Monday Forum: April 16, 2018

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1,386 Responses to Monday Forum: April 16, 2018

  1. Marcus

    woolfe
    #2689040, posted on April 17, 2018 at 6:22 pm
    Over 1300 comments on the Orwellian Folau story. Very few against Folau.

    Same story in the letters pages in the West. Yesterday it was 4-zip in Folau’s favour.

  2. H B Bear

    As are voters from NSW, the ACT, Victoriastan, Taxmania, SA, WA and the NT.

    Sorry Percy, Queenslander voters get their own class of political idiocy. Exhibit A – the Kattter Family dynasty.

  3. Slayer of Memes

    Just caught up with Tim Blair’s wonderful post about Australians passing the cmpetition in F1. A must for motor racing fans.

    The only thing missing is the great Murray Walker (RIP) doing the commentary. Murray would have hit high C during these episodes!

    David Croft, the current Sky F1 race commentator, DID hit High C during Daniel Ricc’s overtaking move on Bottas for the lead in the final stages of Sunday’s race…

  4. nemkat

    Okay, Delta A, so Waleed has chosen not to ”pontificate” on the Izzy/ Joyce/ Hell storm in a teacup.
    You’d be happy about that, no?

  5. H B Bear

    Blair’s trolling of Moose Knuckles over the years is a thing of beauty. Admittedly he is working in a highly target rich environment. The whole Alene Composta prank was magnificent.

  6. Bear Necessities

    I know this is bit late, but RIP R Lee Ermey.

    His presence made Full Metal Jacket a watchable film. In fact they should of canned the second half and filled out the Paris Island first half.

    One movie of his I have watched multiple times is “The Siege of Firebase Gloria”. It has everything. Mass wave commie attacks, decapitations, hand to hand combat and plenty of smutty and sick humour.

    Well done Gunny Ermey. I hope you prayed to every religious honcho before you kicked the bucket so you covered all the bases.

  7. cohenite

    Leigh Sales is off to interview Comey.

    Seriously?

  8. JC

    You know, at times faith in humanity is restored. We can be so nice and decent to each other.

    I bought wifey an expensive bit of Jewelry while in NY last time were there. It broke. It wasn’t forced or anything like that…. it literally fell off her neck.

    Instead of the retailer, I contacted the maker directly in Instabul by email and later through texts. The owner’s son asked me to take pics of it send them to him and he would find a solution. His solution is…

    He will make an entirely new piece and send it to her. When we’re in NYC next time we can leave the broken one with the retailer. How’s that for believing in people’s honesty. Sure, the family is Armenian, which makes them Christian, but still.

  9. wivenhoe

    Is Trump still POTUS or has he been impeached, Monty? Give me the latest.

    It’s happening, It’s all about to come out now, will happen soon. …drip, drip, drip.

    or something like that, Gab.

  10. Rae

    Leigh Sales is off to interview Comey.

    Seriously?

    Why not? Comey is definitely topical. Else why would you folks be so agitated about him?

  11. JC

    You know, at times faith in humanity is restored. We can be so nice and decent to each other.

    I bought wifey an expensive bit of [email protected] while in NY last time were there. It broke. It wasn’t forced or anything like that…. it literally fell off her neck.

    Instead of the retailer, I contacted the maker directly in Instabul by email and later through texts. The owner’s son asked me to take pics of it send them to him and he would find a solution. His solution is…

    He will make an entirely new piece and send it to her. When we’re in NYC next time we can leave the broken one with the retailer. How’s that for believing in people’s honesty. Sure, the family is Armenian, which makes them Christian, but still.

  12. Snoopy

    m0nty
    #2688834, posted on April 17, 2018 at 2:15 pm
    So I guess now we are going to get weeks of hate around here directed at Kimba Wood for correctly doing her job. Tiresome and predictable.

    Monty!

    Defend this:

    https://spectator.org/judge-in-cohen-case-has-clinton-conflict-of-interest/

    You idiot.

  13. Farmer Gez

    I have an eyewitness source that Lisa Wilkinson was seen in NYC last week swathed in fur.
    7.30’s Shop Steward and The Project’s Cash Cow in bitch fight over the Comey interview.
    I’ll watch that.

  14. egg_

    I see that Raelene Castle, the chief executive of Rugby Australia, seems to share a first name with a local troll. Coincidence?

    Both have recently “been satisfied by a column”?

  15. pete m

    m0nty – rake warning:

    Hannity statement re Cohen:

    Michael Cohen has never represented me in any matter. I never retained him, received an invoice, or paid legal fees. I have occasionally had brief discussions with him about legal questions about which I wanted his input and perspective.
    I assumed those conversations were confidential, but to be absolutely clear they never involved any matter between me and a third party.

    You owe him an apology.

    ps you look very old in that hockey photo – leftism and hate do ruin you – switch to the good side asap.

  16. JC

    How did Hannity’s name came out of the Mueller, Cohen heist? Did Mueller’s office leak again?

  17. Dave in Marybrook

    New page game for Cats-
    Find a picture of Di Natali with a glass of anything in his hand.
    I bet you can’t… he’s got that scrawny lectury evangelist look about him that makes me reckon he’s a teetotaller.

  18. Baldrick

    Both have recently “been satisfied by a column”?

    … and the more pixels in reply only increases the strokes on the oily shaft.

  19. Oh come on

    The George Pell witch hunt doesn’t seem to be going too well. Pell’s counsel is hammering the hell out of the prosecution’s case:

    Mr Richter told the magistrate their complaints were “impossible” and “ought to be discharged without batting an eyelid”.

    He said the balance of the charges should also be thrown out.

    “The complainants are unreliable, the complainants have made prior statements that are inconsistent or subsequent statements that are inconsistent,” Mr Richter said.

    “Their credibility has been damaged to a point where … that shot is not worth the powder of proceeding to a charge or proceeding to a trial.”

    VicPol copped both barrels, too:

    He also hit out at the police investigation, again criticising Victoria Police for establishing an operation to investigate Cardinal Pell before any complaints had been made against him.

    Mr Richter argued that detectives had not properly investigated the allegations and instead acted under the “current political correctness in attitudes” which meant victims were always believed without their account being tested.

    “There is simply no supporting evidence for these allegations,” he said.

    “Multiplying unreliable witnesses does not lead to a conclusion that there is a strong and probable cause to commit.”

    This is all beyond question. A grave injustice is being perpetrated.

    (quotes via ABC news app)

  20. Snoopy

    JC
    #2689106, posted on April 17, 2018 at 7:37 pm
    How did Hannity’s name came out of the Mueller, Cohen heist? Did Mueller’s office leak again?

    Not quite. Just Kimba Wood repaying an old favour.
    https://spectator.org/judge-in-cohen-case-has-clinton-conflict-of-interest/

  21. Dave in Marybrook

    Can’t seem to see him in a pub, anywhere, anytime…

  22. zyconoclast

    Baltimore councilman proposes $15 million fund to help eliminate ‘structural and institutional’ racism

    Baltimore City Councilman Brandon Scott plans to introduce legislation Monday that would force each city agency to study whether it is engaging in discriminatory policies — and create a roughly $15 million annual fund that would go toward eliminating “structural and institutional racism.”

  23. zyconoclast

    Students protest conservative professor who wrote about blacks’ role in slave trade

    DeRosa, a political science professor who teaches constitutional law, came under fire last week in part because of a recently resurfaced essay in which DeRosa discusses “black supremacy” and its origins to the history of slavery in the United States.

    Students also furious he calls Caitlyn Jenner ‘Bruce’

  24. Farmer Gez

    How did Hannity’s name came out of the Mueller, Cohen heist? Did Mueller’s office leak again?
    Oo Sir, I know this one.
    Hannity was not a client of Cohen so therefore is not covered by confidentiality so they could not reasonably withhold the information.
    Straight from the ABC.

  25. Dave in Marybrook

    Considering watching Di Natale on Kitchen Cabinet, to see if he touches his vino.
    Had the chills when I saw he’s got an eerily similar brick oven to ours.
    Then had the chills considering watching the whole ep with the left-luvvie frizzy-haired fluffer…

  26. Motelier

    So here I am, sitting here in the dark.

    Bought to me by company, Ergon Energy.

    From the look of the outage map it is a major piece of infrastructure that has has the smoke escape.

    For the uneducated, smoke makes electrical things run. When the smoke gets out, everything stops.

  27. Slayer of Memes

    If anyone has been wondering why mUnty has been even more frenetic than usual with his posting today, there is a reason….

    He, and all the other Leftists of the Democrats [Ed: Why do avowed socialists insist on alluding to democracy for their political parties or countries, when they are utterly opposed to the idea..?? See German Democratic Republic, Democratic People’s Repulic of Korea, People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria, et al… Just sayin’…], were all expecting James Comey to totally destroy the Trump Presidency during his interview with George Stephanoupoulos last night…

    Instead, they were let down…

    Once again…

    Now all he has left to hang his dream of Madame Hillary ‘Cankles and Fainting Spells’ Clinton becoming President is the vain hope that something… ANYTHING…. can be dragged out of this festering pile of shit that is brewing from the destruction of the legal provisi0ns of privacy and attorney/client privilege to prop up and prolong the fiction of Mueller’s impartiality and keep the whole ‘Russian Collusion’ narrative from disappearing up its own fundamental orifice…

    Normally I would urge people to show compassion toward someone going through this kind of hardship…. but let’s face it, it’s mUnty, and the stupid fat fucking dickhead deserves every single rake-to-the-balls that his constant wrongology and adherence to a failed ideology brings…

  28. zyconoclast

    Sweden’s violent reality is undoing a peaceful self-image.
    Shootings have become so common that they don’t make top headlines anymore.

    In a period of two weeks earlier this year, five explosions took place in the country. It’s not unusual these days — Swedes have grown accustomed to headlines of violent crime, witness intimidation and gangland executions. In a country long renowned for its safety, voters cite “law and order” as the most important issue ahead of the general election in September.

    The topic of crime is sensitive, however, and debate about the issue in the consensus-oriented Scandinavian society is restricted by taboos.

  29. JC

    Why would the former playboy bunnie introduce Hannity’s name into the proceedings? What’s he got to do with the story?

  30. Atoms for Peace

    I did find an image of di Natale popping a bottle of champers. I think it was that good $68 stuff.

  31. zyconoclast

    Ulster University has withdrawn the emeritus title from psychology professor Richard Lynn.

    He has argued that people from east Asia have a higher average IQ than Europeans and that men have a higher average IQ than women.

  32. Snoopy

    JC
    #2689121, posted on April 17, 2018 at 7:50 pm
    Why would the former playboy bunnie introduce Hannity’s name into the proceedings? What’s he got to do with the story?

    Spite. It’s what D’rats do when they’re not looting.

  33. Motelier

    Spite. It’s what D’rats do when they’re not looting.

    You can add fvcking to tgat as well.

  34. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    He has argued that people from east Asia have a higher average IQ than Europeans and that men have a higher average IQ than women.

    noody must be allowed to fall behind anyone or to get ahead. all diference is a social construct.

    marxism you know it makes sense

  35. 132andBush

    For the uneducated, smoke makes electrical things run. When the smoke gets out, everything stops

    Lol
    Same goes for brakes.

  36. 132andBush

    The brakes stop working and nothing stops

  37. Baldrick

    I did find an image of di Natale popping a bottle of champers. I think it was that good $68 stuff.

    Catallaxy FactCheck ➡ False.
    The Troll’s Veuve Tailhan Blanc de Blancs Brut is an el-cheapo $13 a bottle.

  38. Tom

    JC, stop interrupting the enemy when he’s making a mistake. A catastrophic mistake, as it turns out.

  39. Oh come on

    I wouldn’t put too much stock in IQ variations amongst ethnic groups. These can vary over time as groups become more acculturated into a dominant culture, or a group begins to place a greater value on education and learning. Perhaps the starkest example of this is the Ashkenazi Jews. When IQ tests first started being used widely in the early 20th century, the Ashkenazi Jews who immigrated to the US had one of the lowest IQ averages out of all the racial groups tested. Today they are the highest. Also, when the US Army started testing the IQ of all enlisting soldiers, northern blacks had higher average IQs than southern whites, according to Thomas Sowell.

