Monday Forum: April 16, 2018

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1,386 Responses to Monday Forum: April 16, 2018

  1. Bruce of Newcastle

    Fascist gets the finger.

    David Hogg’s boycott backfires: Laura Ingraham’s viewership jumps 20 percent

    Unluckily for him he can’t stand for the HoR or Senate because of age limits, otherwise he’d fit right in with the other Dem wrongologists.

  2. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2688498, posted on April 17, 2018 at 12:02 am
    I am seeing chatter on lefty blogs

    Source graded F 6, unreliable gossip from a source with a proven record of error and no access to the information.

    Summary: Wishful thinking.

  3. struth

    Besides all the easy ways to debunk the Marxist attack on our culture in our schools is also their racist notion that Europeans settled Australia.
    The British did not and many still do not consider themselves European.
    Britain was not part of Europe when I was younger and is finding out why it shouldn’t have tried to be lately.
    These humorous and generally confident people tried to be part of a group of countries that have genuine chips on their shoulders for not being British.
    But the Marxist see white skin.
    No different and as racist as to think every aboriginal should stand under their flag which is based soley on the colour of their skin.

  4. woolfe

    I see Israel has doubled down and escalated, calling the Inclusive Social Justice Warrior in charge of the ARU a liar.

    Comments on the article in the Orwellian appear to be 100% pro Folau.

  5. Tom

    Something else to look forward to when the Peanut Head Liars-Greenfilth-CFMEU regime takes over the joint later this year or next year (splashed across the front-page of this morning’s Currant Bun, but heavily paywall protected — this is the fruitcake media edition):

    In a major shift in drugs policy in Australia, the Greens have announced a new policy that would make it legal for adults to buy and consume marijuana products recreationally.

    Announcing the policy tonight, Greens leader Richard Di Natale, who worked as a doctor and public health specialist before entering Parliament, said the war on drugs has “failed”, and it’s time to re-think how the government approaches harm reduction and drug education in Australia.

    “Governments around the world are realising that prohibition of cannabis causes more harm than it prevents. It’s time Australia joined them and legalised cannabis for adult use,” Di Natale said.

    That’s right — zombieism, psychosis and lifelong mental problems are minor issues in Greenfilth cloud cuckoo land. Worth buying the Currant Bun for the real story. Like the rest of its “news”, the ABC’s version is basically a Greens press release.

  6. Shy Ted

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2688477, posted on April 16, 2018 at 11:14 pm
    At last. Bedtime!!! Clean sheets. We’ve gotta make the bed first. Night all.

    You’re right, it’s April. Time for the annual change.

  7. For much of the 20th century, Australians looked forward to the golden age, confident that scientific progress would overcome obstacles and that prosperity would continue to grow.

    I would add a lump of the 19th century to that.

    There was a warm glow of comfort to this period and confidence that we could achieve anything we set our minds to.

    Knowledge, science are now two of the more abused words in the dictionary.

  8. Leigh Lowe

    struth

    #2688544, posted on April 17, 2018 at 7:29 am

    Is there such a thing as Anal sex, or more correctly should it just be called anal penetration.

    It really isn’t sex.

    I am not an authority on this.

  9. Time for the annual change.

    Synchronized with the quarterly underwear change.

  10. Shy Ted

    Wonder if Mary Beard will acknowledge and apply Civilisation’ two greatest achievements, the bra and makeup? But she won’t get a gig on SBS if she does.

  11. struth

    We are allowed to have a sense of humour.
    We cannot keep quiet because a bunch of sad lefties get upset with what you say.
    It’s not sensorship until it’s law, and if you let them sensor you when it isn’t law it soon will be.
    I get sick of people saying you can’t say this or that anymore.
    YES WE CAN.
    Speak up and have fun doing so.

  12. DrBeauGan

    Our ancestors stand accused of closing their eyes to homophobia, child sexual abuse, Aboriginal under-representation, the gender pay gap and countless other social ills that cannot be laughed off. Humour is a weapon denied to today’s public figures, who are required to be serious about everything. They must apologise for every slight, whatever the intention.

    We’re paying a high price for boosting the self-esteem of the moralising classes.

  13. Is there such a thing as Anal sex, or more correctly should it just be called anal penetration.

    It really isn’t sex.

    Teleology is everywhere.

  14. Trump has ensured Governement is funded. Now he can introduce single issue rescission motions to cut spending and fight line item by line item spending on programs hated by most Americans and the Dems can’t conflate the spending with something touchy feels like food stamp programs for the poor.

    That is not going to happen, John C. Congress has basically retired until the mid terms.

    Trump’s omnibus bill blows out the deficit far more than what Hillary would have got through. Schumer and Pelosi won on their spending priorities, again. And I am not hearing about construction on the wall, are you?

  15. DrBeauGan

    I get sick of people saying you can’t say this or that anymore.
    YES WE CAN.
    Speak up and have fun doing so.

    Exactly. And if annoys the wowsers, this is good for them. Stimulates their livers. In fact it’s a public duty, not just a pleasure.

  16. Snoopy

    They must apologise for every slight, whatever the intention.

    For so long as there is money in grievance it will be thus.

  17. OneWorldGovernment

    The difference between men and women

    The Nothing Box….

    I thought it amusing and worth a chuckle.

    http://theferalirishman.blogspot.com/2018/04/the-nothing-box.html?

  18. Tintarella di Luna

    Someone from the New Yorker is alectorophobic – insanely creepy but you can’t look away

  19. Peter Castieau

    The FMIC is reporting this morning that reducing the immigration intake will have a negative impact on the federal budget.

    Who makes this shit up?

  20. struth

    Snoopy I sincerely apolgise if I have hurt your feelings on any level.
    I hope you can understand that as a white male my automatic privilege and inherent racism and paternalism I am only now learning how disgusting I am to the vituous.
    I wil now delete my Facebook account and wait for Tim Sourpossumarse to decide my punishment which I will dutifully accept.

  21. Tintarella di Luna

    I mean Alektorophobic

  22. DrBeauGan

    incoherent rambler
    #2688559, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:07 am
    Time for the annual change.

    Synchronized with the quarterly underwear change.

    I begin to see why some of you are so concerned with deodorants.

  23. Leigh Lowe

    I see Israel has doubled down and escalated, calling the Inclusive Social Justice Warrior in charge of the ARU a liar.

    Comments on the article in the Orwellian appear to be 100% pro Folau.

    The ARU Frump-in-Chief is now wedged bigtime.
    She has obviously promised the toxic leprechaun a backdown by Folau.
    She called the meeting with Folau, hopefully we to vadger him into an “apology” but, if it was not forthcoming, she was determined to misrepresent Folau afterwards, hoping he’d just suck it up.
    Interesting that even the breakfast TV airheads are defending free speech, pointing out that Poocock has been able to spout his opinion about all manner of issues.

  24. calli

    When I’m told “you can’t say that”, the response is always “I just did and I’ll say it again”. With an “it’s a free country” chaser.

    Although the last is doubtful, it gives plenty of wriggle room and the opportunity to raise some cautious harrumphs.

  25. Snoopy

    m0nty
    #2688498, posted on April 17, 2018 at 12:02 am
    I am seeing chatter on lefty blogs

    Until I hear it from Zoe or Prue Lewarne I’ll consider it bullshit. Even then I’ll be sceptical.

    Of course we have known since the dossier surfaced that there was a Michael Cohen in Prague. Unfortunately for the swamp he was not Trump’s Cohen.

  26. egg_

    For much of the 20th century, Australians looked forward to the golden age, confident that scientific progress would overcome obstacles and that prosperity would continue to grow.

    Until the eco movement became evangelistic, with the likes of Al Gore using his political pulpit.

  27. Nick

    Folau has been accused of not being ‘inclusive’.
    Seriously, what does this term really mean these days ?

  28. egg_

    zombieism, psychosis and lifelong mental problems are minor issues in Greenfilth cloud cuckoo land.

    Helps the likes of SHY cope with their daddy issues?

  29. Snoopy

    Snoopy I sincerely apolgise if I have hurt your feelings on any level.

    Nice words, Struth, but completely hollow without a few barrow loads of compo. Hopefully Tim Supercheapauto won’t let me down.

  30. calli

    That’s very good OWG. I have no Nothing Box, but the Beloved definitely does. I call it The Zone.

  31. Roger.

    Folau has been accused of not being ‘inclusive’. Seriously, what does this term really mean these days ?

    It means you can’t have an opinion that isn’t approved of by the Narxist gatekeepers of the new Australia.

    Narxist Newspeak: Inclusive = exclusive of those who dissent & Diversity = uniformity of opinion.

  32. Snoopy

    For a male, ‘not being inclusive’ means that you’re not too keen on smoking cock.

  33. John Constantine

    Australia has two economies, like Mexico City.

    The President teddy turnbull-snow economy, like the billionaire elite economy of Mexico City is powered by tens of millions of dirt poor proles grinding away in Hobbsian squalor in shanty-town slums.

    When president teddy turnbull-snow announces that Big Australia will have high density living, public communal areas instead of backyards, public communal transport instead of private cars, he is simply reciting his wives line that when it comes to the proles:

    “Let them eat communal cake”

    Public communal ration food barns instead of kitchens, public communal gender free crappers and showers instead of private bathrooms, a public communal internet stream instead of private choice.

    People are money, and if an elite crony makes ten cents a year from a contract to crush a hundred million proles, he makes ten million bucks a year.

    Comrades.

  34. calli

    “Inclusive” now means “exclusive of every idea or attitude not rubber stamped by the Keepers of Groupthought”.

    These may change on a whim, so it keeps the proles on their toes. Better not to think at all.

  35. Leo G

    Heard an excellent play on the name of our nation’s capital today – Can’tberra, because it’s full of people who say can’t do this and can’t do that.

    Canbray they say in the Asstralian Capital Territory.

  36. Nick

    Roger, what a strange world. If he’d said that all gays go to heaven he’d have been accused of assuming gays were Christian.

  37. calli

    I sense a disturbance in The Force, Roger. 😀

  38. John Constantine

    Our Inclusiveness is our Merit.

    Proles Submitting to self-critique upon demand, is our Merit.

    Crushing proles that fail to self critique their lack of Inclusiveness is our Merit.

    Strength through submission and capitulation is our Merit.

    Comrades.

  39. struth

    I also sincerely apologise for my spelling, before a coffee, it’s particularly bad.

    This is because I am not of the smarter Asian race Tim Smuttyarse belongs to, and am just a dumb white bloke full of hate and responsible for all the ills in the world.

    Sniff………………….

  40. egg_

    The British did not and many still do not consider themselves European.

    At least, the Gauls could have settled Oz – what did the Huns ever do, besides raid their neighbours?

  41. Roger.

    I sense a disturbance in The Force, Roger.

    Indeed.

  42. OldOzzie

    Memo to Malcolm Turnbull: do not read this column – Maurice Newman


    So 30 successive negative Newspolls have come and gone but Malcolm Turnbull continues his “happiest ever prime minister” routine. The Prime Minister obviously takes his own advice: “If you want to stay sane, don’t read all the negative stuff.” To him, “the government and the opposition are somewhere between even-stevens, 50-50 … either way it is very close.” Maybe. But when the Coalition’s primary vote is 38 per cent and Turnbull’s satisfaction rating is 32 per cent, this analysis borders on delusional.

    Turnbull appears to believe a fun-loving, optimistic persona will attract the voter support he craves. Of course, optimism, positivity and a “Don’t worry, be happy” song have their place. But away from the partyroom and out in the real world, his transactional style and personal need for popularity lead to unwanted distractions and an impression of political ineptitude and ad hoc policymaking.

    Bill Shorten offers no salvation. The Opposition Leader sounds increasingly like a comedian recycling old jokes as he repackages Labor’s past follies. But he has an audience that, should Labor win office, will find everything old is not new again. The real beneficiaries are not poor struggling workers but the powerful elites who really pull Labor’s strings.

    Turnbull’s preference is to remain above the political fray rather than take the fight to Labor. But then, having signed the Paris climate agreement, introduced a special bank tax, launched a royal commission into banks, foreshadowed an increase in the resources rent tax, attacked superannuation, bowed to the Greens’ demand for an additional $5 billion for Gonski 2.0, increased the Medicare levy to help fund the open-ended National Disability Insurance Scheme, offered support for same-sex marriage and the republic, and uttered hardly a peep opposing the merger of two of our most belligerent unions, his main value proposition is that Labor will be worse.

    For the growing number of disillusioned voters running on empty, this is cold comfort. As their predicament worsens they realise they are victims of failed political experiments that promised the world and delivered a pineapple. Their credit cards are maxed out (total household debt stands at an alarming 200 per cent of disposable income), and a third of those with home loans have little to no payments buffer. To them, Canberra’s leadership is remote and out of touch. It is more interested in pandering to minorities on second-order issues, leaving them powerless, insecure and worried about the future.

    And they are right. In the US, China and Germany, leading indicators are softening. Pundits may scoff, but the “synchronised global expansion” seems to be in the rear-view mirror. In the world’s largest economy, real consumer spending, the engine room of economic growth, has stagnated since November. Notwithstanding tax cuts, the highly-regarded Macroeconomic Advisers sees real gross domestic product growing at a weak 1.7 per cent.

    And, late into the longest economic expansion on record, we find US personal savings at a 12-year low, household debt never higher and American companies never more highly geared. Credit defaults are rising rapidly as inflation and the Federal Reserve are putting upward pressure on interest rates. These conditions are not conducive to global growth re-accelerating, which, despite Wall Street’s attempts to keep alive the most overvalued stockmarkets on record, is a point investors are starting to accept.

    Australia is unprepared for a global slowdown. More than a quarter-century of uninterrupted growth has created arrogant leaders who “don’t read all the negative stuff” and show contempt for the laws of economics and unintended consequences.

    Nowhere is this more evident than in energy policy, where naivety and disrespect for markets have resulted in Australian families paying the highest electricity prices in the world — two to three times more than US households.

