Monday Forum: May 14, 2018

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1,390 Responses to Monday Forum: May 14, 2018

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  1. JC

    Here we go.

    More than 500 allegations of ­potentially fraudulent payments and “financial anomalies” are being assessed by managers of the $22 billion National Disability Insurance Scheme, with Social Services Minister Dan Tehan conceding yesterday that checking every invoice for rorts would leave bureaucrats “tied up in red tape”. The new figure, as at February, is higher than the 300 alle­gations reported in the year to July last year as the National Disability Insurance Agency comes under pressure to target fraud and deliver the national rollout.

    The Commonwealth Ombudsman yesterday added to the portrait of an agency operating under “considerable pressure to ensure it meets its various bilateral targets” in its investigation of the plan-­review process.

  2. stackja

    JC
    #2711893, posted on May 16, 2018 at 10:19 am

    Another RGR gift.

  3. C.L.

    What gives? Are they trying to limit a compensation payout to Pell?

    Prosecutors seek ban on reporting of George Pell trials.

    Media may be barred from reporting any of the details of an upcoming trial being faced by Australia’s most senior Catholic, Cardinal George Pell, if a judge approves a comprehensive suppression order put forward by prosecutors…

    The application calls on the judge to prohibit any publications about the trial until after the completion of the proceedings.

    Prosecutors want the order to apply to publications in all Australian states and territories, including any website or broadcast format accessible within Australia.

    In the application, the director of public prosecutions wrote the order is necessary to prevent a real and substantial risk of prejudice to the proper administration of justice. This risk could not be prevented by other reasonably available means, the application says.

  4. C.L.

    New Matilda has more on the “super injunction” being requested by the Victorian DPP.
    Not only will coverage be banned throughout Australia but media will also be banned from telling the public there is a ban.

    Prosecutors Seek Complete Ban On Media Reporting Of Cardinal George Pell Trial.

    Ordinarily, an injunction against media reporting of a trial prevents outlets from reporting the details of the trial. But they can report the existence of the injunction and explain to readers why they’re not reporting the matter.

    The order that the DPP is seeking in the Pell matter is so broad that it will operate as a super injunction. The suppression order would be ‘any part of’ the proceedings, meaning the trial could not be reported, nor could media report the fact they’re not allowed to report. If Wednesday’s application for a super injunction is successful, this story will have to be removed from publication.

    [Sinclair: please note well].

  5. H B Bear

    Fatty Ashton trying to send it down the memory hole before it has even begun,

    Orwell would approve.

  6. Anthony

    Media may be barred from reporting any of the details of an upcoming trial being faced by Australia’s most senior Catholic, Cardinal George Pell, if a judge approves a comprehensive suppression order put forward by prosecutors…

    Sounds like an admission that the damage has already been done, starting with a certain publisher who rushed to print.

  7. C.L.

    Smith retirement fallout …

    There are calls today for Thurston to do an Alfie and return to Origin to skipper the squad.

  8. Andreas

    Just 5.7 percent of the Clinton Foundation’s massive 2014 budget actually went to charitable grants, according to the tax-exempt organization’s IRS filings. The rest went to salaries and employee benefits, fundraising and “other expenses.”
    The Clinton Foundation spent a hair under $91.3 million in 2014, the organization’s IRS filings show. But less than $5.2 million of that went to charitable grants.

    Lots of friends of the Clintons in cushy positions hoovering up cash, with a few measly bucks making it to actual charitable causes.

  9. C.L.

    Take note: if the DPP’s request is granted, comment here on the trial would result in prosecution.

  10. Zyconoclast


    WSJ Editorial – From Washington to Jerusalem
    Trump fulfilled a campaign promise that others wouldn’t.

    What?
    He built a wall along the Mexican border.

    No. Still waiting.

    Trump seems to have very little trouble doing things he actually wants to do.

  11. lotocoti

    From the 2014 financials:
    Total expenditures $248,221,698.
    $33,692,599 Direct program expenditures (i.e. the tiresome charity bit)
    $95,887,139 Salaries and benefits
    $20,786,529 Travel
    $17,249,876 Professional and consulting (i.e. Bill, Hillary and Chelsea’s chump change)
    Need I go on?

  12. candy

    Here we go.

    JC, Treasurer Morrison and PM Turnbull said the other day in budget week the NDIS is completely funded. No worries.
    It is all taken care of, they said.

  13. feelthebern

    monty get back here & defend the Clinton foundation.

  14. H B Bear

    Another RGR gift.

    Gillard’s Fabian master-stroke. $22bn odd this year – anyone want to hazard a guess at the annual cost in 5 and 10 years time?

  15. Fat Tony

    candy
    #2711908, posted on May 16, 2018 at 10:37 am
    Here we go.

    JC, Treasurer Morrison and PM Turnbull said the other day in budget week the NDIS is completely funded. No worries.
    It is all taken care of, they said.

    Of course it is – that’s what all that superannuation money sitting around is for.

  16. feelthebern

    One of my secret shames is listening to Joe Rogan periodically.
    He’s always outrageous, often wrong, but I find his schtick quite enjoyable.
    On a show I’m listening to at the moment he’s saying Donny is pumped up on diet pills & that is where he gets his energy from.
    He’s saying theres an investigator has even tracked down the pharmacy where Donny gets his script filled.

  17. Fat Tony

    H B Bear
    #2711910, posted on May 16, 2018 at 10:40 am
    Another RGR gift.

    Gillard’s Fabian master-stroke. $22bn odd this year – anyone want to hazard a guess at the annual cost in 5 and 10 years time?

    Has anyone worked out who is paying the premiums for the insurance in the ND Insurance Scheme?

  18. John Constantine

    It was explained to me by a lefties activist that travels the world for Stalin, that the money isn’t being taken by their Clinton crime cartel from poor people.