  40. Oh come on

    I wouldn’t put too much stock in IQ variations amongst ethnic groups. These can vary over time as groups become more acculturated into a dominant culture, or a group begins to place a greater value on education and learning. Perhaps the starkest example of this is the Ashkenazi J3ws. When IQ tests first started being used widely in the early 20th century, the Ashkenazi J3ws who immigrated to the US had one of the lowest IQ averages out of all the racial groups tested. Today they are the highest. Also, when the US Army started testing the IQ of all enlisting soldiers, northern blacks had higher average IQs than southern whites, according to Thomas Sowell.

  41. johanna

    Still catching up with the Wisdom of Timmy. In re the debacle of the closing ceremony at the Commonwealth Games, he reminds us of the rip-roaring finale to the 1988 Calgary Games, here.

    Now, k d lang is a rather odd lesbian, but she is a proud Canadian and has a magnificent set of pipes. Notice that she ran and leapt about for a good minute or so before starting to sing, without sounding breathless. Notice the joy and fun and how everyone there was having a blast.

    Being beaten by the Canadians in 1988 is not something to be proud of. It is embarrassing.

  42. Snoopy, nothing printed in the Spectator is worth discussing, even at the Cat. When was the last time they said anything of note?

  43. Snoopy

    That’s a very gutless response, Monty. But not unexpected.

  44. Snoopy

    m0nty
    #2689135, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:13 pm
    Snoopy, nothing printed in the Spectator is worth discussing, even at the Cat. When was the last time they said anything of note?

    But chatter on lefty blogs? Phowarr!

  45. candy

    Why should he be asked?
    AFAIK, Waleed has no connection to Rugby, QANTAS, the Assemblies of God or Tongans.

    Because Waleed is the star of a news/talk/current affairs program and it would be meaningful to hear his views, as there many people who hang off every word he says and want to know.

    My hunch is he is scared to say his views, scared on various fronts … his faith, imans, his pay from Channel 10 if he upsets sponsors.

  46. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2689135, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:13 pm
    Snoopy, nothing printed in the Spectator is worth discussing, even at the Cat. When was the last time they said anything of note?

    Most recent edition?

  47. Snoopy

    Time hasn’t been kind to Noni.

  48. egg_

    Blair’s trolling of Moose Knuckles over the years is a thing of beauty. Admittedly he is working in a highly target rich environment. The whole Alene Composta prank was magnificent.

    Green is starting to resemble the The Hood more and more with age.

  49. zyconoclast

    Italy’s Salvini says a centre-right coalition should be at the heart of the next government

    Italy’s political stalemate following last month’s inconclusive general election has continued with the lead players, the League and the 5-Star-Movement (M5S), still looking distant from reaching an agreement to form a new government.

    M5S leader Luigi Di Maio at the weekend reiterated his call for the anti-migrant, Eurosceptic League to dump its centre-right coalition partner, Silvio Berlusconi’s Forza Italia (FI), to make a deal possible.

    But League leader Matteo Salvini said the anti-establishment M5S should stop imposing vetoes and repeated his assertion that a united centre-right coalition should be at the heart of the next executive.

  50. Geriatric Mayfly

    Senile Old Guy
    TheirABC dropping all pretence of being fair and balanced
    Their ABC dropped balance long ago, when Guthrie took over they swung even harder left.

    That young bloke, currently taking Google to task, indicates that it too is gifted with a water cooler. The bantz around this refreshing spa, is not dissimilar to what you would expect at the ABC’s morning briefings around an identical installation. Googles Guthrie came to the ABC with some highly prized baggage and has slipped into the role with ease and of course, acclamation.

  51. cohenite

    We just went at it like she just didn’t exist.’ Former Playmate reveals she had s3x with Donald Trump in front of her friend during a steamy six-month affair while his then-fiancée Marla Maples was pregnant with Tiffany

    What a man.

  52. Motelier

    Ergon has about 25000 customers without power from Gladstone down to Bundaberg.

  53. johanna

    Baldrick
    #2688987, posted on April 17, 2018 at 5:03 pm

    But Ms Wallington said issues of credibility and reliability were for a jury to decide.

    So, what is the point of the committal hearing presided over by you, Ms Wallington? What remains to argue about?

    In your own time.

    I’m not holding my breath.

  54. Motelier

    Might have dig out the generator and get ready to fire it up.

  55. zyconoclast

    How a Single Swedish Submarine Defeated the US Navy

  56. Snoopy

    We just went at it like she just didn’t exist.’

    That was a wasted opportunity.

  57. Infidel Tiger

    The amazing thing about Trump’s sexual escapades is not just the sheer numbers and the quality and that they were consensual (take not lefty politicians), but that he had all those slappers coming back for more months and years later.

    He’s a machine! No wonder he fuelled up on steak and potatoes prior to getting freaky.

  58. candy

    Beautiful gals love D. Trump and speak well of him even after years.

    Still, kind of sad for Melania. A very beautiful and dignified woman. Probably he holds lots of votes due to her graciousness and dignity. I wonder if their marriage has disintegrated and it is a bit fake for the media.

  59. Infidel Tiger

    he was a great lover and I think he’s a great president.’

    That’s your reelection slogan for 2020 right there.

  60. Infidel Tiger

    Melania knew what she was getting into.

    She’s on a good wicket.

  61. cohenite

    Ocean’s Eight is all about the ladies taking over from Clooney and the rest of the beta’s:

  62. Arky

    I wonder if their marriage has disintegrated and it is a bit fake for the media.

    ..
    I often wonder if your brain has disintegrated and slopped out your ears.

  63. John Constantine

    Big slab of rural vicco had many hours of electricity blackouts last weekend.

    The hilltop windmills kept spinning, but the towns in their shadows had exactly zero houses powered by the squander-rorts.

    Windmills spinning away , harvesting subsidies, but it was fire up the diesel gennies to get power.

  64. candy

    I often wonder if your brain has disintegrated and slopped out your ears.

    I wonder whether you should be teaching kids.

  65. Shy Ted

    Di Natali couldn’t open a bottle of champers without help.

  66. Makka

    Sure, the family is Armenian, which makes them Christian, but still.

    I’ve met a few Armenians in business. I’ve always found them to be very honorable people.

  67. JC

    I can’t recall who said it here at the time. Trump is America’s first black prez.

  68. Infidel Tiger

    That was me JC. As usual I was right.

    Blacks love twitter too. They use it more than any other racial group.

  69. Snoopy

    I’ve met a few Armenians in business. I’ve always found them to be very honorable people.

    And clever too. Gladys Berejiklian.

  70. egg_

    Windmills spinning away , harvesting subsidies, but it was fire up the diesel gennies to get power.

    Very expensive tokens – no wonder AGL is getting in on the scam (as the fast start backup fossil fuel supplier).

  71. egg_

    Ergon has about 25000 customers without power from Gladstone down to Bundaberg.

    Blackouts as a form of ‘demand management’?

  72. H B Bear

    I can’t recall who said it here at the time. Trump is America’s first black prez.

    Yeah the first one seemed to still be in his undergraduate homosexual experimental phase with the Wookie.

  73. Oh come on

    Melania knew what she was getting into.

    Didn’t Trump cheat on Marla Maples with Melania? And, when asked if she thought Trump married her for her looks, she answered by posing the question would she have married him if he wasn’t rich. Yeah, she knew what she was getting into.

    Not saying the fact that Trump’s probably a shameless slut regardless of his marital status is an admirable quality. I just don’t care that much about it. Nobody voted for St Trump.

  74. Shy Ted

    Never eaten at Jamie Oliver’. Couldn’t get the though of my head there was spittle in the food.

  75. Farmer Gez

    Insight SBS Dollars & Dowries.
    Beyond belief that this utterly misogynistic cow/camel herder custom is being given a light hearted treatment.
    How many cows do the lady Cats think they’re worth?

  76. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Not saying the fact that Trump’s probably a shameless slut

    nothing the left hate more than the virile white male

  77. Arky

    There is a reason they went with a consumption tax all those years ago.
    The bastards.
    They have long planned the deindustrialised Australia where fewer and fewer have proper paid employment.
    They knew long ago we wouldn’t need electricity for industry.
    They planned it, under both parties.
    I can’t find an Australian equivalent, but this shows the collapse in New Zealand of PAYE and the culture of paid, useful employment.
    Planned and programmed destruction.

  78. H B Bear

    Relax Ted, the cheeky chappy wouldn’t have set foot in any of them or even know where they are. Unless he has read the administrator’s report, the odds of which are only 50:50 at best. With $120m in debt I expect his mind is elsewhere and not worrying about some minor licensing revenue from the colonies.

  79. H B Bear

    nothing the left hate more than the virile white orange male

  80. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #2689150, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:29 pm

    The amazing thing about Trump’s sexual escapades is not just the sheer numbers and the quality and that they were consensual and not children (take note lefty politicians), 

  81. Leigh Lowe

    We just went at it like she just didn’t exist.’ Former Playmate reveals she had s3x with Donald Trump in front of her friend during a steamy six-month affair while his then-fiancée Marla Maples was pregnant with Tiffany

    Has the Donald acknowledged his shame and announced he chooses to live as a gay man?

  82. Oh come on

    The left can drive itself crazy with the Stormy Daniels sideshow. Nobody who might not approve of Trump’s alleged and numerous peccadilloes, but nevertheless calculated that a vote for Trump was better than a vote for Hillary, care a single jot that Trump slept with a porn star in 2006. He didn’t run on his personal morals. MAGA. That’s what people who voted for him were promised, that’s what they expect and want to see. If he is seen to have delivered on that, tawdry tales about his personal life will be of trivial importance come 2020.

  83. John Constantine

    When the number of animals, not the productive capacity of them is the value, then they all become white elephants.

    When 500 bottles of Corio whisky buys more twelve year old girlchildren for a rapeharem than 300 bottles of twenty-five year old exceptional single malt buys, the currency is as debased as the culture.

    Destocking is the rational response to dry times when the stability of the rangeland is the fundamental thing. When the number size of the herd is the important thing, the environmental devastation of the rangelands is locked in.

    Culture fails, but those that succeed in swapping cows for childbrides are the genetic winners by siring the most offspring.

  84. Arky

    Once upon a time there were people who led who understood the common man needed useful employment.
    A time before working men traded the desire not to dress in a lurid and gay manner for some weird and perverse concept of workplace safety.
    A time when those who ran companies were proud of employing men, not of accomplishing some stupid arbitrary diversity quota.
    When the men who nackered themselves building a nation were led, not betrayed.

  85. Arky

    Those last two posts require some assembling, but all the bits are there.

  86. vr

    johanna — kd lang has a fantastic voice. Saw her MTV unplugged performance. Just beautiful. You tube seems to have removed the full show.

  87. Armadillo

    m0nty at 1556
    You don’t fool me either, Rae/Grigory. I read the stuff that got you the stalker rep. You are a bit of a creep.

    I stand by my prediction that mOnster will be close to the centre-right by the end of the decade, and an unapologetic and committed right winger by 2025.

  88. MarkA;

    The Muslim share of the European population is rising inexorably without integration.

    Those of us who cannot read German agree with you anyway.

  89. Arky

    I surprisingly high percent of female school principals like K.D. Lang.
    Weirdly they all also drive Subarus.

  90. johanna

    Slayer of Memes
    #2689092, posted on April 17, 2018 at 7:14 pm

    Just caught up with Tim Blair’s wonderful post about Australians passing the cmpetition in F1. A must for motor racing fans.

    The only thing missing is the great Murray Walker (RIP) doing the commentary. Murray would have hit high C during these episodes!

    David Croft, the current Sky F1 race commentator, DID hit High C during Daniel Ricc’s overtaking move on Bottas for the lead in the final stages of Sunday’s race…

    Fair point. Perhaps he loves motor racing as much as Murray Walker did, and can convey it to fans as Murray did. Let’s hope so.

  91. jupes

    The RSL will roll over on this. Within five years the “Frontier Wars” will be an exhibition at the War Memorial and every major Anzac Day speech will include grovelling to largely fictional massacred Abos.

    Go to any Australian war cemetery and note that there is no pecking order amongst the graves. A colonel will be buried next to a private. A decorated man will be buried next his mate with no decorations. A body with no name will be buried next to a known grave. Every grave in that cemetery is equal and treated equally.