    Unsurprisingly, as the full effects of this protracted misallocation of assets play out, we watch households struggling to make ends meet while businesses downsize, close or relocate to more welcoming jurisdictions. Canberra is largely unmoved.

    And while the banking inquiry may be popular politically, it is having serious unintended consequences. Predictably, embattled bankers have begun limiting credit. This, like central bank tightening, is a head wind to growth. This risk aversion comes as, during the next four years, about $480 billion in interest-only mortgages will convert to principal and interest loans, affecting 30 per cent of mortgage holders.

    With home loan commitments rising at the fastest pace in more than seven years and other non-discretionary expenditure growing faster than incomes, a wor­rying proportion of mortgage holders has become hostage to job security and rising house prices. Now is certainly not the time to consider ending negative gearing.

    Australia today is a testament to political irresponsibility. What other conclusion can be drawn when in peacetime, after a decade of strong growth and mainly full employment, we continue to generate such high budget deficits?

    On becoming Prime Minister, Turnbull promised an “economic narrative”, yet in office he has delivered nothing that remotely resembles a comprehensive, inter­nally consistent manifesto based on sound economics and market liberalisation. Instead, his government is looking increasingly inward and relying on misguided policies to garner support from special interest groups.

    Not only has this divided society on economic grounds, it has undermined belief in a value system that gave us resilience, long a feature of the Australian economy. Come the next recession we will miss that resilience and there will be no China or Howard-Costello surplus to shelter us.

    Changing prime ministers will not fix this. It requires a philosophical change of direction that is beyond the comprehension of Turnbull and, seemingly, most of Canberra’s political class.

    This leaves hapless voters with the profitless task of choosing between bitter experience and implausible hope.

  43. egg_

    I wil now delete my Facebook account and wait for Tim Sourpossumarse to decide my punishment which I will dutifully accept.

    Caroline Overington pointing out to Timmeh! Sourpuss what a whitebread organisation TheirABc is on Teh Dumb when he was banging on about whiteh! CEOs – even pointing out his frog name.
    Touché!
    Ellen Fanning tried her best to stifle this, of course.

  44. Roger.

    Newman has written the obituary of middle Australia.

  45. OldOzzie

    Members flee Labor despite Shorten’s target – Troy Bramston

    Bill Shorten’s plan to lift Labor Party membership to 100,000 has failed, with those leaving the party outpacing those who are joining, and the party registering only 53,550 members at the end of last year. Labor is officially losing members.

    Three years ago, Labor ­declared that as at December 2014 it had 53,930 members who were eligible to vote in a ballot to elect a national president and two vice-presidents.

    The latest tally of membership, at last December, shows a fall of about 400 members in net terms.

    The Opposition Leader outlined an ambitious plan in March 2014 to boost Labor’s rank-and-file members from about 44,000 to 100,000 members nationally.

    “I announce the start of a major campaign to rebuild the Australian Labor Party and renew our sense of purpose,” Mr Shorten said the following month.

    “A campaign to create a big party, a nation-embracing party, a party that represents and reflects the Australian people … a Labor Party with 100,000 members.”

    Labor’s membership figures, provided by state branches to the national secretariat, are closely guarded.

    The latest tally of members ­obtained by The Australian was prepared for the rank-and-file ballot to elect a president and two-vice presidents that will take place in May and June.

    Ahead of the leadership contest between Mr Shorten and ­Anthony Albanese in September-October 2013, The Australian ­revealed the party had 43,823 rank-and-file members.

    The next audit in December 2014 found the party had 53,930 members, a significant increase following the 2013 election defeat. Membership essentially has plateaued since.

    Meanwhile, the national left faction has split before the presidential election.

    The party’s president, opposition spokesman on ­climate change and energy Mark Butler, will be challenged by Mich-Elle Myers of the Maritime Union of Australia and Queensland senator Claire Moore.

    Former treasurer Wayne Swan is running with the support of the national right faction and Mr Shorten.

    The purpose of Ms Myer’s candidacy is to hurt Mr Butler’s chances. She has the backing of Paddy Crumlin of the MUA and Michael O’Connor of the Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union, which recently merged.

    The militant left unions are hostile to Mr Butler and his key supporter inside the party, Mr ­Albanese.

    Michael Flinn, the national executive officer of the CFMEU, recently posted on Facebook that Mr Butler had a “glaring conflict of interest” in wanting to serve a second term as national president while continuing as an opposition frontbencher.

    “When the inevitable happens, and there’s a difference of opinion on a policy matter ­between the government of the day and the national executive (of the party), who will Mark owe ­allegiance to? The cabinet (he’ll be bound by cabinet solidarity) or the party?” Mr Flinn wrote.

    Nominations for the presidency closed on Friday. Members will vote online or by postal ballot between May 4 and June 15. The successful candidates will be declared before the party’s national conference from July 26-28.

  46. Leigh Lowe

    The ARU Frump-in-Chief is now wedged bigtime.
    She has obviously promised the toxic leprechaun a backdown by Folau.
    She called the meeting with Folau, hopefully we to vadger him into an “apology”

    I meant “badger” but “vadger” might still work.

  47. calli

    I sense a disturbance in The Farce.

    The Farce is *cough* flexible. Having no absolutes is its strength.

  48. johanna

    Been away doing stuff, including bingewatching The Power Game. TPG was made in the mid sixties, but it is chock full of meat about the dangers facing the UK about the EU.

    But, it is much more than that. A sequel to The Planemakers (sadly lost) it is about the struggles between industry and government in Britain in the 1960s, back when they still had industry. And mostly, the struggles within a major civil engineering firm between the patriarch, his son, and the new boy, Sir John Bligh.

    Made on a shoestring, with plenty of flubs they couldn’t afford to reshoot, it is nevertheless gripping, just as I found it the first time around when I watched it with my Dad (sorry, JC, he’s not dead yet – prick!)

    The script is full of classical references that would, like, mean nothing to whatever generation that we are currently inflicted with.

    The protagonist, Wilder, is an alpha male whose mere existence would be deplored these days. Like almost every magnate ever, he has a very classy wife and a mistress. But, his mistress is a civil servant with access to very useful information.

    Patrick Wymark acts his socks off as Wilder. The supporting cast are all spot on.

    Sadly, Wymark died not long afterwards, very young. Fucking unreliable Irish. Worst of all, he is allegedly the father of one of the most objectionable women ever to appear on TV, DCI Barnaby’s ghastly wife.

    But, if you like a bit of political and commercial intrigue, set in Swinging London, this is the real thing, and well worth a look.

  49. OldOzzie

    Q&A Wrap: Our right to a border policy and religious freedoms

    Political relations expert and John Howard’s former chief of staff Grahame Morris says he is fed up with foreign activists “giving us curry” about the way Australia governs its borders.

    Speaking on the ABC’s Q & A program, Mr Morris, the federal director of government relations firm Barton Deakin, lashed out at Kenneth Roth, the international director of Human Rights Watch, over the Syrian war and the need to care for large numbers of refugees fleeing the conflict.

    “I’m getting sick of people like Ken from overseas giving us curry about what we should do about our refugees, migrants and about our borders. We have 190,000 people come here each year as migrants. There are hundreds of thousands of others who queue up, do the right thing, get processed, who wanted to come here,” he told the show, which discussed religious freedom, Facebook’s privacy scandal, the Syrian conflict and, among other topics, Australia’s offshore detention program.

    “We’re getting lectures from people overseas saying, ‘Hey, you’ve got to do more.’ Well, that some people are less, the people who queue and do the right thing are somehow or other less worthy than people who turn up elsewhere and come in through the back door.”

    Mr Roth replied that if Australia was serious about stopping deaths at sea it would set up a processing centre in Indonesia.

    “In terms of the last point, generosity, let me compare it with Canada,” he said. “We’re talking about 12,000. Justin Trudeau said we would tack 20,000 on our Syrian intake. It took three months. At the end of three months … they increased it to 40,000.”

    Communications Minister Mitch Fifield said Australia is “well under way” to taking 12,000 Syrian refugees, and reaffirmed the government’s commitment to securing the borders and stopping people smugglers.

    Labor’s Veterans Affairs spokeswoman Amanda Rishworth said Australia can be more generous.

    “We have probably the most significant number of displaced people around the world and I do agree with Ken, it needs to be non-discriminatory,” she said.

    Singer-songwriter Missy Higgins said blaming people smugglers does not stop desperate people attempting to reach Australian shores.

    “I think that a lot of the time so many of us are so removed from it and especially with this rhetoric that comes out of the government, calling these people criminals, calling them, even the word asylum seekers has a stigma now,” she said.

    “They come to our shores or try to reach our shores. If they get anywhere close we lock them up in these detention centres that are like prisons and probably worse than prisons. Because these people are indefinitely kept in a place where they’re suffering.”

    RELIGIOUS FREEDOM

    There were 16,000 submissions to the Religious Freedom Review headed by Philip Ruddock, one questioner asked the Q & A panel about how thatnumber proves religious freedoms are an extremely important issue to many people.

    “Last year really showed up Christians were under pressure,” the man said. “I think we need laws to really come down on those people hard so we continue to live in a society that respectfully handles difference of opinion.”

    Ms Rishworth said Australia has good laws around human rights.

    “When it comes to rights — you’re talking about the right to express your religion — but there’s the right also to not be discriminated against. So no right is absolute,” she said.

    Mr Fifield said the government needs to be “very careful” when legislating in this area, so as not to create a problem when trying to fix something else.

    “You’ve got to be very careful in this area,” he said. “I always think the greatest protection for religious freedom is having a robust and pluralistic democracy where views can be debated and people feel the freedom to put a view but someone else has the freedom to challenge that view.”

    Mr Morris said last year we had a plebiscite asking whether the gay community could marry.

    “We did not have a vote that says everyone has to wake up in the morning, including footballers like Folau, and say, ‘It’s a good idea to be gay’,” he said.

    “What sort of people should be exempt from that? You could understand the churches should be exempt. That should be a no-brainer.”

    FACEBOOK

    Mr Fifield said the government is awaiting the results of a formal inquiry by the Privacy Commissioner to determine whether Australian privacy law has been breached in the Facebook scandal.

    “If there has, there are significant penalties,” he said.

    “My view is absolutely if the laws aren’t adequate, if the penalties not severe enough, we should absolutely take further action.”

    Mr Roth, meanwhile, said it is clear laws around privacy aren’t adequate.

    “We know companies like Facebook take our data,” he said. “So we need laws that really protect our privacy.”

    The challenge, Ms Rishworth said, is to educate children from a young age to challenge information in the information age. “We’re in a new world now,” she said. “We need a critical citizen to be constantly thinking about it and need to start that at school and the early years as well.”

  50. Roger.

    The Farce is *cough* flexible. Having no absolutes is its strength.

    Meanwhile, Folau has displayed more fortitude than the entire Coopers family.

  51. egg_

    When president teddy turnbull-snow announces that Big Australia will have high density living*, public communal areas instead of backyards, public communal transport instead of private cars, he is simply reciting his wives line that when it comes to the proles:

    It may have the former Lord Mayor of Sydney’s imprint.

    *But, but… all of those 2.5kW clothes dryers and no washing lines – think of Gaia and Energy costs!

  52. Roger.

    Labor’s Veterans Affairs spokeswoman Amanda Rishworth said Australia can be more generous.

    So easy to say when it’s other peoples’ money you’ll be spending to make yourself feel virtuous, Amanda.

    Why not ask the people what they think?

  53. Bruce of Newcastle

    M0nty’s guy is in the doghouse this morning.

    James Comey Gets Pilloried from Left, Right, and Center

    For months, the media and President Trump’s loudest opponents convinced themselves that James Comey’s much-anticipated book was the ticking bomb that would blow up the Trump administration. Instead: No boom.

    Comey hoped to guide the spotlight to his self-image as ultimate G-Man — a stalwart, sober, nonpartisan public servant whose courage and rectitude guided him through a moral, legal, and political thicket. Instead, the book reveals Comey to be a hack. A blunderer. A blowhard. He took a mighty swing at Trump and managed to punch himself in the eye.

    Not only does the book offer zilch in the way of damaging new evidence against the president in the Russia matter or anything else, but its most revealing and most noticed passage pulverizes Comey’s own reputation. The former FBI director is being pilloried from left, right, and center. Perhaps even worse for him, he is being mocked as a pompous ass from left, right, and center. This is quite an achievement when you consider that it isn’t a Fire and Fury–style exposé but Comey’s own memoir that is making a fool of him.

    RTWT for the pure awesome. Being pilloried by WaPo, Vox, NYT and The New Republic as well as righty media and blogs. Oh the pain the pain, make it stop!

  54. Tom

    Tim Supercheapauto

    Snoopy, give me one good reason I shouldn’t steal that.

    I can’t think of one.

  55. Mark A

    Which DCI Barnaby, Johanna?
    If John Nettles then I disagree, she is OK.
    The Midsummer after him I never watch.

  56. OldOzzie

    Migration a net boost to economy, study finds – Simon Benson

    Migration is making Australians wealthier, with the annual ­permanent ­intake forecast to add up to one percentage point to GDP growth each year for 30 years, while making a combined lifetime tax contribution of almost $7 billion.

    Amid a heated debate within government ranks over whether to cut immigration levels, a landmark report released by Treasury and the Department of Home Affairs makes the case for a big Australia and smashes the twin myths that migrants were either taking jobs from Australians or had become a welfare burden.

    The study’s release follows ­revelations in The Australian last week showing that the annual permanent migrant intake this year was forecast to drop by more than 20,000 — from a ceiling of 190,000 — to levels similar to those at the end of the Howard government. The drop was largely due to tighter vetting rules introduced in 2015 by the Immigration Department.

    Tracing the history of migration and population growth over 50 years, the report found that skilled migrants were delivering an economic dividend, lifting the standard of living by 0.1 per cent of GDP per capita, ­increasing productivity by 10 per cent and raising the workforce participation rate. The migrant contribution had helped cushion Australia against the full impact of the global financial crisis.

