Open Forum: April 14, 2018

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1,427 Responses to Open Forum: April 14, 2018

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  1. Nelson Kidd-Players

    Someone’s gotta do it…

  2. Infidel Tiger

    Mind your language.

  3. Arky

    It’s midnight.
    All the children are in bed, the socks are in the drawer and women folk should be getting their beauty sleep.
    I’ve had a good couple of days for a change so sod off Tigger.
    If I feel in high spirits and wish to celebrate in one of the few ways left to me by letting off some profanity, you’ll sit there and listen and like it.

  4. C.L.

    Comey really is a slimeball.
    Everyone knows he stood there and lied to protect the Clinton campaign.
    The man is an absolute disgrace.

  5. Whalehunt Fun

    Copulation with faeces seems unlikely to be a pleasant pastime. To each their own. Copraphiles included.

  6. Nelson Kidd-Players

    So, it’s not about the Model A, Arky?

    I’ve also got one that’s in pieces, although its only 1/10 the size…

  7. Arky

    Banks now have dedicated staff assigned to wander up and down their long queues and encourage people to get off the premises.
    “You want to take some money out? Piss off outside to the ATM”.
    “You want to transfer some money from one account to another? Don’t you know you can do that at home”?
    The one who accosted me thought he could help with opening a share trading account.
    Only he couldn’t, because he knew absolutely nothing about it as he is only trained to tell people to piss off out of the premises and do their banking over the phone.
    I knew more about the product than he did, as I have been using the missus online share account.
    Why do they keep suburban branches staffed by numpties open at all?

  8. Nelson Kidd-Players

    Takes up much less space and to date it hasn’t endangered my foot.

  9. Arky

    So, it’s not about the Model A, Arky?

    ..
    The Model A is well under way.
    Picking up some pieces from the sand blasters tomorrow, and have started cutting out the wood for the fame.

  10. Infidel Tiger

    Banks now have dedicated staff assigned to wander up and down their long queues and encourage people to get off the premises.
    “You want to take some money out? Piss off outside to the ATM”.
    “You want to transfer some money from one account to another? Don’t you know you can do that at home”?
    The one who accosted me thought he could help with opening a share trading account.
    Only he couldn’t, because he knew absolutely nothing about it as he is only trained to tell people to piss off out of the premises and do their banking over the phone.
    I knew more about the product than he did, as I have been using the missus online share account.
    Why do they keep suburban branches staffed by numpties open at all?

    It is very weird.

    I told one of the chicks at Commonwealth I would never deposit in the ATM because I wanted access to the funds instantly and she had no idea what I was talking about. Stupid bitch.

  11. Arky

    I have a good stack of American ash and maple in the shed ready for the frame.
    Ash is a strange wood. Quite light, but hard. Yet fairly easy to cut.

  12. Zatara

    In Comey’s book, “A Higher Loyalty,” the 1978 Northern Highlands Regional High School graduate describes suffering through body-shaming, wedgies and getting shoved into lockers, according to the Washington Post, which obtained an advance copy of the already best-seller.

    Now that explains much.

  13. Arky

    Back when that thing was built Henry Ford and other industrialists knee what was what.
    Firing on protesting workers and insisting on controlling every aspect of production, even buying rubber plantations and iron ore concerns.
    No bloody commie unions at River Rouge in those days.
    ..

    The Ford Hunger March, sometimes called the Ford Massacre, was a demonstration of unemployed workers that took place on March 7, 1932. The march, which started in Detroit and ending in Dearborn, Michigan, resulted in four workers being shot to death by the Dearborn Police Department and security guards employed by the Ford Motor Company. More than 60 workers were injured, many by gunshot wounds. Three months later, a fifth worker died of his injuries. The march was organized by the Unemployed Councils,

  14. zyconoclast

    The BBC has come under fire over plans to broadcast Enoch Powell’s “racist” Rivers of Blood speech on Radio 4.

    The broadcast marks the 50th anniversary of the politician’s controversial speech on immigration, widely considered one of the most inflammatory in modern history by a British politician.

    A BBC spokesman said: “Many people know of this controversial speech but few have heard it beyond soundbites. Radio 4’s well established programme Archive on 4 reflects in detail on historical events and, in order to assess the speech fully and its impact on the immigration debate, it will be analysed by a wide range of contributors including many anti-racism campaigners.”

  15. zyconoclast

    Europe’s Civilizational Exhaustion

    Islam is filling the cultural vacuum of a society with no children and which believes — wrongly — it has no enemies.

    In Sweden, by 2050, almost one in three people will be Muslim.

    The European mainstream mindset now seems to believe that “evil” comes only from our own sins: racism, sexism, elitism, xenophobia, homophobia, the guilt of the heterosexual white Western male — and never from non-European cultures. Europe now postulates an infinite idealization of the “other”, above all the migrant.

    A tiredness seems to be why these countries do not take meaningful measures to defeat jihadism, such as closing Salafist mosques or expelling radical imams.

    Muslim extremists understand this advantage: so long as they avoid another enormous massacre like 9/11, they will be able to continue taking away human lives and undermining the West without awakening it from its inertia.

  16. zyconoclast

    The epidemic of US white male suicide

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 60 percent of all suicides are firearm-related and 80 percent of firearm-related suicides are by white males. These men are older, uneducated and from an impoverished socioeconomic background.

  17. zyconoclast

    With all the tender concern President Trump and Nancy Pelosi have been heaping on “Dreamers” of late, you’d think the media would notice and pepper us with stories about these “incredible kids,” as Trump calls them. Alas, no. Our tedious media drones refuse to provide us with moving human interest stories about the Dreamers.

    Journalists and politicians love to give us archetypes: the DACA soldier, the DACA valedictorian, the DACA grandmother. But there are so many other roles they fill!

    To make up for the Fourth Estate’s failure, this week, I’ll highlight five Dreamers who have done noteworthy things just in the last month.

    The Bounceback Child [email protected]

    A few weeks ago, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement caught up with Dreamer Anastacio Eugenio Lopez-Fabian, 24, in a courthouse parking lot in Oregon. Police in Seaside, Oregon, had arrested Lopez-Fabian for multiple [email protected] of a girl “younger than 14,” assault and harassment.

    Law enforcement then released Lopez-Fabian the day of his arrest, without notifying I.C.E., despite the fact that he had already been deported twice to his native Guatemala, in 2013 and 2014.

    Apart from conservative websites — and Britain’s indispensable Daily Mail! — this story made only the local press.

    The Butterfingered Gun Slinger

    Also two weeks ago, Dreamer Jaime Melchi-Sigas, 22, pleaded guilty to the federal offenses of unlawful possession of a firearm and unlawful possession of a counterfeit alien registration card. Melchi-Sigas was already serving time in a state prison for reckless homicide and tampering with physical evidence.

    His convictions stemmed from an incident last year when Melchi-Sigas was sitting in the back seat of a car, examining an illegal gun he intended to purchase, and accidentally shot and killed the man in the front seat.

    This item appeared in one small local Bowling Green, Kentucky, newspaper.

    The Oppressed [email protected]

    Three weeks ago, Dreamer Alejandro Perez-Cortez, 26, appealed his five-year sentence for attempting to @nally [email protected] a woman, pointing out that he was drunk at the time and barely made enough money to live on, much less send back to his wife and two children in Mexico.

    The appeal was denied, on the grounds that being drunk and poor did not constitute evidence of good character — and also that Perez-Cortez was an illegal alien. (Until Trump has his way on Dreamers!)

    The opinion of the Indiana court turning down Perez-Cortez’s appeal was published on March 19, but no media found the story interesting enough to print. What I find interesting about the case — fascinating, in fact! — is that we have lawyers willing to bring utterly frivolous appeals on behalf of drunk, [email protected] illegal aliens, but not one willing to represent the president.

    The Fleet-Footed Drunk Driver

    Dreamer Ivan Gerardo Zamarripa-Castaneda, 26, killed 57-year-old John Anderson in Denver at around midnight on March 3, when he smashed his pickup truck into Anderson’s truck, setting off a fiery explosion and shutting down I-70 for hours. This poor Mexican who was driving drunk on an interstate — through no fault of his own — fled the scene.

    In another example of the day-to-day terror illegal aliens endure “living in the shadows,” Zamarripa-Castaneda was captured by the police the next day, sound asleep at his home. And that wasn’t the end of Zamarripa-Castaneda’s nightmare. After his arrest, Denver police held him for ONE FULL WEEK, before releasing him without informing I.C.E.

    Only after Attorney General Jeff Sessions and President Trump began denouncing the local sheriff for refusing to turn Zamarripa-Castaneda over to I.C.E. did the story appear anywhere beyond the local press. Now in I.C.E.’s clutches, Zamarripa-Castaneda waits impatiently for Trump to amnesty “incredible kids” like him.

    The May-December [email protected]

    Dreamer Juan Vazquez Cornelio, 38, was recently charged with [email protected] a 10-year-old girl and sending her to the hospital. The reddest state in the Union — Alabama — gave Kardashian-level media coverage to the arrest: THREE local news stories. The Tuscaloosa News lavished 100 words on the [email protected] before turning to another topic: “Severe weather possible Monday in state — Tuscaloosa County could experience severe weather beginning Monday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.”

    The illegal alien Mexican Dreamer was charged with [email protected] in the first degree, the girl was hospitalized and it’s going to rain on Monday.

  18. zyconoclast

    Girl made up story of being attacked in Va. because of her headscarf, police say

    Police in Prince William County said Tuesday that a report of an attack on a 13-year-old girl who wore a headscarf in Woodbridge was false.

    In a statement, police said a school resource officer and the department’s detectives found that the girl last week had “falsely reported” the incident, which they were investigating as a hate crime.

    According to authorities, the girl said a man had cursed at her, grabbed her arm and showed a knife near Jato Court and Riverview Lane. She said the man was black and had also called her a terrorist.

    Police said that “no altercation had occurred” and that the girl is expected to be charged with filing a false police report.

    Her case will be handled through the juvenile justice system, police said.

    The girl also told police that the man had removed her headscarf and placed a hand over her mouth when she tried to scream. When a motorist came by and saw what was happening, the attacker fled, the girl told police.

    This story has been updated to reflect that police now say the girl’s report was false.

  19. zyconoclast

    The Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan has called on citizens of Turkish origin in EU states to extend their political influence. “Personally take responsibilities in political parties and political mechanisms,” said Erdogan on Tuesday in an appeal “to my citizens in Europe”. Before AKP members of parliament in Ankara, Erdogan recalled that in the constitutional referendum a year ago more than 60% of Turks in Germany voted for the presidential system he wanted. “That means there is a power there. This power must also take effect in the local politics there.”

  20. zyconoclast

    The U.S. immigration courts will temporarily halt a program that offers legal assistance to detained foreign nationals facing deportation while it audits the program’s cost-effectiveness, a federal official said Tuesday.

    Officials informed the Vera Institute of Justice that starting this month it will pause the nonprofit’s Legal Orientation Program, which last year held information sessions for 53,000 immigrants in more than a dozen states, including California and Texas.

  21. zyconoclast

    Facebook Bans German Historian for Saying ‘Islam Is Not Part of German History’

    Last month, Facebook censored a German historian who posted a message about Islam’s historic impact on Germany. Facebook banned the historian for 30 days, even though 76 percent of Germans agree that Islam does not “belong to Germany.”

  22. squawkbox

    In Comey’s book, “A Higher Loyalty,” the 1978 Northern Highlands Regional High School graduate describes suffering through body-shaming, wedgies and getting shoved into lockers, according to the Washington Post, which obtained an advance copy of the already best-seller.

    What?? I thought he was 6′ 8″? Unless his growth spurt was extremely late this all sounds very weird. From my experience of wedgies, he’d be too tall for most wedgiers to get the necessary leverage. And how would you shove him into a locker, 6′ high maximum? I guess whoever stuffed him into a locker is now working as a parcel packer at Amazon. Possibly he was viewed as a challenge, and maybe the school bullies got extra points.

  23. zyconoclast

    Daley won his fourth Commonwealth Games gold medal as he and Dan Goodfellow won the synchronised 10m platform on the Gold Coast in Australia.

    Homosexuality remains illegal in 70% of the 53 Commonwealth countries.*

    “Coming to the Gold Coast and being able to live as an openly gay man is really important,” said Daley, 23.

    *Let’s hope the next the next 37 Commonwealth Games are allocated in these countries.

  24. zyconoclast

    The simple fact is that we Aussies pay more tax per bottle of spirits than anywhere in the western world. See that bottle of Four Pillars gin right there on the shelf for $75? Well that includes $23.17 of tax that goes straight to the federal government, before the 10 per cent GST is added to the selling price.

    Thus the feds will take a little more than $30 from each bottle you buy. That amount will go up again in August and again next February. Since we started Four Pillars in December 2013, we have had nine tax increases.

    A bottle of Four Pillars in Los Angeles sells for $US35 ($45) and has 49¢ of US federal government excise applied to it. I will say that again slowly: Forty. Nine. Cents. Our excise in Australia is now 50 times higher than the US.

  25. squawkbox

    Yes, Zyco, returned from an expat contract in Spain where moderately swallowable scotch or tequila was 14 euros per litre, tequila 12 euros, gin 11 euros or local rum 9-10 euros (although getting into less than moderately swallowable rocket fuel territory at this point). Cheapest wine cheaper than bottled water here. Strangely enough, there was no evidence of the mass alcohol-related pyschotic outbreaks we are all assured would happen if Australian booze excise was lowered.

  26. zyconoclast

    Bill Pulver collected a $500,000 bonus on his way out the door at Rugby Australia after overseeing what many believe was the worst year on record for the code.
    Pulver took home the bonus on top of his $775,000 salary last year, but made a tax deductible donation of $200,000 to the Australian Rugby Foundation, of which he is a director.

    It is now the turn of his successor, Raelene Castle, to plot Australian rugby’s next move. Despite keeping a low profile on a self-styled “listening tour” since taking over in January, Castle has wasted no time calling in outside help.
    Fairfax Media has learned that Castle has enlisted the services of Nielsen Sports consultant Michael Tange to map out what Australia’s Super Rugby involvement should look like in the next broadcast cycle, 2021-2025.*

    *Isn’t that her job?

  27. Zyconoclast;

    Islam is filling the cultural vacuum of a society with no children and which believes — wrongly — it has no enemies.

    Perhaps the exhaustion comes from people battling against their own ruling Leftist Bugman class who, having never created anything, have no idea of the value of the society they are destroying.
    When the people become angry enough to deal with the Wreckers, the Police and Army will not be on their side. We can see the rot creeping into the Police Forces in Australia already. The Army will not be far behind.