    The left are that the money is entirely intended for Clinton cronyism and making the world Stalinist, because the poor want to live in a worldwide socialist paradise more than they want food parcels.

  19. Fat Tony

    feelthebern
    #2711912, posted on May 16, 2018 at 10:44 am

    On a show I’m listening to at the moment he’s saying Donny is pumped up on diet pills & that is where he gets his energy from..

    I thought diet pills just gave you the shits eg the old Ford Pills.
    You can only get so pumped up when you have the runs……

  20. Zyconoclast

    Council wants ‘English first’ policy on signs – what does it mean for multicultural Australia?

    An inner-Sydney council proposal to regulate the language of shop signs has significant implications for multicultural policy.
    Strathfield City Council recently voted for a motion that states:

    All signage is to be displayed in the English language, with a direct or near direct translation into another language using smaller letters or character … [which] must not exceed more than 30 per cent of the overall size of the English language text.

    The proposal raises two important questions. Is English the “official language” of Australia? And what is the status of community languages other than English?
    English is not the official language
    English is sometimes described as the “national”, “main” or “common” language, and as a “tool for integration”. But Australia has no policy designating English as an official language.
    Australia’s multicultural policy also has surprisingly little to say about languages. There is no official protection for languages other than English.
    Nevertheless, policy supports community language maintenance and education. In New South Wales, state multicultural legislation states two principles:

    1. individuals and communities are “free to profess, practise and maintain their own linguistic, religious and ancestral heritage”.
    2. all institutions should “recognise the linguistic and cultural assets in the population of New South Wales as a valuable resource and promote this resource to maximise the development of the state”.

    How does regulating signs live up to these principles?
    Mandating English signage and allowing limited translation amounts to a de facto policy of English as an official language.
    It signals, in effect, an attitude of multicultural tolerance, not a policy of active multiculturalism.

    The Strathfield proposal has attracted the interest of some mainstream media and the local English and community language press.
    However, media reports have muddied the waters by using the term “foreign” languages.
    Critical comments on social media have questioned whether the policy would ban established English words like “pizza” and “kebab”.
    Such reports and comments highlight the difficulty of regulating use of languages on signs.
    They also miss the underlying issue of the right to use languages other than English in Australia’s multilingual communities.
    The 2016 Australian Census shows that more than 300 languages are spoken in Australia. In Sydney, 35.8 per cent of people speak a language other than English at home. Languages are part of the social fabric of everyday life in the city.
    In Strathfield itself, 68.5 per cent of the households speak one of 58 languages in addition to English.
    The biggest language groups are Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese), Korean, Tamil and Arabic.
    These are not “foreign” languages in Strathfield; they are the everyday languages of a multicultural community.
    Our research in Strathfield’s commercial centres shows the proposal will mainly affect businesses that display Korean and Chinese script.
    Most of these businesses already have bilingual or trilingual signage. Signage for one barbecue shop shown here includes Japanese, Chinese, Korean and English.
    Why does the language on signs matter?
    Multilingual signage is important to the community for many reasons:

    -community languages convey the cultural identity of businesses and the authenticity of their products
    -community language signs are used for effective communication with speakers of those languages who often make up most of their customers
    -displaying community languages in public space is vital to the visibility of the groups that make up a multicultural community, and also a -resource for community language learning and maintenance
    -the right to use a written language in public is equivalent to the right to use a spoken language.

    When speakers of languages other than English are abused for speaking their languages in the street, we are quick to label this as “un-Australian”. Is it not equally “un-Australian” to regulate written language use?
    The Strathfield proposal is open for public consultation until June 15. It might not ultimately be implemented. Yet it raises enduring questions about the place of language in Australia’s multicultural policy.
    The Turnbull government’s first policy statement on multiculturalism, Multicultural Australia: United, Strong, Successful, stresses that the economy is “strengthened by the skills, knowledge, linguistic capabilities, networks and creativity of our diverse workforce”.
    So, should local policies on signage in multicultural Australia be limited to tolerance of community languages within an English-dominant framework? Or should these policies recognise the right to expression and full participation for everyone?

    Alice Chik is a senior lecturer in Literacy at Macquarie University; Philip Benson is a professor of Applied Linguistics at Macquarie University.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-16/what-putting-english-first-means-for-multicultural-australia/9762578

  21. pete m

    CL, in order to comment on the trial we would need to know when it was on and what was happening. The whole trial could be held and verdict given without anyone outside the process being aware.

    Justice may be blind, but this is ridiculous!

  22. feelthebern

    With reference to CL’s Pell post.
    During the committal & all the technical stuff, it was wall to wall coverage.
    Now we are getting to the real meat & potatoes, they are saying super injunctions wall to wall.
    WTF?
    How many other super injunctions have there been?

  23. JC

    Can a court ban reporting of a case? What’s to stop someone involved from reporting the proceeding to an overseas concern?

    DPP are fucking morons.. dangerous morons. For this request alone they ought to be fired en masse.

  24. JC

    Gargoolety

    Go check to see if the basement is locked and fuck off, you marauding troll.

  25. feelthebern

    Strathfield is not the inner city.
    If you have a shop, business, you should be able to have whatever sign you want.

  26. Anthony

    How many other super injunctions have there been?

    I dunno. Ask Dan, Dan the union man. Or tubby Tubby the police man.

  27. Roger

    So, should local policies on signage in multicultural Australia be limited to tolerance of community languages within an English-dominant framework? Or should these policies recognise the right to expression and full participation for everyone?

    False dichotomy.

    Mandating the prominence of English over other languages does not hinder the right to expression and full participation in community life of anyone. Only other languages would do that.