    The report also came with a warning likely to be seized on by critics. It claims that while the economic benefits of migration are well documented, a solution will need to be found to prevent existing pressures on infrastructure, housing, congestion and the environment intensifying.

    The report, initiated last year as part of an internal study by Home ­Affairs secretary Mike ­Pezzullo and Treasury secretary John Fraser, found the current migration program would add between 0.5 and 1 percentage point to annual average GDP growth between 2020 and 2050, by limiting the economic impact of the ageing population. It found that the wages, hours and employment rate of non-migrant Australians had not been harmed by immigration while improving the budget bottom line.

    Skilled migrants granted permanent visas in 2014-15 were ­estimated to have a lifetime net contribution of $6.9bn to the ­budget, while family migrants granted permanent visas that year were estimated to have a $1.6bn contribution. Only refugee and humanitarian migrants were estimated to have a lifetime net cost to the budget, of $2.7bn.

    “Migrants deliver an economic dividend for Australia due to current policy settings which favour migrants of working age who have skills to contribute to the economy,” the report said.

    “This leads to higher rates of workforce participation and likely productivity benefits. This, in turn, increases Australia’s GDP and GDP per person, with positive flow-on effects for living standards … migration improves the commonwealth’s fiscal position, since migrants are likely to contribute more to tax revenue than they claim in social services or other government support.

    “Together, the 2014-15 cohorts of the Permanent Migration ­Program, the Humanitarian Program and the 457 temporary skilled visa program are projected to contribute a net fiscal benefit of $9.7bn over 50 years.”

    Clare Veness grew up in Scotland and spent time in the US and Singapore, but her roots in Australia are digging deep. The 30-year-old migrated to Sydney three years ago on a working-holiday visa, but it was soon clear to her she wouldn’t be leaving. “I’m going to be here for good,” she said. “I’ve got no plans to go back.”

    She works in recruitment, and secured her permanent residency after being sponsored as a skilled migrant by her employer.

    Skilled migrants, she said, were clearly still an important part of the Australian economy. “We’re filling the gaps,” she said. “Sydney’s full of expats”.

    The report revealed that temporary migration for education and tourism, rather than the permanent program, had been driving population growth in recent times. Nevertheless, migration had accounted for 54 per cent of population growth over the past two decades. However, it remained lower than in the 1960s and 70s.

    The call for lower annual immigration rates was resurrected by Tony Abbott. In a controversial speech earlier this year, the former prime minister said a lack of infrastructure and concerns over social cohesion required the annual intake to be cut by 80,000 to 110,000.

    The issue came to a head last week when The Australian revealed there had been discussions last year among cabinet ministers over whether to reduce the annual intake by 20,000. While supported by several Liberal MPs, the push for mandating lower intakes has been dismissed by cabinet ministers including Scott Morrison, who said that the answer was to build more infrastructure rather than reduce migration.

    “The analysis conducted by Treasury and the Department of Home Affairs provides a clear evidence base for the government’s migration policy settings supporting our national interest,” the Treasurer said last night

    “The Turnbull government’s migration program retains the flexibility of a maximum cap on permanent migration, focused on skills, and is underpinned by our strong and successful border controls and strict enforcement of our visa rules to maintain integrity.

    “The key difference between the Turnbull government and its Labor predecessors is that the Labor government ran a tick-and-flick program on permanent migration. Under previous governments, the 190,000 intake under the permanent program for skills and family visas was a target that had to be met. In the 2016-17 budget, the Turnbull government officially changed this requirement to be a maximum cap under the program, creating the necessary flexibility.”

    Mr Morrison said the report, as well as confirming the economic value of the migration program, reinforced the government’s decision to focus on planning and managing the impacts of growth, “especially through our record investment in public infrastructure”.

    “This will continue to be a focus in this year’s budget,” he said.

    The report supported concerns raised by critics of current intake levels in the permanent migration program. “High rates of population growth can heighten existing pressures on infrastructure, housing, and the environment,” the report said.

    “Without continuing action to find innovative solutions, high rates of growth may also intensify issues such as congestion and excessive waste production. To fully reap the benefits of immigration and population growth, Australia must continue to explore and address these issues.”

  57. herodotus

    Australia can afford to be more generous?
    Not judging by the expanding debt.

  58. Rae

    Is there such a thing as Anal sex, or more correctly should it just be called anal penetration.

    It really isn’t sex.

    struth, I see you are still drunk-blogging this morning. What do you reckon one of the participants would be using to pack the fudge?

  59. John Constantine

    Giving away money we have borrowed, but that other people will have to pay back is our Merit.

    Importing excess to requirement military age unskilled illiterate young men, after the Big Men of their cultures have destroyed their local prospects by looting their accumulated capital and claiming the breeding age females for polygamous rapeherd harems and doing it with borrowed money is our Merit.

    Comrades

  60. Snoopy

    Tim Supercheapauto

    Go for your life, Tom, it’s not mine. I saw it here first. I think it might have been coined by the other Tim.

  61. Roger.

    Some Cats will remember Badfinger. Here’s one of their forgotten gems.

    Not really morning music but the title conjures up an apt image: “We’re for the Dark”.

    The line comes from Shakespeare’s Antony & Cleopatra: “the bright day is done, and we are for the dark.”

    Thanks to our political class, our bright day is done and we’re for the dark.

  62. Boambee John

    m0nty at 0812

    That is not going to happen, John C. Congress has basically retired until the mid terms.

    Two points.

    While Congress is not in session, it is not actively causing harm.

    Like his predecessor, whom you hold in much esteem, he has a pen and a telephone. Authorisation is not expenditure, nor is it appropriation. A simple direction to an executive agency, and funds can be held indefinitely.

  63. herodotus

    Mrs. H. though Comey was wearing eyeliner to hearings, and lost all faith in him instantly. Not that it needed that accelerant.

  64. DrBeauGan

    Comey damns himself with the revelation on the matter of taking the polls into account when deciding what to do about Clinton. No integrity. No belief in the right of the people to know the truth.

    It’s not surprising that m0nty sees nothing wrong with this.

  65. Leigh Lowe

    Tim Supercheapauto

    Snoopy, give me one good reason I shouldn’t steal that.

    If everyone has their own, that one brlings to Tim Blair.

  66. Infidel Tiger

    struth, I see you are still drunk-blogging this morning. What do you reckon one of the participants would be using to pack the fudge?

    Your face.

  67. Boambee John

    Nick
    #2688581, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:26 am
    Folau has been accused of not being ‘inclusive’.

    Those attacking him have certainly NOT been ‘inclusive’!

  68. Infidel Tiger

    Folau is a lot more intelligent than I thought. Very interesting article.

  69. Leigh Lowe

    brlings

    Belongs.
    Fuck, why does my phone think “brlings” is a word.

  70. struth

    struth, I see you are still drunk-blogging this morning. What do you reckon one of the participants would be using to pack the fudge?

    Pack the fudge?

    I hope you are drunk.
    If not, what is your excuse?
    Disgusting.

    By the way, didn’t have a drop last night.
    Haven’t had alcohol for a couple of weeks.
    How about you, Mr Wowser?

  71. OneWorldGovernment

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2688612, posted on April 17, 2018 at 9:03 am

    M0nty’s guy is in the doghouse this morning.

    BoN

    Add in McCabe, Lynch as well

    INSPECTOR GENERAL BOMBSHELL: Why Obama AG Loretta Lynch May Be in Legal Jeopardy
    By @TracyBeanz

    Hidden within the OIG report on McCabe’s leak to Barrett of the WSJ, is an astronomically damning correlation between Loretta Lynch, the NY Field Office of the FBI, McCabe, and the NYPD.

    http://directorblue.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/inspector-general-bombshell-why-obama.html#more

  72. johanna

    Des Deskperson
    #2688163, posted on April 16, 2018 at 7:04 pm

    ‘The ACT government is very reminiscent of the Hillary/Obama approach – look! shiny! while everything goes to hell and they divide up the spoils.’

    Succinct and accurate Johanna!

    What’s interesting is that the disconnect is arguably greatest in those areas where the Labor Greens government particularly likes to preen itself.

    We have a vast human rights bureaucracy led by any number of ‘commissioners’, yet our model, UN rights-compliant gaol is overcrowded and awash with drugs and violence.

    Our government trumpets its commitment to reconciliation and fawns on the local Aboriginal industry, yet the rate of Indigenous incarceration is worse even than Tory old NSW

    We have an inclusive, caring/sharing public education system where a disabled kiddie can be locked in a cage in a classroom and no-one – teacher or bureaucrat – suffers any significant sanction

    There are almost daily reports of violence, corruption, incompetence, bullying and general malfeasance right across our public institutions.

    The sort of corruption pinpointed by Johanna is at lest partly the result of the ACT government’s increasing desperate hunt for revenue but in general it also seems to reflect the government’s lack of interest in real outcomes. A launch, a media release, a glossy ‘strategy’ and then the government moves on, leaving ongoing matters in the hands of a lazy, incompetent, cronyist and union-protected bureaucracy.

    I hate to compare bureaucracies, but it has to be done. I have worked in NSW and the Commonwealth, and only experienced the ACT one.

    As a young gel, I worked in the then Department of the Capital Territory (before self government.) Even then it was known that if you wanted to buy a holiday shack at Bateman’s Bay, best get into the branch that controlled property and lick and suck. That was in the 1970s.

    Nothing has changed since, except the players, many of whom have their fathers’ names.

    Both sides of politics are in it up to their necks.

    There is no chance that housepoodle local media will dare to rock the boat, even though every sentient being knows what is going on.

  73. Rae

    Mr Wowser?

    That’s very Helen of you. I think IT is after a date with your date.

  74. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #2688628, posted on April 17, 2018 at 9:22 am

    Folau is a lot more intelligent than I thought. Very interesting article.

    There was a lot of chatter about Poocock on the TV this morning, even Kaptain Karl asking how they could play together.
    I wonder if Poocock hasn’t been agitating in the background.
    I suspect only one of Folau and Poocock is having a hissy fit and demanding the other be dropped, and that would be Davey.
    There seemed to be a lot of sympathy for Folau and more than one observation that Poocock has been allowed to shoot his mouth off about all manner of pet causes, so why is Folau’s freedom of speech being vetoed.
    The ARU have shot both feet off on this one.

  75. Roger.

    The ARU have shot both feet off on this one.

    That’ll happen when you put a NZ netballer in charge.

    Out…of…her…depth.

  76. egg_

    Importing excess to requirement military age unskilled illiterate young men,

    The ruling class may see this as the solution to our yoof who are allergic to Manuel labour?

  77. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    TREASURY
    Derryn Hinch proposes a way ahead for government’s company tax cuts

    The Australian
    12:00AM April 17, 2018
    Save
    Joe Kelly
    Political Reporter
    Canberra
    @joekellyoz

    Crossbench senator Derryn Hinch has urged the government to consider limiting company tax cuts to companies with a turnover of up to $500 million if it wants to pass the package through the upper house.

    Senator Hinch also hinted he would be more prepared to back the reduction in the corporate rate from 30 to 25 per cent if the Turnbull government took action to stamp out the live export trade following the emergence of damning footage of sheep on separate voyages from Fremantle to the Middle East last year.

    “I think the time is right to get rid of live exports … I think they need my vote on a few things and on this one we’re just going to hold out,” Senator Hinch told Sky News. “We’re going to fix it this time.”

    The government fell two votes short of reaching the nine crossbench votes it needs to pass its company tax cuts through the parliament in March with Senator Hinch joining South Australian independent Tim Storer and Centre Alliance Senators Stirling Griff and Rex Patrick in blocking the legislation.

    From the Oz. Derryn Hinch’s latest brainfart. People actually voted for this old p!sspot?

  78. struth

    Rae “Cus Cus” Grogerlery, fuck off, you boring knob jockey.

    At least our other trolls were entertaining in their insanity.

    You’re just like that sorry kid that keeps hanging around hoping to be picked for the team, but never is.

  79. Snoopy

    If I was Hinch’s adopted liver I’d die of shame.

  80. egg_

    pack the fudge

    Trolls always devolve to the toilet.

  81. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Kids in Victoria, for example, learn about the concept of economic scarcity before they get to high school. They are taught in Year 6 “that our needs and wants are unlimited but the resources available to satisfy these wants are limited”.
    Year 9 students in South Australia consider “the nature of European occupation of Australia”, and in Year 10 are subjected to the educational equivalent of pushpolling. They are asked to debate questions such as “Is Australia’s refugee policy fair?”, “Who owns the land?” and “Should Australia be so closely allied with the USA and Britain?”

    Fourteen year old rellie topped his class in history. Great news, I said, what did you study. World War 1, he replies. Fantastic, I say. The causes, the fighting, or the results? We learned how aborigines fought in it, he replied, a little confused.

  82. Tom

    Bruce of Newk, thanks for the NRO piece on the Comey blowback. It’s obviously not his own invention, but I love the passing reference of the NRO writer, Kyle Smith, to vox.com as a
    “woke-child” site — a perfect description of leftism:

    “Mommy, mommy, I had a dream that Trump destroyed the world.”

    “Calm down, junior — it’s just a dream”.

    “Waaaaaaaaaaaaaah! I hate you! You’re LITERALLY HITLER!!!”

  83. Baldrick

    Remember, softly softly scrolly trollie

  84. struth

    We learned how aborigines fought in it, he replied, a little confused.

    It all starts in our schools………………………………………..

  85. johanna

    While bingewatching The Power Game recently, the last episode of S1 was titled ‘Confound their Politcs.’

    The rarely cited second verse:

    God Save the Queen

    God save our gracious Queen

    Long live our noble Queen

    God save the Queen

    Send her victorious

    Happy and glorious

    Long to reign over us

    God save the Queen

    O Lord our God arise

    Scatter her enemies

    And make them fall

    Confound their politics

    Frustrate their knavish tricks

    On Thee our hopes we fix

    God save us all

    Yep, James Bond is in the National Anthem. At least they admit it.

    European history is full of spies and spying, and ‘confounding’ their political processes.