  28. Boris

    “Everyone knows he stood there and lied to protect the Clinton campaign.”

    LOL

    By announcing re-opening of clinton investigation, Comey made the most significant contribution to Trump’s win.

  29. Boris

    Comey self promotion is a missed opportunity to nail down the most unfit president in 100 years. But his comparison of Trump with mafia bosses is right on the mark.

  30. DrBeauGan

    Trump comes out and tells it like it is. I can see why you wouldn’t care for that, Boris.

  31. DrBeauGan

    It’s common and vulgar and shows a complete lack of sophistication, doesn’t it?

  32. DrBeauGan

    Thanks Tom. Good stuff.

  33. None

    Strangely enough, there was no evidence of the mass alcohol-related pyschotic outbreaks we are all assured would happen if Australian booze excise was lowered.

    I suggest Distillers and Dustributirs and Sellers others actually advertise prices with a breakdown indicating percentage tax- a bit like the Libs who wanted to give us our tax returns with a break-up of where our tax goes. I’d say a lot of people would probably think booze is taxed only with a GST. I’ve also provide an alternative hypothetical price if a volumetric tax was imposed.

  34. None

    *Distributors

    Need coffee.

  35. iain russell

    Zico, thanks for the piece on Daley. It exposes his white male privilege. I am surprised the usual suspects haven’t rounded on him for this and his white man-splaining law and sodomite mores to lesser, darker countries.

  36. iain russell

    Aaah, Boris. The Don is right in your head. Horse’s head coming your way soon?

  37. rickw

    http://www.fordwood.com/images/fordor60ab28new.jpg

    Arky, are the curved bits sawn or steam bent? (Just imagining the cursing and swearing of Arky being involved with steam and hot pieces of wood!)

    FYI – to an extent you can do the equivalent of steam bending by soaking the timber in water for a couple of days and using a heat gun. Harder to get very smooth curves due to the concentration of the heat but you can bend it and it will stay put afterwards.

  38. Zaan

    Thanks Tom, your posts are the first thing I look for in the morning.

  39. H B Bear

    None I have a suspicion that displaying prices showing actual cost plus excise or GST may be prohibited for the very reason you suggest.

  40. Mater

    I suggest Distillers and Dustributirs and Sellers others actually advertise prices with a breakdown indicating percentage tax- a bit like the Libs who wanted to give us our tax returns with a break-up of where our tax goes.

    I’d like the same done with electricity bills so people can see the the monetary impact the green regulations and market manipulations have on their bills.
    The way they have intentionally incorporated them into all of the Generation, Distribution and Retail costs is complex and difficult to deconstruct…but it can be done.

  41. Geriatric Mayfly

    From BBC World News. Always a cause for optimism to find the odd person who agrees with me.

    Yet 10 years later, this sweeping look at the city of Baltimore, from its drug dealers to the city’s police department, to its schools and print media, is still consistently cited by critics as one of the greatest TV series ever made.
    “It was also around The Wire that I first heard the expression ‘novel television’ – that it was a visual equivalent of a Dickens novel – Michael K Williams

  42. Mater

    Tom,
    I rarely comment about your ‘toons, but I have to acknowledge Mike Lester’s effort this morning. On time and precisely on target.

  43. Shy Ted

    Zaan
    #2686282, posted on April 14, 2018 at 7:08 am
    Thanks Tom, your posts are the first thing I look for in the morning.

    Me too. Mrs Ted is getting a bit fed up with you Tom.

  44. C.L.

    Oops!
    Pressed by George Stephanopoulos, James Comey admits he lied to protect Hillary Clinton:

  45. None

    Bear, I believe that a one is obliged to show the price inclusive of GST but there’s nothing to stop people from alisting GST separately.

    As an aside I have come across the odd Indian who likes to tell me that something costs only $X and then hurriedly add plus GST and I think that is a little bit deceptive. It’s easy for someone like me to add 10% but not everybody is functionally illiterate or mentally agile in the case of the elderly. And our prices as a rule are quoted inclusive of GST . So I’ve had to remind them of the same. Since then I’ve always double checked prices quoted by newer ethnic types.

    Mater -I like that idea very much.

  46. None

    *not everyone is functionally literate.

    Gah.

  47. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Comey really is a slimeball.
    Everyone knows he stood there and lied to protect the Clinton campaign.
    The man is an absolute disgrace.

    so an ideal leftist role model

  48. calli

    Hehe. Sunrise going Full Metal Trump this morning. Keith Suttor, suitably dressed in clown clothes, cackling about Trump’s spray tan.

    Now jowl wobbling about “obstruction of justice”. Naturally, they didn’t use CL’s clip.

  49. calli

    My understanding is that it is illegal to quote a price exclusive of GST unless that is explicitly stated.

  50. Rae

    Pressed by George Stephanopoulos, James Comey admits he lied to protect Hillary Clinton

    Sure, C.L. Comey did no such thing. Not in that interview. Maybe not in any other interview.

  51. RobK

    I am eagerly awaiting the second of the series of “Why and How “wonder books for adults by Doomlord and what it will be about.

  52. Snoopy

    WSJ

    SUBSCRIBE NOWSIGN IN
    POLITICS
    Trump Lawyer Michael Cohen Negotiated $1.6 Million Settlement for Top Republican Fundraiser
    The 2017 deal was on behalf of Elliott Broidy, a businessman who faced allegations he impregnated a former Playboy model, and resembles one Mr. Cohen arranged with Stormy Daniels
    By Joe Palazzolo and Michael Rothfeld
    April 13, 2018 12:58 p.m. ET
    President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer negotiated a deal in late 2017 to pay $1.6 million to a former Playboy model who said she was impregnated by a top Republican fundraiser, according to people familiar with the matter.

    Michael Cohen, whose office, home and hotel room were raided by federal agents this week, arranged the payments to the woman on behalf of Elliott Broidy….

    It seems just like yesterday that Monty was claiming that Cohen’s files relating to his other clients would be protected by strict privacy protocols.

  53. calli

    Was Comey under oath in that Stephanopoulos inquiry?

    The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth – there is something noble and rare about that oath. Most people can do the first and the last by cherry picking, but it’s the middle bit that always sticks. It has nothing to do with personal “goals” but about integrity.

  54. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    China engaged in massive theft of US technology, analysts reveal
    China is engaged in large-scale theft of American research and technology from universities, using spies, students, and researchers as collectors, experts told Congress on Wednesday.

    Compounding the technology theft, the administration of President Barack Obama weakened U.S. counterintelligence efforts against foreign spies by curbing national-level counterspy efforts, a former counterintelligence official disclosed during a House hearing.

  55. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Trump Lawyer Michael Cohen Negotiated $1.6 Million Settlement for Top Republican Fundraiser

    who is leaking this stuff?

  56. André M.

    Repeating from an ill-fated thread…

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-13/optus-removes-online-job-ad-calling-for-anglo-saxon-staff/9653270

    Telecommunications giant Optus has launched an internal investigation after a job advertisement calling for white candidates at one of its Sydney stores was posted online.
    The ad for a casual retail consultant appeared on employment portal Seek on Thursday afternoon, and said people “who are Anglo Saxon” would be preferred.
    The company has since removed the ad, which was calling for workers at its Neutral Bay store.

    It wasn’t that long ago that Dennis Jensen MP alerted us to the existence of federally funded jobs in the NT and Qld in which candidates for the position were required to be Aboriginal. Slightly more recently were the QUT students who found themselves on the wrong side of the door to the Aboriginal-only computer labs in Brisbane. To this day the NT government offers training exclusively for Aborigines.
    The government implements racist policies year in and year out and there is barely a batting of the collective eyelid. But when a private sector telco goes wrongly choosy on ethnicity on one day it is front page excoriation.

  57. H B Bear

    Hehe. Sunrise going Full Metal Trump this morning. Keith Suttor, suitably dressed in clown clothes, cackling about Trump’s spray tan.

    Keith Suttor could be replaced by the Cash Cow with no change in the quality of the analysis and greater entertainment value.

    Perhaps I could be a FTA exec after all? Or at least an exec producer of breakfast TV.

  58. Snoopy

    who is leaking this stuff?

    Well, the FBI seized Cohen’s files on Monday. As to who the “people in the know” could be, it’s a mystery.

  59. Entropy

    Andre, was it a genuine ad or hacked?

  60. Entropy

    In America, even getting impregnated can be lucrative.

  61. Snoopy

    If GWB had never invaded Iraq it’s possible that we would have been spared Keith Suter for ever. Bush has a lot to answer for.

  62. Arky

    Arky, are the curved bits sawn or steam bent? (Just imagining the cursing and swearing of Arky being involved with steam and hot pieces of wood!)

    ..
    I have steam bent wood before, and don’t ever want to again.
    But the Model A was mass produced.
    All the curves you see are cut, or two or more pieces of wood laminated together.
    Some pieces in the roof that at initial glance looked like one piece of wood are actually three bits cut to shape and joined.
    The bodies were not made by Ford, but by contracted companies. There are differences between the various manufacturers, even if they were making exactly the same body style. Mine is made by Briggs, a company from Detroit that leased space in a Ford plant.
    These companies probably used jigs made from dimensions specifed by Ford, but using thier own construction methods.
    Contracting to Ford their books had to bevopen for inspection, and Ford even specified the exact amount of “profit” they were allowed per unit.
    Wages had to come out after profit.

  63. Shy Ted

    Are there any heterosexual comedians in Australia? The confused lot might walk funny, talk funny and speak funny but they don’t say anything funny. New Aussie series funnily enough not on ABC or SBS called Sexy Herpes (why has nobody thought of this before?) – The dysfunctional staff of a sexual health clinic can handle the hypoochondriacs and sexual misfits they have to treat: they just can’t keep their own relationships on track. Every ethnicity and sexual orientation under the sun represented. Fast forward to the credits to see who’s funded it – Australian Government and Screen Australia. Nuff said.

  64. calli

    It’s a great project, Arky. I’d love to see progress photos as it all goes together.

    I love it when The Men’s Shed comes to Catallaxy. 🔧🔩🔨

  65. H B Bear

    Taxpayer funded art is worse than taxpayer funded medicine or education. Still hasn’t stopped it though.

  66. calli

    How are the joints done? Are they dowelled and glued or screwed? The originals would have used animal based glue. Are you going to do that or will you be an un-purist?

  67. Snoopy

    The dysfunctional staff of a sexual health clinic can handle the hypoochondriacs and sexual misfits they have to treat: they just can’t keep their own relationships on track. Every ethnicity and sexual orientation under the sun represented. Fast forward to the credits to see who’s funded it – Australian Government and Screen Australia.

    It would be a scandal if this doesn’t get a run on the ABC’s government funded international channel. Malaysians shouldn’t be allowed to miss this.

  68. John Constantine

    The Lord Mayor of nineteen seventies New York City.

    It has seemed for a while that their turnfailure has been running the country of Australia in the style of being the lord mayor of Sydney.

    Their Lucy turnfailure has this as her worldview.
    The analogy of their turnbullites debacle coalition as Sydney town council doesn’t quite work though.

    Had a flick through some American pop culture artifacts depicting nineteen seventies New York City, the blackouts, the crime, the crime, the mafia, the corruption, the decolonisation, the minority street activism, the garbage piling up, the population boom, the traffic jams, the drug wars, sodomy,insider trading, merchant banking, pop art, porn, all progressing a world city being taken beyond pale stale males.

    Or do the turnbullites see themselves as joint lord mayors of Londonibad, the decolonisation of empire project city.

    Taking Sydney and Melbourne into a locked in transnational looting cartel decolonisation satraps, run by U.N. compliant Peoples Councils transforms the polity of the country.

  69. OldOzzie

    zyconoclast
    #2686233, posted on April 14, 2018 at 1:21 am

    The BBC has come under fire over plans to broadcast Enoch Powell’s “racist” Rivers of Blood speech on Radio 4.

    The broadcast marks the 50th anniversary of the politician’s controversial speech on immigration, widely considered one of the most inflammatory in modern history by a British politician.

    A BBC spokesman said: “Many people know of this controversial speech but few have heard it beyond soundbites. Radio 4’s well established programme Archive on 4 reflects in detail on historical events and, in order to assess the speech fully and its impact on the immigration debate, it will be analysed by a wide range of contributors including many anti-racism campaigners.”

    The Telegraph

    Enoch Powell’s ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech

    This is the full text of Enoch Powell’s so-called ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech, which was delivered to a Conservative Association meeting in Birmingham on April 20 1968.

    The supreme function of statesmanship is to provide against preventable evils. In seeking to do so, it encounters obstacles which are deeply rooted in human nature.

    One is that by the very order of things such evils are not demonstrable until they have occurred: at each stage in their onset there is room for doubt and for dispute whether they be real or imaginary. By the same token, they attract little attention in comparison with current troubles, which are both indisputable and pressing: whence the besetting temptation of all politics to concern itself with the immediate present at the expense of the future.

    Above all, people are disposed to mistake predicting troubles for causing troubles and even for desiring troubles: “If only,” they love to think, “if only people wouldn’t talk about it, it probably wouldn’t happen.”

    Perhaps this habit goes back to the primitive belief that the word and the thing, the name and the object, are identical.

    At all events, the discussion of future grave but, with effort now, avoidable evils is the most unpopular and at the same time the most necessary occupation for the politician. Those who knowingly shirk it deserve, and not infrequently receive, the curses of those who come after.

    A week or two ago I fell into conversation with a constituent, a middle-aged, quite ordinary working man employed in one of our nationalised industries.

    After a sentence or two about the weather, he suddenly said: “If I had the money to go, I wouldn’t stay in this country.” I made some deprecatory reply to the effect that even this government wouldn’t last for ever; but he took no notice, and continued: “I have three children, all of them been through grammar school and two of them married now, with family. I shan’t be satisfied till I have seen them all settled overseas. In this country in 15 or 20 years’ time the black man will have the whip hand over the white man.”

    I can already hear the chorus of execration. How dare I say such a horrible thing? How dare I stir up trouble and inflame feelings by repeating such a conversation?

    The answer is that I do not have the right not to do so. Here is a decent, ordinary fellow Englishman, who in broad daylight in my own town says to me, his Member of Parliament, that his country will not be worth living in for his children.

    I simply do not have the right to shrug my shoulders and think about something else. What he is saying, thousands and hundreds of thousands are saying and thinking – not throughout Great Britain, perhaps, but in the areas that are already undergoing the total transformation to which there is no parallel in a thousand years of English history.

    In 15 or 20 years, on present trends, there will be in this country three and a half million Commonwealth immigrants and their descendants. That is not my figure. That is the official figure given to parliament by the spokesman of the Registrar General’s Office.

