over time.

  47. Senile Old Guy

    The mob is not only frothing and hysterical, it knows nothing about cricket.

    IT, I have been watching cricket (and playing other sports) for over 40 years. I know a little bit about cricket.

    You don’t take sandpaper on to the field to scuff up the ball.

    On the issue of conspiracies and cheating…in the NRL, a player gets tackled close to the line and — in a spur of the moment move — does a “second movement” to get the ball over the line: that’s a penalty for a (caught) attempt to cheat.

    Conspiracies?

    The Club was stripped of its 2008 and 2009 premierships (these were not awarded to the opposition clubs either), prevented from earning any competition points in 2010, forced to repay 1.1 million in prize money and fined another $500,000.

  48. Senile Old Guy

    But 3 players will wear the sackcloth and ashes for all the officials who allowed this situation to develop over time.

    No, that’s also BS. The players are adults being paid millions of dollars. Adults are expected to monitor their own behaviour. There seems to be a lot of people finding excuses for Steve Smith and his band of cheats. I do not exclude Lehman as his excuses seem feeble and hard to believe.

  49. Senile Old Guy
    #2673073, posted on March 29, 2018 at 9:42 am

    …if Lehman did not know, then he is incompetent. If he did know, he is telling lies. Either way, he should have resigned. Now, he should be sacked.

    Yep.
    Time to bring back honour to the game and the country.
    “This happened on my watch. I take responsibility. I stood with the players in the good times and I will share the dark times with them too. I vacate the position so another coach can come in with a clean record and turn the situation around.’
    Walks off into the sunset.

  50. dopey

    Once upon a time coaches were for junior cricket only. Test teams had a strong captain and a manager who could drink a lot. All these coaches/ assorted hangers on, what have they done for the game? Are the players any better, of course not. Give me the old masters any day.

  51. Infidel Tiger

    You don’t take sandpaper on to the field to scuff up the ball.

    No shit. That’s why they deserved sanction.

    And as the world governing body determined that is a level 2 offence meaning a one game suspension and a match fee fine.

    These players are being punished for the sins of every other Australian cricketer and the pile on is sickening.

  52. Senile Old Guy
    #2673113, posted on March 29, 2018 at 10:31 am
    There seems to be a lot of people finding excuses for Steve Smith and his band of cheats.

    Nope.
    Not excuses. I’m looking for the root cause of the cheating, and the ACB is a prime suspect.
    All 3 players deserve a punishment but ignoring the fundamental culture which encouraged cheating will only see it re-emerge later.
    Agreed, “Boof” is part of the problem and IMHO contributed to the win at all costs culture.

    Have the ACB explained why their punishment is so far in excess of the ICC and other cricket-playing nations? Or are they just trying to deflect attention from their own failures?

  53. Infidel Tiger

    On the issue of conspiracies and cheating…in the NRL, a player gets tackled close to the line and — in a spur of the moment move — does a “second movement” to get the ball over the line: that’s a penalty for a (caught) attempt to cheat.

    So we suspend and destroy the livelihoods of mongos for 12 months for second movements do we?

    No one is saying these three don’t deserve punishment but this so over the top it defies belief. The rules of Cricket barely consider what they did to be worthy of sanction.

  54. Leigh Lowe

    And as the world governing body determined that is a level 2 offence meaning a one game suspension and a match fee fine.

    That’s too light, but 12 months is too heavy.
    I reckon 2-3 matches is about right for a first offence and 12 months for a second.
    When I said here the other day that I thought Smith and Bancroft would cop the rest of 2018 and Warner would get 12 months, I wasn’t suggesting I thought that was the right penalty … just how I saw it playing out.

  55. Mark A

    Infidel Tiger
    #2673119, posted on March 29, 2018 at 10:40 am

    You don’t take sandpaper on to the field to scuff up the ball.

    No shit. That’s why they deserved sanction.

    And as the world governing body determined that is a level 2 offence meaning a one game suspension and a match fee fine.

    These players are being punished for the sins of every other Australian cricketer and the pile on is sickening.

    Quite so.
    I would be very surprised if this is not overturned on appeal. As you said, the livelihood of the players is effectively destroyed, what with the Indians jumping on the bandwagon.