    American pantywaists and hypocrites (they have been doing it forever) are trying to turn a nothingburger into a Big Mac with extra cheese and pickles.

    They should be careful what they wish for.

  86. egg_

    That’ll happen when you put a NZ netballer in charge.

    (Some) men won’t fall into lockstep so easily as wymmineses, sis.

  87. egg_

    DCI Barnaby’s ghastly wife.

    Midsomer’s gone all PC, now.

  88. stackja

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2688640, posted on April 17, 2018 at 9:37 am

    HINCH, Derryn Derryn Hinch’s Justice Party 16,381

  89. Rae

    Don’t be crass, struth. I think IT wants to Face-time with you.

  90. struth

    Rae, don’t temp a testes fate.

  91. Roger.

    “We’re going to fix it this time.”

    Er, no you’re not, Derryn, you’ll only make it worse.

    Australian live exports will quickly be replaced by those of our competitors in what is a growing international market. And in that market at present Australia has the most stringent animal welfare standards. So you’ll wipe out a $1bn+ local export industry to benefit other countries that take animal welfare much less seriously than we do.

  92. calli

    Comey damns himself with the revelation on the matter of taking the polls into account when deciding what to do about Clinton. No integrity. No belief in the right of the people to know the truth.

    A Higher Loyalty. He says so himself.

  93. egg_

    The protagonist, Wilder, is an alpha male whose mere existence would be deplored these days. Like almost every magnate ever, he has a very classy wife and a mistress. But, his mistress is a civil servant with access to very useful information.

    Prime Suspect 1973 was brilliant, with Alun Armstrong as the lead villain stealing the show.

  94. johanna

    Oh come on
    #2688170, posted on April 16, 2018 at 7:14 pm

    Politically incorrect Danish comedian rips the shit out of Sweden Pt1

    Politically incorrect Danish comedian rips the shit out of Sweden Pt2

    They’re both quite good but

    Thanks for posting that – the second clip especially is a hoot.

    Denmark has taken a hard line against country-shoppers. It’s difficult, being as they are in the middle of porous borders. But, they have removed welfare benefits from intruders and fortified the borders. The EU can go and do the anatomically impossible.

    As for Sweden, after a brief surge in GDP due to porn, the place has little going for it. They did produce a few novels, politically correct to the n, which were OK. And then …

    The ‘swede’ is an underground vegetable, while the ‘Danish’ is fluffy pastry filled with fruit and covered with sweet sauce.

    Make your choice.

  95. Comey damns himself with the revelation on the matter of taking the polls into account when deciding what to do about Clinton. No integrity. No belief in the right of the people to know the truth.

    It’s not surprising that m0nty sees nothing wrong with this.

    Incorrect, Beau. If Comey had just followed the sensible rules laid down by his institution, there would have been no October Surprise and Hillary would have won. In a vain attempt to shield himself from criticism – criticism which is supposed to be part of his job – he installed a narcissistic idiot in the White House. He gets no plaudits from me, apart from appointing Mueller.

  96. struth

    I really have to say that I am admiring the way Trump is giving them so much rope to hang themselves.

    He’s got enough to put them all in the clink, but he keeps on letting them go, it’s a wonderous thing to behold, and they can’t help but by sheer inability to stop with their left wing corrupt activism, to shoot themselves in the foot.

    I truly believe that the left have been beaten purely by the fact that they can’t believe their opposition aren’t as corrupt as they are.
    Corruption is just the way things are to the left.
    They have always been able to find it, and therefore the weak spot of every opposition (while corruptly operating themselves) and are absolutely laughable now they can’t find it……………………..
    It’s a great time to be alive, even though my own country is a toilet of legalised , and hidden corruption.

  97. DrBeauGan

    A Higher Loyalty. He says so himself.

    A loyalty to keeping his arse covered, Calli. And the daft ‘aporth admitted it.

  98. Also LOL that Hannity is Michael Cohen’s third client, given that the job Cohen did for the other two was paying off those with blackmail material. What are we thinking here… live boy, dead girl or half-eaten sheep?

  99. struth

    Sweden proves the old saying, …………………..if it’s blonde with tits, it’s trouble.

    Or something like that.

  100. Andreas

    In a vain attempt to shield himself from criticism – criticism which is supposed to be part of his job – he installed a narcissistic idiot in the White House.

    I thought that was the Wussians?

  101. hzhousewife

    brlings

    Belongs.
    Fuck, why does my phone think “brlings” is a word.

    It’s Chinese.

  102. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    That rousing second verse of the National Anthem is a very good reason for us to stay Monarchists.
    Stand up for Christianity and the Western heritage against the Islamic world by saying out loud we are onto their insidious aims, and the politics and the various knavish tricks by which they hope to take us over. Same applies to any other enemy with intent.

    If only Charles were not such a wet.

  103. calli

    This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.

    All very well, Polonius. Unless you are a crooked man to begin with. Then being true to yourself simply means more genuine crookedness.

  104. I have started answering the home phone with:
    “Telstra technical department, how can I help you?”

    The phone scammers are out of control.

  105. H B Bear

    Keep telling yourself that mUnty if it helps with the healing process.

  106. C.L.

    The ARU have shot both feet off on this one.

    Indeed. But remember this: if Folau was white, he’d already be out of the game.
    This is a “problem” for the ARU and the NRL. Both codes are filled with brown Christian islanders and they’re not exactly sympathetic to sodomy.

  107. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The ‘swede’ is an underground vegetable

    That ruins a good soup. It’s cattle food for northern winters and fit only for cows.

  108. DrBeauGan

    calli
    #2688659, posted on April 17, 2018 at 10:12 am
    Folau is not a knucklehead.

    No, he’s not. He’s an honest man and sticks to his beliefs. I admire him for that. They aren’t my beliefs, but as he says, we’re all different.

  109. C.L.

    LOL. It’s being reported that federal judge Kimba Wood – who okayed abolition of client-attorney privilege for “Two Dogs” Mueller – officiated at the wedding of Nazi collaborater and owner of the Democrat Party, George Soros.

  110. Christian islanders …

    Listening to a Samoan choir (for example) is enough to convert anybody.
    All of the pacific island choirs I have heard were an awesome sound experience.

  111. JC

    Kimba Wood was also a playboy bunnie in London if I recall correctly.

  112. C.L.

    Peter Hartcher in the SMH embraces Senator Joe McCarthy:

    Russia’s been waging a secret war with the US for years
    It’s taken a while, but it seems that the US is starting to grasp the nature of the campaign Russia has been waging.

  113. Dr Faustus

    The ARU have shot both feet off on this one.

    The gay leprechaun running QANTAS has also blown some toes off his own brand. Mr Joyce has been remarkably slow to pull his codeshare arrangement with Emirates – national carrier of the UAE, where active pooves face certain jail time, and theoretically the death penalty.

  114. C.L.

    Kimba Wood was also a playboy bunnie in London if I recall correctly.

    I thought she was a lovable white lion.

  115. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Australian live exports will quickly be replaced by those of our competitors in what is a growing international market. And in that market at present Australia has the most stringent animal welfare standards

    The Indonesians, for example, will replace Australian cattle with cattle sourced from Brazil. “Foot and mouth’ disease is present in Brazil – it’s been kept out of Australia for nearly a hundred years, it’s one of the reasons for Australia’s strict quarantine laws – and would soon be transmitted to Indonesia. When – not if, when – foot and mouth disease broke out in Australia, the damage to the Australian agricultural sector has been estimated at over twenty billion dollars, in the first year alone. I’ll bet Senator Hinch and the inner city Greens couldn’t wash their hands quickly enough.

  116. Snoopy

    When – not if, when – foot and mouth disease broke out in Australia, the damage to the Australian agricultural sector has been estimated at over twenty billion dollars, in the first year alone

    All the better to progress worm meal burgers.

  117. Rae

    Political relations expert and John Howard’s former chief of staff Grahame Morris says he is fed up with foreign activists “giving us curry”

    That’s not a phrase that one hears much, if at all, from we Digital Natives. To “give someone curry” is more likely to be heard from a Baby Boomer or even older person.

  118. I wondered about Abu Dhabi during SS marriage insanity.
    An Australian SS couple with passports (with the same surname?) are pushing their luck using emirates on the way to/from Amsterdam.

  119. egg_

    if Folau was white, he’d already be out of the game.

    Good on him for taking a non-PC stand – and to the brave gays of yore who stood up to feministas.

  120. Guys, I get it with the Lagrange Points, but the Wiki entry shows one pertaining to the Earth, but on the other side of the sun.
    Mislabelled?
    Observation by a drunk?

  121. Nowhere is this more evident than in energy policy, where naivety and disrespect for markets have resulted in Australian families paying the highest electricity prices in the world — two to three times more than US households.

    These not-so-often mentioned additional costs are due for an honest analysis:
    Companies that fail due to unaffordable energy costs.
    Families whose disposable income is slashed due to higher prices of energy-intensive goods.
    Production and productivity downturns due to “temporary” shut-downs (aka demand management).
    Lost stock during blackouts.
    Oh and the little issue of older people dying in the cold.

    Any half-way decent conservative politician would be going gangbusters in the polls campaigning on a platform of overturning these major problems.

  122. stackja

    C.L.
    #2688677, posted on April 17, 2018 at 10:27 am

    Joe McCarthy was right?

    WAS MCCARTHY RIGHT ABOUT THE LEFT?
    By Nicholas von Hoffman April 14, 1996

    An adequate history of the McCarthy/Truman period, one that gives proper attention to the class, ethnic, religious and cultural antagonisms of those times, has not yet been written. But enough new information has come to light about the communists in the U.S. government that we may now say that point by point Joe McCarthy got it all wrong and yet was still closer to the truth than those who ridiculed him.

    Nicholas von Hoffman, a columnist for the New York Observer, is a frequent contributor to Outlook.

  123. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    LOL. It’s being reported that federal judge Kimba Wood – who okayed abolition of client-attorney privilege for “Two Dogs” Mueller – officiated at the wedding of Nazi collaborater and owner of the Democrat Party, George Soros.

    Kimba Wood? Wasn’t she the judge who sent Michael Milken up the creek for his part in the insider trading racket, that nearly destroyed Wall Street? Michael Milken, Ivan Boesky, Martin Siegel and Dennis Levine were the happy little gang, IIRC?

  124. stackja

    Old School Conservative
    #2688687, posted on April 17, 2018 at 10:37 am

    Craig Kelly?

    Renewable energy can kill, MP Craig Kelly warns – The Australian
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/…energy…craig-kelly…/fd81de82db6d2a94c2d49acce…
    Sep 7, 2017 – Federal Liberal MP Craig Kelly has again warned of dangers posed by renewable energy to the lives of pensioners with claims blackouts in the upcoming summer could shut down nursing home airconditioners.

  125. DrBeauGan

    Guys, I get it with the Lagrange Points, but the Wiki entry shows one pertaining to the Earth, but on the other side of the sun.
    Mislabelled?
    Observation by a drunk?

    This is L3 for the Earth sun pair, Winston.

  126. Dr Faustus

    So let’s return to the ridiculous [AHRC] report on cultural diversity. According to the warped methodology used, there are only four cultural backgrounds into which we all fit: Anglo-Celtic, European, non-European and indigenous. Where, you may ask, is Australian?

    And why does the AHRC consider Anglo-Celts to be not European?
    I’m afraid there is some racist disinformation happening here…

  127. egg_

    When you have mentally ill Qwerties calling the PC shots, you know you’re going to hell in a handbasket – viz the AFL tards.

  128. stackja

    incoherent rambler
    #2688668, posted on April 17, 2018 at 10:19 am
    I have started answering the home phone with:
    “Telstra technical department, how can I help you?”

    The phone scammers are out of control.

    Got call from:
    02 6228 3998, went to 101.

    Google search:
    About Consular Section
    au.china-embassy.org › Home › Visa & Consular Affairs
    Tel: 02-6228 3998

    The Chinese Embassy in Australia would like to remind the public that if you have received calls or had miss calls from either 02-62283999 or 02-62283948, please disregard these calls as they are both scam calls and it is NOT generated from the Chinese Embassy or any other Consulates in Australia.

    BTW don’t scammers know many on NBN and there spiel is now out of date.

  129. Leigh Lowe

    Folau said he then went home and turned on the television, only to be “really disappointed” with Castle’s comments during a press conference afterwards in which she said: “Israel acknowledged that maybe he could have put a positive spin on that same message and done it in a less disrespectful way”.

    “I felt Raelene misrepresented my position and my comments,” Folau said. “And did so to appease other people, which is an issue I need to discuss with her and others at Rugby Australia.

    I’d say Mzzz Castle just blew up her career.

  130. Boambee John

    m0nty at 1011

    Hillary would have won.

    Ha, ha, ha, ha. LOL. Ha, ha, ha, ha.

    Oh my aching ribs!

  131. OldOzzie

    Concerns over legitimacy of delegates to ALP national conference – Brad Norington Associate Editor

    The ALP is battling allegations of irregularities and even vote-­rorting in the ballot to choose delegates for its national policy-making conference in July, with an official complaint over how one winning candidate “assisted” party members to cast their votes.

    Supporters of ALP member David Abrahams want the ballot to select the conference delegate for the federal seat of Robertson on the NSW central coast ruled invalid because of alleged discrepancies in online voting.

    According to the complaint, winning candidate Emma Murphy should be disqualified after admitting she personally assisted at least four party members to vote — contravening a party rule on secret ballots that says “a candidate cannot take part in the running of an election in any way”.

    Ms Murphy, a staffer for Gosford state Labor MP Liesl Tesch and member of NSW Labor’s dominant right faction, convincingly won the ballot for Robertson’s national conference delegate, scoring 183 votes.

    Kyle McGregor, a teacher from Labor’s left, came second with 34 votes. Mr Abrahams, an IT expert with links to the Labor right, came third with 28.