    There is no comparable official figure for the year 2000, but it must be in the region of five to seven million, approximately one-tenth of the whole population, and approaching that of Greater London. Of course, it will not be evenly distributed from Margate to Aberystwyth and from Penzance to Aberdeen. Whole areas, towns and parts of towns across England will be occupied by sections of the immigrant and immigrant-descended population.

    As time goes on, the proportion of this total who are immigrant descendants, those born in England, who arrived here by exactly the same route as the rest of us, will rapidly increase. Already by 1985 the native-born would constitute the majority. It is this fact which creates the extreme urgency of action now, of just that kind of action which is hardest for politicians to take, action where the difficulties lie in the present but the evils to be prevented or minimised lie several parliaments ahead.

    The natural and rational first question with a nation confronted by such a prospect is to ask: “How can its dimensions be reduced?” Granted it be not wholly preventable, can it be limited, bearing in mind that numbers are of the essence: the significance and consequences of an alien element introduced into a country or population are profoundly different according to whether that element is 1 per cent or 10 per cent.

    The answers to the simple and rational question are equally simple and rational: by stopping, or virtually stopping, further inflow, and by promoting the maximum outflow. Both answers are part of the official policy of the Conservative Party.

    It almost passes belief that at this moment 20 or 30 additional immigrant children are arriving from overseas in Wolverhampton alone every week – and that means 15 or 20 additional families a decade or two hence. Those whom the gods wish to destroy, they first make mad. We must be mad, literally mad, as a nation to be permitting the annual inflow of some 50,000 dependants, who are for the most part the material of the future growth of the immigrant-descended population. It is like watching a nation busily engaged in heaping up its own funeral pyre. So insane are we that we actually permit unmarried persons to immigrate for the purpose of founding a family with spouses and fiancés whom they have never seen.

    Let no one suppose that the flow of dependants will automatically tail off. On the contrary, even at the present admission rate of only 5,000 a year by voucher, there is sufficient for a further 25,000 dependants per annum ad infinitum, without taking into account the huge reservoir of existing relations in this country – and I am making no allowance at all for fraudulent entry. In these circumstances nothing will suffice but that the total inflow for settlement should be reduced at once to negligible proportions, and that the necessary legislative and administrative measures be taken without delay.

    I stress the words “for settlement.” This has nothing to do with the entry of Commonwealth citizens, any more than of aliens, into this country, for the purposes of study or of improving their qualifications, like (for instance) the Commonwealth doctors who, to the advantage of their own countries, have enabled our hospital service to be expanded faster than would otherwise have been possible. They are not, and never have been, immigrants.

    I turn to re-emigration. If all immigration ended tomorrow, the rate of growth of the immigrant and immigrant-descended population would be substantially reduced, but the prospective size of this element in the population would still leave the basic character of the national danger unaffected. This can only be tackled while a considerable proportion of the total still comprises persons who entered this country during the last ten years or so.

    Hence the urgency of implementing now the second element of the Conservative Party’s policy: the encouragement of re-emigration.

    Nobody can make an estimate of the numbers which, with generous assistance, would choose either to return to their countries of origin or to go to other countries anxious to receive the manpower and the skills they represent.

    Nobody knows, because no such policy has yet been attempted. I can only say that, even at present, immigrants in my own constituency from time to time come to me, asking if I can find them assistance to return home. If such a policy were adopted and pursued with the determination which the gravity of the alternative justifies, the resultant outflow could appreciably alter the prospects.

    The third element of the Conservative Party’s policy is that all who are in this country as citizens should be equal before the law and that there shall be no discrimination or difference made between them by public authority. As Mr Heath has put it we will have no “first-class citizens” and “second-class citizens.” This does not mean that the immigrant and his descendent should be elevated into a privileged or special class or that the citizen should be denied his right to discriminate in the management of his own affairs between one fellow-citizen and another or that he should be subjected to imposition as to his reasons and motive for behaving in one lawful manner rather than another.

    There could be no grosser misconception of the realities than is entertained by those who vociferously demand legislation as they call it “against discrimination”, whether they be leader-writers of the same kidney and sometimes on the same newspapers which year after year in the 1930s tried to blind this country to the rising peril which confronted it, or archbishops who live in palaces, faring delicately with the bedclothes pulled right up over their heads. They have got it exactly and diametrically wrong.

    The discrimination and the deprivation, the sense of alarm and of resentment, lies not with the immigrant population but with those among whom they have come and are still coming.

    This is why to enact legislation of the kind before parliament at this moment is to risk throwing a match on to gunpowder. The kindest thing that can be said about those who propose and support it is that they know not what they do.

    Nothing is more misleading than comparison between the Commonwealth immigrant in Britain and the American Negro. The Negro population of the United States, which was already in existence before the United States became a nation, started literally as slaves and were later given the franchise and other rights of citizenship, to the exercise of which they have only gradually and still incompletely come. The Commonwealth immigrant came to Britain as a full citizen, to a country which knew no discrimination between one citizen and another, and he entered instantly into the possession of the rights of every citizen, from the vote to free treatment under the National Health Service.

    Whatever drawbacks attended the immigrants arose not from the law or from public policy or from administration, but from those personal circumstances and accidents which cause, and always will cause, the fortunes and experience of one man to be different from another’s.

    But while, to the immigrant, entry to this country was admission to privileges and opportunities eagerly sought, the impact upon the existing population was very different. For reasons which they could not comprehend, and in pursuance of a decision by default, on which they were never consulted, they found themselves made strangers in their own country.

    They found their wives unable to obtain hospital beds in childbirth, their children unable to obtain school places, their homes and neighbourhoods changed beyond recognition, their plans and prospects for the future defeated; at work they found that employers hesitated to apply to the immigrant worker the standards of discipline and competence required of the native-born worker; they began to hear, as time went by, more and more voices which told them that they were now the unwanted. They now learn that a one-way privilege is to be established by act of parliament; a law which cannot, and is not intended to, operate to protect them or redress their grievances is to be enacted to give the stranger, the disgruntled and the agent-provocateur the power to pillory them for their private actions.

    In the hundreds upon hundreds of letters I received when I last spoke on this subject two or three months ago, there was one striking feature which was largely new and which I find ominous. All Members of Parliament are used to the typical anonymous correspondent; but what surprised and alarmed me was the high proportion of ordinary, decent, sensible people, writing a rational and often well-educated letter, who believed that they had to omit their address because it was dangerous to have committed themselves to paper to a Member of Parliament agreeing with the views I had expressed, and that they would risk penalties or reprisals if they were known to have done so. The sense of being a persecuted minority which is growing among ordinary English people in the areas of the country which are affected is something that those without direct experience can hardly imagine.

    I am going to allow just one of those hundreds of people to speak for me:

    “Eight years ago in a respectable street in Wolverhampton a house was sold to a Negro. Now only one white (a woman old-age pensioner) lives there. This is her story. She lost her husband and both her sons in the war. So she turned her seven-roomed house, her only asset, into a boarding house. She worked hard and did well, paid off her mortgage and began to put something by for her old age. Then the immigrants moved in. With growing fear, she saw one house after another taken over. The quiet street became a place of noise and confusion. Regretfully, her white tenants moved out.

    “The day after the last one left, she was awakened at 7am by two Negroes who wanted to use her ‘phone to contact their employer. When she refused, as she would have refused any stranger at such an hour, she was abused and feared she would have been attacked but for the chain on her door. Immigrant families have tried to rent rooms in her house, but she always refused. Her little store of money went, and after paying rates, she has less than £2 per week. “She went to apply for a rate reduction and was seen by a young girl, who on hearing she had a seven-roomed house, suggested she should let part of it. When she said the only people she could get were Negroes, the girl said, “Racial prejudice won’t get you anywhere in this country.” So she went home.

    “The telephone is her lifeline. Her family pay the bill, and help her out as best they can. Immigrants have offered to buy her house – at a price which the prospective landlord would be able to recover from his tenants in weeks, or at most a few months. She is becoming afraid to go out. Windows are broken. She finds excreta pushed through her letter box. When she goes to the shops, she is followed by children, charming, wide-grinning piccaninnies. They cannot speak English, but one word they know. “Racialist,” they chant. When the new Race Relations Bill is passed, this woman is convinced she will go to prison. And is she so wrong? I begin to wonder.”

    The other dangerous delusion from which those who are wilfully or otherwise blind to realities suffer, is summed up in the word “integration.” To be integrated into a population means to become for all practical purposes indistinguishable from its other members.

    Now, at all times, where there are marked physical differences, especially of colour, integration is difficult though, over a period, not impossible. There are among the Commonwealth immigrants who have come to live here in the last fifteen years or so, many thousands whose wish and purpose is to be integrated and whose every thought and endeavour is bent in that direction.

    But to imagine that such a thing enters the heads of a great and growing majority of immigrants and their descendants is a ludicrous misconception, and a dangerous one.

    We are on the verge here of a change. Hitherto it has been force of circumstance and of background which has rendered the very idea of integration inaccessible to the greater part of the immigrant population – that they never conceived or intended such a thing, and that their numbers and physical concentration meant the pressures towards integration which normally bear upon any small minority did not operate.

    Now we are seeing the growth of positive forces acting against integration, of vested interests in the preservation and sharpening of racial and religious differences, with a view to the exercise of actual domination, first over fellow-immigrants and then over the rest of the population. The cloud no bigger than a man’s hand, that can so rapidly overcast the sky, has been visible recently in Wolverhampton and has shown signs of spreading quickly. The words I am about to use, verbatim as they appeared in the local press on 17 February, are not mine, but those of a Labour Member of Parliament who is a minister in the present government:

    ‘The Sikh communities’ campaign to maintain customs inappropriate in Britain is much to be regretted. Working in Britain, particularly in the public services, they should be prepared to accept the terms and conditions of their employment. To claim special communal rights (or should one say rites?) leads to a dangerous fragmentation within society. This communalism is a canker; whether practised by one colour or another it is to be strongly condemned.’

    All credit to John Stonehouse for having had the insight to perceive that, and the courage to say it.

    For these dangerous and divisive elements the legislation proposed in the Race Relations Bill is the very pabulum they need to flourish. Here is the means of showing that the immigrant communities can organise to consolidate their members, to agitate and campaign against their fellow citizens, and to overawe and dominate the rest with the legal weapons which the ignorant and the ill-informed have provided. As I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see “the River Tiber foaming with much blood.”

    That tragic and intractable phenomenon which we watch with horror on the other side of the Atlantic but which there is interwoven with the history and existence of the States itself, is coming upon us here by our own volition and our own neglect. Indeed, it has all but come. In numerical terms, it will be of American proportions long before the end of the century.

    Only resolute and urgent action will avert it even now. Whether there will be the public will to demand and obtain that action, I do not know. All I know is that to see, and not to speak, would be the great betrayal.

  70. Arky

    Ford was producing nearly a million of those cars per year in the twenties.
    Eventually the Rouge plant would take in raw materials like iron ore at one end, and pump out cars at the other.
    Ford was obssessed with securing any comodity that effected his ability to pump out millions of vehicles at the cheapest price.

  71. Bruce of Newcastle

    Trump Lawyer Michael Cohen Negotiated $1.6 Million Settlement for Top Republican Fundraiser

    So…if the FBI raided Cohen’s office on a warrant for communications with Trump about Stormy…and a leak occurs shortly afterwards about Cohen’s confidential work with a completely different client…isn’t that totally and appallingly illegal…?

    You know it almost appears like client-lawyer privilege doesn’t matter if the client and the lawyer aren’t favoured pets of the Left.

    I wonder where the leak has come from now that sacrificial scapegoat McCabe isn’t in the FBI anymore. How mysterious!

  72. Arky

    calli
    #2686329, posted on April 14, 2018 at 9:01 am
    How are the joints done? Are they dowelled and glued or screwed? The originals would have used animal based glue. Are you going to do that or will you be an un-purist?

    ..
    Every which way.
    There are neat finger joints.
    There are steel brackets and screws and bolts. There are lap joints and bridle joints.
    And yes I would guess they used hide glue.
    And I want it to look like original, but I will be otherwise unpure.

  73. Myrddin Seren

    Wascally Wussians

    LEAKED EU documents reveal that state-run Russian energy giant Gazprom has been strangling European gas supplies for years and deliberately violating EU energy law for close to a decade, with the EU doing little to challenge it…….

    because…..

    The leak is highly embarrassing for the the EU’s competition directorate, as it implies the Commission gained a full understanding of the “abusive” techniques employed by the company, and nevertheless turned a blind eye, with large countries such as Germany benefitting.

    So Merkel and the EU apparatchiks were happy as warm, cosy clams for the Wascally Wussians to screw over Eastern Europe, as long as Germany kept getting cheaper gas in order to prop up her insane and ruinous ‘Energiewende’.

    One document showed that Gazprom hindered sales of gas in Slovakia, Poland, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Estonia, the Czech Republic and Bulgaria.

    The document commented on this behaviour, saying: “The purpose was to segment the internal market along national borders.

    This meant that Gazprom could impose “unfair pricing” in eastern European regions by leveraging its “dominant position”.

    Keep in mind the next time countries like Hungary and Poland are pushing back against dictat from Brussels – the EU essentially being a sock puppet for Merkel – and most of us here know how that works out.

  74. Bruce of Newcastle

    Had a flick through some American pop culture artifacts depicting nineteen seventies New York City, the blackouts, the crime, the crime, the mafia, the corruption, the decolonisation, the minority street activism, the garbage piling up, the population boom, the traffic jams, the drug wars, sodomy,insider trading, merchant banking, pop art, porn, all progressing a world city being taken beyond pale stale males.

    One of the glorious ironies of the present age is that green progressives are turning inner cities into violent shitholes just as the same green progressives all move there because Gaia.

  75. OldOzzie

    Targets on super-sized public service perk – Adam Creighton

    Tony Shepherd, chairman of the Abbott government’s landmark cost-cutting taskforce, has questioned whether federal public ­servants and politicians should enjoy 15.4 per cent employer superannuation contributions when most other workers receive only 9.5 per cent.

    Mr Shepherd told The Weekend Australian yesterday it was “probably an oversight, to be blunt” that his 2013 Commission of Audit, which recommended drastic cuts to welfare, didn’t examine the extra super contributions enjoyed by the nation’s federal public sector workforce. Estimates suggest the difference in super contributions costs taxpayers about $1.6 billion a year.

    “There really needs to be a ­review: the argument for having a higher rate of superannuation in the public sector doesn’t stack up now,” Mr Shepherd said.

    He pointed to the faster growth in public-sector salaries, compared with the private sector.

    “It was only drawn to my attention later. Treasury were advising us during the audit and funnily they didn’t put it forward,” he said.