  56. Infidel Tiger

    How galling that a corrupt shithole like India where people shit in the street banned Warner & Smith from the most corrupt cricket comp on earth.

    The rest of their world are loving this. Tired of being thrashed by Australi at the one thing we are good at, they see this as retribution.

    Adani must be closed and those Indian xunts left in the dark with their feces and ruined stained streets for comfort.

  57. Senile Old Guy

    Have the ACB explained why their punishment is so far in excess of the ICC and other cricket-playing nations? Or are they just trying to deflect attention from their own failures?

    I do not excuse the ACB but the players are responsible for their actions. Now it has gone from scuffing the ball with dirt to taking sandpaper on to the field.

    Anyone who thinks this is a minor infraction…

    Let’s remember. This was cheating to save the game and the series. Everyone involved knew it was illegal and simply wrong. But they tried it anyway.

    As you said, the livelihood of the players is effectively destroyed…

    And the players destroyed their own livelihood. Some commentators are using language that suggests that the players were just standing around and something (outside their control) happened.

    They tried to cheat and did so — sandpaper! — in a major way.

    Remember Trevor Chappell and the underarm incident? What the team (again, it was not just one player) was legal but the fallout was huge.

  58. Roger.

    I would be very surprised if this is not overturned on appeal. As you said, the livelihood of the players is effectively destroyed, what with the Indians jumping on the bandwagon.

    I would be very surprised if they appealed it.

    As to their livelihood, they’ve likely cost CA c. $200m in the current broadcasting rights negotiations.

    Best to cop it on the chin, express repentance (including the 100 hrs service to community cricket) and move on. Smith and Bancroft will be better men for it.

  59. Roger.

    If this is true, it’s staggering smith was even suspended

    If true…yes.

    Although it does go to his capacity to captain a side at Test level.

  60. Infidel Tiger

    Even if they appealed and won, Cricket Australia is under no obligation to select them, so they are fucked.

    Typical of the Australian mindset to overreact and cave to hysteria, and why we live in the most over governed and officious place on earth.

  61. Senile Old Guy

    It this is true…*

    The voice of ABC Grandstand claims Smith was simply “stupid enough” to give Warner the benefit of the doubt. “He (Warner) was the instigator,” Maxwell told BC Radio. “He was sitting in the dressing room with Bancroft and they came up with this ruse. As I understand it, Steve looked over to them and said, ‘What are you blokes up to? Oh, I don’t want to know’. He went out onto the field and he probably should have been more vigilant, as I said.” Maxwell claimed the entire situation is the consequence of the former 28-year-old skipper’s failure to control his 31-year-old deputy.

    …Smith is stupider than I thought. What leader says “Oh, I don’t want to know”? Really.

    And it is not a “ruse”; that is another attempt to tone down the act. A “ruse” is a trick. They were trying to cheat.

    * Maxwell used the phrase “as I understand it” which means that is what he has been told or has been implied but it has not been confirmed. Having said that, Warner has been a d*ckhead for some time.

  62. Leigh Lowe

    Three of the most damning things …
    (1) Sandpaper. You can do an enormous amount of damage with sandpaper in a short period of time. There is talk about players having sandpaper in their kit for bat maintenance, which would be superfine. We are unlikely to ever find out, but if the sandpaper used was coarse then Warner deserves to go for life, as it would mean that this wasn’t a plan cooked up in the break. It would mean he brought it to the ground with clear intent.
    (2) They knew how damning sandpaper was. This is why they concocted the lie about tape and dirt. So the ‘mea culpa’ at the press conference was bullshit.
    (3) Warner ‘demonstrated to Bancroft how to do it’. Oh? Unless he scuffs up balls for a hobby on the weekends, it means he has done it before.

  63. Infidel Tiger

    (1) Sandpaper. You can do an enormous amount of damage with sandpaper in a short period of time.

    Let’s not forget the umpires inspected the ball and said “carry on”. The match referee didn’t even award the Saffas 5 runs when he became aware at the end of the days play.

  64. dopey

    Many young players do stupid things but learn their lesson.
    Warner has never changed.

  65. Infidel Tiger

    …Smith is stupider than I thought. What leader says “Oh, I don’t want to know”? Really.