    At an ALP internal appeals tribunal hearing last night, Mr Abrahams’ scrutineer for the delegate vote, Alisdair Munn, protested that the ALP’s online voting method used in addition to the party’s traditional postal voting was vulnerable to rorting.

    Mr Munn said the online method was “insecure” because all that was needed for a valid vote was a party member’s name, address and date of birth. He claimed the same IP address could also be used many times to vote for others.

    “There’s not even a PIN number or pass code,” he said.

    Mr Munn said he wanted the ballot conducted again after evidence Ms Murphy had effectively voted on behalf of others.

    In an April 13 letter to the NSW ALP’s internal appeals tribunal chaired by barrister Gerald Ng, Ms Murphy agreed with Mr Abrahams’ claim that she “assisted” party member Carol Fraser. “This is true,” she said, adding she assisted under Ms Fraser’s “instruction” and “provided her birthday so that her vote could be cast”.

    Ms Murphy said she also assisted three to cast their votes, including former NSW MP Marie Andrews. She acted under instruction, using information they personally provided. “The action was within the guidelines provided to candidates,” she said.

    ALP rule No. M5 (b) states “a candidate cannot take part in the running of an election in any way”.

    It says no one is allowed into a polling room during a ballot except with the returning officer’s permission.

    Mr Munn told The Australian the Robertson example raised doubts about ballots for conference delegates in up to 25 NSW seats where online voting was used for the first time across the board.

    He said Big Pulse, the company managing the ballot, used a system that could show computer IP addresses, the number of attempted votes from a single computer and time and date.

    But he claimed ALP officials were refusing to provide these details, making it impossible for him to conduct his job as a scrutineer with an “audit trail”.

    A NSW Labor source said the matter would be assessed by the IAT.

  132. Up The Workers!

    Chicken and the egg…

    Does Greens “policy” come before the drugs, or alternatively, do their “policy” hallucinations follow the drugs?

    Which of their “little maaates” are they touting for all the vastly lucrative supply contracts, and will they be out of prison in time to organise things?

  133. RobK

    Hillary would have won.
    The US would have lost.

  134. OldOzzie

    STATE POLITICS
    Eleni Petinos flew to the Gold Coast Games while bushfires threatened her Miranda electorate – Andrew Clennell NSW Political Editor

    Trouble-plagued NSW Liberal MP Eleni Petinos travelled to the Commonwealth Games to watch an event on Sunday while flames threatened her Miranda electorate in southern Sydney.

    Colleagues raised their eyebrows yesterday at the decision by Ms Petinos to travel to the Gold Coast at the time of a fire emergency near some of the suburbs in her electorate, including Alfords Point. After initially saying she did not need to comment on her ­“personal life”, Ms Petinos said in a statement yesterday: “I undertook personally funded travel for the day and attended a single Commonwealth Games event on Sunday.

    “I remained in constant contact with the Acting Minister ­receiving updates throughout the day. I attended the bushfire briefing this morning with the Acting Minister in Barden Ridge and thanked volunteers and emergency services personnel.”

    But the MP did not attend the fire centre on Sunday as Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and other state MPs did.

    Ms Petinos declined to comment on what event she attended at the Games.

    She and fellow Liberal MP ­Felicity Wilson had been invited to the Gold Coast to play for the NSW parliamentary netball side against their New Zealand counterparts on the Saturday but ­neither showed up for that game.

    Ms Wilson posted an Instagram photo of her at the netball final on the Sunday, in which ­England defeated Australia in a nailbiter.

    Ms Petinos has already had her fair share of controversy since being elected in 2015, after she vomited in a ministerial car on the way back from the rugby league State of Origin last year and was forced to pick up the cleaning bill.

    She was also embarrassed after being caught on an ­exchange with Innovation Minister Matt Kean where Mr Kean propositioned her. The text ­exchange was put on social media by Mr Kean’s ex-girlfriend, a former staffer for Mr Turnbull.

    One of Ms Petinos’s colleagues said there was not much Ms Petinos could do in terms of assisting the firefighting effort.

    “As I understand it, she went up for the day to one event,” a ­fellow MP said. “She was in constant contact with the minister.”

    Miranda is a former Labor electorate held by Ms Petinos on a 13 per cent margin.

    Premier Gladys Berejiklian declined to comment yesterday.

  135. Boambee John

    C.L.
    #2688673, posted on April 17, 2018 at 10:22 am
    LOL. It’s being reported that federal judge Kimba Wood – who okayed abolition of client-attorney privilege for “Two Dogs” Mueller – officiated at the wedding of Nazi collaborater and owner of the Democrat Party, George Soros.

    The Demorats, incestuous to the n th degree. All up each other in a giant game of pass the house keys!

  136. egg_

    The third Lagrange point, L3, lies behind the sun, opposite Earth’s orbit. For now, science has not found a use for this spot, although science fiction has.

    “NASA is unlikely to find any use for the L3 point since it remains hidden behind the sun at all times,” NASA wrote on a web page about Lagrange points. “The idea of a hidden ‘Planet-X’ at the L3 point has been a popular topic in science fiction writing. The instability of Planet X’s orbit (on a time scale of 150 years) didn’t stop Hollywood from turning out classics like ‘The Man from Planet X.’”

  137. OldOzzie

    Peta Credlin talks to Josh Frydenberg about his attack on Tony Abbott

    Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg says he has no regrets about ridiculing Tony Abbott for undermining Malcolm Turnbull.

    Mr Frydenberg said he stands by his criticisms of the former prime minister, despite Mr Abbott’s former chief of staff Peta Credlin claiming the Energy Minister had told her he would refrain from any commentary in the future.

    “I stand by what I said and I will continue to call it as I see it,” Mr Frydenberg said in a statement to The Australian this morning.

    Mr Frydenberg last week showed dismay that Mr Abbott had ramped up his negative comments about the Prime Minister after the release of the government’s 30th consecutive Newspoll loss to Labor.

    “(Mr Abbott) is always going to cut across what the prime minister has been saying lately,” Mr Frydenberg told the Nine Network.

    Speaking on Sky News last night, Ms Credlin said Mr Frydenberg’s comments had “diminished” him in the eyes of conservatives.

    “I think it probably diminished Josh in the eyes of conservatives, it certainly wouldn’t have helped him with the base,” Ms Credlin said.

    “I think it was levity, I think he thought it was funny, I think afterwards he probably rreflected and decided it wasn’t funny.

    “I have had a conversation with him, I’m not going to go into it on air, but I don’t think you will see that again.”

  138. Boambee John

    Folau said he then went home and turned on the television, only to be “really disappointed” with Castle’s comments during a press conference afterwards in which she said: “Israel acknowledged that maybe he could have put a positive spin on that same message and done it in a less disrespectful way”.

    So she tried to verbal him, and he kicked back?

    Go for it, Izzy!

  139. OldOzzie

    GREG SHERIDAN
    SAS Gulf generation comes of age with latest promotions

    The appointment of Angus Campbell as Chief of the Defence Force, and the almost equally fascinating appointment of Rick Burr as Chief of the Army, represent the complete leadership triumph of the Iraq/Afghanistan generation of the army, and in particular of the special forces of the army.

    Campbell and Burr are outstanding men. They have not only the leadership qualities, but the operational experience and intellectual depth to bring great value to these jobs.

    The other guys promoted are no slouches either.

    But Campbell and Burr represent in a particular way a special outcrop of John Howard’s decision to join George W Bush in Iraq and Afghanistan and the war on terror.

    Over the 15 intervening years the Australian Defence Force has had a high tempo of operations. Our strategic circumstances have never changed as quickly outside of war time. The Turnbull government quite properly has announced a long-term rebuild of the ADF, especially the navy.

    But in that last 15 years it has been the army which has been nearly continuously involved in high-danger operations, often in fierce and deadly fighting. And in all those deployments the tip of the Australian spear was the SAS, which was joined in time by the Commandos. Campbell and Burr emerge from that experience.

    As well as acquitting themselves magnificently in combat, this SAS institutional leadership has had huge institutional consequences. The SAS has acquired an almost mythic prestige. There is nothing better on a soldier’s resume than a serious stint in special forces.

    More than that, it was the army, with the SAS at its head, which pioneered a new and astonishingly intimate military relationship with the US.

    Burr led the first allied troops, the Australian SAS, in the invasion of Iraq and promptly captured the Iraqi Al-Assad air force base with its 57 Soviet Mig fighter aircraft. He promptly sent a telegram to the air force asking it to remind him again of how many Soviet aircraft it had captured during the Cold War.

    A characteristic Australian plot to cut up one of the Migs and bring it home to the national war memorial was vetoed at the last minute by then defence minister Robert Hill, which resulted in an almost comically complex exercise to return it to Iraq.

    The performance of our special forces in Iraq, and more particularly in Afghanistan, especially in Operation Anaconda but over all the years we were there, led the Americans to reassess the quality of the Australian Army.

    The Americans came to the view that SAS soldiers were as effective as any in the world and were more than effective as partners for the US in combat. This is a huge distinction. The US always appreciates the political significance of allied contributions. In the Australian Army, it came to appreciate operational combat effectiveness.

    Campbell is also an extremely distinguished and tough former special forces commander. He is best known for his dramatically effective leadership of the task force implementing Operation Sovereign Borders, which gave Australia the most effective border security of perhaps any Western nation.

    Campbell, and the public servant who was his partner, Mike Pezzullo, deeply endeared themselves to the government because they achieved outcomes that other public servants and military leaders said could not be achieved.

    This again goes to the special forces mentality, what the boffins often call the “internal locus of control”, the idea that the soldier controls what’s going to happen, not the other way around.

    Campbell went on to big policy roles with the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, in some ways mirroring the earlier career of another distinguished special forces leader, Duncan Lewis, now the head of ASIO.

    Burr embodied the depth of the US/Australia military intimacy by becoming the deputy commander of the US Army in the Pacific, based in Hawaii, a position no Australian had held before.

    Now Campbell in his new position confronts a piquant paradox. Though it was the army that pioneered the new relationship with the US, the balance of our security needs and priority have now swung back to the navy.

  140. DrBeauGan

    This is L3 for the Earth sun pair, Winston.

    Otherwise known as counter-Earth. A science fiction writer located the planet Gor there a while back. The idea was that we had never seen it because the sun is in the way. Actually we’d have easily detected anything planet sized by its effects on Mercury and Venus. It’s possible that there’s some rocks and dust there.

    You have to make up your mind which pair of massive objects in mutual orbit you are looking at before you decide on the Lagrange points. L3 for the Earth moon pair is in lunar orbit around the Earth, the opposite side to the moon.

  141. egg_

    So she tried to verbal him, and he kicked back?

    Another wymminses promoted above her station.
    Sad.

  142. duncanm

    No, he’s not. He’s an honest man and sticks to his beliefs. I admire him for that. They aren’t my beliefs, but as he says, we’re all different.

    here, too.

    It is so refreshing to see someone take a principled, well argued and respectful stand for what they believe in.

    What’s sad is that is it so rare these days.

    Folau is a true gentleman, and those attacking him have no understanding of (or more likely, haven’t bothered reading) his statements.

  143. egg_

    Actually we’d have easily detected anything planet sized by its effects on Mercury and Venus.

    Yup, there should be various means of detection?
    And what of the L3 of the other planets?
    Jupiter has a vast array of trojan asteroids.

  144. Rae

    “I felt Raelene misrepresented my position and my comments,” Folau said. “And did so to appease other people, which is an issue I need to discuss with her and others at Rugby Australia.

    I’d say Mzzz Castle just blew up her career.

    I don’t think so. Rae Castle is a very experienced and successful CEO. In her new role at the ARU she has a whole organisation to run and major sponsors to keep on side. Izzy is just one player and will be off contract at the end of this year. Maybe he’d like to play for a club in another country?

  145. OldOzzie

    DUD REPORT: TREASURY FAILS ON IMMIGRATION
    Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun

    A Treasury report released by Treasurer Scott Morrison tries to fool us that our massive immigration intake – three times higher than 13 years ago – is actually good for us:

    Migration is making Australians wealthier, with the annual ­permanent ­intake forecast to add up to one percentage point to GDP growth each year for 30 years, while making a combined lifetime tax contribution of almost $7 billion.

    Wait.

    First, that tax take – which has the Treasurer salivating – is offset by the costs of accommodating so many immigrants, like the 245,000 we took in last year.

    It’s the states who have to pay for the extra roads, train lines, police, schools, welfare officials, hospitals and the rest.’

    But what of that growth figure?

    Again misleading. Yes, a bigger country produces more, but what it produces must be divided between more people. It’s whether we are individually richer that matters most. And by that measure, even Treasury admits the high immigration actually makes almost no difference at all to ur wealth:

    The report found that skilled migrants were delivering an economic dividend, lifting the standard of living by 0.1 per cent of GDP per capita.

    That’s next to nothing, even if you accept Treasury’s estimate of the contribution skilled migrants make, when research in fact suggest most don’t actually end up working in professional jobs.

    Against that trivial increase in wealth per capita that Treasury claims are the disadvantages that Treasury admits:

    The report … claims that while the economic benefits of migration are well documented, a solution will need to be found to prevent existing pressures on infrastructure, housing, congestion and the environment intensifying.

    Not mentioned: some of the stresses on social cohesion caused by this massive intake.

    In short: this report is a farce that confirms the case against this high immigration that it seeks to defend.

  146. egg_

    DrBeauGan
    #2688711, posted on April 17, 2018 at 11:10 am

    Thanks for your simplifications – it was only implied on the wiki entry.

  147. Leigh Lowe

    Israel Folau …

    “Every individual in this world is different and we have all experienced things that have shaped us in unique ways.

    I don’t expect everyone to believe what I believe. That goes for teammates, friends and even family members, some of whom are gay.

    “I don’t pretend to have all the answers in life. It can be difficult making the right decisions.”

    Good advice in there for the Fat Frump ARU CEO, the Qantas toxic leprechaun and David Poocock.

  148. egg_

    Good advice in there for the Fat Frump ARU CEO

    “You will respect my Authoriteh!”.

