Symbols of Soviet rule in Budapest

Memento Park displays the statutes which were put up during the communist rule in Hungary and taken down when the nation was liberated. The previous link has a catalogue of the works, this link has more informative pictures and details of the displays.

Displayed in the Park are 42 pieces of art from the Communist era between 1945 and 1989, including allegorical monuments of “Hungarian-Soviet Friendship” and “Liberation”, as well as statues of famous personalities from the labour movement, soldiers of the Red Army and other gigantic pieces: Lenin, Marx, Engels, Dimitrov, Captain Ostapenko, Béla Kun and other “heroes” of the communist world. A favourite with visitors is the Liberation Army Soldier. A hammer-and-sickle flag in its hand and a cartridge-disc machine pistol hanging in its neck make the statue complete. This 6-meter tall statue of the evil-eyed Soviet soldier once stood on the top of Gellért Hill in central Budapest, well-seen from every direction.

When facing it, the main entrance bears the image of a monumental classicist building. Looking behind it, though, it resembles a 12-meter high, under-propped communistic scenery ? a perfect introduction into the nature of dictatorship.

The words of architect Ákos Ele?d, the conceptual designer of Memento Park serve as its motto: “This Park is about dictatorship. And at the same time, because it can be talked about, described and built up, this Park is about democracy. After all, only democracy can provide an opportunity to think freely about dictatorship. Or about democracy, come to that! Or about anything!”

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36 Responses to Symbols of Soviet rule in Budapest

  1. Dr Fred Lenin

    We could have a park for obsolete socialists statues ,evatt ,whitlam, Hawke. Keato ,giliard , shortass, turnbull, not krudd he was never a socialist,krudd was a kruddist a dyed in the wool opportunist . We could charge people to throw mud balls at them to pay off the socialist incurred debt .

  2. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Go and have a look at the “House of Horrors” – the museum to the AVO Secret Police, in Buda Pest – it’s a slightly confronting experience – the replica of a T54 tank in the entrance hall, surrounded by photographs af all the Hungarians killed in the 1965 uprising is a little difficult to deal with, but you can’t really take Gen Snowflake, bawling about how hard done by they are, after that.

  3. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    1965, FFS , 1956. Then go and have a look at the Parliamentary Building, pocked with bullet holes, where the secret police fired on an unarmed crowd, with automatic weapons, from the roof of the Ministry for Agriculture…That’s when the 1956 uprising began..

  4. Zulu thought he was writing down the auction price of his sheep to give the slip to the buyer.

  5. Chester Draws

    Momento Park is pretty cool. A highlight of our time there.

    It’s not really “in Budapest” though, unless the city has recall expanded recently.

  6. Chester Draws

    Really expanded sorry.

    It was a fair old bus ride out.

  7. BorisG

    After all, only democracy can provide an opportunity to think freely

    Rafe, you don’t think democracy is under threat in Hungary?

  8. Rafe

    Yes well out of town as though they want it well out of sight.
    There is also a creepy movie about recruiting and training internal spies and informers.
    You can get to sit in an old Trabant as well.

  9. BorisG

    Hungarians have condemned Soviet and communist oppression, and rightly so. But they have started promoting Nazi collaborators, which isn’t any better.

  10. Bad Samaritan

    BorisG. A link to the “promoting Nazi collaborators, maybe?

    Since it’s 73 years since the end of WWII, I’m guessing the youngest collaborators are now 90+.

    Got that link?

  11. Percy Porcelain

    There is no such thing as “communist art”.

  12. John Constantine

    It will be a huge memorial park to godless Australian communism, the place where they end up putting all the wind fetish totempoles when they all wear out at once.

  13. Mark A

    BorisG
    #2705471, posted on May 8, 2018 at 2:06 am

    Hungarians have condemned Soviet and communist oppression, and rightly so. But they have started promoting Nazi collaborators, which isn’t any better.

    Shut up Boris you haven’t got clue.
    I work there on and off for 6 month of every year, being based in Vienna and haven’t noticed anything of the sort. This sort of rubbish is being promoted by the likes of Soros and Co

  14. Leigh Lowe

    If looking for the place ZK2A is referring to I think it is the House of Terror located at 60 Andrassy St (the old Soviet secret police HQ).
    It was a one stop shop.
    Interrogation rooms, courthouse, cells and death row.
    There is a very sobering lift ride from the top floor to the basement cells.
    It covers the Nazi period of WW2 as well as communist occupation but, of course, it is “controversial” because it points out the excesses of communist brutality.
    Munter would love it.