    Nearly all of them.

    Micro managing every event in a dressing room is impossible and you would hope your VC wasn’t holding a wood shop class with his opening partner.

  66. Senile Old Guy

    Micro managing every event in a dressing room is impossible and you would hope your VC wasn’t holding a wood shop class with his opening partner.

    But would you say “I don’t want to know” to some plan cooked up by known d*ckhead Warner?

  67. Roger.

    But would you say “I don’t want to know” to some plan cooked up by known d*ckhead Warner?

    It’s a failure on his part given the rancorous nature of the series.

    He should have been all over Warner in particular.

  68. Senile Old Guy

    ABC:

    And Our Boys at some point accepted a bit of homemade sandpaper didn’t stretch the bounds of cricket morality. It was sporting bracket-creep. And with a false sense of impunity, three (it seems) cricketers made a very bad decision.

    Just because the ICC has policed the ball-tampering rule badly — or ignored its many iterations — it’s come a cropper because Australians felt visceral disgust, and Cricket Australia (CA) has been compelled to meter out a harsh penalty.

    But CA is filling a void the ICC has left open. The ICC’s failure of leadership has forced CA to step in and deal out penalties that would not have been necessary if the game’s peak body had more guts to address the issue years ago, if it were truly serious about stamping out ball tampering.

    South African Test great Graeme Smith said as much when Smith was given a one-match suspension after his confession, saying it was too lenient and the ICC had “missed an opportunity to set a precedent in matters of this magnitude”.

  69. Leigh Lowe

    Let’s not forget the umpires inspected the ball and said “carry on”. The match referee didn’t even award the Saffas 5 runs when he became aware at the end of the days play.

    Possibly some mitigation there.
    Looking back at Cricinfo.
    Lunch was at the 22 over mark.
    Tea was after 48 overs.
    It seems he got quizzed around the 43rd over
    Maybe he got cold feet.
    Maybe he didn’t get enough opportunities.
    You’d certainly reckon that the 30-40 over mark would be the sweet spot to get at it if you were going to.

  70. Leigh Lowe

    Micro managing every event in a dressing room is impossible and you would hope your VC wasn’t holding a wood shop class with his opening partner.

    A good hard-arse leader wouldn’t need to micro-manage.
    No-one would dare pull this shit on a proper captain.

  71. Leigh Lowe

    Sponsors pulling the pin.
    Excellent news.
    Hopefully it means CA are forced to retrench a swathe of “high performance managers”, “integrity managers” and assorted other hangers on (including Sutherland).

  72. stackja

    Leigh Lowe
    #2673218, posted on March 29, 2018 at 11:55 am

    Pat Howard?

  73. Infidel Tiger

    CA brought all these sponsorship crises on its own head by giving in to the mob.

    The Magellan deal was widely considered a complete dud by both parties and Magellan have snuck out at the first opportunity. Fancy sponsoring a national cricket team and then running ads saying that investing offshore was what smart people did.

  74. Senile Old Guy

    Sponsors pulling the pin.
    Excellent news.
    Hopefully it means CA are forced to retrench a swathe of “high performance managers”, “integrity managers” and assorted other hangers on (including Sutherland).

    Not surprising but now Smith, Warner and CA have all been dumped by major sponsors.

  75. Senile Old Guy

    And perhaps it gets worse:

    They sat and faced us looking grave and anxious and strained. They shifted in their chairs and averted their eyes. They said how sorry they were, how embarrassed, how determined to overcome this error and better themselves.

    And they were lying. Even in that moment of commitment to a more honourable future, they were following a calculated plan to whittle down the consequences.

    Bancroft and Smith lied about using sticky tape and dirt on the ball, in an attempt to make their effort look hasty and impulsive. They cited a “leadership group” to avoid implicating Warner, and they dated the idea to that day’s lunch break to avert the impression of longer-term premeditation.

    And:

    As we finally learned from CA, the tampering tool wasn’t tape, but sandpaper. Warner had been the agitator and instigator. Smith hadn’t wanted him blamed given he was already on the brink of a disciplinary ban.