    Anzac Day commemorates all dead veterans equally too. Or at least it did until a few years ago. 2013 was the first time I saw it – a special Aboriginal ‘smoking’ ceremony was incorporated into the Dawn Service to give special recognition to Aboriginal servicemen.

    Since then, the services I have attended have started with the playing of a didgeridoo. We can see where this is heading and there isn’t a politician in the parliament with the will or authority to stop it.

  92. Oh come on

    Arky, you’re getting morose and melancholy beyond your years. There was a far worse unemployment annihilation that took place in the early 1990s. IIRC, something like half of the middle aged men who lost their jobs during that recession never found regular employment again. And the number of middle aged men who lost their jobs during that period was very large. Half of that number is still very large. A few days ago, men’s sheds were being mocked. Well, I suspect the unwanted male detritus of the recession we had to have are the major clients of men’s sheds.

    Anyway, Arks. People have been wringing their hands with the exact worry you are since forever. You had the intelligentsia’s fretting over dark satanic mills during the industrial revolution. Wordsworth’s glorification of subsistence farming, waxing lyrical about the happy peasant tilling his tiny plot of land.

    It’s a load of crap. Huge change is coming, that’s true. But it isn’t about the offshoring of manufacturing. Soon automation will be cheaper even than the dreaded Chinese labourer.

    We are all facing an uncertain future. But your narrative of the working man being sold out is silly. Within a few decades, your concept of a working man won’t exist anywhere.

  93. cohenite

    Trump’s probably a shameless slut

    Have any of these bints claiming Trump porked them been vindicated?

  94. Arky

    Again, some assemblage work may be required there.
    Not an invitation to recite the alphabet.

  95. egg_

    Hardly surprising.
    Their daytime model (at least in Brisbane) was business quick lunch. But when they first opened you couldn’t book because they were so fucking famous they had a queue out on the street.

    Honestly, pasta should be as cheap as chips.
    You simply can’t carry all Oliver’s voracious appetite for “click the ticket” royalties and his army of advisers on restaurant décor etc in a $12.50 bowl of spag bog.

    Back in the days when we had ‘cook ups’ on shiftwork, whilst an authentic chicken curry from one of our aficionados, complete with psyllium drink, might cost $5-6/head for the ingredients, our Italian co-workers could put together spaghetti in a freshly made tomato sauce for $1/head, so an easy way for a restaurant to make a buck at little ingredients cost.
    Presumably, Jamie had an idea of his margins.

  96. Snoopy

    Within a few decades, your concept of a working man won’t exist anywhere.

    As long as we still have working women we’ll do okay. I’m prepared to give it a go.

  97. Arky

    It’s a load of crap. Huge change is coming, that’s true. But it isn’t about the offshoring of manufacturing. Soon automation will be cheaper even than the dreaded Chinese labourer.

    ..
    Why?
    Third world labour is cheaper than robots, more flexible, self- reproducing and completely disposable, and runs on virtually any fuel.
    Where is the incentive to replace that with expensive robotics?

  98. Steve trickler.

    Good fun. Good Journey.



  99. Arky

    All those neat little gadgets you have that give you the stupid illusion the future is a technological one are made by millions of little third world hands fed on recycled shit.

  100. Armadillo

    Arky has a good point. One that the slave traders would agree with.

  101. John Constantine;

    nobody cares if Batman dated a few actresses back in the old days,

    Are we talking about going to the pictures or rooting said young ladies?

  102. Oh come on

    Third world labour is cheaper than robots,

    Yeah, it still is. But for how much longer? A decade ago, 3rd world labour was *much* cheaper than robots. Now, not so much. And the gap is narrowing, and fast. This trend is pretty obvious. The working man hasn’t been sold out, as you suggest. What’s happening is a feature of human nature. Over time, we improve. We innovate. Apparently, we even engineer ourselves out of mass employment. The question then becomes how most of us lead meaningful lives in a post-work world. Or it could be do we stay in control of the AI race. Or it could be both. Whatever. What you’re lamenting was always going to be lost. It’s an inevitable part of our progress from the points where we were and where we are.

  103. johanna

    Oh come on
    #2689132, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:11 pm

    I wouldn’t put too much stock in IQ variations amongst ethnic groups. These can vary over time as groups become more acculturated into a dominant culture, or a group begins to place a greater value on education and learning. Perhaps the starkest example of this is the Ashkenazi J3ws. When IQ tests first started being used widely in the early 20th century, the Ashkenazi J3ws who immigrated to the US had one of the lowest IQ averages out of all the racial groups tested. Today they are the highest. Also, when the US Army started testing the IQ of all enlisting soldiers, northern blacks had higher average IQs than southern whites, according to Thomas Sowell.

    Yup.

    The use of IQ as a political weapon is bullshit. We are talking here about a product of the social ‘sciences’ – nuff said.

    The Stanford Binet test was designed as a predictor of how well students might do at university (back when going to university was only available to a small percentage of people). As such, it was a very good predictor.

    That’s it.

  104. feelthebern

    Rowan Dean called Craig Emerson Dr Dolittle.
    LOL.

  105. Arky

    The question then becomes how most of us lead meaningful lives in a post-work world.

    ..
    Well we’re fucked then.
    Because the 50% of people have an IQ less than 100, and left to their own devices spend their time tattooing each other, contracting STDs and voting Labor.
    So out of the two of us, I’m the fucking optimist.

  106. H B Bear

    The Legover-Man has done some work that none of you would bend your back and do.

  107. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The question then becomes how most of us lead meaningful lives in a post-work world

    A few decades? most of us won’t be here.

  108. DrBeauGan

    The question then becomes how most of us lead meaningful lives in a post-work world.

    That’s already been answered. We join a noble cause, i.e. join a new religion, and wave placards and punch anyone with a different noble cause. And vote for wrecking the economy or what’s left of it.

  109. Oh come on

    Well we’re fucked then.
    Because the 50% of people have an IQ less than 100, and left to their own devices spend their time tattooing each other, contracting STDs and voting Labor.
    So out of the two of us, I’m the fucking optimist.

    If that’s all you took away from what I wrote, then there is no point talking more. Or you’re being snarky over an issue that you repeatedly claim to care about, so maybe you don’t actually care that much about it.

    If you want to seriously engage, then go for it. But just because I said “most of us”, you resort to 50% +1 semantics – you aren’t engaging with an eye to any kind of resolution.

  110. Arky

    It isn’t even as if they tattoo anything interesting on themselves.
    “Richmond Premiers'”
    I saw on some idiot’s calf.
    This morning I saw some dickhead with some made up heraldry crests tatted on his legs.
    One on each.
    Two different ones.
    So that’s it. That is your grand plan for the future. More professional sport idiots, more micromanagment of said idiots by an increasing army of politician idiots and more tattooed idiots.
    Fucking count me out.

  111. Snoopy

    Food Bank are lying liars who believe in teaching kids that parents don’t have to feed their own kids.

  112. Nick

    A question for Melbourne Cats, the left hand turning lane from Elizabeth St into Flinders is blocked off by water laden bollards. It looks crap. The religion of peace ?

  113. DrBeauGan

    You’re forgetting antifa and behead those who insult the prophet.

    I’d prefer fiscal Conservatives waving placards that say behead those who insult the profit.

  114. Arky

    I will give you an extra tip:
    It won’t be us who have these hypothetical army of future robots.
    You need electricity for that.

  115. johanna

    Oh come on
    #2689169, posted on April 17, 2018 at 8:55 pm

    Melania knew what she was getting into.

    Didn’t Trump cheat on Marla Maples with Melania? And, when asked if she thought Trump married her for her looks, she answered by posing the question would she have married him if he wasn’t rich. Yeah, she knew what she was getting into.

    Not saying the fact that Trump’s probably a shameless slut regardless of his marital status is an admirable quality. I just don’t care that much about it. Nobody voted for St Trump.

    Precisely. As Greg Gutfeld said on his admirable show on Fox, when Comey claimed that Trump was like a Mafia boss, Americans thought – yes, but he’s our Mafia boss.

    The Left don’t get it about Trump, they never will. Which is a good thing.

  116. Oh come on

    Seriously, Arks. You sound like the Lost Cause confederate historical apologists. Sorry, but the model society you’re mourning was fundamentally doomed. It wasn’t and isn’t a matter of the decisions of a small number of influential people – any more than any other human advancement has been, that is.

  117. Arky

    ies.
    Assemble as required.

  118. John Constantine

    The truly suspicious would say that the great transnational looting cartels do not care at all if their great slaveherds are organic or android.

    Once the tipping point is reached and ten billion proles stop being money and start being an embarrassment, then they just ring around amongst each other, checking they have all had their highly expensive and rationed immunity granting implant installed, then they release their weaponised aerosol black death/1918 flu/ebola/rabies/gonnorhea hybrid and all the post work world problems are solved.

    The elites could never quite trust the post work proles to stay happy with porn and soma, just incase some random prole found a guillotine and got a crew to rediscover a work ethic.

  119. Arky

    You are very pesimistic OCO.
    You paint a bleak future.
    Perk up.
    We could avert the horrendous dead end you describe if we have the courage to do what Trump is doing.

  120. Oh come on

    Seriously, this is the trajectory of humanity. We don’t wield ploughs anymore. Not for a long time. We soon won’t be driving combine harvesters. Maybe we aren’t now. Soon we won’t even be remotely driving them. Again, the question will become what gives most of us meaning in our lives, when most of us aren’t working in a post-work world. And when I say “most”, I mean almost all of us, not 50% +1.

  121. John Constantine

    On a brighter note, a heap of Stimpy’s have put together a list of Batman’s thirty or forty dating interests.

    http://dc.wikia.com/wiki/Batman%27s_Love_Interests

    Sometimes sordid, sometimes not.

    Everybody still loves Batman.

  122. cohenite

    We could avert the horrendous dead end you describe if we have the courage to do what Trump is doing.

    Do you think Trump, great man that he is, is doing enough?

  123. Oh come on

    Arky the optimist! I like it. Keep that spirit up.

  124. Makka

    The question then becomes how most of us lead meaningful lives in a post-work world. Or it could be do we stay in control of the AI race. Or it could be both.

    As time goes by , the deploying of AI and robots will be viscerally obstructed by the left. It might take a while but it’s not difficult to see all manner of legislation and regulation being summoned up to thwart that progress.

  125. LOL, Hannity’s excuse is that he talked “almost exclusively” with Cohen about real estate. Like the other 10% being all about dead hookers or whatever doesn’t matter, he was just chatting about dachas on the Dnieper, comrade!

  126. chrisl

    We will all be making each other coffees

  127. Makka

    Looks like mUnty’s fkd up yet again.

    Hannity!!! Cohen!!! Wussia!!!Trump!!!

    Idiot still can’t take a trick. Pathetic.

  128. Oh come on

    the deploying of AI and robots will be viscerally obstructed by the left

    I don’t think this is true. The left has moved beyond its pro-labour roots and is now concerned with something totally different, ie. identity politics. The Western left hasn’t even begun to comprehend the technological change that we’re staring down the barrel of. It will happen, and it will happen quickly. It is happening quickly. The left hasn’t even noticed. Their current values will be utterly irrelevant in not such a long time. They aren’t nimble enough to adapt.

  129. Snoopy

    What’s Kimba Wood’s excuse, Monty?

  130. Rae

    When Donald Trump first met Melania, back in 1998, he was on a date with Celina Midelfart.

    Make of it what you will.

  131. egg_

    The irony of STEM folk maintaining AI putting 70% of Accountants out of work.
    Similar to the waves of automation that have hit the Banking industry over the decades.

  132. Within a few decades, your concept of a working man won’t exist anywhere.

    We’re already half way there.
    There are only two classes in the neo-communist world we live in. The Working Class (those who work for a living) and the Welfare Class (those who live off the Working Class).

  133. Makka

    They aren’t nimble enough to adapt.

    We’ll see. They will react when they see the impacts to their coffers as fees and donations emanating from unionized jobs get chewed up. Watch them adapt then. They won’t stand idly by and allow a large portion of their treasury and income evaporate. Look what they have to to the energy business around the world. Tied it up in regulatory, legislative and tax eating knots.

