Wednesday Forum: May 16, 2018

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1,786 Responses to Wednesday Forum: May 16, 2018

  1. C.L.

    If any further proof was required of what stupendous left-wing wankers now run the Democrat FBI …

    FBI trolled Rolling Stones-loving Trump by naming the original Russia probe ‘Crossfire Hurricane’.

  2. cohenite

    Nup cohenite, the shale oil boom happened under Obama.

    You’re not even trying. obuma weaponised the EPA, CO2 was taken to the SC, fracking was effectively banned, pipelines stymmied and oil exploration discouraged.

  3. DB, crows can count up to seven by inspection, human beans only to about five. Moreover they already have the concept of a human with a long gun. Of course they haven’t got as much capacity for forming abstractions as human beings do. But they clearly have some.

    Not at all, counting isn’t having a concept of number, nor is a crow fleeing when confronted by a man with a long gun having the concept of a man with a long gun. If scarecrows had a concept of man with or without a long gun they wouldn’t be scared of scarecrows, even temporarily. What they do have, though, are mental images.

  4. OneWorldGovernment

    Snoopy
    #2712894, posted on May 17, 2018 at 12:19 pm

    I can see that Dr BeauGan is beginning to weaken. Another three or four weeks of this and I predict that one Sunday morning he’ll find himself wondering why he’s standing outside a Uniting church.

    lol

    Stop picking on the DRibbleBogon or he will tRoll out spikey when he gets the skin out of the basement.

  5. I can see that Dr BeauGan is beginning to weaken. Another three or four weeks of this and I predict that one Sunday morning he’ll find himself wondering why he’s standing outside a Uniting church.

    Snoopy, let me tell you, the last thing anyone in the Uniting Church accepts is the LNC. In fact, accepting it is grounds for expulsion.

  6. OneWorldGovernment

    dover_beach
    #2712897, posted on May 17, 2018 at 12:28 pm

    ………

    What they do have, though, are mental images.

    To see a mob of crows swooping over the lambing paddock and picking on a birthing lamb is disgusting.

  7. Bruce of Newcastle

    crows can count up to seven by inspection

    One of my tame noisy miners can count to 4. If I give it only two or three bits of bread it waits until I provide the rest – then takes off to feed the kiddies.

  8. DrBeauGan

    Snoopy
    #2712894, posted on May 17, 2018 at 12:19 pm
    I can see that Dr BeauGan is beginning to weaken. Another three or four weeks of this and I predict that one Sunday morning he’ll find himself wondering why he’s standing outside a Uniting church.

    Nah, Snoopy. I’d sooner join da catlicks. And that’s not happening any time soon.

  9. OldOzzie

    Canavan should hear farmers, who know land clearing isn’t the future – Lyndon Schneiders

    For a generation, fierce debate has raged in Queensland over landclearing and deforestation. Elections have been won and lost, laws have been made and unmade. Tensions have spilled over. Protests and counter-protests have come and gone.

    The issues are complex and the ­solutions hard. Consensus to balance the needs of the environment and the interests of farmers, primarily cattle graziers, has been fleeting and easily lost.

    Finding the balance demands wisdom and leadership from government and from the combatants in this polarising debate.

    Clearly, this leadership won’t be coming from senior Turnbull government minister Matt Canavan, who has trotted out a stale ­series of half-truths and mis­information in his attempt to fan the flames of division between the bush and the city.

    Resources Minister has trotted out a series of claims that are hard to sustain. He appears to be saying the environmental impacts of deforestation and clearing are without foundation and that laws to restrict clearing have no impact on the environment.

    Yet hard facts suggest otherwise. The most authoritative source of information about threats to Australia’s environment is the national State of the Environment Report by a panel of Australia’s leading scientists on behalf of the government.

    The most recent report was released by Canavan’s cabinet colleague, Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg, last year.

    The report found land clearing, the primary cause of habitat fragmentation, was a key threat to the environment. Each report stretching back to the first in 1996 said the same.

    It noted that everywhere except Queensland, land-clearing rates have remained stable or declined.

    A decision by Campbell Newman’s Liberal National Party government to break an election promise and weaken the laws in 2013 led to 1.2 million hectares being cleared during the next three years. Almost instantly, Queensland became a global deforestation hot spot, rivalling ­places such as the Amazon and Borneo.