  28. Dr Faustus

    Breaking hybrid vigour news: I do want to walk Meghan down aisle

    Markle dismissed claims that the Queen was upset with him, saying: “I don’t think the Queen is thinking about what I’m doing.”

    And he said he would risk his health to fly to Britain if doctors let him leave the hospital. He suggested he had asked to leave hospital today, giving him three days to get to England by the eve of the wedding.

    I expect HM Queen is actually thinking deeply about the prospect of Mr Markle Sn rocking up at Windsor Castle on Saturday morning, jet-lagged, and wearing an oddly-fitting suit made by Jose the tailor from one of the colourful fabrics in his shop.

  29. Roger

    Only banning other languages would do that.

  30. Zatara

    In the application, the director of public prosecutions wrote the order is necessary to prevent a real and substantial risk of prejudice to the proper administration of justice.

    Risk of prejudice is right mate. That’s why the concept of open justice was invented. It prevented the perversion of justice at secret trials.

    Open justice – A principle of the common law going back to before the Magna Carta that proceedings ought to be open to the public, including the contents of court files and public viewing of trials.

    It is necessary because the public nature of proceedings deters inappropriate behaviour on the part of the court. It also maintains the public’s confidence in the administration of justice. It enables the public to know that justice is being administered impartially.

    Indeed.

  31. Zatara

    Can a court ban reporting of a case?

    I know it can ban reporters from the courtroom and put gag orders on officers of the court. But I don’t think it can take any action external to the court.

  32. Roger

    Justice may be blind, but this is ridiculous!

    From New Matilda: The DPP will argue that the order is “necessary to prevent a real and substantial risk of prejudice to the proper administration of justice that cannot be prevented by other reasonably available means”.

    Yes, it is ridiculous and quite a concern. Secret trials have no place in a democracy.

  33. JC

    Kerry O’Brien: “Politicians would kill to have the level of trust the ABC has.”

    Lol That’s like comparing a coyote to a fox in a hen house.

    Fuck off Kerry.

  34. Snoopy

    The case against Pell has been comprehensively made in a book, in a television ‘documentary’, endless reports in the MSM, and all over social media. What the DPP is seeking to hide through this application is Pell’s defence. To whose benefit?

  35. Roger

    I know it can ban reporters from the courtroom and put gag orders on officers of the court. But I don’t think it can take any action external to the court.

    Oh, yes they can; it’s called contempt of court.

  36. Myrddin Seren

    Gillard’s Fabian master-stroke. $22bn odd this year – anyone want to hazard a guess at the annual cost in 5 and 10 years time?

    Unquantifiable.

    The current rate of billable disability will skyrocket. Service providers will push to expand definitions. People overseas will be fighting to get in and immediately claim disability due to PTSD or something.

    The NDIS will force massive wealth confiscation by 2030 and vast slabs of the population will be fat and unfit and swishing around on mobility scooters with their every need catered for by Service Providers importing yet more third world minimum wage workers to do the bum wiping.

  37. Tel

    Australia’s multicultural policy also has surprisingly little to say about languages. There is no official protection for languages other than English.

    Australia’s Constitution has little to say about authorizing the Commonwealth to get involved in languages spoken by Australians. That power belongs to the states then.

  38. max

    The court pays thorough attention to ensuring our staff have privacy and information management training at induction, and we maintain a focus throughout their employment on the importance of appropriate management of information.”

    In other words this was done deliberately and purposefuly. This needs more than just sacking the turd.

  39. Geriatric Mayfly

    Treason and spy trials are at times held in camera to protect intelligence sources and individuals in the field. Is Pell now a person threatening national security? Quite a leap from a Ballarat swimming pool.

  40. Myrddin Seren

    ..it is ridiculous and quite a concern. Secret trials have no place in a democracy.

    From Eureferendum:

    This week, it is what he has often described in his column as one of the most disturbing scandals in Britain today: the catastrophic state of our highly secretive “child protection” system.

    There is a heap of stuff on the For-profit ‘child protection’ industry and secret courts in Formerly-Great Britain at Euref.

    Suffice to say – secret courts and trials are now a real thing.

    And as Roger says – they have no place in a democracy.

    Draw your own conclusions.

  41. Roger

    “Publicity is the very soul of justice … it keeps the judge himself, while trying, under trial.”

    Jeremy Bentham

  42. C.L.

    The case against Pell has been comprehensively made in a book, in a television ‘documentary’, endless reports in the MSM, and all over social media. What the DPP is seeking to hide through this application is Pell’s defence. To whose benefit?

    Exactly.
    The DPP is attempting to hide the preposterous, laughable ‘evidence’ against Pell.

  43. thefrolickingmole

    “necessary to prevent a real and substantial risk of prejudice to the proper administration of justice that cannot be prevented by other reasonably available means”

    Translated: “Richter will make us look like arse clowns on a daily basis, our only hope is to string it along until Pell dies or we find a technicality to call a mistrial then start again”

    Im sure Richter will be asking exactly what prejudicial material might be out there which has not already been made public.

    Its a travesty and a farce.

  44. Snoopy

    Shock!

    Breaking news
    Blackmail charges against CFMEU bosses John Setka and Shaun Reardon dropped by Victorian prosecutors.

  45. C.L.

    In the application, the director of public prosecutions wrote the order is necessary to prevent a real and substantial risk of prejudice to the proper administration of justice.

    ———–
    Risk of prejudice is right mate. That’s why the concept of open justice was invented. It prevented the perversion of justice at secret trials.

    And what a spectacular hypocrisy. After years of ostentatious denunciations of secret Church proceedings regarding child sexual abuse allegations – to say nothing of customary references to the Inquisition – the Victorian DPP wants the trial of Cardinal Pell to be held in strict secrecy, reportage to be outlawed and journalist offenders to be imprisoned.