  134. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Anzac Day commemorates all dead veterans equally too. Or at least it did until a few years ago. 2013 was the first time I saw it – a special Aboriginal ‘smoking’ ceremony was incorporated into the Dawn Service to give special recognition to Aboriginal servicemen.

    The 2012 0r 2013 11 A.M. service where I used to live, began with a “Welcome to Country.” Two of the local veterans walked out, and I never went back.

    If we are beginning to commemorate the “millions” of Aborigines killed in the “frontier wars”, do we also commemorate the thousands of European settlers, killed in those same wars?

  135. Baldrick

    ScoMo says he’s not Santa and won’t be bringing a bag of goodies in the upcoming budget.
    Tomorrow’s Daily Telegraph front page obliges.

  136. Rae

    Kimba Wood was a Reagan appointee. She worked her way through college. Her job happened to be with Hef.

    No job with Hef. Already had 2 degrees before she went to Playboy Bunny training school in London for 5 days. Quit without actually working as a Playboy Bunny. Went and earned her law degree instead.

  137. Rae

    Kimba was named after the town in South Australia.

  138. Marcus

    ScoMo says he’s not Santa and won’t be bringing a bag of goodies in the upcoming budget.
    Tomorrow’s Daily Telegraph front page obliges

    It’s amazing how excited politicians expect us to get over road and rail projects. “A bag of goodies?” “Santa Claus?” That’s meat and potatoes stuff, at best. Road and rail is literally the bare minimum we expect to see in the budget.

    I know it’s Michael McCormack’s portfolio, but come on. It’s not that interesting.

  139. Leigh Lowe

    H B Bear

    #2689219, posted on April 17, 2018 at 10:05 pm

    The Legover-Man has done some work that none of you would bend your back and do.

    Yes.
    Doc Emmerson and his contact lenses are a timely reminder to those criticising the Donald’s choices in casual roots.

  140. Oh come on

    They will react when they see the impacts to their coffers as fees and donations emanating from unionized jobs get chewed up.

    True but by that point it will be too late. They can react all they like but a strike-proof, automated workforce will be a viable alternative to the union model – if it isn’t already installed, that is.

    The left is waaaaay behind the changing times. Those still interested in fighting battles over labour relations (not that many) are bickering with their time-honoured reactionaries (Arky types). The whole thing is going to be a moot point. Most of the left has been distracted by trinkets, while society is being fundamentally transformed.

  141. Zyconoclast

    If we are beginning to commemorate the “millions” of Aborigines killed in the “frontier wars”, do we also commemorate the thousands of European settlers, killed in those same wars?

    No because they deserved to die.
    Whitey always deserves to die a violent death.
    It is their destiny.

  142. What’s Kimba Wood’s excuse, Monty?

    She’s just doing her job by the book, any other judge would have made the same decision. Trump’s legal argument was weak as water, Dennis Denuto level.

    Mueller is going to get the best mix tape since Kendrick Lamar’s debut EP.

  143. Oh come on

    Here’s the fact. The current green-left coalition is antithetical. Look at Silicon Valley. Wall-to-wall leftists. But are these technocrats willing to sign up to the Luddite green agenda in the longer term? No. What’s in it for them? The academic poli-sci leftists have no idea how the world works. There is a deep schism looming amongst the left. They have no Idea it’s coming.

  144. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ‘Low life scumbags’ smash tiles off a $22million war memorial named after a fallen soldier just days before Anzac Day

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5625009/NSW-war-memorial-vandalised-just-days-Anzac-Day-people-smashing-scooters.html#ixzz5Cw8cKIqT
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    I’d use stronger language then “Low Life Scumbags”, believe you me.

  145. jupes

    Most of the left has been distracted by trinkets, while society is being fundamentally transformed.

    No the left aren’t distracted at all. They are focused and fundamentally transforming society while what’s left of the ‘right’ is distracted.

    Gay marriage, women in the infantry, safe schools, diversity quotas, welcome to country, climate change, mining bans, black armband history, mass 3rd world immigration, super unions.

    They don’t seem too distracted to me.

  146. mizaris

    http://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/7c784e27df54d79425a935f3c881ef87?width=1024

    New page game for Cats-
    Find a picture of Di Natali with a glass of anything in his hand.
    I bet you can’t… he’s got that scrawny lectury evangelist look about him that makes me reckon he’s a teetotaller.

    Does a bottle count??

  147. Makka

    They can react all they like but a strike-proof, automated workforce will be a viable alternative to the union model

    Only if it allowed to be deployed and in a cost effective manner. The left will not stop AI or robotics but once the threat is identified, the regulatory and legislative dogs will be unleashed. Sure, they may be behind the curve but they will still bog down robots and AI in regulatory and taxation quicksand. It’s a mistake to underestimate the left’s ability to sustain itself.

  148. Armadillo

    A few decades? most of us won’t be here.

    The internet is forever. Your comments and thoughts survive. Make use of it.

    At least some smug little arsehole great great grandchild in 100 years time won’t misconstrue your comments. Tell it how it is.

  149. Armadillo

    Note to self. Younger people need to follow “The Cat”, and pass it on to their grandchildren.

  150. Armadillo

    mOntsters grandchildren will be living in utopia by then. Free energy from wind and solar. No one has to work. Government wage for everyone.

  151. Infidel Tiger

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump

    Employment is up, Taxes are DOWN. Enjoy!

    Too fuckin’ right, Donny. ‘Ave a good one!

  152. zyconoclast

    London: Two Killed in 30 Minutes Overnight, U.S. Visitors Fearful of ‘Crazy’ Violent City

    A young father and a woman were stabbed in London within 30 minutes last night, as the number murdered in the capital this year hits 59.
    The killings come as News Yorkers living in London said they fear the “crazy” violent crime wave overtaking the city. “It’s like home but without the breakdancing,” one said.

  153. struth

    Millions killed in the frontier wars!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Not one farm.
    That’s a shit load of hunter gatherers in one arid dried up country!!!!

    Fuckwits.

  154. Zyconoclast:

    A 2017 Pew Research report documents Muslim population at 8.1% of the total population of Sweden of 10 million (approximately 810,000)

    Yep that’s almost in line with the social/violence graph.

    Islam’s Effect On Society At 10%-19%
    When Muslims approach 10% of the population, they tend to increase lawlessness as a means of complaint about their conditions. In Paris, we are already seeing car-burnings. Any non-Muslim action offends Islam, and results in uprisings and threats, such as in Amsterdam, with opposition to Mohammed cartoons and films about Islam. Such tensions are seen daily, particularly in Muslim sections, in:
    Guyana — Muslim 10%
    Bulgaria — Muslim 10%
    Central Africa — Muslim 15%
    India — Muslim 14.6%
    Israel — Muslim 16%
    Kenya — Muslim 10%
    Russia — Muslim 15%

  155. struth

    Ah the UN agenda is progressing nicely.
    Only 11 and a half years to go and it’s a brown socialist diversity utopia for the entire planet.

  156. Nerblnob

    Infidel Tiger
    #2689269, posted on April 18, 2018 at 12:13 am
    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump

    Employment is up, Taxes are DOWN. Enjoy!

    Too fuckin’ right, Donny. ‘Ave a good one!

    His 37% tax on overseas profits could cost me my job working internationally for a US outfit.

  157. C.L.

    Rugby union boss praises chilling gestapo policy for all Australian institutions:

    Rugby Australia’s support for Israel Folau divides sponsors.

    Ms Castle has previously admitted the level of sponsor concerns about Folau’s stance.

    “That’s the conversation we have had with Qantas. Alan Joyce is very clear they have an inclusion policy — it is about every one of their employees living towards that,” she said. “That’s fundamentally what a sport like rugby has to be.”

  158. Nerblnob

    (not so much Trump’s 37% as Rep congress deal, but still …)

  159. None

    So we have Alan Joyce dictating rugby policy. Gaystapo
    Here is Karvelas also of the Gaystapo. https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/i-hope-you-run-it-in-full-greg-hunt-in-fiery-and-bizarre-interview-over-gay-conversion-therapy-20180417-p4za70.html . Good on Greg Hunt for standing up for free speech. I have no idea what this gay conversion motion is, but let’s be clear here. If you want to tell us that gender is fluid therefore sexual preferences are fluid and so people can choose whether they want to be male or straight, or femsle snd gay or bi or whatever and you also tout for access to any sort of therapy that allows them to choose -like sex change operations.- then ypu must allow gay conversion therapy. And if you don’t then you once again exposed your hypocrisy’ incoherence and your duplicitous agenda. As I also keep saying, the Greeks once gave us Homer and Plato and Lysias and democracy and freedom of speech; now they give us demented dykes like Karvelas. Deport the Greeks.

  160. None

    So the moral of the story is, never let Qantas be your sponsor for as long as Alan Joyce is at the helm. What a fascist prick. But then we’ve always known that about that Irish peasant.

  161. Nerblnob

    You’re being unfair to the Greeks. It’s said that the Greeks invented sex.
    Then the Italians came up with the idea of doing it with a woman.

    Really, every corporation is coming out (NPI) with this kind of crap nowadays. You can’t really single out Qantas.

    And by their compliance requirements, they force it on suppliers.

    It needs someone independent enough to just ignore it, like Trump did with stern lectures from the media.

  162. Cactus

    I report from Belgium where I am visiting my brother. I say the socialism here is deep and the state oppressive. My brother pays circa 50% or more on a low income as a senior engineer. He also receives a form of food stamps with his pay from his firm. Coupons to buy food from supermarkets. There are stickers he also gets to use as credits for healthcare and credits or rebates on other things like language lessons. Not only do you get taxed heavily the state makes you buy certain things in certain quantities.

    He also spoke about his work. He is killing it and is a go to guy in an organisation which is understaffed. I ask why doeant he seek a raise or try to change firms. He says because his marginal tax rate would be 60 or 70%, so why bother. He sees his post as a working holiday so just shrugs. But what a cancerous thing for an economy.

    Lastly several walking tours of Brugge and Gent have stories of hundreds of years ago far off kings in Austria or Burgundy raising taxes. The people revolted, were laid seige to and then killed and their town and cathedrals burnt. So there is a history of resisting this socialism. But i guess they learnt through bitter experience not to make a fuss.

    Beer top notch and nice quaint towns. Visit but dont live methinks.

  163. None

    Not every corporation nerb, quite a few just get on with their job. This is why I want to know how many of the other sponsors got phone calls from Mr Joyce- after all they all swan around together in his oh so exclusive chairman’s Club.
    By the way this myth about the Greeks and sex only really applies to the elite. Never part of mainstream culture and quite frowned upon by the hoi polloi. Even Plato eventually reasoned that sodomy was not a good thing.

  164. None

    I always found Belgium asphyxiating, like a really bad public service on steroids. I don’t know how you can maintain any sort of self dignity as an engineer working for food stamps.

  165. “That’s the conversation we have had with Qantas. Alan Joyce is very clear they have an inclusion policy — it is about every one of their employees living towards that,” she said. “That’s fundamentally what a sport like rugby has to be.”

    And here was me thinking Rugby was about ……. winning matches!

  166. Roger.

    “That’s the conversation we have had with Qantas. Alan Joyce is very clear they have an inclusion policy — it is about every one of their employees living towards that,” she said. “That’s fundamentally what a sport like rugby has to be.”

    We demand gender and racial quotas for the Wallabies!

  167. nerblnob

    Someone needs to ask about the gender gap of deaths at work.

    97% male last time I looked.

  168. Bruce of Newcastle

    Thanks Tom for a marathon effort!
    I think Beattie and Comey should get together.

  169. Herodotus

    Morland channeling Delonas.

  170. woolfe

    Comment in Owellian on ongoing Folau saga

    Accenture operates in two locations in Malaysia where LGBT rights are unrecognised and sodomy is a crime. If Accenture feel so strongly about LGBT rights then they should remove themselves from Malaysia.

  171. calli

    Yep. Branco then Gorrell for the chuckles.

  172. calli

    By the way, where is Delonas today. Did the creeping TDS get him?

  173. OldOzzie

    <strong>JUDITH SLOAN
    High immigration rate a great deal for the few

    I thought I got it. No change to the formal number of the annual permanent immigrant intake but a lot going on behind the scenes to ensure that the 190,000 figure won’t be met. Tell the department to do more checks, go slow, bring New Zealand residents living in Australia into the program and voila, the number could be as low as 170,000.