  15. Leigh Lowe

    Shut up Boris you haven’t got clue.
    I work there on and off for 6 month of every year, being based in Vienna and haven’t noticed anything of the sort. This sort of rubbish is being promoted by the likes of Soros and Co

    Mark, the House of Terror referred to above covers both Nazi and Communist oppression. The massive steel awning over the building carries both the “4 arrows” Nazi symbol and the Soviet star.
    There is also one of the largest Holocaust museums in Europe in the Chewish quarter along with the “holocaust tree” at the Synagogue.
    And the “Shoes by the Danube” memorial.
    This is not a nation which has forgiven or forgotten Nazism or Communism.
    Full of shit Boris.

  16. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    If looking for the place ZK2A is referring to I think it is the House of Terror located at 60 Andrassy St (the old Soviet secret police HQ).

    Quite right, LL , and thank you.

  17. Dr Fred Lenin

    Rafe. You should have taken that globalist credo soros { Schwartz) with you to refresh his memory of “the greatest time of my life” as he said about the Nazi occupation when his father helped the Germans loot the assets of his fellow Jews before they were sho]upped off to the extermination camps . Perhaps someone might have done the world a favour . Alternatively he could move to Israel he has “the right of return” @bothhis parents wereJewish . The big fortune probably had its origin in the Hungarian loot . Why is this vermin allowed to finance the wrecking of western civilisation unharmed?

  18. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Interrogation rooms, courthouse, cells and death row.

    The death row display is sobering, but they didn’t carry out executions on the premises. IIRC, if you were so inconsiderate as to die under interrogation, or commit suicide, they dissolved your body in a tank of acid, and poured your remains into the Danube.

    The story goes that one Felix Fezerzinsky Fanzerfaust, or something equally distinctive, was picked up by the A.V.O., and charged with spying for the Americans. He was being interrogated with the usual vigour by the A.V.O., when they were notified that they had arrested the wrong Felix Fezerzinsky Fanzerfaust. They couldn’t just release him, and admit that the glorious people’s secret police didn’t know one Felix Fezerzinski Fanzerfaust from another, oh no, so they kept him in gaol for nearly a year before they released him…

  19. max

    sorry not related to this, maybe to start new tread:


    George Popowski and a branch of the NSW Liberal Party is set to debate the merits of Sharia-style corporal punishment and a radical proposal to make citizens responsible for sentencing criminals rather than judges.


George Popowski thinks he is smarter than bible and instead to call for reintroduction of biblical law he is asking for sharia laws.

The basic principle in biblical law is that a person who is convicted of a crime must make restitution to the victim of their crime.

  20. Leigh Lowe

    If looking for the place ZK2A is referring to I think it is the House of Terror located at 60 Andrassy St (the old Soviet secret police HQ).

    Quite right, LL , and thank you.

    “We’re going where?
    The House of Terror?
    Thank Christ for that.
    I thought you said House of Horror.
    No-one wants to ho there”.
    .
    The correction wasn’t to be a pedant.
    Just in case people wanted to visit and wanted to find it online.
    It is a great museum.

  21. sabena

    And,needless to say,the statues lack grace,style or artistic merit.

  22. Roger.

    After all, only democracy can provide an opportunity to think freely about dictatorship. Or about democracy, come to that! Or about anything!”

    I understand why the gentleman would say that after having lived under Soviet Communism for many years, but as some in the West are discovering democracy can lead to a dictatorship of sorts, too, even if it is “soft” in comparison with the Soviets. We only recently had British police monitoring social media posts relating to the case of Alfie Evans, to cite but one example of how authorities in a democracy can seek to enforce state approved orthodox opinion, not to mention the role of mainstream media in doing the same. In Australia we recently had many in politics and the media attempting to shut down a public debate about a momentous proposed change to marriage. Any democracy is only as healthy as its key institutions, which in many Western democracies, including Australia, have been captured by the Progressive Left, i.e. Marxists.

  23. Black Ball

    Very interesting and worth circulating far and wide. This article piqued my interest into what happened to Hitler’s Berghof because of the opulence of the place. Of course the hoi polloi couldn’t live like he did, with monies forfeited for the war effort.
    http://markfelton.co.uk/publishedbooks/hitlers-obersalzberg-today/

  24. Woger;

    I understand why the gentleman would say that after having lived under Soviet Communism for many years, but as some in the West are discovering democracy can lead to a dictatorship of sorts, too, even if it is “soft” in comparison with the Soviets.