  46. Rae

    Secret trials have no place in a democracy.

    “Secret”. Interesting word, and inference.

    Gag orders are commonplace in child abuse/[email protected] trials in Australia. Nothing to do with “democracy”.

  47. C.L.

    Blackmail charges against CFMEU bosses John Setka and Shaun Reardon dropped by Victorian prosecutors.

    Speaking of the Victorian DPP …
    The union that threatens to r-ape your children hurriedly exonerated.
    George Pell sent to trial. In secret, preferably.

  48. thefrolickingmole

    While baldrick is away..

    Scroll the troll

  49. pete m

    BS they are Rae.

    The gag applies to naming the child, or identifying the alleged perp if that would also identify the child. Apart from that child identify prescription the rest of the trial is open Court and able to be reported. On occasion the child may give evidence via video link, and rarely not in open Court.
    Stick to sticking gags on your dolls.

  50. Roger

    Victoria appears to be taking over from New South Wales the mantle of Australia’s most corrupt state.

  51. Roger

    While baldrick is away..

    Scroll the troll

    +1

  52. Boambee John

    JC
    #2711885, posted on May 16, 2018 at 9:58 am
    Monster, Here’s some info for you to look at.

    The Clinton Foundation continues to be the subject of a great deal of controversy long after Hillary Clinton lost her election to Donald Trump.

    m0nty is not interested in evidence of malpractice by the Clinton Foundation. m0nty is interested only in defending the leftist establishment and attacking non-leftists. He is classic proof of the adage that one who is not a socialist at 20 has no heart: one who is still a socialist at 40 has no brain. m0nty is over 40.

    He is truly a running dog lackey of the left fascist establishment, and should be treated as such.

  53. H B Bear

    Dr Graegooglery QC is back. Had any luck with finding the grounds for appealing a magistrate’s decision to commit an accused for trial yet?

    Fvckwit.

  54. candy

    I think Scott Morrison is fiddling the figures with regard to the NDIS and the cost of Snowy2. He looks shifty as, these days.
    Wayne Swan used to do such things too.

  55. nemkat

    The Defence is awfully quiet on the Prosecution’s Application.
    Surely they would oppose secrecy, wouldn’t they?

  56. H B Bear

    Victoria appears to be taking over from New South Wales the mantle of Australia’s most corrupt state.

    It is certainly the most Marxist. I’d still give NSW gold for pure corruption. In Victoriastan the entire system of justice from VicPol, Australia’s most politicised police force, the DPP and the Hulls-era judiciary are in on the game.

  57. Rae flounders and up pops Nemkat..
    Quelle surprise!

  58. nemkat

    Family Court proceedings are shrouded in secrecy. Duellists can’t be identified, expert witnesses can’t be identified, bot the parties and any children are forbidden from ever publishing anything about the process, and how they were affected.

  59. candy

    The court pays thorough attention to ensuring our staff have privacy and information management training at induction, and we maintain a focus throughout their employment on the importance of appropriate management of information.

    It’s surprising that an individual would take such a risk, losing their job and probably any meaningful employment forever. They certainly could not boast about it to anyone. The breach of privacy is massive and destroys public confidence.

  60. Rae

    pet m. No doubt you would be happy with a mistrial. But:

    Prosecutors seek media reporting ban on George Pell trial

    … the Victorian Department of Public Prosecutions lodged an application with the Country Court of Victoria on Friday for a supression order over any media coverage of the trial.

    If the application is successful, it would mean the trial could not be reported until after the court proceedings are completed.

    It is understood the application is being made on the grounds that Cardinal Pell would not be given a fair trial due to the intense publicity which has surrounded the case to date.

    The orders being sought by the DPP include “that publication is prohibited of any report of the whole or any part of these proceedings and any information derived from this proceeding and any court documents associated with this proceeding.”

    The DPP has also requested that the ban stretch across all states and territories of Australia including “any website or other electronic or broadcast format accessible within Australia.”

    It’s the digital age, pete m and others. The suppression order in this instance, if approved, is intended to prevent the jurors being influenced one way or the other by external reporting, so that those jurors reach decisions based only on the evidence presented in court during the trial.

  61. Boambee John

    m0nty knows about the corrupt activities of the Clinton Foundation.

    m0nty knows about Arkancide.

    m0nty doesn’t care.

    m0nty is a running dog lackey of the left fascist establishment.

  62. Myrddin Seren

    I think Scott Morrison is fiddling the figures with regard to the NDIS and the cost of Snowy2. He looks shifty as, these days.

    Wayne Swan used to do such things too.

    Completely captured by the Department.

    It is a wonder we don’t see the puppet strings hanging down when any recent Treasurer is doing a presser.

  63. Rae

    running dog

    calli has much to answer for. The least you could do is acknowledge her whenever you use the phrase.

  64. Boambee John

    More flamin’ Repetitive Scroll Injury!

  65. stackja

    The ‘evidence’ is, that someone says that someone said George Pell did something. Reporting the ‘trial’ will influence who?

  66. Rae

    The only thing repetitive is your inane use of the same phrase over and over.

    calli has much to answer for (BIRM)

  67. Rae

    JC. Your pretend lawyer friend from the retirement village thinks he knows what “evidence” (sic) is, and knows nothing about how a “trial” (sic) works or what a suppression order is for. You gonna help him out?

  68. Geriatric Mayfly

    The only thing repetitive is your inane use of the same phrase over and over.

    The only people I recall using the words ‘running dogs’ ad nauseam were Stalin, Mao and their lackeys.

  69. C.L.

    Justice Victoria-style

    Blackmail charges brought against construction union bosses John Setka and Shaun Reardon have been dropped by Victorian prosecutors.

    They told a hearing in the Melbourne’s Magistrates’ Court that “after consideration of the facts, we have been advised to withdraw”.

