Maintain the rage

Facebook reminds me that today is the fifth anniversary of Margaret Thatcher‘s death.

Here is how the ABC covered the news.

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26 Responses to Maintain the rage

  1. Oh come on

    Ummmm why was the sinking of the Belgrano a war crime? Let’s not stoop to Pilgering, Germaine.

  2. Oh come on

    Greer says some thoughtful, interesting things. She also comes out with some absolute rubbish. Mrs Thatcher did the lecture circuit – so what? So did both Bushes, both Clintons, Howard AND Blair! And Obama. They all had lucrative book deals, too, after their political careers ended. The lecture circuit alone is a very lucrative gig for not a whole lot of work.

    Not every former political leader of significant stature wants to enter the corporate world and feed at the trough. Some find it unseemly. Doesn’t surprise me in the slightest that Blair has no problem with it.

    I also note that the Thatcherite reforms to Labour – so famously symbolised by Tony Blair – have all been undone by Jeremy Corbyn, so there is that.

  3. Leigh Lowe

    At the time of this broadcast the Minister responsible for the ABC was the then (and still) potentially great Malcolm Trumble.
    He said nothing.
    He did nothing.
    He is not fit to polish Maggies shoes.

  4. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Ummmm why was the sinking of the Belgrano a war crime? Let’s not stoop to Pilgering, Germaine.

    The Argentine cruiser, the “General Belgrano” – ironically, the former U.S.S. “Phoenix,” which survived Pearl Harbor – was a perfectly legitimate target, and the true war criminals were the Argentine Naval officers, who ordered her there.

  5. RobK

    Most memorable for me was the closing of many of the coal pits which were bogged in IR quagmire…….and the many memorable quotes (from google):
    There is no such thing as society: there are individual men and women, and there are families.
    Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren’t.
    I am extraordinarily patient, provided I get my own way in the end.
    No-one would remember the Good Samaritan if he’d only had good intentions; he had money as well.
    Standing in the middle of the road is very dangerous; you get knocked down by the traffic from both sides.
    To wear your heart on your sleeve isn’t a very good plan; you should wear it inside, where it functions best.
    The Iron Lady will long live in people’s hearts. A remarkable person.

  6. RobK

    Format fail – the last two sentences are mine. 🙂

  7. MichelLasouris

    I don’t expect Germaine ( who is still not germane) to get much correct, or say anythingof import or interest. What will everyone sa7 on her demise…. who?….what?
    But the woman Brooke Magnati came straight out with her prejudices. Who is she? where is she now? Has anybodyseen/heard of her since? Where does Cone Top find these talking heads?

  8. iain russell

    The Germ is correct in saying that trans women will always be men. This has seriously pissed off the bulk of the Sisterhood. Other than that, The Germ is just another Leftard chucklehead.

  9. Baldrick

    Don’t you just love the smug moral elites, arm on the chair back, casually explaining how evil was Margaret Thatcher all because she didn’t fit their view of feminist identity politics.

  10. Up The Workers!

    To ‘Oh, Come On’ at 11.38pm:

    You mention that some former Leaders “…enter the corporate world and feed at the trough…”

    What would be Jeremy Corbyn’s equivalent?

    Chowing down on a mung bean at the local looney-bin asylum, perhaps (IF the more sentient local loonies aren’t too picky about their speakers).

    (And let’s not forget that Corbyn is one of the more intellectually gifted Labour Leaders – at least he can spell the name of his own Party correctly – unlike some).

  11. Frank

    Brooke Magnati wrote a blog under the pseudonym belle du jour that was later serialised on television. It was about her life as a prostitute in London.

  12. duncanm

    According to wiki, even the Argentinian’s didn’t think there was anything suss about the sinking:

    Argentine Rear Admiral Allara, who was in charge of the task force of which General Belgrano was part, said, “After that message of 23 April, the entire South Atlantic was an operational theatre for both sides. We, as professionals, said it was just too bad that we lost the Belgrano”.[30] Captain Bonzo also told Middlebrook that he was not angry about the attack on his ship and “The limit [exclusion zone] did not exclude danger or risks; it was all the same in or out. I would like to be quite precise that, as far as I was concerned, the 200-mile limit was valid until 1 May, that is while diplomatic negotiations were taking place and/or until a real act of war took place, and that had happened on 1 May”.[30]

  13. Cassie of Sydney

    “At the time of this broadcast the Minister responsible for the ABC was the then (and still) potentially great Malcolm Trumble”. Maggie died in early 2013 when Ghoulard was still PM. Trumble was shadow minister.

  14. Leo G

    “… even the Argentinian’s didn’t think there was anything suss about the sinking …”

    The Argentine Navy did think it was a bit “suss” that while Captain Bonzo had orders to attack any British ship within the exclusion zone which came within range of its armaments, that the General Belgrano had been ordered to enter the TEZ (but had not yet done so), that it was supposed to be “at action stations”, but was recklessly proceding with water-tight doors open.