    Yes, it’s the Dictatorship of the Bureaucracy.
    I’ve been banging on about it for decades and everybody is probably as sick of hearing it as much as I am of stating it.
    Yet the message has never lost its imperative.

  25. In moderation again…
    Yes, it’s the Dictatorship of the Bureaucracy.
    I’ve been banging on about it for decades and everybody is probably as sick of hearing it as much as I am of stating it.
    Yet the message has never lost its imperative.

  26. Leigh Lowe

    I understand why the gentleman would say that after having lived under Soviet Communism for many years, but as some in the West are discovering democracy can lead to a dictatorship of sorts, too, even if it is “soft” in comparison with the Soviets.

    Indeed.
    There were people who were sent to labour camps for years post 1956 who did not discuss it with even close family until after 1989.
    The cancer of informing on family and friends under extreme duress was so all pervasive that many of them trusted nobody.
    Mueller would have been in his element.

  27. manalive

    I have a question Rafe, do the locals say “Budapesht”?
    For some reason nowadays English speakers insist using what I think may be the Hungarian pronunciation while oddly not according the same courtesy to Poles, Italians, Russians, Austrians etc.

  28. Mark A

    manalive
    #2705716, posted on May 8, 2018 at 12:12 pm

    I have a question Rafe, do the locals say “Budapesht”?
    They sure do. If you want “s” then spell it az “sz”

  29. Mark A

    manalive
    #2705716, posted on May 8, 2018 at 12:12 pm

    I have a question Rafe, do the locals say “Budapesht”?
    For some reason nowadays English speakers insist using what I think may be the Hungarian pronunciation while oddly not according the same courtesy to Poles, Italians, Russians, Austrians etc.

    Where did you find that?
    I think most English speakers go out of their way to accommodate/imitate native pronunciation, if they are familiar with it. Problem is, mostly they pick it up from TV radio etc. as pronounced by ignorant journos, thus the blind leading the sightless.

  30. Dr Fred Lenin

    When house of horrors was mentioned I thought Rafe was going to visit giliards place while hilarity was staying there ,now there IS a house of horrors you wouldnt find at Luna Park . You shudder to think of it ,hope bill comes too, stop his little antics with these two witches , they would frighten Shakespeare out of his pointy shoes .

  31. Dr Fred Lenin

    Mark A,always remember a “footy journo” describing a trip to Paris , they were “walk-in down the Champs Eleesees” , probably calling waiters Garkon and Monsewer , ABC journos are the worst , pretentious buggers talking down to their audiences ,love to hear them try those Arab names and they speak Chinese like rudd , totally uninteligible to a native speaker . A Chinese freind used to laugh at rudds pathetic Chinese ,bit like the footy commentators French . It seems rudd spoke Chinese like an Italian or Greek peasant who had only been in Australia since the 1950 s .

  32. Damienski

    It seems rudd spoke Chinese like an Italian or Greek peasant who had only been in Australia since the 1950 s .

    So not dissimilar to the way he speaks English, then?

  33. Dr Fred Lenin

    Do t knock Kev he uses them big words no one else understands not even teachers of English , or the people who write english dictionaries . Foreign affairsese, fatty Beasley and the stick insect are fluent in it ,its another word for bullshitese .

  34. BorisG

    A link to the “promoting Nazi collaborators, maybe?

    Sure. from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikl%C3%B3s_Horthy

    The downfall of the communist regime and the rebirth of a free press and academia in Hungary vastly improved Hungarian understanding of the Horthy era. In 1993, only a few years after the first democratic elections, Horthy’s body was returned from Portugal to his hometown of Kenderes. Tens of thousands of people, as well as almost the entirety of József Antall’s MDF cabinet, attended the ceremony. Antall had prefaced the burial with a series of interviews praising Horthy as a “patriot.”[74] The reburial was broadcast on state television and was accompanied by large-scale protests in Budapest.[74]

    In contemporary Hungary, hagiography of Horthy is associated with the far-right Jobbik and its allies. Since 2012, Horthy statues, squares, or memorials have been erected in numerous villages and cities including Csókakő,[7] Kereki, Gyömrő, and Debrecen.[8] In November 2013, a Horthy statue’s unveiling at a Calvinist church in Budapest drew international attention and criticism.[9]

    In 2017, Viktor Orbán, Prime Minister of Hungary, made a speech in which he called Horthy an “exceptional statesman” and gave him the credit for the survival of Hungary. The U.S. Holocaust Museum then issued a statement denouncing Orbán and the Hungarian government for trying to “rehabilitate the reputation of Hungary’s wartime leader, Miklós Horthy, who was a vocal anti-Semite and complicit in the murder of the country’s Jewish population during the Holocaust.”[75]