    That sounds better. No formal announcement, just a lower number that might calm stressed residents of Melbourne and Sydney, in particular.

    But then we have another drop by another senior politician. This time it’s the promotional immigration report we would expect from the Department of Immigration (now Home Affairs) and Treasury — yes, both those departments would say that.

    Mind you, the net annual economic gain is very small: 0.1 per cent of gross domestic product — smaller than a rounding error. The report also contains the fallacy that immigration has a favourable effect on the age profile of the population even though the immigrants themselves age.

    Only if the immigration numbers are ramped up — year in, year out — will there be any effect on ageing, that’s why it’s the equivalent of a Ponzi scheme, which is now being endorsed by Treasury.

    No consideration is given in the report to the cost of congestion, the loss of urban amenity, overcrowded schools and hospitals, environmental pressures and the like associated with immigration. You might have thought the ridiculous and expensive expansion of Treasury into Sydney and Melbourne (there is even a Perth office) could have given some insights into the daily pressures people feel as those cities grow too rapidly.

    But here’s the way the boosters weasel their way out of this dilemma: fix up infrastructure and Bob will be everyone’s uncle. How long have we been hearing that one? And, by the way, it’s been getting worse, not better.

    And as for those silly figures about tax revenue gained from having immigrants — well, not refugees — there is no account of associated costs. And we know these costs are borne by the states and territories, so I guess the Treasurer doesn’t really care.

    But here’s something to think about: if these immigrants add to our tax revenue when they come to Australia, are we depriving the less developed countries from which they came of tax revenue that could be very helpful in those countries? In other words, should we be considering the moral argument about bringing in immigrants from countries that could well use their services so that they can pay taxes in Australia?

    But let’s not get too worried about the skilled immigrants being very skilled, because Bob Birrell’s analysis clearly shows non-English-speaking, overseas-born graduates of Australian universities who remain here as skilled immigrants are half as likely to be in professional or managerial jobs as Australian-born graduates. Our skill program is actually very weak and easy to game, particularly the ­employer-sponsored component.

    The real trouble for the government is it is proving itself utterly incapable of controlling the rate of growth of the population, now almost an extra 400,000 a year, mostly due to immigration. And if that’s not alarm­ing enough, most new arrivals go to Melbourne and Sydney.

    The temporary program is proving unmanageable. The surge in international students is partly because of streamlined visa processing by the Department of Home Affairs, which seems like a very strange outcome.

    It’s time to consider ways of restricting temporary immigration. And let’s not forget that many immigrants come here on a temporary basis only because they expect to become permanent residents in due course.

    The reality is the government has lost the confidence of great swaths of the population when it comes to immigration — and the government knows it. It is all over the shop. One minute there is a triumphal announcement that the permanent immigrant cap won’t be met, so we can all feel slightly relieved. The next we are told immigration is one of the biggest economic gains around.

    Of course, what Treasury won’t admit is that the distribution of those gains are snaffled mainly by the immigrants themselves, and the businesses that can secure larger domestic markets — think property developers, in particular — and save on paying for training. It’s a great deal for them. Whether it’s a great deal for everyone else is an open question.

  174. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    High immigration is good for the national interest

    The Australian
    12:00AM April 18, 2018

    A big, carefully composed immigration intake is good for Australia. The latest proof comes in a report from the federal Treasury and the Department of Home Affairs that estimates our permanent migration program will add up to one percentage point to gross domestic product growth each year. We attract skilled migrants with bankable qualifications who are likely to pay more in tax than they take in services, something essential if our nation is to live within its means. Their relative youth helps offset the costs that come with an ageing society. They lift productivity and the workforce participation rate. The report dispels the myth that skilled migrants displace locals from jobs or rob them of hours and wages; new arrivals generate demand for goods and services. We need the inflow of human and financial capital. Without investment, growth falters. A shortage of skilled workers pushes up costs, as the US is finding.

    Economics is not the only test of an immigration program. In the counter-terror era, Australia wisely has put more emphasis on selecting migrants who not only pose no threat but also positively embrace our democratic, pluralist values. What’s at stake is civic cohesion and public safety within a successful multicultural nation. Last week, we reported that the permanent intake this year is expected to fall by more than 20,000 places from its ceiling figure of 190,000. The main reason is tighter vetting rules that took effect in 2015. A temporary drop in numbers is no bad thing if it’s necessary to guarantee security and quality in the program. Public support for a high immigration intake depends on confidence that the government polices our borders effectively and runs visa programs consistent with the national interest. Australians also understand that a bigger population is better and safer, in a geostrategic sense, for a large, sparsely settled country in a region beset by land hunger.

    The other vital element of our migration program is provision for refugees. Former prime minister Tony Abbott agreed to take 12,000 refugees from Syria and Iraq. On top of that, our total humanitarian intake will rise to 18,750 in 2018-19. On Monday’s ABC Q&A program Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch, suggested Australia should accept more Syrians. He misses the big picture. We have a proud record as one of the most generous destinations for refugees resettled via the UNHCR, and we do so within the context of one of the fastest migration growth rates within the OECD.

    Monday’s immigration report makes the unsurprising point that a high number of new arrivals adds to pressure on housing and infrastructure. That’s not an argument against immigration, it’s a reminder of the need for good and prudent planning. For global cities, Sydney and Melbourne do not have much density at all. Better land release and zoning can free up housing supply. As for infrastructure, cities that are key migrant destinations (especially Sydney) are making up for past neglect but it will take time before congestion is alleviated. Meanwhile, it’s worth reflecting on the fact a well-run and sizeable immigration program makes us a smarter, wealthier and more defensible country.

  175. OldOzzie

    Chinese defy warnings and flock to Australian universities

    Chinese students have defied unspecified ‘‘safety’’ warnings from their government amid fears of undue Chinese influence, flocking to Australia in larger numbers this year than ever before.

    Official figures to be released today show 173,000 Chinese students enrolled in Australian universities, colleges and schools in the first two months of 2018, 18 per cent more than in the same period last year.

    In total, 542,000 students from more than 190 countries have enrolled in Australia so far this year, according to the latest data. This is 13 per cent more than for the same period last year, indicating yet another boost is on the way for education exports, which were valued at $32.2 billion in 2017.

    Federal Education Minister Simon Birmingham said the new figures showed Australia was “on track to continue our record-breaking run of growth in international education”. He said education exports supported about 130,000 jobs in tourism, retail and hospitality, on top of those in universities, colleges and schools. The continued growth in Chinese student numbers is a relief to universities which feared political tension between the two countries, as well as two official Chinese warnings to students about safety concerns in Australia, could turn them away.

    The prestige Group of Eight universities are particularly reliant on Chinese student fees to fund research programs.

    Group of Eight chief executive Vicki Thomson said the continued growth in student numbers showed that “despite the current political rhetoric outside of our sector, international students, particularly those from China, continue to see Australia, and importantly the Group of Eight, as a high-quality destination”.

    But others point out that when the Chinese safety warnings were made in December and February, it was too late for students to withdraw from enrolment and political tension could still have repercussions down the track.

    Federal Education Minister Simon Birmingham said the government’s international education strategy, which brought a “whole of government” approach to the sector, was instrumental in forging the growth.

    “We won’t make the same mistakes as the previous Labor government with their erratic changes to student visas that took years for our international education sector to recover,” he said.

    Student numbers from other countries also grew strongly in January and February. Enrolments from India, the second-largest student source, grew 16 per cent to 63,000, while Nepal enrolments went up an astonishing 57 per cent to 29,000 to make it the third-largest student source.

    Industry observers say the chaos of the 2015 Nepal earthquake has caused more Nepalese families to send their children to Australia for education.

    Student numbers from Latin America are also rising strongly with Brazil up 26 per cent to 19,000 and Colombia up 29 per cent to 12,000.

    International Education of Australia CEO Phil Honeywood said part of Australia’ success was due to other countries toughening visa rules for students.

    From the Comments

    – Most international students are hoping to achieve “back door” entry to permanent residency in Australia. This is part of the out of control Immigration rate we are experiencing. International students should be required to return home at the end of study and apply from their own country if they wish to migrate here

    – “toughening visa rules for students”……what, they now have to speak at least a little English ?

    – Chinese students, by the hundreds of thousands, just like all the Indian. students are not just here for the education, the product their families are paying for is permanent residence followed by Australian citizenship ship. The student will eventually bring in their family. All will gain free first world health, education and welfare, much of the family wealth will be transferred to Australia, and made more secure. It will be and invested in real estate, residential, retail and commercial, and at the end of the day, the absence of death duties is the icing on the cake. So that dubious Uni degree, or that much shorter dodgy diploma at Immigration/Education Scam Pty Ltd is looker better and better

    – This immigration dwarfs the official figures discussed. Over half a million enrolled this year. How many ever go home? Clearly Australia is for sale.

    – o go home would be to defeat the whole purpose of the exercise, their families would be furious at the failure of such a very promising investment.

    – Yes, and all with the hope of obtaining permanent residency after completing their degrees. Look hard people, these students will ultimately be your competition for an otherwise unexceptional three bedroom house in the suburbs in four years time.

    – Let’s not fool ourselves, the Chinese are smart. They subsidise our universities research but get visa/residency at the end of the process! It’s as simple as that. No inheritance tax in Australia is a big positive for them.

    Can someone tell me how many of these temporary residents (overseas students) stay in Australian each year after they finish their degree? And is this number of stayers each year included in the annual immigration count?

    – Why are we educating the worlds children while our own have no future. visit the shopping malls and see our children wandering around in the middle of the day. Doesn’t our politicians realise four years study then another year advanced study equals citizenship and then family reun ification entitlements. We are being invaded.
    FlagShare

  176. OldOzzie

    Claimed wind farm generation figures fall well short of actuals

    Unfavourable winds appear to have clipped the wings of the wind farms in the national electricity market, with their actual power production coming in about 11 per cent below their claimed production capacity in the year to July 2017.

    Only four wind farms connected to the NEM that services Queensland, NSW, Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia exceeded their claimed capacity in 2016-17.

    Production figures released by the Clean Energy Regulator show AGL’s Macarthur Wind Farm in Victoria produced 894,077 MWh compared with a claimed capacity of 1.29 million MWh for the financial year.

    AGL’s Oaklands Hill Wind Farm, also in Victoria, produced 170,182 MWh compared with a claimed capacity of 205,422MWh, a shortfall of 35,240MWh, while its Wattle Point Wind Farm in South Australia produced 233,053MWh compared with a claimed capacity of 360,000MWh, a shortfall of 126,947 MWh in the period.

    “Performance in FY2017 was primarily affected by planned outages at Macarthur, and unfavourable wind for all farms,’’ AGL said.

    The shortfall in generation by wind farms comes amid Greens attacks on the reliability of coal-fired generation. Late last year, Greens climate change spokesman Adam Bandt branded coal “unreliable’’ and said coal-fired stations struggled in the heat.

    Research by the Australian Energy Council said coal-fired power stations had the highest capacity factor in all states except Tasmania and the Northern Territory, where the primary generation was from hydro and gas-fired plants.

    The capacity factor of a power station is the electricity produced represented as a percentage of the theoretical maximum a plant could produce if it ran at maximum output 24 hours a day for a full year.

    The Australian Energy Council research, published in November, showed the capacity factor of coal ranged from 56 per cent in Western Australia to 81 per cent in Victoria in the 2015-16 year. The capacity factor of wind farms ranged from 30 per cent in Victoria to 37 per cent in Tasmania.

  177. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Starbucks closing 8,000 US stores on May 29 to conduct ‘racial bias training’

    Everybody is exactly the same, all differences are evil illusions of social constructs.

  178. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    In total, 542,000 students from more than 190 countries have enrolled in Australia so far this year, according to the latest data.

    Train the best, keep the rest.

  179. John Constantine

    Decolonisation is the express intent of allowing migration agents run by foreign Mafia’s to sell Australia’s citizenship at cents in the dollar through the education Rort.

    Imagine their left if agricultural colleges offer agricultural degrees with inform working placements to a hundred thousand south African farmers a year?.

    Self funding through the working part and family reunion at the end?.