  149. Leo G

    More on the TracyBeanz revelations:

    Loretta Lynch Threatened To Reopen Eric Garner Case If NYPD Leaked Info About Weiner’s Laptop | Martin Walsh | ConservativeDaily Post | 16th April 2018

    In an attempt to perhaps shield Clinton from more public scrutiny, the OIG report appears to show that Lynch threatened to reopen the Garner case — which involved the NYPD fatally shooting an African American — if officers leaked damaging information about Clinton’s emails on Weiner’s laptop.”

    Even though she knew the NYPD officers could not have been the source of the leaks.

  150. C.L.

    Folau said he then went home and turned on the television, only to be “really disappointed” with Castle’s comments during a press conference afterwards in which she said: “Israel acknowledged that maybe he could have put a positive spin on that same message and done it in a less disrespectful way”.

    Good on Folau for going back to the scene of the brawl to let ’em have it again.
    We don’t see enough of it.
    The stupid woman probably thought he’d be pleased she’d mouthed a media formula that was Good For Everyone Involved. But no. You lied, hun. Stop lying.

  151. old bloke

    Confused Old Misfit:

    You asked two days ago for the source of the claim that > 70,000 white farmers have been murdered in South Africa. It seems that the 70,000 figure refers to murders of white people generally in South Africa since the ANC came to power, 4,000 of this number were white farmers.

    The claim is from Genocide Watch, I don’t know how accurate it is.

  152. C.L.

    Sheridan does get himself in exited states sometimes, doesn’t he?
    I don’t care if Campbell played a bit part for the Coalition in Iraq.
    What I care about is that he says his number one military priority for the ADF is more lesbians and midgets in uniform. Ergo: he’s an absolute idiot.

  153. Oh come on

    Cater will have to do much more than write a few sensible articles to be forgiven for throwing our areff under the bus when he was the target of a leftist pile-on.

    Jordan Peterson said it in a recent interview. Trump’s election and continuing Presidency proves it. You must never apologise to the left and never back down. I’m not that interested in anything Cater has to say if he doesn’t understand this basic rule.

  154. 4,000 of this number were white farmers.

    Oh only 4000.
    That’s alright then.

  155. OldOzzie

    US firm Jack Morton Worldwide paid $46m for Commonwealth Games closing ceremony

    THE trendy US PR gurus behind the embarrassing Commonwealth Games closing ceremony, which snubbed athletes in favour of a series of speeches and “karaoke” performances, pocketed a total of $46 million for their lacklustre efforts on the Gold Coast.

    Jack Morton Worldwide — which has an office in The Rocks in Sydney — is an international organisation with a footprint in the US, the UK and the Middle East, and boasts it is “one of the world’s largest global advertising and marketing services firms”.

    But as Games chair Peter Beattie tried to deflect attention from the PR nightmare by claiming responsibility for the debacle, the trendy advertising firm refused to acknowledge its role in Sunday’s cringefest.

    It released a statement only saying it was “disappointed” the closing ceremony, widely panned by TV viewers, official broadcaster Seven and participants, has copped so much flak.

    “We share GOLDOC’s disappointment at the level of criticism targeted at specific aspects of last night’s performance,” Jack Morton said.

    And as the fallout from the embarrassment seen around the world continued, reports emerged that Channel 7 had been given a detailed rundown on what was going to happen on Sunday night and knew that star athletes would be largely snubbed.

    Insiders said all broadcasters covering the closing ceremony, including Channel 7, were handed a minute-by-minute briefing on Saturday about exactly how events would unfold. But presenter Johanna Griggs, whose on-air outrage mirrored that of millions of Australians, disputed this.

    “I was one of three people representing Channel 7 in that briefing,” she said.

    “The briefings are to give you an overview of the creative vision of the producers, and find out where they think things need to be explained in commentary.

    “At no point in the guide does it mention that there wouldn’t be one single shot shown of athletes watching the performances.”

    Jack Morton Worldwide won the tender for its work at the Games in controversial circumstances.

    It beat bids from some of Australia’s finest entertainment producers for the $33.15 million contract two years ago and received an extra $13 million last year for other Games events.

    And yesterday the company was under siege from politicians and the public over the Gold Coast disaster, with Queensland Premier Anastacia Palaszczuk saying those responsible should be ashamed for airbrushing the athletes from the ceremony.

    “Whoever made that decision not to allow those athletes to march in should hang their head in shame,” she said.

    Mr Beattie, who is also the chairman of rugby league’s ARL Commission, yesterday said he took responsibility for the disastrous ceremony, admitting the organising committee got things “wrong”.

    “The athletes would not have enjoyed last night. I understand that and frankly the buck stops with me on that,” he said.

    Leading the opening and closing ceremonies team as artistic director and project director was British-born David Zolkwer, head of the Jack Morton’s public events.

    Mr Zolkwer is a veteran of putting on sporting events, taking charge of the 2004 Olympic Games and Commonwealth Games in Manchester, Melbourne and Glasgow.

    He flagged in an interview that he would downplay the significance of the athletes.

    “The Gold Coast is uniquely qualified to not play the usual ceremonies game, with looking inwards and backwards,” he said in an interview earlier this month.

    Jack Morton Worldwide’s appointment to put on the showpieces at the Games was mired in controversy after its Aussie rivals for the tender wrote to Ms Palaszczuk to protest at the appointment.

    It was chosen over three Australian companies — David Atkins Enterprises, Ric Birch’s RMBC and JB World Events.

    Questions were also raised after it was revealed former employees of Jack Morton went on to be employed by the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games Corporation, which led the tender development.

    However, accountants BDO reviewed the tender process and found no wrongdoing — but it was then revealed a BDO expert had also worked for GOLDOC as a “probity adviser”.

    An enraged Queensland government then appointed a watchdog to oversee GOLDOC deals and prevent any blunders.

    The committee that signed off on the $33 million ceremonies was stacked with former athletes or career bureaucrats.

    Mr Beattie is on this committee alongside retired basketball player and sports administrator Perry Crosswhite, sports administrator Mark Peters, The Arts Centre Gold Coast director and former public servant Criena Gehrke, events expert Brian Nourse and tourism bureaucrat Damien Walker.

  156. Ergo: he’s an absolute idiot.

    +1
    Your deduction is supported by first hand accounts from his subordinates.

  157. old bloke

    Things that confuse old brains:

    I’ve seen advertisements on TV for a Ford SUV which shows a bloke driving to a remote beach, releasing four dogs in the bush, then driving away abandoning his dogs.

    Why hasn’t the RSPCA commenced prosecutions against Ford Motor Company for its blatant animal cruelty?

  158. Dr Faustus

    “Israel acknowledged that maybe he could have put a positive spin on that same message and done it in a less disrespectful way”.

    HELL. Unless they turn from their sins and repent.
    NOT HEAVEN. Unless they turn from their sins and repent.
    It would make God really pleased if they turned from their sins and repented.
    God really loves gay people very, very much, but we have agreed that he would be even more pleased with them if they stopped doing gay stuff – or at least tried to cut down a bit…

    Only a sports administrator…

  159. Leo G

    A Treasury report released by Treasurer Scott Morrison tries to fool us that our massive immigration intake – three times higher than 13 years ago – is actually good for us:

    By “us” he means Public Service chiefs.
    Parkinson’s Law applied to the APS: The Public Service grows together with the square of the welfare population. Public Service chiefs salaries grow in line with the square of the public servant population.
    Good for their “us”, but our “us” is used up.

  160. egg_

    Just got a Fed election robo poll call on the mob.

  161. Old Ozzie;

    Three years ago, Labor ­declared that as at December 2014 it had 53,930 members who were eligible to vote in a ballot to elect a national president and two vice-presidents.

    How many of those members realise that they are members?

  162. Oh come on

    Sounds like that virtue-signalling Audi ad they aired during last year’s Superbowl about grrrlpower and showed a little rich princess beating a bunch of bogan hick cheater kids at box car racing. After little rich princess won the race with handsome father cheering on (surrounded by ugly hick white trash fathers cursing, spitting, throwing their hats on the ground, and generally behaving in a stereotypically white trash knuckle-dragging bad loser kind of way), little miss princess and handsome father walked back to his gleaming Audi, hand in hand.

    It wasn’t towing a trailer with the box car on it, though. They just left her box car behind? Or they had a crew for a box car race who towed it? Wankers.

    It’s the damn Superbowl, Audi, you pack of xunts. The vast majority of male middle America was watching – this was before that shitty quarterback started taking a knee to prop up his failing career – and they notice things like that.

  163. OldOzzie

    Erdogan’s American Hostage
    Andrew Brunson’s case is part of a larger problem with Turkey.
    By The WSJ Editorial Board

    April 16, 2018 7:20 p.m. ET

    Turkish strongman Recep Tayyip Erdogan has imprisoned opponents and moved the country toward authoritarian rule. That’s the political context through which to understand the trial of American pastor Andrew Brunson.

    The 50-year-old evangelical Christian appeared in court in Aliaga Monday on charges that he aided groups that tried to overthrow Mr. Erdogan’s government in a 2016 coup. The indictment reads like a series of conspiracy theories and is based on evidence from secret witnesses that would be laughed out of an American court. Mr. Brunson, who has been detained since October 2016, maintains his innocence and noted in court Monday that violence is against his religious beliefs. He could face up to 35 years in prison if convicted.

    Turkey is in essence holding Mr. Brunson as an American hostage. Mr. Erdogan gave the game away last year when he suggested swapping Mr. Brunson for Fethullah Gulen, a Pennsylvania-based imam who Mr. Erdogan blames for the coup attempt. Mr. Erdogan is obsessed with Mr. Gulen and claims the U.S. is protecting him from justice. But the Turks haven’t presented credible evidence to justify Mr. Gulen’s extradition to Turkey, where he can never get a fair trial.

    President Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and others have asked Mr. Erdogan for the pastor’s release. And in March the U.S. dropped charges against members of Mr. Erdogan’s security detail who beat up protestors while in Washington last year, in the hope their release would soften Mr. Erdogan’s stance. To no avail.

    Perhaps the lesson is that the Trump Administration should use less carrot and more stick to get Mr. Erdogan to behave like the NATO ally Turkey is supposed to be. Senator James Lankford (R., Okla.) proposed sanctions on Ankara on these pages in February, and he repeated that threat Monday, calling Mr. Brunson’s detention “unconscionable,” which on all the available evidence it is.

  164. OldOzzie

    WSJ Opinion Main Street
    McCabe, the New ‘Deep Throat’

    Another top bureau official who leaked, lied and blamed other FBI agents.

    Before there was Andrew McCabe, there was Mark Felt. Or, as he is better known, “Deep Throat.”

    Both Mr. McCabe and Felt were FBI deputy directors. Both leaked information about an FBI investigation that was under way. Both did so for the sake of their own careers, lied about it to their bosses, and even let other FBI agents take the blame.

    Start with Felt, who died in 2008. Though sometimes cast as the noble truth-teller of Watergate—in “All the President’s Men” he was memorably played by a chain-smoking Hal Holbrook—reality is less flattering. Felt saw himself as the rightful heir to J. Edgar Hoover. When he was passed over for L. Patrick Gray III, Felt flattered Gray to his face while sabotaging the new FBI director behind his back.

    He also let others take the fall. On a Saturday morning in June 1972, a furious Director Gray summoned 27 agents from the Washington field office to the conference room at FBI headquarters. He then cussed them out over a leak to Time magazine. Paul Magallanes, an FBI agent working the Watergate burglary, said Gray called them all “yellow-bellied sniveling agents” and demanded the guilty party step forward. No one did, of course, and Gray vowed to find out who the leaker was and fire him.

    Felt never corrected the record on behalf of his falsely accused brother agents. To the contrary, Deep Throat would himself assume control over the investigation into who was leaking—and use that position to admonish other agents about leaks for which he himself was the culprit.

    Mr. McCabe is Felt’s heir. Like Felt, he had a highly personal reason for authorizing a leak to The Wall Street Journal and then denying it. In October 2016, the Journal had raised questions about Mr. McCabe’s impartiality on the Hillary Clinton email investigation by reporting that his wife, Jill, had accepted donations from political action committees associated with Terry McAuliffe —a Clinton friend and former member of the Clinton Foundation board. Now the Journal was following up, and asking about an alleged order from Mr. McCabe telling FBI agents investigating the Clinton Foundation to “stand down.”

    To counter the narrative that he might be compromised, Mr. McCabe authorized FBI counsel Lisa Page and a public-affairs officer to tell the Journal about a phone call with a high-ranking Justice official. In this account, Mr. McCabe is the fearless G-man pushing back against Justice complaints that the bureau was still investigating Mrs. Clinton’s family foundation during the election.

    In the process the leak made public something Mr. Comey had studiously kept quiet: an FBI investigation into the Clinton Foundation. In a report released Friday, the Justice Department’s inspector general notes that while this disclosure “may have served McCabe’s personal interests,” it did so “at the expense of undermining public confidence in the Department as a whole.”

    Mr. McCabe’s disservice to the bureau didn’t stop there. Just as Felt had covered his tracks by shifting blame, Mr. McCabe implicated innocent agents. After the second Journal story appeared, he called the heads of the New York and Washington field offices to berate them for what appears to be his own leak. The head of the Washington office says he was told “to get his house in order.”

    Then, in a final Feltian flourish, Mr. McCabe lied to his director.

    The IG report says that Messrs. Comey and McCabe give “starkly different accounts” of their conversation about the article containing the leak. Mr. McCabe insists he told Mr. Comey he’d authorized it—and that Mr. Comey had answered it was a “good” idea. Mr. Comey is categorical that Mr. McCabe “definitely did not tell me that he authorized” the leak.

    Just two men with different memories? The inspector general thinks not. The circumstantial evidence, the report notes, all runs against Mr. McCabe. Not a single senior FBI official backs Mr. McCabe’s claim that within the bureau people generally knew he’d authorized the leak. It isn’t the only McCabe statement to conflict with accounts given by other agents: At one point, he claimed FBI agents who had interviewed him under oath had wrongly reported he’d denied authorizing the leak.