  15. Bruce

    Something for the nautical buffs to ponder;

    The torpedo that sank the “Belgrano” was basic 1960’s / 70’s technology.

    The same vintage “dumb” torpedoes will snap any of our toy fleet in half.

    The really interesting ones (apart from the Nuke options), are the more modern torpedoes that do not strike the ship on its flanks, but cruise UNDER the vessel and detonate just below the line of the keel. Because water is essentially incompressible, almost all of the blast force goes straight up into the ship.

    This is specifically intended to rupture or weaken the keel and “spring” hull plating, watertight doors, bulkheads, seals, etc. Rapid sinking is pretty much inevitable.

  16. dopey

    Britain’s first prime minister. Wasn’t that Walpole?

  17. mh

    Occasionally the ABC produces something of interest, like it’s recent 4 Corners report on our crazy immigration program.

    Tonight’s 4 Corners is on the excessive powers of the ATO. It is covering this subject online, too.

    The high cost of taking on the Tax Office

    And tonight:

  18. Dr Fred Lenin

    All these bitter and twaisted feninazi communists slagging off a woman who entered the fray with me and emerged victorious while keeping her femininity ,punched out the boys including the Argentinian fascist misogynists . Not one of these bitter pretenders could hold a candle to her . Inadequate bitching about a winner.

  19. Rohan

    Bruce
    #2682052, posted on April 9, 2018 at 10:00 am
    Something for the nautical buffs to ponder;

    The torpedo that sank the “Belgrano” was basic 1960’s / 70’s technology.

    I think you’ll find that they were sunk with unguided or “dumb” 3 x 21 inch Mk 8 torpedoes. They first entered service with the RN in 1927. They used these instead of the “Spearfish” guided torpedo as the Belgrano was sailing in a straight line in a combat zone with constant speed, and the Mk 8 was considered to be much more reliable than the Sprearfish guided torpedo.

  20. The BigBlueCat

    “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.”
    ― Margaret Thatcher

  21. gbees

    Brooke Magnanti – what an aweful, aweful lady (sic).

  22. gbees

    meant to type awful – not ‘awe’ ful …

  23. Mark A

    Rohan
    #2682202, posted on April 9, 2018 at 1:36 pm

    Bruce
    #2682052, posted on April 9, 2018 at 10:00 am
    Something for the nautical buffs to ponder;

    The torpedo that sank the “Belgrano” was basic 1960’s / 70’s technology.

    I think you’ll find that they were sunk with unguided or “dumb” 3 x 21 inch Mk 8 torpedoes. They first entered service with the RN in 1927. They used these instead of the “Spearfish” guided torpedo as the Belgrano was sailing in a straight line in a combat zone with constant speed, and the Mk 8 was considered to be much more reliable than the Sprearfish guided torpedo.

    Torpedoes are marvelous things, if you disregard the reason they exists.
    The engines that drive them, built into such confined space speak of ingenuity.

    As Maxwell Smart said “If only it was used for goodness instead of evil?”

  24. Natural Instinct

    Margaret Thatcher and William F Buckley Jr. touch on a variety of subjects including economic incentives, minimum wage and redistribution of wealth. http://www.LibertyPen.com
    She talks about consensus versus conviction politicians.
    And at 7min she explains the difference between being born free, and living life in a zoo. If you choose to leave decisions to others, and like being told what to do and having a comfortable home, then the zoo is for you.
    etc

  25. Tel

    The really interesting ones (apart from the Nuke options), are the more modern torpedoes that do not strike the ship on its flanks, but cruise UNDER the vessel and detonate just below the line of the keel. Because water is essentially incompressible, almost all of the blast force goes straight up into the ship.

    I’m expecting submarine drones to be the next big thing. Kind of half drone, half mine, and half torpedo, with a sonar array spread out and resting quietly on the bottom of the ocean. If it sees a ship then come up underneath and punch a hole from the underside which is hard to fix. If it runs low on fuel then float up a bit, pack up the sonar array and gently drift home for a top up.

    The technology isn’t quite there yet, but won’t be long. Depends on how cheap, smart and reliable they can be made.

  26. Bruce;

    The really interesting ones (apart from the Nuke options), are the more modern torpedoes that do not strike the ship on its flanks, but cruise UNDER the vessel and detonate just below the line of the keel. Because water is essentially incompressible, almost all of the blast force goes straight up into the ship.
    This is specifically intended to rupture or weaken the keel and “spring” hull plating, watertight doors, bulkheads, seals, etc. Rapid sinking is pretty much inevitable.

    There is a further aspect to this.
    Asthe force is transmitted through the ship, it is then suspended over a void for about three/four seconds. The weakened hull, now only supported at either end, then breaks in two.
    The same effect is thought to be behind the sudden sinking of large vessels at sea – caught between two very large ‘rogue’ waves, the centre section of the ship is unsupported and fails.

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