    This is the product sold to Chinese and subcontinent tribes.

    Decolonisation through corruption is our Merit.

    Comrades.

  180. 132andBush


    Starbucks closing 8,000 US stores on May 29 to conduct ‘racial bias training’

    Everybody is exactly the same, all differences are evil illusions of social constructs.

    Implying everyone who works there is a racist.
    Beginning of the end for Starbucks.

  181. cynical1

    So that lunatic D’ath has floated the idea of non gender specific birth certificates in Qld.

    Err, what are you going to call your sprog?

    Call it “David” or “Paul” and you are taking liberties.

    It may identify as a she (with a penis).

    Maybe the most popular baby’s name in future will be “X”.

    I fucking hate “Progressives”.

  182. OldOzzie

    Labor’s $3.75bn retiree savings grab revealed – Simon Benson – NATIONAL AFFAIRS EDITOR

    More than $3.75 billion would be wiped from almost 2000 small ­retail superannuation funds and 50 of the largest retail funds over the next 10 years, in a second-round hit to 2.6 million member accounts under Labor’s plans to scrap refundable tax credits for retirees.

    In a direct challenge to Bill Shorten’s claim that APRA-­regulated super funds would be largely unaffected by the $56bn tax grab on retirees, updated Australian Tax Office figures due to be released show the majority of APRA funds claimed refunds for imputation credits in 2015-16.

    The refunds assessed by the ATO amounted to $309 million for the year, which if averaged over the 10-year life of Labor’s tax policy would amount to $3.75bn, based on a 3.5 per cent growth rate.

    While Labor’s policy would draw the bulk of the refunds from self-managed super funds — estimated to be $2.6bn — and high-wealth individuals, Treasury analysis of ATO data reveals the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority-regulated funds that would be affected represent 2.6 million member accounts.

    Labor claims that only 10 per cent of APRA-regulated funds would be affected by the changes, but the government said the ATO data revealed that 2013 of the 2603 APRA-regulated funds received franking credit refunds worth $308,844,250 in 2015-16.

    he majority of the funds had fewer than five people. Of the 2363 small APRA-regulated funds, 1963 received refundable franking credits worth $74m.

    While the Opposition Leader has argued that the large retail funds would not be affected, the Treasury analysis reveals that 50 out of 240 of the large APRA regulated funds — comprising hundreds of thousands of members — received refundable franking credits worth $235m.

    The 2031 APRA-regulated funds potentially affected are on top of the 200,000 self-managed super funds that were the primary target of Labor’s policy.

    As people often hold more than one super account, it is estimated the number of people who are members of an ordinary retail or industry super fund that would be affected could be several hundred thousand and possibly more than one million.

    The analysis used by the government contradicts claims by Labor and industry super funds that the policy would have little to no impact on the majority of funds because most imputation credits would be exhausted because of the tax liabilities of most funds.

    The Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia has warned that retail investors could be affected by the policy directly through their superannuation funds as well as any shares outside their fund.

    Mr Shorten was forced into a politically damaging change to the policy last month, two weeks after it was announced, following an admission that low-income pensioners with modest equities ­investments would lose annual franking credit refunds.

    The strategic retreat to protect 300,000 pensioners and welfare recipients from the policy shaved $3bn from the $59bn that Labor claimed would be savings but which the government has ­attacked as a tax grab.

    Scott Morrison said the new analysis meant that many pensioners and retirees stood to be hit twice by Labor’s plan.

    “This is just another example of how shifty Bill Shorten has been over his plan to thieve the ­legitimate tax refunds of older Australians, now revealed to hit hundreds of thousands of Australians, including pensioners, through their super fund ­accounts, costing them around $3.75 billion,” the Treasurer told The Australian.

    “Once again Labor’s retiree tax has been exposed as hitting pensioners and retirees on low ­incomes. This has occurred either through the further incompetence of his shadow treasurer, Chris Bowen, who has muffed this policy from day one, or Bill Shorten’s own menace in deliberately hiding the impact.”

    Mr Bowen yesterday maintained that the only 10 per cent of cash refunds went to APRA funds.

    “Labor was upfront when making the announcement on ­reforms to dividend imputation that 90 per cent of all cash refunds to super funds accrued to SMSFs with just 10 per cent going to APRA-regulated funds (based on 2014-15 ATP data),” he said.

    “Industry Super Australia, which represents the superannuation of five million Australians, has said that Labor’s reforms ‘will have little or no impact on the super of most Australians’ and ‘super funds where most Australians have their retirement savings will be largely unaffected by this proposal because the imputation credits are exhausted offsetting tax liabilities of the fund’.

    “The fundamental issue is that Australia can no longer afford to give out cash refunds — it is projected to cost the budget up to $8bn a year in the next 10 years.”

    ASFA chief executive Martin Fahy said the industry was calling for a halt to any more changes to superannuation from both side of politics.

    “Until legislation is drafted and the detail fully specified, we cannot be certain how many people or funds will be affected,” Mr Fahy said.

    “ASFA remains concerned about possible unintended consequences of such a measure on ­retirement outcomes.

    “Furthermore, we continue to call on politicians to cease tinkering with the superannuation system as it undermines confidence.”

    Mr Shorten has defended the policy, claiming that the refunds are paid to a “few very wealthy people who are already very ­comfortable”.

    Industry super funds, which are heavily influenced by union membership on their boards, have welcomed the policy but claim the proceeds should be ­reinvested to improve the super system.

    From the Comments

    – Cut the super contributions to politicians and public servants and the $$$ yield from that will make it unnecessary to ROB from self-funded retirees who worked hard and saved to be independent of other taxpayers in their retirement.

    – I’m surprised he hasn’t tried to grab control of all Super funds. After all, Shorten the Socialist stated that Superannuation was a national asset. Wait for more plundering.

    – Absolutely disgraceful. Australia can not afford a Shorten-Labor Government.

    – How about what happens to share prices when billions of dollars is wiped from full tax paying companies share prices (rotten banks) and moved to low taxed companies, property trusts, offshore investment companies, offshore share markets etc. The value of union controlled super funds will slump? Oops!

    – Shorten + Bowen (+ Turnbull + O’Dwyer + Morrison + Cormann):

    “How dare the kulaks be more productive! How dare they save for themselves! How dare they be independent!

    We demand fairness and equality for all, and in the interests of the people we will share the wealth of the kulaks with the people. Some of the wealth will be confiscated to compensate the government for it’s brave and heroic efforts in bringing about fairness and equality for all.

    Remember the mission my good subjects – Government good, kulaks bad”.

    – At least LiaraBillity Shorten is consistent. Consistently wrong, consistently coming up with policies to favor his mates and dud retirees. Shorten and Bowen are Australia’s Beagle Boys intent on taking everything away from those who want to get off the government pension system. They are First Class dopes who cannot be trusted.

    – I would love both sides politics, as ASFA chief executive Martin Fahy says, to halt any further changes to superannuation. My impression as to why compulsory superannuation contributions were introduced in the 1990s was so that when Australians retire, they can live comfortable in their retirement, without receiving the Age Pension from the Commonwealth. By reducing their ability to live off on their superannuation, will increase more retirees to receive the Age Pension, or part thereof. Thus, increasing Age Pension liability to the Commonwealth. Also, by halting changes to Superannuation, Australians will be able to make a more informed decision with their superannuation in their retirement.

  183. John Constantine

    If south African migration agents opened hole in the wall universities in the west Australian grain belt, selling agricultural uni degrees as the students drove farm machinery as exams, then did family reunion after the citizenship came through, watch the left ignite in racist rage.

    The migration agents of the subcontinent and China are just more skilled at corruption than the saffies, so will have millions of their clients in Australia while Africa positions itself for the final solution to the Boer problem.

  184. OldOzzie

    ALP presidency vote dogged by rigging warnings even before it starts – Brad Norington – ASSOCIATE EDITOR

    The ALP’s contest for its national presidency has been dragged into allegations of potential vote-rigging even before it starts as doubts grow about the “integrity” of its planned online ballot.

    Senior Labor officials told The Australian there were serious ­security issues surrounding the running of the secret ballot of party members because of easy ­access to their personal details held in head office files.

    They said the company running the presidency ballot had the capacity to use high-security methods such as those used for online banking to safeguard voters — but the system remained vulnerable in relying on just a party member’s name, address, membership number and date of birth.

    The ALP national presidency ballot — to run from May 4 to June 15 — has become a heated contest as Labor frontbencher Mark Butler seeks a second term as the left’s main candidate, and squares off against the right’s candidate, former treasurer Wayne Swan.

    When nominations closed last Friday, two other contenders emerged, with Mich-Elle Myers running as an alternative left candidate with backing from construction, maritime and rail unions, and Labor senator Claire Moore running as part of Mr ­Butler’s group.

    As the ALP increasingly shifts to online ballots for elections to party positions, security issues emerged this week with an official complaint to the NSW ALP about how one winning candidate from the central coast “assisted” party members when they voted to choose delegates for the ALP’s ­national conference in July.

    The candidate, Labor staffer Emma Murphy, has confirmed in writing she “assisted” four party members with online secret ballots — but insists she acted on the “instruction” of party members, and consistent with guidelines, ­including when one “provided her birthday so that her vote could be cast”.

    The future of an appeal against Ms Murphy’s election remains ­unclear, but party insiders said the incident highlighted a potential vulnerability in the online method more broadly for the ALP national presidency ballot affecting 53,500 party members nationwide.

    “We’ve raised the issue of integrity (with the ALP’s national secretariat) because of past practices — we’ve seen rorting before,” a senior left source said.

    “What we’ve asked is to put in place one safeguard — no running list of who’s voted. So you shouldn’t be able to tell who’s voted, which is something I could see happening.”

    Another senior Labor figure said online voting was at its weakest in the latter stages of a ballot when it became clear who had not voted, and was not likely to do so.

    It was then possible, without protection, for party insiders ­favouring one candidate to access membership details and “harvest votes” by voting on behalf of ­others using a single IP computer address.

    The ALP’s national secretariat also faces complaints over allegedly “discriminatory” ballot rules that will deny party members aged over 66 the automatic right to online voting for the ALP national presidency.

    Instead elderly voters are ­required to make traditional postal votes — unless they specially ­request online participation.

    From the Comments

    – I wonder if the Russians will interfere?

    – Just because you are dead it doesn’t mean you cant vote. Corpse Rights Now!
    FlagShare
    4BarbaraJimgejKathrynLikeReply
    Avatar for Mark
    Mark
    24 minutes ago

    How anyone could vote for Wayne Swan is beyond me after the lies and damage he did to Australia.
    FlagShare
    4BarbaraJimKennygejLikeReply
    Avatar for Mark
    Mark
    25 minutes ago

    Vote rigging by Labor? No!! not Labor, they are always really honest when it comes to voting practises. Just look at their past record, oh wait.
    FlagShare
    4BarbaraJimgejKennyLikeReply
    Avatar for David
    David
    33 minutes ago

    “We have raised the level of integrity “. LOL

    DW
    FlagShare
    4JimKennygejJeffreyLikeReply
    Avatar for David
    David
    31 minutes ago

    “Issue “
    FlagShare
    LikeReply
    Avatar for Paul
    Paul
    34 minutes ago

    ALP and “integrity” in the same article, nay, the same sentence? Now there’s a first!
    FlagShare
    6JimKennygejKenLikeReply
    Avatar for Mark
    Mark
    35 minutes ago

    Are we surprised?
    FlagShare
    9JimKennygejBryanLikeReply
    Avatar for John
    John
    1 hour ago

    Whats the problem…? thats how Labor rolls.
    FlagShare
    12JimKennygejKenLikeReply
    Avatar for David
    David
    7 hours ago

    I had an old traditional Labor mate who always used to say “Vote early and vote often”, somethings never change!
    FlagShare
    15JimKennygejKenLikeReply
    More Stories
    US joining TPP ‘not policy’
    Larry Kudlow (C), Director of the National Economic Council, leaves following a speech by US President Donald Trump about tax cuts during an event with American workers in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, April 12, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB
    Cameron Stewart

    White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow says US interest in rejoining Trans Pacific Partnership “more a thought than policy.”