    Total cash wages paid to ­federal government employees (including all agencies and ­universities, but excluding the military) were $21.07bn last financial year, implying government super contributions of about $3.8bn, or $1.6bn more than a 9.5 per cent contribution rate would have required.

    Universities typically pay staff 17 per cent superannuation.

    Former NSW Labor treasurer Michael Egan said public servants were often well paid compared with the private sector. “It was a bit rough on taxpayers to say public servants should be paid more super than everyone else,” he said.

    Public-sector wages have consistently grown faster than ­private-sector wages since 2013, rising 2.4 per cent last year compared with 1.9 per cent in the private workforce. The average total remuneration for mid-level managers (classification EL2) was $169,918 in the federal public service in 2016.

    A spokesman for the Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation, which oversees eight federal public-sector schemes, said super contributions were paid at a rate of 15.4 per cent on “the entire salary even if that salary is over $54,030 a quarter”. By law employers need pay compulsory super only on salaries up to $216,000 a year.

    “In the old days the public servants had a far better pension, but they didn’t get paid as much; I don’t know whether that comparison is valid anymore,” Mr Shepherd said.

    Across Australia public sector workers earned $92,000 a year on average last year, according to the ABS, compared with $82,900 for those in the private sector.

    Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said the Howard government’s decision to shut defined benefit superannuation in July 2005 in favour of a 15.4 per cent employer contribution had “saved taxpayers a lot of money by ­materially reducing future ­unfunded public sector super pension liabilities”.

    Senator Cormann said the rate of superannuation didn’t affect workers’ total pay. “A higher percentage in the context of an overall remuneration package going into super means less money going into take-home pay,” he said.

    Opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen said lifting the super rate for all workers would ­reduce the disparity.

    “The Abbott-Turnbull government has already delayed the SG increase twice, costing working Australians billions of dollars in future retirement income,” Mr Bowen said.

    The super guarantee rate is scheduled to rise to 12 per cent from 9.5 per cent by 2025.

    Community and Public Sector Union secretary Nadine Flood said it was “revolting” to consider lowering the super rate for public-sector workers. “All workers should receive super of at least a rate of 15.4 per cent,” she said.

    Daryl Dixon, an authority on superannuation, said the argument public servants earned less was “rubbish”. “We run a business in Canberra,” he said. “Firms can’t pay these sorts of wages the public sector pays.”

    Former Labor leader Mark Latham, who pressured the Howard government to end defined benefit superannuation schemes, said MPs had been “outraged” by their abolition. “Some smarties on both sides of parliament worked out they could salvage something by making the scheme for new MPs comparable to the APS, ie 15.4 per cent,” he said.

    “I had also wanted to get rid of defined benefits super for judges but our shadow AG hit the roof, alerted the legal profession, and they started lobbying hard. I had enough trouble getting the modified policy through for MPs.”

  76. Zyconoclast

    The secret budget rules making it hard to cut Australia’s immigration intake

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/the-secret-budget-rules-making-it-hard-to-cut-australia-s-immigration-intake-20180413-p4z9jp.html

    Not much of a secret.
    Destroy and replace.

  77. Myrddin Seren

    Bruce

    So…if the FBI raided Cohen’s office on a warrant for communications with Trump about Stormy…and a leak occurs shortly afterwards about Cohen’s confidential work with a completely different client…isn’t that totally and appallingly illegal…?

    Aren’t all the leaks by Justice, FBI and Mueller’s Team illegal ? Would not every leaker be in breach of confidentiality provisions ?

    And given Homeland Security has just worked out that hostile entities have been stringing up phoney cell phone towers in Washington, would not leakers be open to coercion by hostile powers who might have evidence of their breaches of trust ?

    Rhetorical questions I am sure – the DC Swamp.

  78. Boambee John

    None at 0500

    actually advertise prices with a breakdown indicating percentage tax- a bit like the Libs who wanted to give us our tax returns with a break-up of where our tax goes.

    I think this should be applied widely. Price stickers should identify the GST on the item, PAYE should cease, with taxpayers required to pay quarterly.

    Showing voters how much the pay for their “free” services would focus minds.

  79. OldOzzie

    Millions flow to anti-Adani green group – John Ferguson ASSOCIATE EDITOR

    The Australian
    12:00AM April 14, 2018

    A coalition of anti-Adani mine green groups generated nearly $25 million in income last financial year, raising more questions about charity status and the use of the environment to mask political activism.

    Analysis of financial statements of seven of the country’s most vocal anti-Adani groups shows money is flooding in amid intense debate about whether politically active organisations should be registered as charities and the transparency of other lobbyists such as the left-leaning GetUp!

    The Australian Conservation Foundation’s gross income climbed to $13.3m in 2016-17, making up more than half of the revenue generated by the Adani seven.

    The total funds pouring into green groups more broadly is also likely to be many millions of dollars higher because two of the biggest groups are yet to declare their gross income for that year.

    GetUp!, which is the only one of the seven covered by the analysis that is not a registered charity, devotes key aspects of its campaigning muscle to climate change and Adani, and attracted nearly $8.4m in gross revenue in 2016-17.

    350.org Australia, which was ubiquitous in opposing Adani during the recent Batman by-election in Melbourne won by Labor, raised more than $1.2m, more than $100,000 above the previous year.

    Resources Minister Matt Canavan yesterday warned of the need for transparency from the green groups, but said the ACF and others had every right to be involved in the democratic ­process. “They should be upfront about where their money comes from and how they intend to use it,’’ Senator Canavan said.

    “The huge war chests these groups amass give them the power to drown out smaller local voices. So it’s only fair groups like GetUp! and the ACF are transparent when they receive their money and when they spend it.”

    The Bob Brown Foundation, named after the former Greens leader, amassed nearly $1m in gross income in 2016-17.

    Green Music Australia — backed by musicians Missy Higgins and Paul Kelly — attracted $132,915.

    The ACF stated in last year’s annual report it had “a strong ­financial base’’ of $18.1m, made up of Melbourne property and “a portfolio of ethical investments’’.

    ACF chief executive Kelly O’Shanassy said: “The vast ­majority of ACF’s donations come from ordinary Australians who generously give to us to ­advance the cause of Australia’s beautiful environment.

    “ACF is subject to high standards of regulation and transparency through the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profits Commission, and much more so than industry lobby groups.’’

    The Minerals Council of Australia said in a submission to an inquiry into tax deductions last year that environmental groups were able to campaign politically but evade scrutiny.

    “Yet, while political parties are obliged to disclose the source of donations greater than $13,200, environmental groups can spend millions of dollars every year without having to disclose the identities or locations of their donors,’’ it said.

    “This lack of transparency constitutes a potential threat to Australia’s sovereignty, by ­allowing foreign interests to exert political influence by ­covertly funding domestic environmental groups.’’

    The green groups are under pressure over their finances on two fronts; the first being the legislative push to ban foreign political donations.

    A cross-party committee inquiry into foreign donations has heard that thousands of charities are failing to comply with funding disclosure laws. A review is also under way into Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission legislation, which could also examine the charity status of groups such as ACF.

    A GetUp! spokeswoman said the organisation would send Senator Canavan a copy of its annual report, which showed where its money went.

    “GetUp! is funded by small-dollar donations from everyday Australians — they made up 77.25 per cent of GetUp!’s total revenue that year. All up, more than 57,400 individual donors made 491,228 individual donations,’’ she said.

    “These donations are used to do what our members want: to make this country a fair and just place to live with an environment that we and all of our children can enjoy.

    “While you can freely access the scope and scale of donations flowing in to GetUp! in real time, the undue influence of corporations on our elected officials — millions of dollars of dark money — goes unchecked.’’

  80. Boambee John

    calli
    #2686304, posted on April 14, 2018 at 8:25 am
    My understanding is that it is illegal to quote a price exclusive of GST unless that is explicitly stated.

    Just add in brackets “Includes $xx GST”. I see that on a lot of tax invoices, but not on price tags.

  81. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    Make a noise and make it clear

    Malcolm Turnbull’s excruciating week turned in on itself when, in the silliest political embarrassment of the year, he was criticised for not knowing the lyrics to John Farnham’s anthemic You’re the Voice. The Prime Minister was arm in arm with our songful swim team on the Gold Coast, missing the words to Farnham’s party song and longing for the bagpipe solo. Next day on radio he sought to make amends. “Well, there’s a good line in there for the Treasurer,” he assured 3AW’s Neil Mitchell, “ah, time to, um, what was it, time to, er, er, was it time, er, cripes, um, there’s a bit about balancing the books.” The intriguing coincidence for those frustrated by the Turnbull government is that inside those banal lyrics is a key to one of the Prime Minister’s failings.

    Hardly unexpected, the 30th losing Newspoll in succession was always going to provide an uncomfortable start to the week, predictably unleashing critics inside and outside his Coalition team. Former prime minister Tony Abbott and former deputy prime minister Barnaby Joyce provided dark theatre around the grim reality of the polling numbers. Yet, aside from increasing the rating of his media appearances, Mr Turnbull didn’t seem to have a plan to change the subject, set the agenda or shift the debate on to his priorities. Once more he was buffeted by events, even forced on the defensive about this newspaper’s reports that the government last year decided not to reduce immigration quotas. Seemingly in desperation, the Prime Minister accused us of peddling a “completely untrue” story; this flushed out more voices confirming we were, in fact, correct. Pointless stuff.

    Especially when Farnham had the answers — “You’re the voice, try and understand it, make a noise and make it clear.” This is the most obvious and sound lesson the Prime Minister could take; as the leader of the government he possesses all the authority, tools and ammunition to set the agenda, direct the national conversation and advocate on the issues he chooses. Yet even this week, when he knew he would be under political pressure, Mr Turnbull failed to do that. He announced a series of infrastructure projects — the most notable being the Tullamarine rail link — that are useful joint ventures with the states, and which amount to governments getting on with what governments are supposed to do. But the Prime Minister gave us nothing further on the direction he wants to take us: on immigration, energy, industrial relations or economic reform.

    Does he not know his powers? “We have the chance to turn the pages over, we can write what we want to write,” he should have known. “With the power to be powerful, believing we can make it better.” Instead, Mr Turnbull looked for that prosaic lost line for the Treasurer, which at least would have been an ode to fiscal repair: “We gotta make ends meet, before we get much older.”

    Worryingly for the Coalition and the nation, we see a former prime minister setting the agenda. Mr Abbott spent the week on his bike and in the news, so that he could draw attention to his take on energy and immigration policy; he knows the power of his voice and how to use it. Just as one of his fatal flaws as prime minister was a refusal to promote Mr Turnbull, his successor is spooked by rivalries and leaves Mr Abbott on the Pollie Pedal instead of in cabinet. Not even for the common good do either of them ask: “How long can we look at each other down the barrel of a gun?”

  82. Marcus

    zyconoclast
    #2686250, posted on April 14, 2018 at 2:23 am
    Bill Pulver collected a $500,000 bonus on his way out the door at Rugby Australia after overseeing what many believe was the worst year on record for the code.
    Pulver took home the bonus on top of his $775,000 salary last year, but made a tax deductible donation of $200,000 to the Australian Rugby Foundation, of which he is a director.

    It is now the turn of his successor, Raelene Castle, to plot Australian rugby’s next move. Despite keeping a low profile on a self-styled “listening tour” since taking over in January, Castle has wasted no time calling in outside help.
    Fairfax Media has learned that Castle has enlisted the services of Nielsen Sports consultant Michael Tange to map out what Australia’s Super Rugby involvement should look like in the next broadcast cycle, 2021-2025.*

    *Isn’t that her job?

    In theory, but then she’d have to be accountable for her own decision-making. Rugby Australia aren’t really into that.

  83. OldOzzie

    PAUL KELLY
    Critical energy debate defines the differences in Liberal circles

    The conflict between Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg and the Tony Abbott-led populist conservatives could hardly be sharper: if Frydenberg prevails with his ­market-based energy design as legislated policy, the conservative political strategy around energy will collapse.

    Frydenberg has drawn a line in the sand this week. It goes to the essence of Liberal Party belief. He says the government believes ­energy policy is a practical, investment issue, not an ideological one. He says the aim must be to restore market effectiveness, not sponsor government ownership of coal plants. He says having “more conflict than consensus” on energy policy is hurting all Australians.

    Get the message: political war on energy doesn’t work for the country. Frydenberg was explicit: Liberal Party populists seeking to turn energy policy into the frontline issue in the culture wars will perpetuate high prices, poor investment and failed energy policy.

    This highlights the schism ­in the Liberals and the Turnbull government. Abbott’s aim is to maximise product discrimination be­tween the Coalition and Labor and use the pricing issue to win the election. This is a repeat of a proven Abbott tactic around carbon pricing in the 2010 and 2013 polls.

    Frydenberg, rejects the Abbott strategy. His critique, in effect, is it puts politics before people and because it cannot work in practice it cannot ultimately work as a political tactic. He quoted former prime minister John Howard: “Ideas are not political ends in themselves” but foundations for “policies that work for the common good”.

    With a cabinet decision behind him, Frydenberg’s philosophy is to recreate a functioning energy market to permit $200 billion of private-sector investment to 2050. He argues the essential precondition is an accepted policy design, not nationalisation nostalgia and ideological conflict that means more investment strikes.

    The key lines in Frydenberg’s speech are: “As politicians set their battlelines, it is consumers who are the casualties. This is the hard truth.” Indeed, his speech was about the theme “time to tell some truths” — his targets being both Coalition populists and Labor and Greens ideologues seeking to shut down coal for ambitious emission-reduction and renewable energy targets. Targeting the latter, he said the government would not engage in green gesture politics “at the expense of our blue-collar workers and their industries”.

    Howard offered clear support yesterday for the government’s ­solution, the national energy guarantee. In a balanced but firm statement to The Australian, Howard said: “I am not in favour of the government building coal-fired power stations. That approach doesn’t appeal to me. But I acknowledge that we have this problem because we allowed the subsidies for renewables to be so generous that it became very hard to sustain ­investment in coal-fired power stations. Given where we are, I think the national energy guarantee that the government has come up with is quite a good approach.”

    The critical question is whether Frydenberg can secure the support of the states and territories for his NEG. To make this policy a reality, the design is legislated by state parliaments and the emissions targets are legislated by Canberra. The politics, by definition, demand a degree of bipartisanship and that means Labor support at least at state level for the policy design.

    In the end, the federal legislation will need Coalition party-room approval and this is the last hope for any conservative changes or veto. While the partyroom is master of its destiny, the idea it would undermine any NEG policy that had won federal-state support is improbable. Once this policy design is legislated at the state level, the game is done and dusted. The structure will endure for years.