    The charges related to allegations the pair from the CFMEU had spoken to executives at Boral about not supplying concrete to Melbourne worksites run by construction giant Grocon.

    When told the prosecution intended to withdraw the blackmail charges, Magistrate Charles Rozencwajg said: “I think it’s a very sensible decision”.

  70. C.L.

    It’s the digital age …

    So what?

  71. Roger

    Completely captured by the Department.

    As Douglas Haig said of another general, Morrison is like a cushion; he bears the impression of whoever last sat on him.

  72. egg_

    For an non-profit organisation that makes no sales, what kind of metrics does the ABC have for performance?

    The number of complaints received?

    Highly likely.

  73. Rae

    It’s the digital age …

    So what?

    So, it’s easy for religious zealots and others to attempt to influence the outcome of a trial involving a senior member of the clergy.

  74. Geriatric Mayfly

    When told the prosecution intended to withdraw the blackmail charges, Magistrate Charles Rozencwajg said: “I think it’s a very sensible decision”.

    Richter QC will be preening his whiskers. Now for another case which should never have been initiated.

  75. egg_

    I think Scott Morrison is fiddling the figures with regard to the NDIS and the cost of Snowy2. He looks shifty as, these days.

    Completely captured by the Department.

    It is a wonder we don’t see the puppet strings hanging down when any recent Treasurer is doing a presser.

    Teh Cormannator looks more confident at Pressers, almost as if he’s the puppeteer.

  76. Tom

    Of course Dickhead Dan’s CFMEU Caliphate was never going to allow the prosecution of the union thugs who got him elected. Herald-Sun story:

    BLACKMAIL charges against construction bosses John Setka and Shaun Reardon have been sensationally withdrawn in the middle of their preliminary hearing to see if they were to face trial.

    The astonishing backflip comes years after the men were charged on the back of statements made by two Boral executives to the royal commission into trade unions.

    The union officials have long declared their innocence, taking their challenge to the Supreme Court in an effort to clear their names.

    The development comes after days of embarrassing testimony from Boral executives Paul Dalton and Peter Head.

    Mr Dalton was forced to request a certificate indemnifying him after admitting he had destroyed his original notes taken after a meeting with the men that ultimately led to the charges.

    His underling, Mr Head described the cafe meeting with the men as “pleasant”.

    “It was calm, it was pleasant. There was no overt aggression but certainly passion for the cause,” he said.

    Mr Setka, backed by Mr Reardon, allegedly threatened to blockade Boral plants if it continued to supply cement to builder Grocon as the union fought to see its own officials appointed as OH&S reps on its city sites.

    The threats were allegedly directed at the Boral executives during an hour-long meeting at a cafe in North Melbourne in April 2013.

    The union bosses were not hit with charges until 2015 after both Boral executives made statements to the royal commission into trade unions.

    Mr Setka and Mr Reardon’s legal expenses are likely to run into the millions.

    But the union will not seek costs under a deal with the prosecution.

    Magistrate Charlie Rozencwajg described the decision to withdraw the charges as “the right one”.

    “I think it’s the sensible resolution to this matter,” he said.

    Mr Rozencwajg said the hearing highlighted the difference between statements taken from witnesses by lawyers to that by police.

    “It highlights how police take statements is far more conducive to getting the facts as witnesses see them,” he said.

    The court had previously heard the Boral executives made dozens of drafts of their statements that eventually went before the royal commission.

    It was those statements that police used to form the view the pair had been blackmailed at the cafe meeting.

    The men have been defended by prominent barrister Robert Richter QC and Neil Clelland QC.

    To RTWT, Google Blackmail charges against CFMEU pair John Setka, Shaun Reardon withdrawn.

    Link.

  77. C.L.

    So, it’s easy for [anyone] to attempt to influence the outcome of a trial …

    Really? How?
    GO!

  78. Geriatric Mayfly

    While on matters law, wonder what the current state of health is concerning the bloke who was stretchered out of the Banking Royal Commission. His lapse seemed to coincide with a couple of very curly questions served up by Mr Costello QC. No reports so far of his recuperation.

  79. C.L.

    It’s night pizza time again and you know what that means …

    Ramadan is a significant and blessed time for Muslim communities around the world, who gather to commemorate the revelation of the Quran, and commit to achieving greater restraint, self-sacrifice and compassion.

    As Australian Muslims observe the fasting month, I hope you find peace and fulfilment in the sacred traditions, and strength in the knowledge that your brothers and sisters throughout the world are sharing in these with you.

    Australians are fortunate to live in the most successful multicultural country in the world, where we are free to express our cultural and religious beliefs, and to nurture faith from one generation to the next.

    The shared commitment of all our citizens to our values of mutual respect, friendship, inclusion, rule of law and peace is what lies at the heart of our success.

    Australian Muslims have made a significant contribution to building our vibrant multicultural society. I wish all those observing this holy month a blessed and peaceful Ramadan.”

    Ramadan Mubarak!

    A message from the Prime Minister – Ramadan 2018.

  80. stackja

    egg_
    #2711981, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:18 pm

    The Honourable Peter Walsh AO
    Minister for Finance In office
    13 December 1984 – 4 April 1990

    Peter Alexander Walsh AO (11 March 1935 – 10 April 2015) was an Australian senator and Labor politician from 1974 to 1993.