    Criticism ‘won’t stop attacks’
    Vladimir Putin
    Supratim Adhikari

    Criticism of Russia is unlikely to dissuade the Kremlin from using hacking as a weapon, a cyber expert says.

    Offensive to hit Russian hackers
    Taylor
    PRIMROSE RIORDAN, CAMERON STEWART

    Australia could respond to last year’s Russian cyber-attack with further sanctions or by using its new offensive cyber capabilities.

    – How anyone could vote for Wayne Swan is beyond me after the lies and damage he did to Australia.

    – Vote rigging by Labor? No!! not Labor, they are always really honest when it comes to voting practises. Just look at their past record, oh wait.

    – “We have raised the level of integrity “. LOL

    ALP and “integrity” in the same article, nay, the same sentence? Now there’s a first!

  185. “That’s the conversation we have had with Qantas. Alan Joyce is very clear they have an inclusion policy — it is about every one of their employees living towards that,” she said. “That’s fundamentally what a sport like rugby has to be.”

    If you have a policy that excludes orthodox Christians it is not an inclusion policy, but in fact the opposite, an exclusion policy.

  186. OldOzzie

    Apologies for the Coments stuff up above – eyes not working properly at the moment

  187. OldOzzie

    GRAHAM RICHARDSON
    Banking greed must be punished swiftly and harshly


    Anyone following the revelations of the Banking Royal Commission will have had their suspicions confirmed as day after day we are confronted by the greed of these massive financial institutions.

    This sorry saga once again demonstrates why the banks are so unpopular. Nobody wants to deal with them which is the reason more than half of the home mortgages in our country are handled by brokers. The mob worked the banks out years ago and they will now go to great lengths to minimise the dealings they have with them. Consequently, ordinary punters let the brokers shop around the banks and come up with the result.

    Australians would have been entitled to believe that when the government moved to prevent the big banks and the likes of AMP from owning financial planners that some of the rorts would stop. The conflict of interest in a planner recommending the products of the company which owns his or her business was too obvious to be allowed to carry on forever — or so we thought. AMP has admitted to the Royal Commission that it chose to mislead the Australian Securities and Investments Commission on a regular basis. This is a truly staggering admission. The average punter has always suspected that there is one law for the rich and powerful and one for the rest of us. If any ordinary citizen intentionally and deliberately misleads ASIC you know a crime has been committed and that perjury charges are coming.

    As a senior AMP officer calmly explains to the Commission the litany of lies presented by the company to ASIC, there was a ring of truth to the theory that the law applies differently to individuals depending on where they stand on the social scale.

    We have been promised by the counsel assisting the commission, Rowena Orr QC, more investigation of Storm Financial and this will be about time. Those behind the glorified Ponzi scheme that Storm Financial most certainly was, encouraged people without great resources to take out second mortgages and empty their superannuation funds chasing interest returns that could never have been met. No one has spent one hour in prison as a result of a disgraceful rort which sent thousands of people, often elderly with no hope of starting again, broke and penniless. Someone must pay for this, particularly given the role of several banks in this scandal.

    Already we have heard how money can change hands and loans advanced on the basis of inflated valuations. All of the horrors so far though pale in comparison to the AMP charging customers fees for services which were never rendered. It is tantamount to Dick Turpin holding up a stagecoach. This is just plain rotten and yet AMP seems only to be modestly embarrassed, and that embarrassment is more about being caught rather than committing the act itself. Eighteen times AMP mislead ASIC and if that doesn’t result in serious charges being laid against individuals and not merely fines, then that will be another scandal to add to those revealed so far.

    The whole country is watching this and for once we have all dared to hope that real action might be taken. If you fine one of the banks or AMP $1 million it will not matter a damn. The only way is to see the individuals, be they in AMP or Storm Financial, who oversaw the swindling of thousands of ordinary Australians, being hit with serious criminal charges.

    The mob is right. There should be one law for all.

  188. OldOzzie

    JANET ALBRECHTSEN
    ACTU boss Sally McManus is outperforming government frontbench

    ACTU boss Sally McManus said on the ABC’s Insiders last Sunday: “It is actually the law of the jungle, and the tigers are winning.”

    Oh Sally, let’s be honest. You’re the tiger. Not the big bosses that you disparage as evil Dickensian types, those rich chaps who you say have shiny yachts and throw a few crumbs to workers. You know that’s tosh. And as for the industrial relations jungle, no one on the centre-right side of politics has been game enough to seriously enter that realm since John Howard left office. That jungle is yours alone, tiger.

    But I have to admit I have a slight girl-crush on McManus. Of course, our politics couldn’t be more different. Her cravings for more collectivism, more centralised power in the hands of union leaders are abhorrent to anyone who reveres individual freedom and understands that unemployment falls when the economy grows. And neither of those aims is part of McManus’s regressive agenda. She just is not a believer in growing the national pie.

    That said, when authenticity is rare in Australian politics, the ACTU boss has cornered the market, outperforming the government frontbench. That makes McManus our Jeremy Corbyn. She oozes Corbyn’s class war convictions, channelling his hatred of the rich with no comprehension of basic economics.

    Sure, she’s younger than him, and her Wiki page, which reads as if it has been cleansed by the KGB, fits her persona: more icy-cold Soviet Russia than warm Cuba. Yet still the unsmiling McManus has the earnestness of Corbyn. Given few in Britain ­expected his success as a left-wing populist, she might be a potent political leader here one day.

    McManus is compelling enough right now, taking the union movement on to the field of industrial relations reform, playing hard even without an adversary. And when there’s only one team on the field, it wins by default. The sooner the Liberals realise this, the sooner they might re-enter that arena.

    At the moment, play is going Sally’s way. Yesterday at Melbourne Town Hall, the ACTU held a “change the rules” rally, part of a campaign to demand new industrial relations laws giving unions even more power. No shrinking violet, McManus is a regular on ABC radio and television. She performed her greatest hits at the National Press Club last month and repeated that rendition on Insiders

    Her appearance on the ABC’s Q&A in February was a tour de force. Up against three solid proponents of facts and reason — James Pearson from the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, businesswoman Heather Ridout and Chris Richardson from Deloitte Access Economics — McManus dominated the evening with her collection of classic hits of emotional assertions devoid of supporting facts. Not even a trio of fact-checkers could neutralise McManus’s scary ability to sound as if she is the voice of reason when she’s not.

    Just as the Turnbull government took too long to see the potency of Labor’s “Mediscare” campaign, it hasn’t worked out that McManus packs a punch. If it did, it would be vigilant in battling every absurd claim she makes every time she makes it, instead of occasional pea-shooting retorts.

    Her most constant and captivating claims don’t stand up to the facts. McManus told her Q&A audience that “profits are up at 20 per cent and wages are at 2 per cent. There’s something wrong. It’s not being shared fairly at the moment.”

    Something is certainly wrong with that: her grasp of facts. Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows that business profits rose 5 per cent in the year to December and the total wage bill rose 4.8 per cent. And basic economics tells you that wages head up when unemployment, now at 5.5 per cent, heads down, and unemployment falls when businesses grow.

    Another McManus classic hit is that productivity has risen while wages haven’t. It sounds dreadfully unfair. Except that’s not true either. According to the ABS, in real terms, consumer wages have risen 54 per cent during the past 25 years and productivity rose 51 per cent in the same period.

    Insecure work is spreading, says McManus, deliberately using an emotional term not measured by any one set of statistics. If McManus means casual work is on the up, the Productivity Commission found that the percentage of casual workers, at 21 per cent, hasn’t changed for two decades. If McManus means contractors are in insecure work, that empty claim is exposed by the real world of Uber and hundreds of thousands in the modern economy who choose the flexibility and freedom of contracting over nine-to-five permanent jobs.

    McManus’s class-war rhetoric about big companies is intoxicating politics, but it’s entirely bogus too. She says big companies such as Qantas, BHP and Boeing “earn billions but pay no tax”.

    As ABC economics guru Emma Alberici was recently reminded, companies pay company tax on profits after paying all their expenses. And far from the wild claim that big companies are ripping us off, it’s likelier to be workers dudding the system. Tax commissioner Chris Jordan has said many times now that “the work-related expenses gap is estimated to be greater than the large corporate tax gap of $2.5 billion”.

    But you have to hand it to McManus. Any mention of a corporate tax cut elicits masterful “trickle down” imagery from McManus. She talks of rich blokes who are “so incredibly rich, people like us can’t even imagine how much money they’ve got” and they decide “to throw a few crumbs to their workers”.

    No mention that tax cuts grow companies, creating jobs. Or that that almost 60 per cent of small business owners who would benefit from a corporate tax cut earn $50,000 or less, well below the median award wage.

    Equally spurious is her claim that “the basic right to strike in Australia is very nearly dead”. The right to strike is in the Fair Work Act, enacted by Labor. Nothing has changed.

    That brings us to the real fraud at the core of the ACTU’s change the rules campaign. The ACTU boss started saying the “system is broken” when a decision by the Fair Work Commission went against a union. Don’t agree with the umpire? Scream about a broken system. The system is broken, but not in the way that McManus claims. Fewer workers are covered by enterprise agreements, down from 1.2 million in 2010 to just over 500,000 last year, because EAs are complex to negotiate and inflexible in practice. More workers fall under the convoluted system of awards, not replicated by any other developed economy.

    McManus’s prescriptions of more powerful unions, industry-wide pay claims and strike action, a “living wage” paid by goodness knows who, higher taxes for ­companies and so on would be a disaster for economic growth, unemployment and sustainable wage rises.

    It’s bad enough that her influence is bolstered by unions bankrolling the Labor Party, now in poll position to win the next election. It’s even worse that the Liberals have emboldened her. There is no contest of ideas from the Liberals, no fight to reform workplace laws for the 21st century, let alone to tackle her wild claims of a jungle ruled by evil bosses with the same passion.

    It’s true that the Business Council of Australia, led by Jennifer Westacott, has stepped up to the plate. But right now, McManus is a tiger, and it’s not just down to her convictions. It’s because a supine and silent government ­amplifies her roar.

  189. Tom

    By the way, where is Delonas today. Did the creeping TDS get him?

    He’s one of those layabouts the yarts is full of, Calli — only works when he feels like it (or has to pay some bills).

  190. OldOzzie

    RICHARD GLUYAS
    AMP’s reputation in tatters as fee-for-no-service cover-up exposed

    AMP’s reputation as a venerated and trusted institution, painstakingly built up over 169 years, has been trashed in a day and a half of grubby evidence before the financial services royal commission.

    The late US president Richard Nixon can attest that it’s ultimately the cover-up — and not the crime — that really matters.

    It was a version of Watergate that sprang to mind yesterday as senior counsel assisting Michael Hodge’s official count of the number of times AMP had misled ASIC over its fee-for-no-advice scandal clicked past 20, and evidence was presented that law firm Clayton Utz had shared 25 drafts of its 2017 “independent” report on the practice with AMP.

    The commission heard that AMP chair Catherine Brenner went into bat for chief executive Craig Meller before the board settled on the final version of the ­report.

    In an October 11, 2017 email sent by AMP group counsel Brian Salter to Clayton Utz partner Nicholas Mavrakis, Brenner asked for the inclusion of a statement that Meller was “unaware of the practices or their illegality”.

    AMP believed Meller had not seen internal legal advice that the practice was illegal, and had not been involved in communications with ASIC after a breach report was lodged with the watchdog in 2015.

    Four days later, in an email to Salter, Brenner asked for some talking points on Meller for a scheduled meeting with ASIC chair Greg Medcraft, and others, to present the final Clayton Utz ­report.

    “Has Clayton Utz now included in their report that we will give to ASIC their findings on Craig?” the AMP chair asked in an email copied to Meller.

    Salter forwarded the question to Mavrakis.

    The commission heard there were two unusual aspects to the email.

    First, it was not sent to AMP group executive, advice, Jack Regan, despite his status as one of only two people in the group with day-to-day dealings with Clayton Utz.

    Asked for his response, Regan, under cross-examination yesterday for a second consecutive day, said that the report was “substantially settled by the board”, the general counsel and Clayton Utz.

    The second unusual aspect was the level of interaction between AMP and Clayton Utz.