    This complex struggle is conducted at two levels: between the Turnbull government and Liberal conservatives, and between the Turnbull government and Labor.

    Frydenberg was a pivotal supporter of Abbott against Turnbull in 2015. While Abbott and Frydenberg are friends, the policy tensions are intense and rising: Frydenberg said Abbott “is always going to cut across what the Prime Minister has been saying lately”.

    Abbott says the NEG has been designed by technical experts but they have made mistakes in the past. He’s right. But the real vulnerability is whether the NEG ­delivers tangible price falls. Both Abbott and Labor’s energy spokesman, Mark Butler, are sceptical.

    Frydenberg said wholesale prices would fall 23 per cent on average in the decade 2020 to 2030, and he had instructed power retailers to pass on full gains to consumers. But the wholesale element is about a third of the final bill. Price gains are likely to be modest. But recent advice is that wholesale price falls are steeper.

    Butler says there are three critical problems with the NEG: the 26 per cent emission reductions target is too modest; the electricity sector’s pro rata share of the target is too weak, with electricity (think coal) needing to assume a far greater burden; and the design leaves too much power in the hands of the big three integrated players, raising serious doubts about price reductions. However the Energy Security Board’s draft design suggests action has been taken to secure more competition.

    Critically, Butler says Labor “wants to see a bipartisan solution” and hopes the problems can be worked through. Labor’s concern is with state-legislated design. A future ALP government will have discretion to change federal law to increase the emission-reduction targets to Labor’s 45 per cent.

    Frydenberg says the NEG seeks to integrate both energy reliability and emission reductions. He says it is not a trading scheme, not a tax, not a subsidy and treats technologies on merit.

    For the government, if this fails, there is no Plan B.

    From the Comments

    – Paul, sadly more selective facts to taint the narrative. Butler is on record as saying if the NEG is passed, when they win office the renewable target will go to 45 (I thought he said 49 but may have heard it wrong). JF needs to show how the NEG will bring down wholesale prices at the higher target because thats what it will deliver under. You enjoy having a crack a TA, but lets see who’s right. The second thing is Labor are malicious and untruthful. Before Shorten loses the election after next, he would have ploughed billions into renewable subsidies and committed billions more in the out years to make 45% achievable. Another hospital pass for conservatives to try and fix. If you and others believe coal is so bad, how about we legislate that all profits from renewables are immediately returned to the government until they have paid back their subsidies. Lets add a generously low 5% interest rate on that for the loans from us taxpayers. Do you reckon AGL would still be knocking out ads by a disingenuous semi-hipster advocating their magnanimous renewable plans while asking “are you with us”? If Team Wet, Labor and the lunatic Greens were serious we would have nuclear power stations everywhere.

    – Why on earth with 1.6 % of the worlds CO2 emissions do we need to beggar the poorest in our communities to pay for ludicrous emissions reductions as Labor wants.

    – Frydenberg is still wet behind the ears for this job and is mincing it.

    – Why then is Frydenberg supporting Turnbull’s stupid Snowy 2 program. What is the difference between this and a new coal fired power plant. Oh that right, the coal plant will supply more more power, 24/7 regardless if the sun shines or the wind blows and would cost less.

    – Todays energy policy:

    Environmental concerns come first, even to the point of being used to make huge profits for the elitist few.

    Big business making money comes second, even if they are exploiting the people.

    Affordable energy for the people comes last. The people do not matter, and are being used and exploited to the maximum.

    – I don’t really believe Mr Frydenberg truly believes the words he has probably been told to say by his master, Mr Turnbull. His body language shows a man in fear – not his confident person with incredible intellect when he had Mr Abbott as his leader. Sadly, I believe he is another very talented person being run over by a bus driven by Mr Turnbull.

  84. feelthebern

    And everything old is new again.
    Scooter Libby pardoned.
    Judith Miller on Fox.
    Valerie Plame on CNN.

  85. Leigh Lowe

    How are the joints done? Are they dowelled and glued or screwed? The originals would have used animal based glue. Are you going to do that or will you be an un-purist?

    He will use tongue and joist pigeon-tail joints, with clag glue and offset through trunnions.
    Of course.

  86. Nick

    He will use tongue and joist pigeon-tail joints, with clag glue and offset through trunnions.
    Of course.

    The curriculum at Collingwood tech for lezzo carpentreses?

  87. calli

    BJ, my quotes always state the raw amount, then the GST and the final amount. No misunderstandings, no exceptions.

    Working out the GST on the final amount (say on a pricetag) is easy, especially in these days of apps for everything.

  88. C.L.

    Despite being one of America’s holiest Catholics – ask him, he’ll confirm that – Comey seems unaware that lying by omission is still lying.

  89. feelthebern

    We need to remember, that Scooter lied to the FBI.
    That was his crime.
    He did not do anything in regards to Valerie Plame.
    And Dick Armitage, who actually did the deed, was never even indicted.
    Because he was one of Powells boys, one of the “good” guys.

  90. C.L.

    Valerie Plame

    In her day, she was the world’s best-known “secret agent.”

  91. If you want ATO staff numbers to explode, then sure get rid of PAYE.

    Why not suggest consumers take over responsibility for paying GST.

    Milton Friedman was the brain behind Payg iirc.

    Besides which my PAYG, HECS and Medicare Levy paying children are already painfully aware of how much tax they pay.

    Cormann is correct regarding public service superannuation arrangements, if people want to cut public service salaries, then they should call that spade a spade.

    What they ought to do is stop ‘bracket creep’

    How many jobs done by a clerk class six in 1972 are now El2?

  92. Leigh Lowe

    C.L.

    #2686363, posted on April 14, 2018 at 9:48 am

    Valerie Plame

    In her day, she was the world’s best-known “secret agent.”

    Just behind James Bond and Maxwell Smart.

  93. feelthebern

    The biggest news overnight is that Trump is forcing Sessions out of office.
    Why?
    Trump met with pro-cannabis lobbyists over the past 24 hours.
    The RNC realise there is more to be made by legalising & taxing pot than by this stupid prohibition.
    Jeff Sessions is majorly anti pot & I doubt he’ll stick around if Trump makes these kind of moves ahead of the mid-terms.

  94. C.L.

    Christopher Hitchens’ best work was his chapter and verse destruction of Plame and Wilson as lying Democrat stooges.

  95. JC

    Maybe I’m behind the times. We’re two years into the Wussian collusion hysteria and there’s no evidence of any. Meanwhile there’s an out of control special prosecutor.

  96. C.L.

    When Plame walked into hotels on a mission, the concierge would say, “ah, Ms Plame.”

  97. calli

    Heh. On the subject of PS super, a family member is about to retire on a hefty defined benefit, which she boasted about to The Beloved.

    He couldn’t help himself – “that’s pretty generous of the taxpayer” says he. “Oh, no”, says she, “the government is paying it.”

    This woman has a PhD. Sigh.

  98. Roger.

    So the ARU is basically paying a NZ woman close to $1m per annum but she can’t get together with SA & NZ to work out a round robin competition with favourable TV viewing times without hiring a high flying “sports consultant”?

  99. Arky

    He will use tongue and joist pigeon-tail joints, with clag glue and offset through trunnions.
    Of course.

    ..
    If you want to glue anything go to FGI in centre road Springvale.
    Best resins and fillers for any application.

  100. Roger.

    This woman has a PhD. Sigh.

    In Economics?

  101. C.L.

    Sub-header at ABC Online:

    ‘Cheeky’ competitors had wrong strategy against me: Semenya.

    They brought vaginas to a penis fight.

    “It was a big surprise when I took the lead [so early]. They realised then it was too late, that I’m running one pace for a long time, because I can run that pace for a long time.”

  102. Arky

    offset through trunnions.

    ..
    What is a trunnion?
    Is that when Trump eats a raw onion Abbott- style?

  103. calli

    In Economics?

    A health discipline, Roger. Nice little earner and lots of perks. The public purse is deep and wide.

  104. John Constantine

    Expecting the price of ruinables electricity to drop in the mid twenties, just when the first pulse of solar and wind will wear out and require decommissioning and replacement.

    Haven’t seen the projections for full O,H and S compliant pulling down and recycling, but we can take a stab at it.

    To be billed to landowners after the company that owns the windmills is sold to a bankrupt shelf company in Turkmenistan.

  105. Roger.

    They brought vaginas to a penis fight.

    Er…just looking at the pic of the three medallists…I’m not so sure about that!

  106. calli

    It was a big surprise when I took the lead

    No it wasn’t. Stop lying.

  107. Arky

    From CLs link:
    ..

    but that did not appear to phase Semenya, who was still talking afterwards about potential world records and the season ahead.
    ..

    They really don’t know anything at all, do they?

  108. Roger.

    A health discipline, Roger. Nice little earner and lots of perks. The public purse is deep and wide.

    The public purse is empty.

    We’re living on the credit card.

  109. Christopher Hitchens’ best work was his chapter and verse destruction of Plame and Wilson as lying Democrat stooges.

    Without a doubt.

  110. Feser is going to be giving a talk called What is a law of nature? at Fermilab in June. Should be very interesting.

  111. Boambee John

    From the SMH article referenced by Zyconoclast

    The secret rules mean that if Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull or Treasurer Scott Morrison moved to reduce the intake in the budget, they would need to overrule Treasury

    A classic case of the Deep State setting rules that the elected government is too cowardly to over rule.

    If the politicians are happy to let the bureaucrats run the country, then get rid of the politicians, but refusing to cut immigration because Treasury has set a “rule” is less than pathetic.

  112. feelthebern

    Obama had A-G’s fighting for him every inch of the way.
    Trump has moron Session’s trying to stop teenagers smoking joints.
    Trumps stupidest decision of all was appointing him A-G.
    He’s living with that decision for now.

  113. Roger.

    The secret rules mean that if Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull or Treasurer Scott Morrison moved to reduce the intake in the budget, they would need to overrule Treasury

    What are we paying them for?

    Rubber stamps come a lot cheaper than the PM & Treasurer’s salaries.

  114. H B Bear

    The Prime Minister was arm in arm with our songful swim team on the Gold Coast, missing the words to Farnham’s party song and longing for the bagpipe solo. Next day on radio he sought to make amends. “Well, there’s a good line in there for the Treasurer,” he assured 3AW’s Neil Mitchell, “ah, time to, um, what was it, time to, er, er, was it time, er, cripes, um, there’s a bit about balancing the books.”

    Great communicator. Smartest man in the room. Potential Greatness right there.

  115. John Constantine

    Raiding the offices in Australia of those that funded the cleanup squads in charge of the depths of depravity that Senior Labor Figures left behind them, like snail trails over the nation’s conscience:

    This would be as informative as the stormy daniels uncovering.

    Just that a billion dollars a year can’t buy a public broadcaster with the courage to ask the questions.

  116. OldOzzie

    Investor wake up call to Labor tax grab

    Retiree Stuart Smith says he feels like he’s about to be robbed by highwaymen. Under Labor’s proposed franking credit changes, he and wife Ruth will kiss goodbye to $18,000 a year in franking credit refunds.

    That’s just over a third of their combined annual income of $58,000. “We feel as though we’ve run into Ned Kelly on the road. His gun is pointed at us, we’re being held up and it looks as if we’re going to get robbed.”

    It is important to note that the shot won’t be fired for some time, if at all. Labor first has to win the next federal election and then get its policy through the Senate, which could be as fractious as the current incarnation.

    Nevertheless, self-funded retirees are rattled, and rightly so. Making excess franking credits non-refundable would strip $5000 from the annual income of an average self-managed super fund worth $1.1 million, according to the SMSF Association, which estimates about a million people will be affected even with Labor’s “pensioner guarantee” carve out.

    Let’s pause for a quick refresher. Under Australia’s system of dividend imputation, shareholders receive franking credits to account for tax paid at the corporate level, which in most cases is 30 per cent. These credits can be used to offset tax owed by the shareholder.

    For people who pay little or no tax (such as super funds and retirees), excess franking credits are paid out as cash refunds. Labor plans to make those credits non-refundable for everybody except people drawing a government-funded age pension or other allowance. There is also a temporary reprieve for some self-managed super funds..

    “Labor is cracking down on a loophole that gives tax refunds to people who have a lot of wealth but don’t pay any income tax,” the party’s policy material says.

    “Most of these refunds go straight into the pockets of a few very wealthy people who are already very comfortable. In fact, 80 per cent of the benefit accrues to the wealthiest 20 per cent of retirees.”

    When Labor first announced the policy in early March, it was met with a public backlash. Opposition leader Bill Shorten was exposed to criticism that he was going after people on low to modest incomes, not just “millionaires”.

    Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull spent a bit of time hammering the point before Shorten announced a “pensioner guarantee”. This spared more than 300,000 low-income retirees from the effects of the policy.

    Judging by the letters received by The Australian Financial Review, there is much confusion about who’s in and who’s out, which mostly arises from the use of the term “pensioner”.

    Labor’s exclusion applies specifically to people receiving an age pension – either full or part – or allowance from the government (of the type Centrelink pays). It does not apply to account-based pensions drawn from superannuation funds, including self-managed superannuation funds (SMSFs).

    To make matters more complicated, Labor also announced an exemption for SMSFs with at least one member receiving a government age pension on or before March 28, 2018. Unless your arrangements were in place before that date, the exemption does not apply.

    If Labor gets elected and the proposal passes into law, the policy will take hold from July 2019.

    In the interests of absolute clarity, here is the precise wording of the announcement: “Under the pensioner guarantee, every recipient of an Australian government pension or allowance with individual shareholdings will still be able to benefit from cash refunds.

    This includes individuals receiving the age pension, disability support pension, carer payments, parenting payment, Newstart and sickness allowance.”

    A further exemption applies to “SMSFs with at least one pensioner or allowance recipient before March 28, 2018”.

    So if somebody with an SMSF retires today and starts receiving a pension next week, the reprieve does not apply. Again, this is all dependent on Labor getting elected and passing laws to enact the policy, which is why financial planners are advising clients not to do anything just yet.

    It is this uncertainty that bugs many, including the Smiths, who live in a two-bedroom apartment on the Gold Coast. The couple started account-based pensions in 2013. Their SMSF is largely invested in equities/hybrids and they therefore rely substantially on cash refunds of franking credits.

    Each of their account balances is below the $1.6 million transfer balance cap limit and they have never drawn a government-funded age pension, either in part or full. They are precluded from doing so by the assets test.

    The government mandates a certain rate of drawdown for each pension – Ruth’s rate is 4 per cent and Stuart’s is 5 per cent. Combined they received $58,000 in the financial year to June 30, 2017 and of that just under $18,000 was cash rebates of franking credits.