    And:

    Plenty of people around the scene in South Africa contend Warner had sandpaper involved at least one Test earlier. That suggestion started being made during the Port Elizabeth Test, and the resulting scrutiny on Warner is one possible reason why he recruited Bancroft.

  76. Infidel Tiger

    Sachin Tendulkar
    Sachin Tendulkar
    @sachin_rt
    Cricket has been known as a gentleman’s game. It’s a game that I believe should be played in the purest form. Whatever has happened is unfortunate but the right decision has been taken to uphold the integrity of the game. Winning is important but the way you win is more importan

    What a joke. Sachin was convicted of ball tampering himself!

  77. Leigh Lowe

    stackja

    #2673221, posted on March 29, 2018 at 11:59 am

    Leigh Lowe
    #2673218, posted on March 29, 2018 at 11:55 am

    Pat Howard?

    Yeah, he is Mr High Performance isn’t he?
    What sort of job is that, FFS?
    I don’t know the bloke but sounds like he is another fucking corporate psych witch-doctor.

  78. Senile Old Guy

    Match referee Mike Denness was in the international cricket hot seat when he penalized five Indian players for excessive appealing and sanctioned Tendulkar for ball tampering during the second test against South Africa at Port Elizabeth. TV cameras showed Tendulkar cleaning the seam of the ball but, because he hadn’t notified umpires he was doing it, it fell under the regulations for altering the condition of the ball.

    Probably would have been okay if he had notified the umpires. Not quite the same as taking a bit of sandpaper onto the field?

  79. Leigh Lowe

    Plenty of people around the scene in South Africa contend Warner had sandpaper involved at least one Test earlier. That suggestion started being made during the Port Elizabeth Test, and the resulting scrutiny on Warner is one possible reason why he recruited Bancroft.

    I saw a photo of Warner’s hands from one of the previous tests.
    J H Christ!
    I have seen less tape and bandaging on a boxers hands.
    (It did have “Kandiss” scrawled across the back of the hand as well).

  80. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    TV cameras showed Tendulkar cleaning the seam of the ball but, because he hadn’t notified umpires he was doing it, it fell under the regulations for altering the condition of the ball

    Oh yeah, those perfect little Indians. “I was just removing some grass that was stuck in the seam, stop being racist!”

    Spin, spin, spin. He was caught picking the seam but the Indians would not tolerate their best player being sanctioned.

    This is the crap they pull out every time they are busted and is exactly why the punishments for the Australians were ridiculous.

  81. steve

    How is it that a Victorian State Government can use 400,000 dollars that was not theirs to win an election and the sanctions for it are less than those given to a cricketer that tries to take shine of the ball?

  82. Leigh Lowe

    From Wikipedia on Pat Howard …

    Howard has received some criticism for this role. Shane Warne said in 2013, Cricket Australia should “please put current cricket people in charge to run the game,select teams, not ex rugby or any other sports people” and called Howard a “muppet”.

    In March 2013, following being temporarily dropped from the national team Shane Watson said Howard had not been involved in cricket long enough to pass comment on his commitment to the Australian team.

    Now I would tend to take Warney and Watto with a grain of salt, but it sounds as if Howard has managed to stick his oar into the selection process.
    Warne is right … cricket selection should be done by ex players (of cricket, not D Grade rugger, which is Howard’s sporting background).
    I wonder if Howard was the architect of Micky Arthur’s famous homework exercise, which Watto told them to shove up their arse.

  83. Leigh Lowe

    Mh at 1:25.
    Easy mistake to make.
    He thought it was a toffee apple.

  84. jupes

    Three of the most damning things …
    (1) Sandpaper. You can do an enormous amount of damage with sandpaper in a short period of time. There is talk about players having sandpaper in their kit for bat maintenance, which would be superfine. We are unlikely to ever find out, but if the sandpaper used was coarse then Warner deserves to go for life, as it would mean that this wasn’t a plan cooked up in the break. It would mean he brought it to the ground with clear intent.
    (2) They knew how damning sandpaper was. This is why they concocted the lie about tape and dirt. So the ‘mea culpa’ at the press conference was bullshit.
    (3) Warner ‘demonstrated to Bancroft how to do it’. Oh? Unless he scuffs up balls for a hobby on the weekends, it means he has done it before.