    Walsh grew up in Doodlakine, Western Australia, where he was a wheat and sheep farmer. He was elected to the Australian Senate in 1974, and served as Minister for Resources and Energy from 1983 to 1984 and Finance Minister from 1984 to 1990.[1] He was noted for his pro-free market views.[2]

    In his 1995 memoirs, Confessions of a Failed Finance Minister, Walsh was critical of his colleagues and of political processes in general for failing to curb what he saw as wasteful government expenditure, and unnecessary government intervention. Also in his book he corrected errors made in Whatever It Takes, the book written by former ministerial colleague and fellow Senator Graham Richardson.[3]

    After leaving politics, Walsh was a columnist for the Australian Financial Review and was particularly critical of environmentalism. He was one of the founders of the Lavoisier Group which opposes the Kyoto protocol on global warming. Walsh also expressed criticism over the Rudd government’s National Broadband Network scheme.[4]

    Walsh died at a hospital in Perth after a short illness on 10 April 2015.[5]

    In his tribute to him, sitting Liberal Finance Minister and another WA Senator Mathias Cormann described his predecessor as “a real pillar of the Hawke Government”.[6]

  81. Blackmail charges brought against construction union bosses John Setka and Shaun Reardon have been dropped by Victorian prosecutors.

    They told a hearing in the Melbourne’s Magistrates’ Court that “after consideration of the facts, we have been advised to withdraw”.

    The charges related to allegations the pair from the CFMEU had spoken to executives at Boral about not supplying concrete to Melbourne worksites run by construction giant Grocon.

    When told the prosecution intended to withdraw the blackmail charges, Magistrate Charles Rozencwajg said: “I think it’s a very sensible decision”.

    “I think it’s a very sensible decision” (given that they were threatened to do to your beagle).

  82. nemkat

    When told the prosecution intended to withdraw the blackmail charges, Magistrate Charles Rozencwajg said: “I think it’s a very sensible decision”.

    One of the complainants said he didn’t feel ”threatened” until several years after the alleged conversation with Setka. He also said clandestine meetings between the Major builders and the CFMEU and it’s predecessor had been going on for over 30 years.
    Interesting to see if the State has to give Setka and his mate a payout.
    There wasn’t even any Evidence that a crime had ever been committed.

  83. Leigh Lowe

    Geriatric Mayfly

    #2711985, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:25 pm

    While on matters law, wonder what the current state of health is concerning the bloke who was stretchered out of the Banking Royal Commission. His lapse seemed to coincide with a couple of very curly questions served up by Mr Costello QC. No reports so far of his recuperation.

    It’s a question of tactics.
    Fainting spells and heart attacks are spectacular but stretch credibility when they occur repeatedly in the witness box, but nowhere else.
    Amnesia, on the other hand, is quite mundane and doesn’t garner much sympathy, but it is a much more durable tactic for the long haul.

  84. C.L.

    One of the complainants said he didn’t feel ”threatened” until several years after the alleged conversation with Setka.

    One of the complainants against Pell said he brushed his bottom in a pool 50 years ago.

  85. “we have been advised to withdraw”

    Source of that advice ?

    A large guy holding a baseball bat.

  86. Leigh Lowe

    Interesting to see if the State has to give Setka and his mate a payout.

    Well, no, actually.
    Part of the deal …

    Mr Setka and Mr Reardon’s legal expenses are likely to run into the millions.

    But the union will not seek costs under a deal with the prosecution.

  87. stackja

    Leigh Lowe
    #2711990, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:29 pm

    Carmen Lawrence?

  88. Leigh Lowe

    stackja

    #2711996, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:31 pm

    Leigh Lowe
    #2711990, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:29 pm

    Carmen Lawrence?

    Remind me.
    Was Carmen a fainter or a forgetter?

  89. C.L.

    Nicola Sturgeon vows to curb junk food promotions by banning two-for-one pizzas …

    That won’t go over well during Ramadan.

  90. Viva

    More Markle Madness I see:

    So we have Diana followed by Meghan et al: “history repeats itself, the first as tragedy, then as farce”,

  91. nemkat

    One of the complainants against Pell said he brushed his bottom in a pool 50 years ago.

    If this is correct, then the person remembered the alleged action of Pell’sfor 50 years.

    Does that sound credible to you, CL?

  92. Leigh Lowe

    Jamie Oliver ?

    JAMIE SUGAR CHUMP Jamie Oliver’s milkshakes have six times the daily limit for sugar – despite him saying shop versions should be taxed

    You know what comes next – Comrades.

    Forget Jamie.
    ‘e’s in a lot of bovver.

  93. C.L.

    Still waiting for an explanation of how it’s “easy” to corrupt a jury in the digital age.

  94. nemkat

    Remind me.
    Was Carmen a fainter or a forgetter?

    A trougher.
    Probably still feeding at some NGO lurk in W.A..

  95. cynical1

    Australian Muslims have made a significant contribution to building our vibrant multicultural society.

    Name these “Contributions”.

    Waleed Ali, kebabs and Man Monis spring to mind.

    Thanks for nothing.

  96. Leigh Lowe

    Viva

    #2712001, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:36 pm

    More Markle Madness I see:

    So we have Diana followed by Meghan et al: “history repeats itself, the first as tragedy, then as farce”,

    I predict trainwreck.

  97. stackja

    Leigh Lowe
    #2711998, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:34 pm

    Amnesia.

  98. stackja

    cynical1
    #2712009, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:42 pm

    Bilal Skaf?

  99. Leigh Lowe

    stackja

    #2712011, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:44 pm

    Leigh Lowe
    #2711998, posted on May 16, 2018 at 12:34 pm

    Amnesia.

    Sorry.
    I didn’t recall her amnesia.
    🙂

  100. Tintarella di Luna

    I think Scott Morrison is fiddling the figures with regard to the NDIS and the cost of Snowy2. He looks shifty as, these days.
    Wayne Swan used to do such things too.

    Since 1991 disability services have been funded like this: $16billion put in by the states and territories and the Commonwealth the with Commonwealth putting in about 25% – because it is a state responsibility. That $16billion is still in the forward estatimates of all three parties each and every year. The Commonwealth needs to find $6billion to bring it up to the $22billion — and according to SloMo the Commonwealth is awash with money so can meet that additional funding requirement.