    Story Wealth Management managing director Anne Graham looked over the Smiths’ tax return. “If there is no refund of excess franking credits as per the proposal, then they will lose the refund in total,” she confirms.

    “From an investment perspective, that affects the rate of return and income earned. It doesn’t necessarily impact the amount of pension they draw down. But because the overall return will be lower, the funds will run out sooner.”

    That funds will run out sooner is a point made by many critics of Labor’s policy. Won’t this policy push people on to the age pension sooner and therefore end up costing the government more?

    According to official costings by the Parliamentary Budget Office, making franking credits non-refundable will increase federal revenue (any time the government denies a tax break it collects more revenue) by $10.7 billion in its first two years and $55.7 billion over a decade.

    Labor has not released the PBO figures (although to be fair, this is common on both sides of politics). Nor is there any data available on what affect the policy will have on rates of reliance on the age pension.

    “The unfortunate aspect of the proposed change is that members in pension phase who have based their decisions on the rules of the day will be significantly impacted by the loss of refunds,” Institute of Public Accountants senior tax adviser Tony Greco says.

    “Retirement planning requires stability, and this constant tinkering with the goalposts is creating a loss of confidence in the superannuation system, especially for those who cannot re-enter the work place to make up for any loss in income to support their lifestyles when adverse changes are retrospectively made.”

    While many financial planners have decried the proposed changes, Perth advisor Philip Carman says Labor’s policy is fair and necessary. He believes the Baby Boomers have had it too good for too long. “Getting this refund is beyond the pale,” Carman says.

    “We’ve all got to be citizens of the country and say, hang on, what’s fair and reasonable? What can we afford?” At 64, Carman just makes it into the Baby Boomer generation. He has yet to retire and has an SMSF, which means he sits squarely in the demographic Labor is targeting.

    Retired police officer Steve Apps, who faces a loss of income of as much as $30,000 a year, says politicians seem determined to erode people’s ability to fend for themselves.

    Geoff Grimley, who started out as a tradesman before moving into general management, is in the same boat. “We’re looking at a hit of between $28,000 and $30,000, or about 25 per cent of our income,” he says.

    Of course, many investors – and their advisors – are already thinking about what to do if franking credit non-refundability does come to pass.

    The obvious option is to rejig shareholdings, perhaps to property, stocks whose dividends are either partially or non-franked and international high-yielding shares.

    Michael Hanninan, superannuation special counsel at SUPERCentral, says other possible reactions will include transferring money from retirement-phase accounts (where zero tax applies) to accumulation-phase accounts (which are taxed at 15 per cent), or inviting others still in accumulation phase into the fund. These options would mean the fund has tax liabilities against which franking credits can be offset.

    That people with SMSFs might move their money into retail and industry funds owned by banks and unions has also been well canvassed.

    “These funds are likely to have a very significant tax liability against which the otherwise excess – and lost – imputation credits can be offset,” Hallinan says.

    “The retirees would have to be confident that they received the benefit (or most of the benefit) of the otherwise excess imputation credits. Additionally, this response would only be feasible if the transferred balance consisted entirely of cash or listed securities.”

    At a public policy level, the government ought to be wary about narrowing the gap between the level of income a couple can expect as self-funded retirees and the income they can expect as age pension recipients, says Jason Delisser, the director of F3 Financial Services says.

    “It’s hard enough to get people engaged about planning for their retirement and financial future in the first instance,” he says.

    “If the outcome or lifestyle from having a larger pot of investments – that is, no age pension income, no pensioner concession card and no franking credit refunds – is not that dissimilar to having a smaller pot of investments, there is not a great incentive to accumulate the larger asset pool and either become self-funded or remain self-funded.

    “My view is that the proposed franking credit policy will contribute to this narrowing of the gap between the two alternatives.”

  117. John Constantine

    We will never waver from the decolonialisation through de-electrification of our mass imported welfare voteherd plantations, as imposed by the Stalinist inculcated third columnists of treasury.

    The crushing and impoverishment of the racist proles is our Strength through Stalinism.

    Comrades.

  118. Boambee John

    calli at 0944

    Working out the GST on the final amount (say on a pricetag) is easy, especially in these days of apps for everything.

    Yes, it is easy, but how many do it? Rub their noses in it every time they by a slab of beer or a tank of petrol (identify the excise there also, on the receipt).

  119. OldOzzie

    What to do if Labor’s franking plan goes through

    The bias that many self-managed superannuation funds (SMSFs) have to Australian shares would almost certainly change if the Labor proposal to stop franking credit refunds got through. So say advisers deluged by calls from clients worried about their potential loss of income under the Labor plan.

    Franking credits (to take account of company tax already paid on dividends before you get them) are an important component of the overall return for Australian shares, says Jonathan Philpot, partner with HLB Mann Judd Wealth Management. They’re used to offset tax on other income and retirees paying little or no tax boost their annual income via unused franking credits being refunded by the Australian Taxation Office.

    “The current dividend yield on the Australian market is 4.3 per cent and the franking level is about 70 per cent,” Philpot adds. “Therefore the franking credits add a further 1.3 per cent to the return for Australian shares. For a super account that may have 40 per cent exposure to Australian shares, this is adding 0.5 per cent to the overall return.”

    Effectively this would lower the expected return for Australian shares for super funds not able to make full use of the franking credits.

    “This does not necessarily make them a worse investment than, say, US shares, as dividends plus expected growth is the driver of investment returns, but it does have an impact on the expected return,” says Philpot. “Perhaps a bias that has existed in many SMSFs towards Australian shares with much lower exposure to other asset classes will become more balanced over time.”

    Diversify

    Nerida Cole, head of advice at Dixon Advisory, agrees. She says under the Labor proposal, those adversely affected would need to “diversify their investments (in line with their tolerance to risk) but look for assets that provide gross income or don’t have franking credits and are taxable, eg international shares, property, fixed interest, infrastructure assets”.

    The higher the level of income from the non-share component of the portfolio, she adds, the lower the potential impact. “All other things being equal, the income from the other investments may absorb the franking credits. Or even where there is no tax benefit, the other income will reduce the impact relative to total income,” she says.

    The Labor proposal has supposedly been aimed at “hitting the rich”. But Philpot – like many advisers and retirees – says it will be retirees with just enough assets to miss out on the part age pension who will be hit the hardest. That’s because they will lose a bigger proportion if they’re not refunded unused franking credits by the ATO.

    Philpot cites someone with a $800,000 pension with 40 per cent invested in Australian shares. Assuming a dividend yield of 4 per cent with fully franked shares, the tax refund up to June 30, 2017, was $5485 – which they would lose under the Labor proposal.

    He compares this to someone with a $4 million balance (using the same assumptions) where the tax refund to June 30, 2017 was $27,428. “With the $1.6 million pension cap, now $2.4 million is subject to tax on the taxable earnings [because this amount would have to be in accumulation mode]. Assuming 5 per cent earnings ($120,000), 15 per cent tax of $18,000 will offset the tax refund. This reduces the tax refund to $9,428, so the Labor proposal will only have an impact of $9,428, being the lost tax refund.”

    Lower balances worse hit

    As Philpot says, Labor’s proposal would have the greatest impact on retirees who fall just outside the assets test thresholds. “The impact of that lost tax refund on the couple with $800,000 is a far greater proportion than those with the $4 million balance. Those who had large pension balances were hit harder by the $1.6 million pension cap than they would be by Labor’s proposed loss of franking credits,” he adds.

    The first time excess franking credits became refundable for dividends was from July 1, 2000, says Bryan Ashenden, head of financial literacy and advocacy at BT Financial Group.

    Dividend imputation had been introduced in 1987 to prevent double taxation.

    As Ashenden explains, when a company makes $100 of profits, it has to pay 30 per cent (or $30) tax. This leaves $70 of after-tax profit payable as a dividend. “If your SMSF receives the $70 dividend, it would be taxable to it,” he says.

    “Before dividend imputation, your SMSF would have paid tax on that dividend. With a tax rate of 15 per cent, your SMSF would have paid another $10.50 tax, leaving you with only $59.50 from the company’s original profit. In other words, those profits were taxed twice, and in these circumstances a total tax rate of 41.5 per cent applied.”

    AFR Contributor

  120. Boambee John

    nota at 0948

    Besides which my PAYG, HECS and Medicare Levy paying children are already painfully aware of how much tax they pay.

    Good to hear, but how many of the bogans are?

  121. H B Bear

    Waldorf and Mavis team up in Teh Weekend Australian. Blair’s Law in action once again.

  122. Boambee John

    nota at 0948

    What they ought to do is stop ‘bracket creep’

    How many jobs done by a clerk class six in 1972 are now El2?

    Related to that, knew a naval officer in the early 1990s who commented that he had done a particular job in Navy Office as a LCDR. A few postings later he came back as a Captain, to find himself doing the identical job.

    So, yes, bracket creep exists and should be stopped. But how? It would take a degree of detailed management beyond the wit of any current politician.

  123. Nick

    The letters in the Travellers section of the SMH are an interesting window into your usual self centred Lefty. When they aren’t complaining about their ‘rights’, for example, complaining about people putting their seats back, or, using the overhead locker, they are lecturing others as to their social magnificence.

    PLASTIC, NOT SO FANTASTIC

    I couldn’t agree more about taking our principles with us when we visit other countries. Reports that the amount of plastic in the Pacific Gyre is now the size of France is absolutely gob-smacking. Many locations in Bali don’t have adequate, functional and effective waste systems – so we visitors can make a difference when we travel. I consistently took my silk carry bags to all shops – and advised all and sundry that I didn’t want plastic and spoke about the problems of plastic in Bali and in general. I consistently got really supportive responses from shopkeepers and supermarket staff and other Balinese I spoke to. I discussed ideas for options to plastic with many of these people and floated ideas of an ‘I love Bali’ calico/cotton bags being made available to people in shops for free or for very little – in place of plastic.

    I also did my bit and picked up plastic waste whenever I could and disposed of it correctly – and had Balinese thank me for helping their environment. I gave around two hours to a personal clean-up of around 100 metres of beach in west Bali near one of the locations we were staying at. The more people who saw me doing it the better. If I saw a local I said ‘ I love Bali’ and ‘I want to keep Bali beautiful’. Terima kasih (thank you.)

    Gayle Russell, Nunderi, NSW

  124. Roger.

    Many locations in Bali don’t have adequate, functional and effective waste systems – so we visitors can make a difference…by not going there?

  125. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Most of the household small renovation quotes we get give a final figure that does not include GST. Beside the figure is always a statement ‘plus GST’. One gets the feeling that for many it is the start of a negotiation. One even printed if you are unhappy with this price, please contact us. We pay the GST but we know that many don’t.

    Also, I bet those food outlets and other businesses that insist on cash run two sets of books.

  126. Infidel Tiger

    Imagine going on holiday with Gayle? I think you would have to drink a fair bit.

  127. John Constantine

    The plastic in the ocean.

    Paying chicoms to take plastic waste from the West and ship it to China.

    Economically, the most profitable thing to do would to be take the money upfront and dump the plastic as soon as you are well out to sea, then rinse and repeat.

    No documented proof, but the incentive is there.

  128. Leigh Lowe

    I consistently took my silk carry bags to all shops –

    Silk? Will no-one think of the silkworms?

    and advised all and sundry that I didn’t want plastic and spoke about the problems of plastic in Bali and in general. 

    So I make these poor hardworking chumps scratch around for a cloth bag and make their hard lives just a bit tougher.

    I consistently got really supportive responses from shopkeepers and supermarket staff and other Balinese I spoke to. 

    Balinese are polite. Even to dickheads.

    I discussed ideas for options to plastic with many of these people and floated ideas of an ‘I love Bali’ calico/cotton bags being made available to people in shops for free or for very little – in place of plastic.

    In other words I was as condescending as possible to the ignorant brown people.

  129. Arky

    Never been to Bali.
    Never intend going to Bali.
    Couldn’t give a shit if Bali was covered in a fragrant mixture of pig manure, radioactive sludge, shredded plastic and the minced up, tattooed bodies of bogan idiots.
    It’s their country. They can decorate it any way they like.

  130. Tom

    BREAKING: US to launch Syria attack. Trump to address the nation tonight (Friday) US time.

  131. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    “Well, there’s a good line in there for the Treasurer,” he assured 3AW’s Neil Mitchell, “ah, time to, um, what was it, time to, er, er, was it time, er, cripes, um, there’s a bit about balancing the books.”

    Yep. Saw a clip of it on Sky. Stumbling Mumbles. He does it all the time.
    Abbott’s public utterances were never as bad with the er/ah/um’s as Mal’s.
    And they did improve somewhat on the job. Mal’s have become worse.

  132. None

    No documented proof, but the incentive is there.

    Comrades.

  133. Roger.

    BREAKING: US to launch Syria attack. Trump to address the nation tonight (Friday) US time.

    Bolton 1

    Mattis 0

    Trump sidelined by the new neo-con management.

  134. Shy Ted

    The lefty lady is the one on the right. On a good day. Makeup already applied. She’s a comedian. Apparently.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/apr/13/eight-feminist-ways-to-love-your-body-without-even-leaving-the-house

  135. Top Ender

    What an odd concept!

    Review years in the making – and still years from change

    THE long-awaited 16,000-page review of the Territory’s 43 Aboriginal town camps has finally been released to the public – more than two years after the Parliamentary Inquiry into Housing in Aboriginal Town Camps was established.

    The inquiry aimed to address community concerns regarding the state of housing in NT town camps – and the cost, timeliness and quality of repairs and maintenance.

    Handing down its report in May 2016, the inquiry found consecutive governments failed to provide efficient and effective public housing to people living in town camp communities.

    In response to these findings, the NT Government ordered a major review into the state of town camps. Led by Deloitte and Cross Cultural Consultants, researchers visited each camp several times accompanied by first language speakers. The NT Town Camps Review was first given the reporting deadline of December 2016 and was delayed due to privacy concerns in 2017.

    The Gunner Government received the report mid-2017, and finally released it yesterday. The NT Government also handed down its response to the report’s recommendations – but the $24 million it pledged toward urgent works was just 20 per cent of the $132.1 million researchers said was needed to upgrade current housing to urban houses.

    The NT Government will also spend $1 million to launch its Town Camps Futures Unit by July 1. This five-person team will be in charge of developing a plan for each of the 43 NT town camps and guiding future government policies. The plan will be released mid-2019.

  136. LBLoveday

    Are the children killed by chemical weapons somehow more dead than the many more killed by CinC Obama’s bombs?
    Do their families mourn more than the families of those killed in CinC Obama’s strike on the Kunduz Hospital in Afghanistan?

  137. John Constantine

    Crap weather here in yarragrad, the few drops of rain not really settling the dust.