    Oh FFS Leigh, you are embarrassing yourself now.

  85. jupes

    TV cameras showed Tendulkar cleaning the seam of the ball but, because he hadn’t notified umpires he was doing it, it fell under the regulations for altering the condition of the ball

    Lifting the quarter seam (the one without the stitching) is one of the best ways of producing reverse swing.

    Certainly better than sandpaper (as in the Bancroft case where the umpire inspected the ball and allowed play to continue).

  86. kae

    I preferred the old days. Football (now NRL) for example.

    The players had full-time jobs and football was a weekend and a couple of weekday evenings thing. The lived in the real world and weren’t earning ridiculous money.

    I really don’t like how it is now with sport supported by taxpayers, with the ridiculous fees paid to players why can’t the organisations running these sports build their own stadiums?

    I remember when going to the football on a Saturday was cheap and getting into places like Belmore Oval was easy (only 20c I think).

  87. MichelLasouris

    Considering the obscene salaries these cricket “legends” are paid (I won’t say “earn”) could it be beyond them to either a) grow a beard or b) shave properly? Ooooops I forgot, they probably don’t know what a razor is for; or which end to grasp come to that. Pathetic

  88. MichelLasouris

    Fantastic. Someone wound “legend” Shane Wayne up,opened the box, set his gob in motion. This is the guy who made insults an art form. Not content with insulting the Opposition, their wives and children, he managed to bad mouth his confreres! What a Legend! (not). The most despised person in Sport; let alone cricket.
    Last night at the pub, some well oiled client asked my opinion about the “Crukit” I explained that it wasn’t my “field” (The pun eluded him) “‘I’m an Engineer, not an Entomologist.”….. A stunned silence followed…………

  89. jupes

    Considering the obscene salaries these cricket “legends” are paid (I won’t say “earn”) could it be beyond them to either a) grow a beard or b) shave properly? Ooooops I forgot, they probably don’t know what a razor is for; or which end to grasp come to that. Pathetic

    Good point Michael. They should get an extra year for that.

  90. jupes

    Last night at the pub, some well oiled client asked my opinion about the “Crukit” I explained that it wasn’t my “field” (The pun eluded him) “‘I’m an Engineer, not an Entomologist.”….. A stunned silence followed…………

    With such wonderful comic timing, I’m surprised you don’t have your own TV show.

  91. LBLoveday

    There were many $millions legally bet on the various results of the game, and punters are entitled to assume the results are fairly determined and not dependent on the success or not of cheats.

    Part of those $millions are paid to CA for the right to bet on “their product” and goes into the pool from which these cricketers are paid. Betting on the game also encourages those who have bet to watch, increasing the ratings & thus increasing the value of television rights, a big part of CA’s income.

    Part of the players’ payments is by way of performance bonuses. Yesterday female cricketer Melissa Quinn was charged with four counts of dishonestly obtaining financial advantage by deception – colloquially by cheating. While using a very different method to hers and not being successful, the male cricketers also attempted “dishonestly obtaining financial advantage by deception”, as they tried to illegally affect the results of the game (more wickets, more quickly, greater chance of winning) when succeeding could have meant bigger bonuses. No matter which way it is spun, it was attempted match-fixing.

    Far from being unfairly treated, I consider them lucky to not be criminally charged.

    In my view they committed an even greater transgression by lying about what went down, by claiming it was a piece of tape befouled with dirt from the pitch, when a piece of sandpaper had been sneaked onto the ground and used. Liars and cheats!. Even when caught out they were not men enough to truthfully fess up. Contemptible.

    This was not a kid cheating at hide-and-seek, but premeditated bringing of sandpaper onto the field and illegally using it for potential financial advantage.

    I only received one belting as a child, and that was not for what I had done, but for lying about it – it taught me a well-deserved lesson.

  92. JohnA

    steve #2673295, posted on March 29, 2018, at 1:03 pm

    How is it that a Victorian State Government can use 400,000 dollars that was not theirs to win an election and the sanctions for it are less than those given to a cricketer that tries to take shine of the ball?

    I don’t know but to correct the injustice, I suggest that the Victorian Government (ALP Branch) be banned for life.

    I do not want the cricketing penalties to be reduced.

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