    Back in the early 1970s, Mark Felt leaked information about an investigation in hopes it would eventually lead to his becoming director. In a 1999 interview with Slate’s Timothy Noah, six years before his Watergate role was revealed, Felt rightly declared that if he had been Deep Throat, it would have been “terrible” and “contrary to my responsibility as a loyal employee of the FBI to leak information.”

    Today Mr. McCabe stands accused of an unauthorized leak that poisoned the FBI’s relationship with Justice and of a “lack of candor” under oath. President Trump is having a Twitter field day calling Mr. McCabe a liar. But the irony of the McCabe defense is that it hinges on having us believe it was not him but Mr. Comey and other FBI agents who gave the false accounts of his actions.

  165. calli
    #2688659, posted on April 17, 2018 at 10:12 am
    Folau is not a knucklehead.

    Reading Israel’s article in “Players Voice” I understand why he didn’t need Alan Jones’ help in any meetings with the NZ netballer.
    A very powerful and thoughtful explanation of his position.

  166. John Constantine

    California or Mexico City.

    Which is the model our elites have sold Australia out to?.

    We can be sure that our elites are blinded by the Merit of having small brown women from far away places scrub their crappers and leaf blow their gardens.

    The Merit of having high density living, the Merit of packed public transport, the Merit of public spaces made safe by Bollards and full camera monitoring, even the Merit of reserving the fruits of corruption for only those at the top who have the tone to truly appreciate it:

    All this Merit informs us that we are promised San Francisco, but will be delivered Mexico City, if not Venezuela.

    Comrades.

  167. Roger.

    All this Merit informs us that we are promised San Francisco, but will be delivered Mexico City

    SF isn’t what it used to be, John. The Left ruins everything.

  168. stackja

    OO – WaPo Wood Stein used leak to help Dems. Then came Carter.

  169. OldOzzie

    Macron at the Movies
    Why the French can’t see Netflix films at their own film festival.

    By The WSJ Editorial Board

    Netflix movies likely will be missing from the Cannes Film Festival that opens in southern France next month, and the reason is a classic of French economic dysfunction.

    Some of the streaming-service’s movies have been well-received by critics at Cannes in recent years. But this year organizers ruled that only films distributed to movie theaters in France are eligible to enter the competition. That blocks Netflix, which doesn’t show its films in French cinemas.

    The policy question for President Emmanuel Macron should be: Why not? Netflix does sometimes show films in movie houses, such as last year’s Korean-language “ Okja, ” which appeared in theaters in South Korea and the U.S.

    The answer, as always in France, is regulation. For decades Paris has allowed the French film industry to impose a cartel-like rule that a movie can’t be distributed via in-home media such streaming for three years after it’s released in cinemas. Netflix, which has experimented with simultaneous home and theater releases, doesn’t want to wait.

    The French movie industry claims the distribution time restriction, known as windowing, is necessary to finance French productions. Windowing gives French broadcasters, which play a significant role in funding French movies, exclusive periods to profit from their investments. Those broadcasters can then also be taxed, as are all cinema-goers, to provide a subsidy for the movie industry.

    Netflix has a different plan. It produces local-language content on its own, without recourse to subsidies, and then uses its streaming technology to deliver it to French-speakers around the world. But to do that, Netflix can’t release its films in French cinemas even if doing so might make commercial sense. It also can’t offer French subscribers recent movies licensed from other producers, which is frustrating for consumers whose subscription fees otherwise might help finance more French content.

    Only time and corporate earnings calls will tell whether Netflix’s approach is a good strategy, but it’s silly for French filmmakers and politicians to think their local movie industry should be immune to technological advances and business experimentation. Presumably they think limits on the roll-out of gas lighting would have saved French candle-makers.

    The French film industry has never been able to agree on a reform, and now the government is threatening to step in. But Paris’s main proposal is to shorten but not eliminate the regulatory window on home release—and only if streaming services pay into the subsidy kitty. Mr. Macron often says he wants to encourage a French tech industry that can rival America’s, and a good start would be to scrap these cinematic rules.

  170. feelthebern

    Comey lied under oath.
    How come he isn’t locked up somewhere at this time?

    Or is this another case of one rule for the members of the club & one rule for those who aren’t members?

  171. egg_

    The Merit of having high density living, the Merit of packed public transport, the Merit of public spaces made safe by Bollards and full camera monitoring, even the Merit of reserving the fruits of corruption for only those at the top who have the tone to truly appreciate it:

    Preferred infrastructure upgrades was part of the recent political phone poll.

  172. feelthebern

    & whether you like or loath Hannity, why is a lawyers client list being made public?
    I always knew democracy was always an illusion & the rule of law is a sham for the masses.
    But what’s next?
    Are they going to forget about property rights?

  173. H B Bear

    Proles rewarded for their vote by a seat on the train.

  174. Leigh Lowe

    & whether you like or loath Hannity, why is a lawyers client list being made public?

    Exactly.
    Obviously trying to paint the lawyer as a crook and, by association, so are all of his clients.
    Fucking bizarre.

  175. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    All this Merit informs us that we are promised San Francisco, but will be delivered Mexico City

    Mexico City is probably in better order than San Francisco.

    For starters the Mexican authorities don’t let illegals and homeless defecate on the streets.

  176. calli

    Dr Faustus
    #2688728, posted on April 17, 2018 at 11:26 am

    Thank you. There is absolutely no wriggle room in the statement.

    But the Brunette Bob found it. Shame she had to lie to do so.

  177. calli

    Comey lied under oath.
    How come he isn’t locked up somewhere at this time?

    Again. Comey has A Higher Loyalty.

    Truth telling is for the little people.

  178. OldOzzie

    Putin Funds America’s Environmental Movement

    With all the attention being paid to Russian “collusion” these days, it is remarkable that there has been so much focus on Facebook ads while far more serious meddling by Vladimir Putin goes mostly unremarked. In particular, Russia’s subsidizing of U.S. environmental groups, specifically those who oppose development of U.S. energy resources by blocking fracking and pipelines, has long been known but is too often forgotten.

    That’s why this video by Clear Energy Alliance is so important. It is produced by Mark Mathis:

  179. thefrolickingmole

    Next time Monty wants to invoke Nixon gently point him to this article.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1995/12/13/us/clinton-invokes-executive-privilege-in-resisting-subpoena.html

    In a brief filed this evening, the White House invoked executive privilege for the first time on Whitewater as it formally defended President Clinton’s decision to defy Senate subpoenas.

    The brief, filed with the Senate Whitewater committee, relied in part on legal arguments put forward in Watergate by President Richard M. Nixon and in the Iran-contra affair by former members of the Reagan Administration.

    It repeated the White House’s argument that Mr. Clinton could withhold material from the committee about a 1993 Whitewater meeting involving senior aides and lawyers because it was protected by the lawyer-client privilege. But the Administration also asserted, for the first time, that the material was protected by executive privilege.

    Executive privilege protects the confidentiality of communications involving the lawful duties of the President.

    In asserting that privilege, the White House relied on two court opinions involving the invoking of that privilege, ultimately unsuccessfully, by Mr. Nixon’s lawyers.

    The brief is bound to become the basis of a struggle in the courts and in the 1996 Presidential campaign. Until the current clash with the Senate committee, the White House had been reluctant to invoke either the lawyer-client privilege or executive privilege, fearful that doing so would undermine the assertion that Mr. Clinton had been as forthcoming as possible with investigators.

  180. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Maybe he’d like to play for a club in another country?

    Maybe he will.

    He will earn much more money doing so and the Wallabies will be without their only world class player in a World Cup year.

    Let’s see what Qantas’s return on advertising is like when we are not even making the Quarter Finals.

  181. Viva

    Nick
    #2688581, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:26 am
    Folau has been accused of not being ‘inclusive’.
    Seriously, what does this term really mean these days ?

    It means everyone gets a prize and everyone gets to go to heaven

  182. OldOzzie

    Global warming’ claims a victim
    By Thomas Lifson

    I restrained myself from commenting on the suicide to protest global warming of “famed gay rights lawyer” David Buckel for the last two days because, quite frankly, my first reactions were inappropriate laughter at what must be regarded as a human tragedy. “What was the carbon footprint of dousing himself in flammables and releasing into the atmosphere all the carbon in a carbon-based life form?” was the first thought I had. But after all, this is a human being, so I hesitated to mock.

    After some reflection, I see that this is a tragedy in the Greek sense of the word, being based on a fatal human flaw.

  183. Nick

    Jeez, Mundine must be shitting himself at the comments he’s made. Oh hang on.

  184. John Constantine

    Looks like we are going to have to genetically engineer cattle to have meat with an alcohol content.

    The only way to get hinch off their abc vegynsys bandwagon is to let him get drunk eating steak.

  185. egg_

    Scientists Solve Mystery Of Moon’s Irregular Gravitational Field

    “A better understanding of these features also adds clues to the moon’s origin and evolution and will be useful in studying other planets where mass concentrations also are known to exist including Mars and Mercury,” said Melosh.

    The team confirmed the standing theory that the concentrations of mass were caused by massive asteroid impacts billions of years ago, and determined how these impacts changed the density of material on the moon’s surface and, in turn, its gravity field.

  186. Executive privilege protects the confidentiality of communications involving the lawful duties of the President.

    Key word there is lawful. Nixon lost because he was a crook, Bill C won because he wasn’t. If Trump is a crook, which seems inevitable at this point, executive privilege won’t save him.

  187. egg_

    Proles rewarded for their vote by a seat on the train.

    Trumble and Tits fighting over trains populated by illegals and powered by unreliables.
    California, here we come.

  188. C.L.

    … in March the U.S. dropped charges against members of Mr. Erdogan’s security detail who beat up protestors while in Washington last year, in the hope their release would soften Mr. Erdogan’s stance. To no avail.

    Senator James Lankford (R., Okla.) proposed sanctions on Ankara on these pages in February, and he repeated that threat Monday, calling Mr. Brunson’s detention “unconscionable,” which on all the available evidence it is.

    Oh please. “Sanctions” are not a threat to anybody.
    If you want Brunson out, send in a SEAL team. Issue an arrest warrant for Erdogan.
    The Western world is run by sissies who wouldn’t have been fit to lick Teddy Roosevelt’s stamps.

  189. Old Ozzie;

    The appointment of Angus Campbell as Chief of the Defence Force, and the almost equally fascinating appointment of Rick Burr as Chief of the Army, represent the complete leadership triumph of the Iraq/Afghanistan generation of the army, and in particular of the special forces of the army.

    Campbell and Burr are outstanding men. They have not only the leadership qualities, but the operational experience and intellectual depth to bring great value to these jobs.

    The other guys promoted are no slouches either.

    So we don’t need a “Purge of the Marshalls”?
    Good.

  190. Bruce of Newcastle

    Bill Shorten’s plan to lift Labor Party membership to 100,000 has failed, with those leaving the party outpacing those who are joining, and the party registering only 53,550 members at the end of last year. Labor is officially losing members.

    It’s amazing how few members they have. Think about it: every unionist with any ambition would have to be a long term paid up member. Every tin pot local ALP councillor. Their wives, husbands & others. Many more lobbyists, staffers, building industry people wanting to deal with the CFMEU, contractors, teachers, university employees etc. All of these would feel a need to be in the ALP in case someone asks them that question. That 53,550 minus all these people shows just how few actually are real voluntary members – even discounting the branch stack drones.

  191. zyconoclast

    The ARU should be more interested in the appalling crowd attendance figures at Super Rugby games.

    » Attendence
    14/04/18 Super Rugby: Waratahs d Reds 15,648
    14/04/18 Super Rugby: Jaguares d Rebels
    07/04/18 Super Rugby: Brumbies d Reds
    31/03/18 Super Rugby: Waratahs d Brumbies 13,515
    30/03/18 Super Rugby: Hurricanes d Rebels 16,135
    23/03/18 Super Rugby: Rebels d Sharks 8,393
    17/03/18 Super Rugby: Brumbies d Sharks
    10/03/18 Super Rugby: Reds d Bulls
    09/03/18 Super Rugby: Rebels d Brumbies
    02/03/18 Super Rugby: Reds d Brumbies 11,034
    24/02/18 Super Rugby: Waratahs d Stormers 11,700
    23/02/18 Super Rugby: Rebels d Reds 10,021

  192. egg_

    That’s why this video by Clear Energy Alliance is so important. It is produced by Mark Mathis:

    Just don’t mention the toxic waste dumps created in the carbon tax recipients countries by REE mining for wind turbines.

  193. OldOzzie

    Reviewed ordered after record spike in complaints about NBN
    AAP, The Daily Telegraph


    Telecommunications giants have been warned to lift their game following the release of eye-watering half-yearly complaints figures, with the federal government launching a fresh review into customer safeguards.

    More than a quarter of the 84,914 complaints by residential and business customers to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman were about services delivered over the NBN.

    The majority of NBN complaints made in the six months to December 31 were in regards to service quality, with customers unsatisfied by provider responses, while other issues were around connection delays.

    Communications Minister Mitch Fifield said the existing model for complaint handling and redress was not working, and a root and branch review was required.

    “No matter who the responsible party is, the complaints figures are simply too high,” Senator Fifield said.

    “The current model for protecting consumers needs reform.”

    NBN Co says of the 22,827 complaints to the ombudsman about retail services delivered over the network, it received only 1052 complaints to resolve – a decline of 16 per cent compared to the same corresponding period. Ombudsman Judi Jones said while the increase in NBN complaints is not surprising given the growing number of connections to the network, the rise is concerning and the service is still not meeting expectations.

    Overall complaints rose 28.7 per cent on the same period in 2016, with multiple services contributing the bulk (30.8 per cent), followed by mobile services (29.4 per cent) and internet services (28 per cent).

    Complaints increased across all states and territories with Queensland, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia recording particularly high increases of over 30 per cent compared to the same period in 2016.

    “Customers are continuing to experience poor service and are unable to get their service provider to satisfactorily resolve issues,” Senator Fifield said.