    Drifting dirt from firetruck farming burnt off paddocks was bad last night, but disguised by low cloud today.

    None of mine, yet to drop a match, but a big backlog to catch up on now.

  138. feelthebern

    Tillerson out as Sec State.
    Bolton in as Nat Security Advisor.
    Within the month they are carrying out Saudi policy.
    wtf.

  139. Roger.

    A WH insider: “Bolton has limited his role to ensuring Trump has all the information he needs.”

    The hand that edits the presidential security briefing rules the world.

  140. Tom

    Fox News: Agence France Presse reports explosions are already being heard in Syria as France, UK and US launch co-ordinated bombardment.

    Trump’s speech was all about eliminating chemical weapons — very focused, no ad-libbing. It was one of his better ones.

  141. Shy Ted;
    Adding the Australia Film Commission to the list.
    Add to the List of Shit That Needs to be Dealt With:
    1. Several new nuclear/coal power stations to be commenced immediately the party gets in;
    2. An immediate cessation of immigration;
    3. All judges/magistrates to be elected, not appointed;
    4. Department of Defence overhauled;
    5. The Federal Departments of Health and Education abolished;
    6. Safe Schools to be investigated for sexually predatory indoctrination;
    7. Bring back the death penalty.
    8. Review and terminate all sporting bodies like ASADA.
    9. Wipe off the face of the earth – DFAT.
    10. Delete Australian Standards.
    11. Abolish any government ‘thing’ with the words Aboriginal, Indigenous, Torres Strait Islander.
    12. Abolish any/all anti-discrimination and anti-free speech legislation and associated bodies both state and federal.
    13. Review membership of and withdraw from all UN and other international bodies or treaties that do no to specifically favour Australia.
    14. Cancel the Uphill Wet Battery.
    15. Cancel the Submarine Contract and order a dozen Virginia Class vessels for delivery over 12 years.
    16. Defund Screen Australia/Australian Film Commission.

  142. feelthebern

    Interesting fact.
    Most Americans won’t know about this change in policy.
    At least for a week.
    They are too busy with a Kardashian baby & coachella.

  143. Mater

    I gave around two hours to a personal clean-up of around 100 metres of beach in west Bali near one of the locations we were staying at. The more people who saw me doing it the better.

    This pretty much sums up Gayle’s motivations. Not entirely satisfied with the level of exposure, she partakes in a little self aggrandisement in the SMH.

  144. rickw

    China is engaged in large-scale theft of American research and technology from universities, using spies, students, and researchers as collectors, experts told Congress on Wednesday.

    Not to mention cyber theft. The Chicoms are so smart they need to steal everything.

  145. feelthebern

    Why did Trump have to announce anything?
    If they had the google maps of where the chemical weapons were, why didn’t he authorise to bomb them a week ago?
    Say something after the fact.

  146. areff

    JC: that McClatchey story, Trump should be worried because it re-builds the Russian dossier narrative, but not on the strength of the “facts” it presents. It’s based on a pair of unnamed sources who, obviously, are Dem staffers, hence “Democratic investigators for the House and Senate Intelligence Committees…”. If he was in Prague, as the story asserts, then those sources should know when he was there, yet the story posits it was sometime in August or, maybe, “early September”.

    There will be more stories like this, lots more, all arising like ectoplasm from the one known fact: that the feds seized a lawyer’s documents. As no one knows what is in them or what they are (“he is known to have tape-recorded conversations”) any number of furphies will be generated to add to the general ball of wax being assiduously rolled through newsroom contacts, generating any number of “scoops” along the way.

    This was McClatchey’s turn to get a we-told-you-so scoop. Tomorrow it will be another couple of hacks delighted to be played for suckers in return for a few column inches of attention.

    Credible? Well, consider this one aspect of today’s “revelations”: He is said to have met in Prague, supposedly after a hush-hush undocumented dash from Germany, with Russian nobs AND “top hackers”.

    Ask yourself this: if the alleged rendezvous was so secret and so sensitive, why the Mad Hatters Tea Party of the invited to discuss a conspiracy. It would have been the lawyer and the Russian knob?

    “Come, my Americanski friend, let us discuss subverting your country’s election, and let us also do it in front of all these potential witnesses.”

    Yeah, right.

  147. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Oh dear. Sometimes I fall quite unconsciously into the British linguistic trap, as exemplified above. Brits of a certain class (that I was trained aged 11 by a teacher to emulate) refer to an abstract self-referential ‘one’ instead of ‘I’ or the inclusively self-referential ‘you’. So ‘one notices’, or ‘one may find that’ etc. Hairy’s brother’s wife does it full on, and his brother uses it occasionally, so I guess I get reinforced there. I don’t think I’ve ever heard Hairy use it though. The Irish in him speaks. 🙂

    It did my worst with it on this:
    “One couldn’t agree more about taking one’s principles with one when one visits other countries.”
    Sets the right tone for the rest of the lady’s letter, I think.

  148. Entropy

    I would not be surprised if Gayle Russell was a cousin of Alene Composta.

  149. feelthebern

    China is engaged in large-scale theft of American research and technology from universities, using spies, students, and researchers as collectors, experts told Congress on Wednesday.

    Experts.
    FFS.
    Sure everyone steals everything, but not everything feeds back to Beijing.
    They steal it for their own use.
    Morgan Stanley got hit last year with an intern stealing parts of algorithms.
    The guy fled back to China & disappeared.
    I’m sure he’s making millions now, for himself.

  150. Zyconoclast

    They’re not sending their best.

    ‘Hand over your son or we’ll shoot him’: escaping Central America’s gang violence

    The UN calls it a “silent emergency”: the flood of terrified youths targeted by gangs for “misdemeanours” as petty as looking at an enemy the wrong way.

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/south-america/hand-over-your-son-or-we-ll-shoot-him-escaping-central-america-s-gang-violence-20180409-p4z8lw.html

    There are few places on earth more violent than El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, an area referred to as the Northern Triangle of Central America. In 2016, El Salvador had a homicide rate of 81.2 people per 100,000. Honduras’ murder rate was 59 per 100,000. (Australia’s has fallen in recent years to a record low of about 1 per 100,000.) The violence has its roots in deep, intergenerational trauma, a legacy of agrarian conflict, persecution of Indigenous people, corruption, inequality and, in the case of Guatemala and El Salvador, decades-long civil wars that featured widespread torture and civilian massacres. The region is also unequivocally patriarchal, with high levels of violence towards women and the LGBTI community.

    And I thought the cause of the violence was a primitive population with an average IQ range of 80-85.

  151. Roger.

    Within the month they are carrying out Saudi policy.

    Trump & the Sauds bonded over their mutual taste in interior decorating before Bolton came on the scene.

    The latter adds an element of frisson to the relationship, though.

  152. feelthebern

    Roger, everyone strokes the Saudi shaft.
    But not everyone fellates.

  153. Rae

    So…if the FBI raided Cohen’s office on a warrant for communications with Trump about Stormy…and a leak occurs shortly afterwards about Cohen’s confidential work with a completely different client…isn’t that totally and appallingly illegal…?

    You know it almost appears like client-lawyer privilege doesn’t matter if the client and the lawyer aren’t favoured pets of the Left.

    What lawyer-client privilege? Elliott Broidy has been part of Muellers investigation for quite a while. As reported in Newsweek on 29 March 2018, two weeks before Cohen was raided.

    Elliott Broidy — a fundraising machine for Trump and Republicans — does not have a formal position within the Trump administration. But the new emails further illustrate Broidy’s power as a Washington broker, often tapped by other political insiders to reach deep into Trump’s administration and use his outsize influence to get them results. Broidy’s connections have emerged amid a growing focus into his efforts to advance the interests of the United Arab Emirates in the White House. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe has reportedly broadened to look at Emirati contacts with the Trump administration, facilitated by Lebanese-American businessman George Nader. Nader, now a cooperating witness in the probe, gave Broidy $2.5 million to advocate for Emirati interests at the White House, the Associated Press reported.

    Softly softly catchee monkey.

  154. Zatara

    Why did Trump have to announce anything?
    Say something after the fact.

    He chose to say something during the fact.

    Why?
    – It’s prime time on the US East coast.
    – Because having the reporter announce “massive explosions are being heard in Damascus at this moment” right after Trump finished speaking lends a nice dramatic effect.
    – Churchill would have loved it.

  155. Nick

    I would not be surprised if Gayle Russell was a cousin of Alene Composta.

    It’s possible. Alene was such a good take off. We even have Cats here where it can be hard to tell sometimes, too.

  156. I’m sure he’s making millions now, for himself.

    No doubt, family responsibilities come first.

  157. Arky

    I had a colleague who was big on the idea of staff picking up rubbish in front of students.
    “Lead by example”.
    “Setting the tone”. etc.
    Fuck that. I’m not their servant.
    The little swine would just sit there at lunchtime among their own mess a watch this dude pick stuff up.
    In all the years he did it I never saw one kid move a muscle to help.
    Me?
    I would catch them out throwing their fucking sandwiches on the ground. And then they get an ear bashing and to clean up the whole damn area.

  158. Infidel Tiger

    BREAKING: US to launch Syria attack. Trump to address the nation tonight (Friday) US time.

    What an idiot.

    That’s the end of his Presidency.

  159. Motelier

    I would catch them out throwing their fucking sandwiches on the ground. And then they get an ear bashing and to clean up the whole damn area.

    I would have made them eat their sammiches.

  160. calli

    I gave around two hours to a personal clean-up of around 100 metres of beach in west Bali near one of the locations we were staying at. The more people who saw me doing it the better.

    Poor Gayle from Nunderi.

    Lives in mendicant central in what was once a highly productive rural area. I wonder if she pops down to Kingscliff during school holidays and terrorises the tourists? Or is it just the little brown people that she lords it over?

    I suggest Gayle sets up a soapbox by the College of Knowledge outside the Mur’bah pub and harrangues the locals on the evils of plastic. Bound to get a response.

  161. feelthebern

    What an idiot.

    Correct.

    That’s the end of his Presidency.

    Incorrect.

  162. calli

    I would not be surprised if Gayle Russell was a cousin of Alene Composta.

    Lol. As I re-read my comment, she ticks all the boxes.

  163. feelthebern

    Fox reporting (live) that British jets are just taking off from their base in Cyprus to bomb Syria.
    Thanks for the heads up fella’s.
    FFS .

    I have no doubt it file footage, but nothing gives the US a hard-on faster than military porn.
    That goes for R & D’s.

  164. feelthebern

    Tucker Carlson – where is the proof on any of this.
    Hannity – let’s get it on.

  165. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    the recent paradigm shift in which “now, health is indistinguishable from virtue”. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of orthorexia – an eating disorder in which a fixation for “healthy eating” is what causes one harm.

    From Shy Ted’s link to the feminist May is ‘love your body’ month where the message is ‘eat up’.
    An ideal time for me to take on the ‘starve for a week to do up your zip’ I’ve promised myself.

    Orthorexia is alive and well in the cafes beloved of urban hipsters in Sydney.
    Hairy and I can often find nothing in those that we want to eat.

  166. feelthebern

    Tucker Carlson – why are we getting involved.
    Hannity – America, fuck yeah, here to save the motherfuckin’ day, yeah.

  167. Rae

    I think this should be applied widely. Price stickers should identify the GST on the item, PAYE should cease, with taxpayers required to pay quarterly.

    Why would you do that, BJ? You like the idea of increasing the administrative workload of businesses?

  168. Nick

    Entropy, you might be onto something:

    http://www.oziart.com.au

    Gayle is an outstanding naturally gifted artist, who is multi talented in all painting mediums. Noted for realistic wildlife artwork in water colour and oil, along with sensational pointillism works in oil and acrylic of gardens and more, absolutely breathtaking underwater scenes and flowers painted on silk, as well as beautifully executed pastels in a variety of subject matter.

    The hyperbole continues. Have a look at the ‘art’. Mwuahahahahahaha.

  169. calli

    Bother. I’m off to the ME next week.

  170. Infidel Tiger

    How easy is Trump to con?

    In one week he has caved on TPP and also come under the spell of the neocon morons who have destroyed global security.

  171. Infidel Tiger

    Hannity is everything that is wrong with the media. A bloviating sycophant with zero knowledge of history.

  172. Nick

    Too good if parody:

    WATER DRAGON PUPPET WORKSHOP
    Budd Park Murwillumbah
    MAY 26
    2 – 4 pm
    Numbers Maximum 20
    Bookings not required
    Earth Learning will be telling stories of water-dragons and platypus and their
    resilience, with help of hand puppets and soft toys.

    Please come and share your stories of animals and the river
    For Ages 3-9
    We’ll provide materials for craft activities to bring your stories to life!
    Crafty persons & helpers:
    Adrienne Weber, Angel Fideles, Susan Riley Dignan, Gayle Russell

  173. JC

    IT

    Stop it. You can blame Trump for drawing the line in the sand about 12 months ago. You can’t blame him for acting on it. Even if he’s wrong about this, the Russian and Syrian jerkoffs needed reminding who’s boss.

  174. Roger.

    Churchill would have loved it.

    Having actually fought in wars at the command level, I suspect Churchill would be a little less sanguine and more cautious about the prospects of even limited strikes on a Russian proxy power ostensibly motivated by humanitarian concern:

    “Let us learn our lessons. Never, never, never believe any war will be smooth and easy, or that anyone who embarks on that strange voyage can measure the tides and hurricanes he will encounter. The Statesman who yields to war must realize that once the signal is given, he is no longer the master of policy but the slave of unforeseeable and uncontrollable events. Antiquated War Offices, weak, incompetent or arrogant Commanders, untrustworthy allies, hostile neutrals, malignant Fortune, ugly surprises, awful miscalculations — all take their seats at the Council Board on the morrow of a declaration of war. Always remember, however sure you are that you can easily win, that there would not be a war if the other man did not think he also had a chance.” Churchill, My Early Life.

    If Trump surgically excises Assad’s chemical weapons (assuming it was Assad that was responsible, something that yesterday Mattis said they didn’t have definitive proof for) from the battlefield well and good. If he draws Russia into a war, what then? Or is the goal to further destabilise one of the few secular regimes in the ME (to what end? so that the “moderate” Islamists the US has been supporting can take over?) and bloody Putin’s nose while doing so? No doubt Putin will have to be dealt with at some stage, but not in this theatre where the consequences are so unpredictable.

  175. Nick

    The same guy who the American Left trumpeted at being Putin’s puppet is bombing a Russian alli? That can’t be right, surely ?

  176. Trump sidelined by the new neo-con management.

    Anyone who believed that isolationist nonsense was a fool. This is the third term of the disastrous Dubbya presidency.

  177. JC

    Stop acting like a melodramatic lesbian, Monst. It’s unseemly on this blog.