    On the role of Horthy in the Holocaust, see here: https://www.ushmm.org/research/scholarly-presentations/conferences/the-holocaust-in-hungary-70-years-later/the-holocaust-in-hungary-frequently-asked-questions#9

    By maintaining his position after the German occupation of Hungary in March 1944, Horthy legitimized the invasion and its consequences in the eyes of government officials and the public. He clearly knew the brutal details of the ghettoizations and deportations orchestrated by his own government, and he was well aware of the fate of the deportees. He did momentarily suspend the deportations in early July 1944—after the Jews from all regions except the capital city had all been deported, the overwhelming majority to Auschwitz—but he agreed to restart the deportations a few weeks later. The Jews of Budapest were given a temporary reprieve because of national and international political and military considerations, not because of any sense of compassion or responsibility toward the Jewish community.

    Despite some hesitation, Regent Miklós Horthy accepted the German occupation of his country. Military resistance was not a realistic option, and the presence of German military forces was welcomed by many as the Red Army drew closer to Hungary’s eastern borders. While Horthy could have resigned, he did not, and he ordered Hungary’s military not to resist the occupation. He thus remained in his position and appointed the members of the new government, while convincing himself that Germany would remove their troops, restoring Hungary’s full sovereignty and freedom of action, as soon as the Jewish community had been eradicated. This price was one he was willing to accept. Horthy withdrew from directly handling Jewish affairs, but he was well aware of what was happening and condoned it.

    Sorry we will never forget.

  35. BorisG

    A link to the “promoting Nazi collaborators, maybe?

    Sure. from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikl%C3%B3s_Horthy

    The downfall of the communist regime and the rebirth of a free press and academia in Hungary vastly improved Hungarian understanding of the Horthy era. In 1993, only a few years after the first democratic elections, Horthy’s body was returned from Portugal to his hometown of Kenderes. Tens of thousands of people, as well as almost the entirety of József Antall’s MDF cabinet, attended the ceremony. Antall had prefaced the burial with a series of interviews praising Horthy as a “patriot.”[74] The reburial was broadcast on state television and was accompanied by large-scale protests in Budapest.[74]

    In contemporary Hungary, hagiography of Horthy is associated with the far-right Jobbik and its allies. Since 2012, Horthy statues, squares, or memorials have been erected in numerous villages and cities including Csókakő,[7] Kereki, Gyömrő, and Debrecen.[8] In November 2013, a Horthy statue’s unveiling at a Calvinist church in Budapest drew international attention and criticism.[9]

    In 2017, Viktor Orbán, Prime Minister of Hungary, made a speech in which he called Horthy an “exceptional statesman” and gave him the credit for the survival of Hungary. The U.S. Holocaust Museum then issued a statement denouncing Orbán and the Hungarian government for trying to “rehabilitate the reputation of Hungary’s wartime leader, Miklós Horthy, who was a vocal anti-Semite and complicit in the murder of the country’s Je*wish population during the Holocaust.”[75]

    On the role of Horthy in the Holocaust, see here: https://www.ushmm.org/research/scholarly-presentations/conferences/the-holocaust-in-hungary-70-years-later/the-holocaust-in-hungary-frequently-asked-questions#9

    By maintaining his position after the German occupation of Hungary in March 1944, Horthy legitimized the invasion and its consequences in the eyes of government officials and the public. He clearly knew the brutal details of the ghettoizations and deportations orchestrated by his own government, and he was well aware of the fate of the deportees. He did momentarily suspend the deportations in early July 1944—after the Je*ws from all regions except the capital city had all been deported, the overwhelming majority to Auschwitz—but he agreed to restart the deportations a few weeks later. The Je*ws of Budapest were given a temporary reprieve because of national and international political and military considerations, not because of any sense of compassion or responsibility toward the Je*wish community.

    Despite some hesitation, Regent Miklós Horthy accepted the German occupation of his country. Military resistance was not a realistic option, and the presence of German military forces was welcomed by many as the Red Army drew closer to Hungary’s eastern borders. While Horthy could have resigned, he did not, and he ordered Hungary’s military not to resist the occupation. He thus remained in his position and appointed the members of the new government, while convincing himself that Germany would remove their troops, restoring Hungary’s full sovereignty and freedom of action, as soon as the Je*wish community had been eradicated. This price was one he was willing to accept. Horthy withdrew from directly handling Je*wish affairs, but he was well aware of what was happening and condoned it.

    Sorry we will never forget.

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