    “The fact that complaints to the TIO are still high across all types of fixed line and mobile services clearly shows that the telcos need to lift their game.” The review will aim to ensure customers have access to effective and transparent complaint handling and redress schemes, with telcos held to account through compensation and penalties.

    It will also look to guarantee consumers are given reasonable time frames for connections, repairs and appointments, are able to make informed choices, and are treated fairly.

    Recommendations will be provided to the government by the end of this year.

  194. jupes

    Campbell went on to big policy roles with the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, in some ways mirroring the earlier career of another distinguished special forces leader, Duncan Lewis, now the head of ASIO.

    That pair of absolute dickheads aren’t covering special forces in glory.

    They are worse than useless and their legacy will be to gift Australia an emasculated military and an emboldened jihadist insurgency.

  195. Boambee John

    Bern at 1157

    But what’s next?
    Are they going to forget about property rights?

    Waddya mean “next”? Waddya mean “going to forget”?

    Long since happened.

  196. C.L.

    In his book, James Comey explains just how brave he was:

    He explains that his first action on his first day as FBI director – wearing a blue shirt – was meant to make clear he departed from Mueller, who always wore a white shirt and insisted his leadership team did the same. “I said nothing about my shirt, but people noticed,” Comey writes.

  197. Rae

    The ARU should be more interested in the appalling crowd attendance figures at Super Rugby games.

    No doubt the ARU does have some concerns about poor attendance. But, it is competing with Rugby League, Australian Rules and Soccer, each of which is far more popular than the so-called “running game”.

  198. CL;

    What I care about is that he says his number one military priority for the ADF is more lesbians and midgets in uniform. Ergo: he’s an absolute idiot.

    OK, a selective Purge of the Marshalls it is.
    sigh.

  199. Boambee John

    If Watergate had never happened, left fascists would have had to invent it to stimulate their wet dreams.

    Sleep well last night m0nty? Pleasant dreams?

  200. John Constantine

    Stalinist mayor of Ararat shire, the one out to double farm rates?.

    Moved to Mount Isa, but claims she is still entitled to be a victorian mayor, in the name of Stalin.

    Because it is her turn.

    Comrades.

  201. jupes

    OK, a selective Purge of the Marshalls it is.

    No it has to be a total purge. Every single officer above colonel is there because they are a social justice warrior dedicated to equality, diversity and other such shit.

    Rabz the fuckers and start again.

  202. Leigh Lowe

    C.L.

    #2688775, posted on April 17, 2018 at 12:28 pm

    In his book, James Comey explains just how brave he was:

    He explains that his first action on his first day as FBI director – wearing a blue shirt – was meant to make clear he departed from Mueller, who always wore a white shirt and insisted his leadership team did the same. “I said nothing about my shirt, but people noticed,” Comey writes.

    That is a parody, right?

  203. John Constantine

    Just on three thousand kilometers from Ararat shire to Mount Isa, but the mayor claims she can keep being mayor from Queensland and just phone in the will of Stalin.

    As Christine Nixon established, you don’t actually have to be there in the room, once the routine of communism is established.

    Comrades.

  204. feelthebern

    He explains that his first action on his first day as FBI director – walking around with a hard on – was meant to make clear he departed from Mueller, who never had a hard on and insisted his leadership team did the same. “I said nothing about my hard on, but people noticed,” Comey writes.

    Fixed it.

  205. H B Bear

    That is a parody, right?

    I’ve given up trying to make these calls. It is too hard.

  206. Sleep well last night m0nty? Pleasant dreams?

    Grigorian levels of stalkerhood.

  207. calli

    That is a parody, right?

    It must be. There’s no mention of his FBI cufflinks.

  208. Boambee John

    jupes
    #2688780, posted on April 17, 2018 at 12:38 pm
    OK, a selective Purge of the Marshalls it is.

    No it has to be a total purge. Every single officer above colonel is there because they are a social justice warrior dedicated to equality, diversity and other such shit.

    When FDR selected George C Marshall to be Chief of Staff of the US Army, he promoted Marshall over around 400 officers more senior to him.

    Do that here, and the resignations will provide the purge.

  209. Carpe Jugulum

    Barbra Bush has passed away, aged 92

  210. feelthebern

    Barbra Bush has passed away, aged 92

    If she was a mare, they wouldn’t have covered her again after the first colt.

  211. Leigh Lowe

    He explains that his first action on his first day as FBI director – wearing leopard print jocks – was meant to make clear he departed from Mueller, who always wore white Bonds Y-fronts and insisted his leadership team did the same. “I said nothing about my jocks, but people noticed,” Comey writes.

  212. Nick

    Barbara Bush:

    Clinton lied. A man might forget where he parks or where he lives, but he never forgets oral sex, no matter how bad it is.

    Rest In Peace, maam.

  213. struth

    Key word there is lawful. Nixon lost because he was a crook, Bill C won because he wasn’t. If Trump is a crook, which seems inevitable at this point, executive privilege won’t save him.

    Oh dear, you’re puffed out Monty.
    There is a lethargy in the realisation of failure in every word.
    You don’t believe in it anymore, but you persist.
    You know it Monty.
    It’s over.

  214. Percy Porcelain

    Can any Cats please help? I need a laugh and have been trying to find the picture of Chauffer Parker wearing the black bob wig that makes him look like a cross between Nikki Savva and the ARU frump.

  215. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    THE NATION
    Killer of Victorian WWII veteran jailed

    AAP
    12:29PM April 17, 2018

    An ice user who murdered an elderly World War II veteran in rural Victoria, taking off with his war medals, has been jailed for 27 years. Adam Lucas Williamson, 40, was the “driving force” behind the fatal burglary at the Springbank home of Kenneth Handford in September 2015.

    In sentencing on Tuesday, Supreme Court of Victoria Justice Jane Dixon described Williamson’s conduct as “brutal and cowardly”.

    Williamson organised the burglary because he knew the 89-year-old would be in possession of a large sum of money, because of his habit of not using banks. Williamson falsely told his co-offender Jonathan Jeffrey Cooper that Mr Handford was a paedophile before Cooper stabbed the veteran 13 times.

    “He ultimately stabbed the deceased repeatedly in the back while he was tied up and unable to defend himself,” Justice Dixon said.

    “You are therefore criminally responsible even though you did not inflict the stab wounds to Mr Handford.” Williamson must serve 23 years in jail before he is eligible for parole. Cooper was jailed last year for 16 years, which was increased to 24 years on appeal earlier this year.

    From the Oz. This pair should have been hanged as high as Haman, and their worthless carcasses left to the crows.

  216. Feeling a tad weary after my first game of veterans hockey for the season last night thanks struth, but pretty chipper all things considered.

    I see Uncle George has things well in hand on the Cohen case, eeeexcellent.

  217. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    THE NATION
    Killer of Victorian WWII veteran jailed

    AAP
    12:29PM April 17, 2018

    An ice user who murdered an elderly World War II veteran in rural Victoria, taking off with his war medals, has been jailed for 27 years. Adam Lucas Williamson, 40, was the “driving force” behind the fatal burglary at the Springbank home of Kenneth Handford in September 2015.

    In sentencing on Tuesday, Supreme Court of Victoria Justice Jane Dixon described Williamson’s conduct as “brutal and cowardly”.

    Williamson organised the burglary because he knew the 89-year-old would be in possession of a large sum of money, because of his habit of not using banks. Williamson falsely told his co-offender Jonathan Jeffrey Cooper that Mr Handford was a p######## before Cooper stabbed the veteran 13 times.

    “He ultimately stabbed the deceased repeatedly in the back while he was tied up and unable to defend himself,” Justice Dixon said.

    “You are therefore criminally responsible even though you did not inflict the stab wounds to Mr Handford.” Williamson must serve 23 years in jail before he is eligible for parole. Cooper was jailed last year for 16 years, which was increased to 24 years on appeal earlier this year.

    From the Oz. This pair should have been hanged as high as Haman, and their worthless carcasses left for the crows.

  218. Zyconoclast

    Homeward Bound raises awareness for women in STEM

    Homeward Bound is a groundbreaking leadership, strategic and science initiative for women, set against the backdrop of Antarctica.
    The initiative aims to heighten the influence and impact of women with a science background in order to influence policy and decision making as it shapes our planet, within 10 years.
    In 2016, Homeward Bound gathered the first 76 of a targeted 1,000 women from around the world, all with critical science backgrounds, to undertake a year-long state-of-the-art program to develop their leadership and strategic capabilities, using science to build conviction around the importance of their voices. The inaugural program culminated in the largest ever female expedition to Antarctica, in December 2016, with a focus on the leadership of women and the state of the world.
    A second cohort of 78 women have recently completed their 12-month leadership program and Antarctic expedition in March 2018, and our third cohort of women in STEM are currently undertaking the program. Join our mailing list to be the first to know about future Homeward Bound news and developments, including the recruitment of our fourth cohort in April 2018.

    https://homewardboundprojects.com.au/funding/

    Sponsorship seems to come from a lot of Australian taxpayer funded agencies and universities.

  219. Percy Porcelain

    Chauffeur Parker, s’il vous plaît …

  220. DrBeauGan

    A second cohort of 78 women have recently completed their 12-month leadership program

    How did Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar and Napoleon manage without doing leadership programmes? And they were blokes too, a double handicap.

  221. Percy Porcelain

    completed their 12-month leadership program and Antarctic expedition in March 2018

    So presumably they didn’t end up trapped by ice that wasn’t meant to be there in the first place.

  222. egg_

    Homeward Bound is a groundbreaking leadership, strategic and science initiative for women, set against the backdrop of Antarctica.

    Both the expedition leader and the ship’s captain are blokes.
    Just sayin’.

  223. Leigh Lowe

    Feeling a tad weary after my first game of veterans hockey for the season last night thanks struth, but pretty chipper all things considered.

    What’s to get weary from?
    I assume the just wedge you in the 3.5 metre space with the net to prevent any chance of the opposition scoring.
    You may be bruised but you shouldn’t be tired.

  224. Leigh Lowe

    Homeward Bound is a groundbreaking leadership, strategic and science initiative for women, set against the backdrop of Antarctica …

    … aboard the SS Lezzo Comfortzone.

  225. Senile Old Guy

    We created a powerful, life-long network of scientists and environmentalists, we discussed the ways we could be more effective in our leadership today and tomorrow, we worked through collaborative projects, and we encouraged one another to elevate our voices and meaningfully shape the road to peaceful and sustainable development.

    Leftist through and through. Completely invested in climate change, sustainability and similar issues.

  226. Geriatric Mayfly

    Queensland researchers have discovered a new strain of high-risk, drug resistant bacteria in the Middle East. The University of Queensland’s Dr Hosam Zowawi said his team had witnessed rapid growth of variants of existing superbugs in the Gulf States, dubbed ‘super-superbugs’ for being internationally identified as high-risk. “(They) can destroy even last-line safe antibiotics,” Dr Zowawi said.”We knew that some clones could thrive inside individual hospitals and spread from one-patient to another, but it’s the first time we’ve identified a clone scattered across the entire Arabian Peninsula,” he added.

    Infection control and surveillance plans are in place to stop them spreading further.

    Does this mean no more Muslim imports from these rat holes? If so, good news.

  227. Percy Porcelain

    Time for Pete Bleattie to do the right thing and inhale a whole bunch of greenfilth administered Mary Jane just before going for a refreshing dip in the Margaret River.

  228. network of scientists and environmentalists,

    I weep for the Science I once loved.

  229. Leigh Lowe

    Time for Pete Bleattie to do the right thing and inhale a whole bunch of greenfilth administered Mary Jane just before going for a refreshing dip in the Margaret River.

    Perhaps a quick roll on the butchers shop floor before he takes that dip.

  230. LL, we only had nine blokes so I did a lot of running from centre forward.

  231. stackja

    Boambee John
    #2688789, posted on April 17, 2018 at 1:05 pm

    GCM always remembered for being horse riding on 7 December 1941 morning. Later, of course, improved communications.

  232. Leigh Lowe

    LL, we only had nine blokes so I did a lot of running from centre forward.

    Have a rest.
    You’re delusional.

  233. Leigh Lowe

    Queensland researchers have discovered a new strain of high-risk, drug resistant bacteria in the Middle East. The University of Queensland’s Dr Hosam Zowawi said his team had witnessed rapid growth of variants of existing superbugs in the Gulf States, with the two main streams of variants being classified as Sunni and Shia.

  234. thefrolickingmole

    BBC is going to get pantsed, beach sanded and pineappled by Cliff Richard.

    A former police detective has told the court hearing into Sir Cliff Richard’s damages case against the BBC that he felt forced to reveal the raid on the singer’s home to a journalist from the corporation.

    Matthew Fenwick, who was a detective superintendent with South Yorkshire police, said he believed reporter Dan Johnson would run a story about the investigation into the singer, leaving it “compromised”, unless he was told about the search.

    Fenwick said it had been clear Johnson knew the force was investigating an allegation of child sexual abuse against Richard, because he described the singer as a “celebrity pa**o” during a meeting.

    Discussing a meeting in July 2014, Fenwick said: “I believed the BBC was in a position to publish a story and I didn’t want them to publish a story at that stage.

    “[Johnson] said he could and he would, and we came to an arrangement that he would not publish it then but that we would let him know when we were going to take further action.

    “I felt that we didn’t have many options – there was no option, other than to cooperate with him.”

    I wonder how many zeros there will be in the payout?

  235. egg_

    network of scientists and environmentalists,

    Hopefully, there’s a distinction?

  236. OneWorldGovernment

    Talk about salacious!

    Cohen’s Judge & Stormy Daniels Have Much in Common: Playboy Bunny Judge Worked for Hugh Hefner, Had Illicit Sexual Romp on Federal Bench

    https://truepundit.com/cohens-judge-stormy-daniels-have-much-in-common-playboy-bunny-judge-worked-for-hugh-hefner-had-illicit-sexual-romp-on-federal-bench/

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