  178. feelthebern

    Anyone who believed that isolationist nonsense was a fool. This is the third term of the disastrous Dubbya presidency.

    No.
    It continues the US post WWII policy of sucking Saudi cock.
    It’s pure Washington syndrome.
    Turn up to the place, within 2 years all you do is walk around looking for Saudi cocks to pleasure.

  179. Seth Abramson @SethAbramson
    BREAKING (CNN): Trump is at this hour trying to convince the military to put U.S. soldiers in harm’s way in a “sustained assault” on Syria—even as the Defense Department is pushing back hard on the idea. There can be little doubt they know this is just a ploy to distract America.
    10:13am · 14 Apr 2018

    We are getting to Nixon-ranting-at-paintings levels of aversion by the military to orders from the president.

  180. Zyconoclast

    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/rugby-union/rugby-australia-as-top-heavy-as-they-come-and-the-gamble-is-falling-flat-20180413-p4z9es.html

    Structurally, though, the most worrying aspect of RA’s finances are those that relate to Super Rugby, player costs and ‘‘corporate’’ expenditure versus the amount being brought in by broadcasting.
    Take a deep breath. In 2017, RA spent $12m on ‘‘Super Rugby team costs’’, $27m on ‘‘Super Rugby funding’’ and $25m on ‘‘player payments and RUPA costs.’’ That’s a total of $64m.
    However, it’s total broadcast take – by far the No.1 source of revenue – only amounted to $61m.
    It gets worse. Much worse. RA also threw $1.3m to the ‘‘SANZAAR office,’’ spent another $8m on ‘‘High Performance and National Teams’’ and another $4m on ‘‘Marketing and Media’’.
    There’s more. Rugby Australia also spent $17m on ‘‘Corporate’’ costs, described in the RA report as ‘‘all costs associated with the administration, legal, compliance . . . of running the business.’’
    In other words, executive salaries and the like.

    The only players mentioned are Israel Falou (3 times) and Quade Cooper

  181. feelthebern

    At least pre WWII, the yanks tried to nick the black stuff from everyone in the region, including the Brits & Frogs.
    They just realised it was easier to replace the Brit’s as the Saudi’s enablers-in-chief.

  182. bern, we are not disagreeing. Dubbya was very tight with the House of Saud.

  183. Zatara

    So…if the FBI raided Cohen’s office on a warrant for communications with Trump about Stormy…and a leak occurs shortly afterwards about Cohen’s confidential work with a completely different client…isn’t that totally and appallingly illegal…?

    BoN, as predicted on the Cat about 24 hours ago:

    The USAM — and relevant caselaw — therefore require the feds to set up a review process. That process might involve a judge reviewing the materials to separate out what is privileged (or what might fall within an exception to the privilege), or else set up a “dirty team” that does the review but is insulated from the “clean team” running the investigation.

    Yeah, and the FBI “clean team” undergoes immediate brain bleaching so they forget all that pesky evidence which has nothing to do with the warrant? No chance of them using that information to pursue other investigations or prosecutions. Yeah, right.

    If it is underhanded or illegal it’s a very safe prediction the left is doing it.

  184. feelthebern

    In 200 hundred years, Communism will be seen as only a blip in the scheme of things, where as the influence of the Saudi’s will be seen as the most cancerous poison the world has ever seen.

  185. Roger.

    Anyone who believed that isolationist nonsense was a fool.

    No, Trump meant it; he had listened to the war weary American heartland which bears the burden of sacrifice for American foreign policy.

    The trouble is he has a short attention span and in the WH his mood is set by whatever he last watched on TV, which someone like Bolton can then exploit for his own purposes.

  186. Infidel Tiger

    The Idiot GWB’s Third Term continues apace.

  187. feelthebern

    Monty, for some reason you are giving the Clinton & Obama administrations a pass.
    They were balls deep in Saudi fun time too.

  188. The trouble is he has a short attention span and in the WH his mood is set by whatever he last watched on TV, which someone like Bolton can then exploit for his own purposes.

    Roger, he hired Bolton for a reason: to start wars. There is no other valid reason to hire Bolton. It’s not as if the mustachioed maniac just wandered into the Oval Office randomly, Trump invited him there.

  189. Rae

    feelthebern #2686467, posted on April 14, 2018 at 11:36 am

    What an idiot.

    Correct.

    That’s the end of his Presidency.

    Incorrect.

    So much sarc. So little comprehension.

  190. Infidel Tiger

    Monty, Seth Abramson is a crackpot and probably a meth head.

  191. Tom

    Stop acting like a melodramatic lesbian, Monst.

    Didn’t you notice IT’s brand new frightbat vagina, JC?

  192. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Bother. I’m off to the ME next week.

    Hope it doesn’t interfere with your trip, Calli. I’ve travelled in the past at times of international tension and mostly the worst that happens is a flight re-routing. People in tourist industries no matter where generally do their best to keep the lid on tensions and offer a secure and pleasant holiday. And the crowds are fewer. You can enjoy the famous sites in a semblance of splendid isolation.

  193. Jo Smyth

    Of course, we will be informed by CNN and the other fake news channels that these strikes were only authorised to counter Comeys book release.

  194. Infidel Tiger

    Shut up JC.

    Trump will probably be bailing out Wall St in 2 years like the idiot GWB did. That’s why you are sucking up to him.

  195. bern, I don’t disagree with that either. I have said here several times before that it is mystifying why both sides of US politics have sucked up to the Sauds for a generation or more, particularly after 9/11 when it was clear the threat that Wahhabism posed to the Western way of life and how much Saudi money was behind it.

  196. feelthebern

    Of course, we will be informed by CNN and the other fake news channels that these strikes were only authorised to counter Comeys book release.

    As did conservatives when Clinton dropped bombs on/around the time he was being impeached.

  197. Infidel Tiger

    After two decades of idiocy from Bush and Obama you’d think he would have learned.

  198. Monty, Seth Abramson is a crackpot and probably a meth head.

    Hmm, I see now that he’s part of the Mensch clan. My bad, I will not post his stuff again.

  199. dopey

    $1.20 available on Winx.

  200. feelthebern

    Peter Thiel’s great hope was that a Trump Whitehouse would stop this kind of shit & bring the Iranians in from the cold.
    That is, change 70 years of US foreign policy.
    Just goes to show, you can’t drain the swamp when the entire wet land is full of Saudi money.

  201. feelthebern

    when it was clear the threat that Wahhabism posed to the Western way of life and how much Saudi money was behind it.

    Liberty quote.
    From monty.
    Well done.
    Should be remembered the next time he goes on with some nonsense.
    That is, he can be saved.

  202. Infidel Tiger

    Peter Thiel’s great hope was that a Trump Whitehouse would stop this kind of shit & bring the Iranians in from the cold.
    That is, change 70 years of US foreign policy.

    That is exactly what he should have done. He would have become the greatest President in history.

    Instead he has ac sed to the swamp and the donor class.

  203. feelthebern

    $1.20 available on Winx.

    Fun fact.
    Winx not a massive fan of the wind.
    The day Winx missed the jump last year was a very windy day.
    Very windy here in Sydney today.
    She’ll still win, but will have to work for it.

  204. Roger.

    Trump invited him there.

    Yeah, after watching him on TV.

  205. Zatara

    Having actually fought in wars at the command level

    Well la de da. If you disagree that Churchill had a love and talent for the dramatic then argue that. But you can take your argumentum ad verecundiam and shove it up your oak leaf clusters because you aren’t the only one here who rates them.

    I suspect Churchill would be a little less sanguine and more cautious about the prospects of even limited strikes on a Russian proxy power

    Really? How sanguine and cautious was he attacking a German proxy power at Gallipoli?

  206. H B Bear

    US has been bombing the wrong bits of the Middle East for decades. Easiest thing to do is just bomb all of it all of the time. Would have saved a lot of time and cash.

  207. Infidel Tiger

    Yeah, after watching him on TV.

    Pity he didn’t hire Tom Selleck. He seems more sensible.

  208. Baldrick

    It’s all over IT, you can relax. Three targets destroyed which were linked to chemical weapons production.

    Mattis just now: “Right now we have no additional attacks planned.”

    Trump is still God.

  209. Motelier

    Is Syria a sheet of glass now?

  210. Bruce of Newcastle

    Seth Abramson @SethAbramson

    LOL

  211. feelthebern

    So what happens the next time chemical weapons are used Baldrick?
    The Whitehouse will be seen as obligated to act.
    Great way to escalate the situation further.
    Trump took the bait, hook, line & sinker.

  212. Roger.

    How sanguine and cautious was he attacking a German proxy power at Gallipoli?

    Gallipoli is probably not the best example to cite in this context, z.

    And after it Churchill was a good deal less sanguine and more cautious in planning military adventures. In other words, he learned his lesson, unlike our present day wannabes.

  213. Tom

    Fun fact.
    Winx not a massive fan of the wind.
    The day Winx missed the jump last year was a very windy day.
    Very windy here in Sydney today.

    Bern, on radio here this morning, Dr Turf mentioned that every time in the past that the Herald-Sun wheeled out a chickybabe model to pose with a horse on the front page — as it did this morning with Winx — the nag has gone on to lose.

    However, the most interesting thing about today’s race is that Humidor, which got within a nostril of Winx in last year’s Cox Plate, is out of gate 1 while Winx is drawn in the car park (gate 10).

    I expect the Queen Elizabeth Stakes will be decided in the last 50 metres.

  214. Is Syria a sheet of glass now?

    me. ” Great-uncle, what was Syria like in WW2?”
    great-uncle. “Shithole”

  215. herodotus

    So. The missiles were coming.

  216. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    US has been bombing the wrong bits of the Middle East for decades. Easiest thing to do is just bomb all of it all of the time. Would have saved a lot of time and cash.

    can’t find fault in this logic

  217. calli

    US has been bombing the wrong bits of the Middle East for decades. Easiest thing to do is just bomb all of it all of the time. Would have saved a lot of time and cash.

    I’ll send them the memo after I’ve seen the pyramids and Petra.

    Makes more sense.

  218. Percy Porcelain

    Seth Abramson composes poetry inspired by the Vogons.

  219. thefrolickingmole

    Immigration department bugmen busy ensuring visa places are available for thier own tribe.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/apr/14/peter-duttons-department-blocked-white-south-african-farmers-asylum-bid

    Peter Dutton’s department blocked a white South African farmer’s asylum bid because its evidence showed “the vast majority of crimes against whites are not racially motivated”.

    A delegate for Dutton also shut down a second, separate asylum bid by a white South African woman who feared racially motivated persecution, arguing there was no evidence she “had been targeted because of her race or gender or that she would be targeted for this reason upon her return”.

    To be granted refugee status, an asylum seeker must have a well-founded fear of persecution for one or more of a number of legislated reasons: race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion.

    The two decisions, both made by immigration authorities in 2015, appear to be at odds with Dutton’s recent stance in support of protecting white South African farmers.


    The first decision to deny a white South African farmer’s asylum bid, which was upheld by the administrative appeals tribunal in September last year, involved a man who asked for protection from the immigration department in January 2015, because he “fears harm on the basis of his race” should he return home.

    The man told the immigration department he was the victim of a serious attack at his home in 1998, where his wife and another five people were murdered, and he was left with serious injuries. The claim was corroborated by media reporting.

    But the immigration department knocked back his asylum request in July 2015, arguing there was little evidence of racially motivated crime against white farmers or white South Africans.

    The department’s stance was only made public because the farmer appealed the decision to the administrative appeals tribunal, which again ruled against the farmer’s application for protection.

    “The delegate of the department in the decision record dated [July] 2015 referred to country sources which indicate that although white farmers are targeted for crime at a rate higher than other white people in the country, there was also significant crime against black farm workers,” the tribunal’s decision read.

    “Furthermore, the department referred to sources which indicate that the vast majority of crimes against whites are not racially motivated, but rather are crimes for financial gain.”

    In ruling on the farmer’s appeal, the tribunal also downplayed the notion of racially motivated violence against white South Africans. It accepted he genuinely feared harm in South Africa, and agreed he had experienced “horrific and terrible” crime himself.

    “However the evidence discussed above indicates that the motive of the perpetrators of crime is considerably more likely to be based on economic need, and a violent subculture, rather than race,” the tribunal ruled. “Sources also indicate that there is a general level of violence arising out of criminal activity in South Africa, which affects the entire population.

    “Some groups, such as young black men or women in black townships, are affected disproportionately, with one commentator stating that people in ‘suburbs can buy security that people in townships cannot’.”

    In the second case, a delegate for Dutton rejected an asylum bid by a white South African woman in March 2015 after the woman asked for Australia’s protection.

    The woman was not a farmer but said she and her son would be targeted in South Africa “because they are ethnically white South Africans”. Dutton’s delegate argued there was no evidence to support her claims of racial persecution.

    “The delegate accepted that the applicant had been the victim of crimes in 2002 and 2008, but did not accept she had been targeted because of her race or gender or that she would be targeted for this reason upon her return,” an appeal judgment said.

    The situation in South Africa has changed since the two decisions were made by immigration authorities. Earlier this year, the nation’s parliament passed a motion that may lead to the seizure of land from farmers without paying compensation. The South African government says it is attempting to redistribute land fairly, but insists no one is being persecuted or having their rights taken away.

  220. Roger.

    Trump is still God.

    And in the Trumpian heaven Michael and the dragon do battle.

    Which will be cast out?

    Mattis or Bolton?

    It’s difficult to see them both surviving in Trump’s war cabinet.

  221. Baldrick

    Well Fatty Trump did the same last year, now this year and I’m guessing if they get their chemical weapons plants up and running again, next year too.

    Don’t forget, he also had the aid of the French and British. It wasn’t just a US led strike.

  222. Boambee John

    bern at 1151

    No.
    It continues the US post WWII policy of sucking Saudi cock.
    It’s pure Washington syndrome.

    Classic Demorat Deep State policies. I’m astonished m0nty is not shouting his support from the rooftops.

  223. To be fair to Trump, he is pretty much doing what Hillary would have done in this specific scenario. Whether Hillary would have allowed herself to get into this scenario is another matter.

  224. To be fair to Trump, …

    Like sentences that begin with:

    “Honestly …”
    “Well, to tell the truth …”
    “Frankly, …”
    “In all truth …”

    It leaves one pondering the sentences that do not have the lead in qualification.

  225. Bruce of Newcastle

    Whether Hillary would have allowed herself to get into this scenario is another matter.

    LOLOLOLOLOL.

  226. feelthebern

    Hillary would have had US boots on the ground an hour after her inauguration.
    It just took Trump 12 months or so to be infected by Washington Syndrome.

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