    The impact on wildlife is profound. Last year the CSIRO published a report estimating 50 million mammals, birds and reptiles were killed annually by land clearing in Queensland and NSW, but the vast majority occurs in Queensland.

    The RSPCA appeared before the recent Queensland parliamentary inquiry into land clearing and called it the greatest single threat to animal welfare in the state.

    The CSIRO, the RSPCA and Australia’s leading scientists are hardly wide-eyed greenies, as Canavan would have us believe. But they all agree there is a problem in Queensland and that the problem has been created by gutting previously strong laws.

    It wasn’t always like this. When land clearing began in earnest in Queensland in the 1950s, no one understood the impact of clearing on soil productivity and on the ­environment.

    It was government policy to support land clearing in places such as the Brigalow Belt. Over time, the balance was lost.

    Stretching across millions of hectares in central Queensland and NSW, 90 per cent of the brigalow forests have been cleared. This forest type is now listed nationally as endangered under our national environment laws.

    Four brigalow-dependent animal species, including the beautiful paradise parrot, are extinct. Another 17 species are threatened.

    Importantly, most leaders in the beef industry know that the era of massive land clearing is over and that demonstrating the sustainability of farm management is the key to market access and farm productivity.

    One of Australia’s largest purchasers of beef, McDonalds, is developing policies aimed at “eliminating deforestation from our global supply chains”, while last year the China Meat Association committed itself to “avoiding land degradation, deforestation and conversion of natural vegetation in the livestock production . . . feed chains”.

    Industry leaders also are leading the charge. The Australian Red Meat Advisory Council has developed the Australian beef sustainability framework, which includes improving animal welfare prac­tices, protecting conservation values and promoting tree cover.

    But these voices are being drowned out by the noisy mob. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, there are about 28,000 farm businesses in Queensland. Protests held against new laws passed by the Queensland parliament last week attracted fewer than 200 people.

    The vast majority of farmers care about the environment and know that the future is all about sustainability, not a return to the past.

    There is more than enough ­land already cleared in Queensland, more than 20 million hectares, to base a vibrant industry producing high-quality food for Australians and overseas markets.

    Canavan is not doing the Australian farm community any favours. He is a senior leader of his party but his political antenna is wrong. He has misjudged the electoral benefits in respect of land clearing.

    Five times in 15 years Queenslanders have gone to the polls with a clear choice in respect of land-clearing laws and five times they have endorsed the party with the strongest laws. The only time they backed the LNP was when it promised to keep the laws — a promise immediately broken. It is time to turn the page on the past and look to a better future.

    Lyndon Schneiders is the national director of the Wilderness Society.

    From the Comments

    – Mr Schneider’s idea of sustainability is different to mine. His reliance on politically charged reports illustrates he has no idea about the reality on the ground for landholders to manage vegetation while at the same time making a living. I love trees, and I love our native wildlife. I also make a living off the land. I find it beyond frustrating that the divide between city based green zealots,and rural dwellers has become so great that there is little understanding, or care, about how farmers need to manage their land. The big stick approach and constant misrepresentations of what is really happening on the ground is greatly resented. Rural landholders are forced to save the planet, at their own expense, for the likes of Lyndon Schneiders. He can feel good whilst we scratch our heads and wonder whether we’ll unwittingly fall foul of yet more rules and regulations imposed upon us from afar.

    Ah! The voice from the wilderness society, not a farmer dealing with drought.

    – Lyndon seems to have got lost in the wilderness.

  10. Rae

    Special counsel Robert Mueller’s team has informed President Donald Trump’s attorneys that they have concluded that they cannot indict a sitting president

    So says Rudi Guiliani. In which case, it ain’t necessarily so.

  11. zyconoclast

    Twitter will hide more bad tweets in conversations and searches

    Twitter will begin using a wider range of signals to rank tweets in conversations and searches, hiding more replies that are likely to be abusive, the company said today. Comments from users that have often been blocked, muted, or reported for abuse will be less visible throughout the service, CEO Jack Dorsey told a group of reporters. “We are making progress as we go,” Dorsey said.