    The NDIS was supposed to meet the needs of those people who are so severely disabled they cannot look after themselves, not for beach wheelchairs or lawn mowing. The legislation is a debacle with the Scheme designed in the image of the Labor party’s bureaucracy.

  101. Okay, so your evidence that Clinton Foundation funds were misused is one email unsupported by any factual basis whatsoever about Chelsea’s wedding, plus a bunch of other emails about access, none of which imply that funds were used for anything other than charity.

    Basically you have no hard evidence whatsoever that Foundation funds were used for personal Clinton enrichment. And as I said, the point about charitable grants is bogus because the Foundation largely performed its own charitable works, it was not a conduit to fund other charities.

    Menwhile, Trump is enriching himself with that $500 million Chinese loan to fund his branded development, in exchange for going easy on ZTE. He is selling out American jobs to benefit himself through international diplomacy. A more obvious example of corruption could hardly be envisaged. But from you lot, crickets.

  102. Mother Lode

    What majesty and grandeur the Royal family may have possessed has long since evaporated.

    The younger generations have, of their own accord, shed any of the mystery and any of the gravity to pursue relevance.

    Consorting with show people was never going to end well. Earlier monarchs had enough sense to make sure this sort of thing was never officially acknowledged.

    And Harry wanting to invite the swiftest has-been that ever strode the earth looking for more mirrors to gaze in, Obama, but not the Leader of the (residually) Free World? Puhleeease!

    Well, they had a good run, I suppose.

  103. egg_

    I predict trainwreck.

    It sounds like Markle burns people – walks away with a nice pre-Nup package in a few years?

  104. Des Deskperson

    “For an non-profit organisation that makes no sales, what kind of metrics does the ABC have for performance?”

    Performance bonuses don’t work in budget-funded organisations, I thought everybody knew that.

    That’s because, as the above quote indicates, it’s very difficult to fairly and objectively measure individual performance without hard measures. Performance pay schemes inevitably lead to perceptions of patronage, cronyism and nepotism with corrosive effects on morale, trust and organisational integrity with almost no evidence that they actually improve effectiveness.

    That’s why most APS agencies have abandoned performance bonuses. It says a lot about the ABC culture that these shoddy and divisive schemes still operate.

  105. Rae

    It’s the digital age …

    So what?

    So, it’s easy for religious zealots and others to attempt to influence the outcome of a trial involving a senior member of the clergy.

    Really? How?
    GO!

    GO!?? GO!?? Na. But you can if you need to. And while you’re there get out one of those ubiquitous digital devices and type George Pell into Google and see how many religious zealots and others are trying to influence your views about him. Alternatively, go to Catallaxyfiles and read the comments there about his committal hearings and impending trial.

  106. Confused Old Misfit

    For the Munster:
    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/296879/

    Leaving aside the standing issue, there’s a strong argument that the emoluments clause doesn’t cover the President, and also no reason to think that business income is an “emolument” anyway.

    None of which is to say that the Indonesia deal isn’t sleazy — it might be, or it might not be, but it’s not an emoluments clause violation, and that fact that Trump critics are focusing on the emoluments issue suggests to me that there’s not much else there. According to the NYT story, the scandal is that a Chinese concern is building a theme park next door to a “Trump-branded hotel” that isn’t actually owned by Trump:

    The Trump Organization’s partner in a lavish Indonesian development project boasting a six-star hotel and golf course with President Trump’s name has brought on a new ally: a Chinese state-owned company.

    The Indonesian partner, the MNC Group, said Tuesday that it had struck a deal with an arm of Metallurgical Corporation of China, a state-owned construction company, to build a theme park next door to the planned Trump properties. . . .

    The Chinese state-owned construction company, in an announcement of the deal, did not provide any details on the agreement. The announcement, which was initially published on its website, was later taken down. A representative for M.C.C. declined to comment.

    Both the theme park and the Trump-branded hotel and 18-hole golf course are being developed by the billionaire Hary Tanoesoedibjo, head of the MNC Group, and packaged together as part of a splashy $500 million complex called Lido City that it has marketed as an “integrated lifestyle resort and theme park.”

    Hatunggal Muda Siregar, a spokesman for MNC, said the theme park and the Trump properties are separate projects within the Lido development. The agreement with the Chinese company to build the theme park does not include any financing for the project, he said. . . .

    There isn’t any evidence that the agreement with the construction company was intended to sway the Trump administration on any matters. Still, Mr. Trump has threatened China with tariffs on $150 billion in Chinese-made goods if it doesn’t back away from plans to use state support to finance a new generation of high-tech industries.

    “There isn’t any evidence. . . . Still. . . ” Monty will insist!

  107. Myrddin Seren

    Blair’s Law:

    “the ongoing process by which the world’s multiple idiocies are becoming one giant, useless force.”

    Today’s example – courtesy of PJW:

    Are straight black men the white people of black people?

    That is so intersectional it has sharp edges and should only be handled wearing safety gloves.

  108. H B Bear

    Graeoogs maaate, settle down with the HTML code. Leave some for the rest of us. Fvckwit.

  109. Fat Tony

    Funny how Rae, nemkat & candy show up at the same time.
    It is a Trollius Faecus – please do not engage. It twists your words and adds lies.

    SCROLL SCROLL SCROLL THE TROLL
    GENTLY DOWN THE PAGE

  110. thefrolickingmole

    I see some are still engaging the troll.

    Apparently Gutenberg passed him by.

    Scroll the troll.
    It doesnt argue out of anything other than a vapid sense of desperation that it really is as much of a non entity as it feels it is.
    Mummie is so disappointed.