    After further evidence of more exchanges between the company and the law firm, Regan agreed he had a “level of discomfort” about representing the report as independent to ASIC because of the “significant amount of interchange” between AMP and Mavrakis. Hodge asked Regan if Mavrakis could have been in any doubt whatsoever about the preferred Clayton Utz outcomes by AMP’s most senior people.

    “That’s up to Mr Mavrakis to determine,” Regan said.

    Commissioner Kenneth Hayne clearly had concerns about AMP’s degree of influence.

    In yet another bombshell shortly before the commission adjourned, Hayne acknowledged there might be questions about the role of AMP senior management and others in a report that was ­submitted to ASIC as independent.

    “It is a matter for AMP and its advisers whether it seeks to have some opportunity to provide any material which goes beyond the evidence given by Mr Regan about that matter and the documents that tendered in relation to it,” the commissioner said. Suffice to say that AMP has a target plastered all over its back after yesterday’s damning evidence.

    Against an otherwise solid performance by the overall market, the company’s share price sagged 4.4 per cent.

    Brenner said last month that Meller would step down before the end of the year, but the CEO is now hanging by a thread. Serious governance concerns have also rocked the board, raising questions about Brenner’s future.

    Canberra has had a lot of fun kicking the banks around, and inevitably there will be more to come before Hayne hands in his final report next February.

    But as things currently stand, it’s AMP that has shown the most pressing need for a radical overhaul of its culture.

    Yes, much of the behaviour is historical, but Brenner, her fellow directors and senior management bear responsibility for the way the misconduct has been handled.

    Regan, who was appointed in January last year to clean up the mess, has emerged with his reputation mostly intact, and yesterday offered his own thoughts on organisational culture.

    Asked about the culture of AMP’s advice business, he said it wasn’t as robust as it should be.

    He agreed with Hodge that a conscious decision had been made to protect profitability at the possible expense of AMP’s licence.

    “But I think there are other elements that are concerning as well,” Regan said. “I think there is clearly a lack of clarity in terms of the way directions are being given, but also there’s a concern about the degree to which things should have been escalated as a result of the things identified further down.”

    Had profitability also been prioritised at the expense of the law, Hodge asked. “Absolutely,” Regan said. “Absolutely.”

  191. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    NT powers up as reality bites

    While hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has created an oil and gas boom in the US during the past decade, most states in Australia have been captive to reprobate green groups, to the detriment of energy security and affordability. Northern Territory Chief Minister Michael Gunner has made an important decision for the Territory’s economy and the nation’s energy supply, reversing his government’s ban on fracking. Just over half of the NT will be open to the development of shale gas. The move should be copied by the states, including Victoria, that had banned conventional gas exploration as well as fracking despite severe power problems. Already, the Liberal government in South Australia, which has some of the world’s most expensive power, has imposed a moratorium on fracking in the southeast.

    The Territory’s move made eminent sense after a report by NT Justice Rachel Pepper found risks associated with fracking could be managed. National parks, residential, conservation and indigenous protected areas and cultural sites will remain off limits. The NT’s revenue will be boosted, to the benefit of taxpayers across the nation who have bankrolled the Territory for decades despite lack of accountability and failure to direct money to areas of chronic need, such as Aboriginal disadvantage. A “return to taxpayers” through gas royalties, Mr Gunner said, could start from the early to mid-2020s. As it raises more of its own revenue, the NT needs to become more responsible in spending and accounting for it.

    The first exploration is expected early next year. Energy companies responded yesterday, highlighting the vast resources available in the NT and their potential to create thousands of new jobs and power several Australian capital cities. As Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg said, development of NT gas could not come soon enough with gas playing an increasing role in setting the price of electricity. When the NT is in the doldrums, the two-year moratorium stalled or wasted at least $200 million worth of investment. Yesterday’s decision was long overdue but better late than never. If Australia’s power crisis is to be overcome, all states must embrace gas extraction.

  192. OldOzzie

    The Southwestern Hemisphere Is Sliding Towards Its Own “Arab Spring”

    South and Central America are on a crash course for regional collapse and a geopolitical disaster which could drastically alter the political landscape of the Western Hemisphere and plunge the United States into dire crisis.

  193. John Constantine

    Saudi Arabian shipowners hired cut rate Pakistani employees to transport sheep across the Tropics into the Persian gulf summer.

    Pakistani was so distressed by the suffering he supplied footage to Australian wealthy and sexually active wymynsys activists.

    Now it is shut down every ship and all species to all destinations.

    Nobody asks how the supplier of the footage copes with the street torture of the eid festival of slaughter, or who overpacked the sheep into the pens then took the film, or who was responsible for filling the water troughs or who was responsible for the ventilation.

    Was the supplier of the footage connected to those that set it up?.

    I don’t supply to this trade, but can see how easy it would be to obtain footage if a cute wealthy harlot went to work on a poor horny sailor.

    Comrades.

  194. stackja

    Cardinal George Pell the ‘victim of a witch hunt’: Robert Richter, QC
    Shannon Deery, Herald Sun
    [email protected]
    April 17, 2018 2:33pm
    Subscriber only
    FANTASY, nonsense, impossible: three words used today to sum up the historical sexual offences allegations levelled at Cardinal George Pell.

    His lawyer Robert Richter, QC, spent almost two hours outlining his case at the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court this morning arguing to have all charges being faced by his client thrown out of court.

    He argued Cardinal Pell, Australia’s highest ranked Catholic, was the victim of a witch hunt because of his perceived failure to single-handedly stop child abuse within the church.
    There was a public hatred for him as the face of the Catholic Church, and that hatred increased as he climbed the ranks of the organisation.

    Mr Richter spared no one in his take down of the allegations against the Cardinal, slamming the police investigation, publicity around the case and the victims’ evidence.

    Following a month long committal hearing magistrate Belinda Wallington must now decide whether there is sufficient evidence to support a conviction and if so commit the Cardinal to stand trial.

    Mr Richter, who has filed an 80 page no-case submission with hundreds of submission points, told her there wasn’t.

    “There has to be a sensible approach taken at committal,” he said.

    “This is a situation in which your honour has to weigh up whether there is evidence of sufficient weight to support a conviction and that means evidence which is capable of belief.”

    Mr Richter said the complainants simply could not be believed.

    The Cardinal is facing numerous charges in relation to several victims, though the nature and number of charges has not been publicly revealed.
    Mr Richer said the investigation into Cardinal Pell, that started without a complaint, was lacking with police automatically believing the claims of victims, including one from a psychiatric hospital, without properly investigating their accounts.

    “It should be difficult to destroy and lock up a citizen unless there has been a proper investigation,” he said.

    “We know that at the beginning and for a long period of time there was no investigation of the complainants story,” Mr Richter said.

    He said the bulk of the charges related to a single witness.

    The victim made “appalling allegations of very serious misconduct”, but Mr Richter said they “ought to be regarded as impossible”.

    “The complainants are unreliable, the complainants have made prior statements that are inconsistent or subsequent statements that are inconsistent, their credibility has been damaged,” he said.

    Mr Richter said other allegations were either “the product of fantasy or mental health problems … or pure invention in order to punish the representative of the Catholic Church in this country for not stopping child abuse by others of children”.

    “Cardinal Pell has been seen as the face of that responsibility,” he said.
    Mr Richter said even if his client was committed to trial, there would be questions raised about whether he could receive a fair trial.

    “What’s in the public mind is a mish mash of allegations and fantasy,” he said.

    The public perception was fuelled by reporting he slammed as disgraceful, singling out ABC journalist Louise Milligan’s award-winning book Cardinal: The Rise and Fall of George Pell.

    “He hadn’t fallen (when the book was published). He hadn’t even be charged,” Mr Richter said.

    “When it became clear that charges were imminent in June, Melbourne University Press and Louise Milligan brought forward the publication date of this damning character assassination book,” he said.

    “She (Ms Milligan) was out for fame and fortune,” he said.

    Mr Richter said it would be a waste of public time and money to take the case further.

    “There is suffering to be undergone not just by (the Cardinal), there is additional suffering to be undergone by people who have made complaints with no prospect of them getting up, because they are wrong.”

    Cardinal Pell stood down from his position as Vatican treasurer after being charged in June last year and returned to Australia shortly after.

    “In terms of an illustration of innocence we can go a bit further,” Mr Richter said. “What we have here is a situation where a Cardinal, who is entitled to diplomatic immunity … comes voluntarily.”

    Cardinal Pell attended every day of the committal hearing but was excused from today’s hearing.

    Ms Wallington will hand down her decision on May 1.

  195. John Constantine

    Kogan to offer life insurance. no frills, no rorts.

    Imagine if a no frills, no rorts big company like Kogan was to offer superannuation services without the crony corruption that is the foundation of the current Australian offerings.

  196. Boambee John

    Zulu at 2247

    do we also commemorate the thousands of European settlers, killed in those same wars?

    Demand the right to lay a wreath for them, and watch the PC RSL “leaders” tie themsekves in knots trying to work out how to say no.

    Also write to ghe AWM and Minister for Veterans’ Affairs in the same vein.

  197. Leigh Lowe

    A couple of points regarding the AMP drama …
    (1) Fee for no service is wholly unremarkable in the finance sector and is the cornerstone of the bruvvers industry funds;
    (2) The misbehaviour at AMP was sanctioned by tye Board and is no doubt the result of the director’s toxic masculinity.

    .
    .
    Oops.
    Four of the ten AMP board members are wymminses, including the chairwymmins.

  198. stackja

    Donald J. Trump
    ‏Verified account
    @realDonaldTrump
    56 minutes ago
    ….Congress – House and Senate must quickly pass a legislative fix to ensure violent criminal aliens can be removed from our society. Keep America Safe!

    Donald J. Trump
    Verified account
    @realDonaldTrump
    56 minutes ago
    Today’s Court decision means that Congress must close loopholes that block the removal of dangerous criminal aliens, including aggravated felons. This is a public safety crisis that can only be fixed by….

  199. Boambee John

    m0nty at 2327

    Trump’s legal argument was weak as water, Dennis Denuto level.

    Thus saith Montague M0nty, QC, LLD, MA, DJuris etc.

  200. None

    Absolutely heartened to read that from Richter. He id 100% correct in his assessment. That is precisely what should happen
    Every charge should be thrown out. The whole case against Pell is a sham and a national disgrace.

  201. Percy Porcelain

    This Israel Folau imbroglio is becoming quite interesting. It seems to be the first time there has been a concerted pushback by a significant number of normal people sick of being hectored by hysterical collectivist cockheads for holding entirely normal views.

    As a result, rugby crowds and general patronage of the game will continue to plummet and qaintarse will continue to suffer an ever increasing backlash from very pissed off customers.

    The toxic leprechaun’s position is untenable, as is the position of that monstrous beast busy running rugby into the ground.

    Both of them are utterly ridiculous characters, who if they didn’t exist, would have to have been created by the best satirists.

  202. Tom

    That Southwest Airlines incident, at 29,000 feet en route from New York La Guardia to Dallas, was a real shocker: it’s only the third fatality for SWA, now America’s biggest domestic airline, in its 51-year history. The frightening part is that it was an uncontained engine failure — the left engine exploded and shrapnel peppered the cabin, killing a woman and injuring several others.

    In the current era of super aircraft engine reliability, uncontained engine failures (like the Qantas A380 incident in 2010) are virtually unheard of and today’s SWA incident is one of the worst of its kind. SWA, incidentally, is by far the world’s best low-cost carrier and wins awards for its customer service every year. It’s the only LCC that carries bags free.

  203. Boambee John

    struth
    #2689274, posted on April 18, 2018 at 12:51 am
    Ah the UN agenda is progressing nicely.
    Only 11 and a half years to go and it’s a brown socialist diversity utopia for the entire planet.

    The next stage will be the immigration treaty they are working on.

    Likely clauses will include a demand that all advanced countries take a fixed proportion of their population annually as migrants from undeveloped countries, and provide them with the same social services available to citizens.

    Comrades.

  204. Crossie

    South and Central America are on a crash course for regional collapse and a geopolitical disaster which could drastically alter the political landscape of the Western Hemisphere and plunge the United States into dire crisis.

    This is all fault of the international Left and liberation theologists. The only option left for Latin America is the Pinochet strategy.

    If they want to save themselves the US better build that wall asap. They could also put the military on the border but I don’t think they have the guts, the Left has weakened them from the inside.

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