  12. DrBeauGan

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2712901, posted on May 17, 2018 at 12:37 pm
    crows can count up to seven by inspection

    One of my tame noisy miners can count to 4. If I give it only two or three bits of bread it waits until I provide the rest – then takes off to feed the kiddies.

    That’s one more than the aborigines could manage.

  13. gingerbeer

    I wish the press (including industry rags) would stop with the misinformation about the Grenfell fire. Whilst the ACP panels contributed some of the fire load, the vast majority came from the foam insulation behind the ACP.

  14. zyconoclast

    As Twitter explodes, Eric Lander apologizes for toasting James Watson

    Prominent geneticist Eric Lander apologized on Monday for toasting James Watson, the co-discoverer of the double helix who in his later years has become known for racist and misogynist views. Social media tore into the director of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard after his remarks on Watson’s 90th birthday.

    “I was asked to toast James Watson last week … for his role in the Human Genome Project, on the occasion of his 90th birthday,” Lander said in an email to “fellow Broadies” sent just before noon. “People who have called this out are correct. I was wrong to toast, and I’m sorry.”

  15. OneWorldGovernment

    DrBeauGan
    #2712902, posted on May 17, 2018 at 12:37 pm

    Snoopy
    #2712894, posted on May 17, 2018 at 12:19 pm
    I can see that Dr BeauGan is beginning to weaken. Another three or four weeks of this and I predict that one Sunday morning he’ll find himself wondering why he’s standing outside a Uniting church.

    Nah, Snoopy. I’d sooner join da catlicks. And that’s not happening any time soon.

    poor old dribblegons wont be accepted anywhere.

    What state was it that you were/are a teacher. DRbogon?

  16. thefrolickingmole

    “can I eat it? can it eat me? can I fuck it?”

    Also known as closing time at the nightclub.

    duncanm
    Thats the one, if only they acted like that all the time.

  17. struth

    God tell me why we let women out of the kitchen?

    I am in a lodge in Gove Arhnem land.

    More white lefty females attending talkfests discussing funding and cultural sensitivities and who is who n their various tax payer funded aboriginal councils and organisations and sipping from council and aboriginal flagged waterbottles while looking intensely serious ( after all the plight of aboriginal Australia who they’ve just met rests in their hands)……than you can poke a stick at.
    None of them have a clue but the platters of finger food keep coming so life for them in communist Arnhem land is great.
    They are the worst.
    A nice clean group of aboriginal women sit on a rug with their kids playing on their smart phones which they all have.
    I have to hold myself back………….

  18. H B Bear

    The Aboriginal Industry is a growth industry.

  19. thefrolickingmole

    The onion, your living in it.

    An accidental sugar spill at a Centrelink office in Adelaide’s south has prompted an emergency evacuation, with a HAZMAT team brought in to test the substance.

    Adelaide centerlink beat some customers to some mysterious spilled white powder?
    A real lack of bogan pride there, should have been hoovered up by some junkie 12 year olds in 5 minutes flat.

  20. Snoopy

    Snoopy, let me tell you, the last thing anyone in the Uniting Church accepts is the LNC.

    LNC? I had to google that. I thought you were still debating metaphysics. I guess I haven’t been reading all that closely.

  21. DrBeauGan

    Da catlicks have a long tradition of reason, to which I confess an addiction. The uniting church has a short tradition of sentimental idiocy which I find embarrassing.

  22. bundyrum

    I wonder if those Boral guys took up gardening after finding some free implements at the front door?

  23. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    I predict that one Sunday morning he’ll find himself wondering why he’s standing outside a Uniting church.

    It certainly wouldn’t be for religious reasons. Perhaps they have scheduled a Pilates class for 9am Sunday he was curious about?

  24. Zatara

    Remember those classified ‘Trump Tower Tapes’ that were supposed to tie Don Trump Jr. to “collusion with Russia”? Well they were released today.

    Why haven’t you heard anything about them you ask? Because they were a complete flop.

    A nothing-burger, hold the caviar.

    Donald Trump Jr. got straight to the point during the now-famous Trump Tower meeting in June 2016.

    “So I believe you have some information for us,” he said, directing his attention across a large conference table to the Russian lawyer who was there, he thought, to deliver incriminating information on Hillary Clinton.