  111. Boambee John

    The running dog lackey of the left fascist establishment continues to defend the left fascist establishment!

    Surprise!

  112. jupes

    Australians are fortunate to live in the most successful multicultural country in the world, where we are free to express our cultural and religious beliefs, and to nurture faith from one generation to the next.

    No. Australians are unfortunate that successive governments have allowed thousands of Muslims to immigrate here and pass their evil ideology on to their kids with the predictable results.

    The shared commitment of all our citizens to our values of mutual respect, friendship, inclusion, rule of law and peace is what lies at the heart of our success.

    Then perhaps you can explain the bollards in the centers of our capital cities. Perhaps you could also explain why an Australian Muslim is over four times more likely to join Islamic State than the ADF.

    Australian Muslims have made a significant contribution to building our vibrant multicultural society.

    On the contrary, Australian Muslims have done exponentially more than anyone else to ensure that multiculturalism has become the disaster that it is today. Australia would be a much richer and safer place if we had enforced a ban on Muslim immigration over the last 50 years.

  113. C.L.

    It’s the digital age …
    ————-

    So what?
    ————-

    So, it’s easy for religious zealots and others to attempt to influence the outcome of a trial involving a senior member of the clergy.
    ————-

    Really? How?
    GO!

    ————-

    Na. But you can if you need to.

    So you cannot explain how it’s “easy” to corrupt a jury in the digital age.
    Thanks.

  114. C.L.

    Australians are fortunate to live in the most successful multicultural country in the world, where we are free to express our cultural and religious beliefs …

    Except if you’re a Christian Tongan-Australian who plays rugby for a living.

  115. Rae

    Mummie is so disappointed.

    Yes, Hole. I’m sure your “Mummie” (you call her “Mummie”? FFS.) is sooooo disappointed. You still can’t do nappy changing without getting stuff on your digits. And your face!!?? … you just keep planting it.

  116. Rae

    Not like you to run away with your tail between your legs, C.L.

  117. thefrolickingmole

    Always easy to tell when you are over the target.

    Mummies boy.

  118. Des Deskperson

    ‘One of the complainants against Pell said he brushed his bottom in a pool 50 years ago.

    If this is correct, then the person remembered the alleged action of Pell’sfor 50 years.’

    My recollection is that this memory was allegedly jogged after seeing those two shambling old geezers on the 7.30 report claiming they were goosed by Pell at a swimming pool.

    The two geezers subsequently made such a poor showing at Pell’s hearing that even Walligton dismissed their evidence.

  119. Leigh Lowe

    Des.
    Please.
    “Shambling old geezers”?
    You are talking about the core constituency here at the Cat.

  120. C.L.

    Rae on jury trials in the digital age:

    … it’s easy … to attempt to influence the outcome of a trial …

    It’s easy, huh.
    How?
    GO!

  121. nemkat

    The two geezers subsequently made such a poor showing at Pell’s hearing that even Walligton dismissed their evidence.

    She didn’t dismiss any Evidence, she just decided it wasn’t strong enough to put to a jury.
    The Charges that didn’t make it past Committal were described as the ”most vile”, IIRC.

    Wouldn’t ”most vile” refer to more than ”bottom brushing”?

  122. Boambee John

    Scroll ’em up, move on by,

    Keep on scrollin’, scrollin’, right by.

    Don’t bother even readin’, even much less respondin’,

    Just keep on scrollin’, scrollin’, right by.

  123. Rae

    Repetitive now, C.L. As I said upthread, you can go if you need to. I’m sure you can find the rest.

  124. stackja

    Boambee John
    #2712048, posted on May 16, 2018 at 1:29 pm

    Scrolling, scrolling, rawhide

  125. thefrolickingmole

    Troll on the Avenue
    Troll on the avenue, they’re trying to get you in,
    Commenting by with their idiotic trys,
    They’re all depressed and ill, taking mummies pills,
    Commenting your way with their hair on fire;
    But don’t you slip don’t you slip
    And comment with the troll on the avenue

    Massive apologies to Lou reed fans….

  126. thefrolickingmole

    Clapton fans…

  127. Confused Old Misfit

    I’ll admit to shambling. But I emphatically deny that I have ever “geezered”!

  128. max

    Australians are fortunate to live in the most successful multicultural country in the world, where we are free to express our cultural and religious beliefs, and to nurture faith from one generation to the next.

    That’s not how Muslims see it, Malcolm.

  129. John Constantine

    Big Australia means importing mass millions of people that will not inherit legacy wealth from the existing obsolete and deplorable Australian system.

    Racist settler culture will pay for this, most obviously by superannuation funding infrastructure spending and an inevitable death tax funding recurrent spending.

    British activists have a more immediate way to get old racists to provide early inheritance to imported voters.

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/apr/02/pay-all-uk-25-year-olds-a-10000-inheritance-says-thinktank

  130. John Constantine

    A one off scrip tax, where major companies have to issue 3% of their capital for free to a ‘good causes State fund]

    British activist idea, but give a bankrupt Australian left another decade….

  131. stackja

    Carpe Jugulum
    #2712056, posted on May 16, 2018 at 1:35 pm
    New Fred kids

  132. JC

    Gargs

    You’re sounding less passive aggressive than usual. Has something happened in the ossuary?

  133. cohenite

    monster said this some time ago:

    AT&T got net neutrality passed and is in the middle of antitrust action, Korean Aerospace is about to win a billion dollar government contract.

    Trump just let ZTE off the hook in exchange for China investing in his hotels. He is not even hiding it any more. He is a crook.

    Anyone got any idea what he’s rabbiting on about.

  134. Confused Old Misfit

    cohenite
    #2712169, posted on May 16, 2018 at 4:11 pm

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/296879/

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