    But if Mr. Trump expected a campaign-changing bombshell, he was quickly disappointed. The disparaging information about Mrs. Clinton amounted to no more than allegations of fraud in Russia by several obscure Democratic donors. The Trump campaign officials reacted with dissatisfaction, not eagerness. Both sides left disappointed.

    Documents Show Promise, and Letdown, Around Trump Tower Meeting

    Really lame try on the setup boys.

  25. DrBeauGan

    Law of non-contradiction, Calli. It’s a rule in most sophisticated languages warning you not to assert A & Not A, where A is any statement whatever, because that isn’t the way the words And and Not are correctly used. There’s a reason why it’s a good rule.

  26. DrBeauGan

    PS, are you back from Foreign Parts yet?

  27. Oh come on

    So, James Watson apparently said

    If you could find the gene which determines sexuality and a woman decides she doesn’t want a homosexual child, well, let her.

    A great many of the people who profess to be horrified by this are fully supportive of the following statement:

    If you find the gene which determines Downs Syndrome in a foetus and a woman decides she doesn’t want a Downs child, well, let her.

  28. calli

    Dubai lounge. For another hour.

    Our Emirates driver wished us God’s blessings and a safe trip, inshallah. We were his first Ramadan transfer.

  29. DrBeauGan

    Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)
    #2712923, posted on May 17, 2018 at 1:03 pm
    I predict that one Sunday morning he’ll find himself wondering why he’s standing outside a Uniting church.

    It certainly wouldn’t be for religious reasons. Perhaps they have scheduled a Pilates class for 9am Sunday he was curious about?

    I admit I prefer watching reasonably attractive chicks in leotards bouncing up and down on a big beach ball. Beats theology.

  30. thefrolickingmole

    First flogger on the moon tries his hand at whitewashing the Palliwood productions in Isra*l

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/17/gaza-shootings-when-i-was-14

    Take good note of the entirely passive tone used “protesting at the border with a pair of wire cutters in her hand”…

    Are these people actually this dumb or is there a little frisson of joy they experience perverting reality in order to virtue signal?

  31. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    PICTURED: Bride, 29, who stabbed her brother-in-law in the FACE with a wedding cake knife over an argument at the reception about an ‘angel’ table for dead family members

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5738555/PICTURED-Geelong-bride-stabbed-brother-law-face-wedding-cake-knife.html#ixzz5Fj1rK4C4
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    I’ve heard of “Bridezilla” before, but I do think the lady went a little too far?

  32. Nup cohenite, the shale oil boom happened under Obama

    Mmyes. Observe the great oil production boom of 2015-16. Fuckwit.

    As your link shows, oil production in America doubled under Obama, or thereabouts. You just can’t help looking like a complete idiot, can you Snoopy?

  33. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    In one week the Left have gone all in for Hamas and now MS-13.

    These people are insane.

  34. Chris

    I admit I prefer watching reasonably attractive chicks in leotards bouncing up and down on a big beach ball. Beats theology.

    In the best of all possible worlds, you can get attractive chicks teaching you theology!

  35. DrBeauGan

    ’ve heard of “Bridezilla” before, but I do think the lady went a little too far?

    I hope they have a long and happy marriage. Bets, anyone?

  36. calli

    According to the NYT, which the Beloved is reading now, at least 8 of the Gaza dead were armed and wearing civvies.

    The usual caper. Armed to the teeth and blending in among 14year olds.

    Reminds me of Golda Meir’s comment years ago – peace will come when they love their children more than they hate us.

  37. Makka

    The blog clown;

    You just can’t help looking like a complete idiot, can you Snoopy?

    JC, I blame you for this mOron being allowed back in.

  38. thefrolickingmole

    Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    I missed the MS13 bit, what numpty is shilling for them?

  39. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Good to see Monty is now pro Oil.

  40. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    I missed the MS13 bit, what numpty is shilling for them?

    Trump called them “animals”. The entire left has gone berserk.

  41. calli

    That stabby bride has crazy eyes.

  42. Des Deskperson

    ‘The JCU spokesman said staff members could comment and engage in public discussion on matters within their area of expertise, within the framework of the university’s Code of Conduct.

    “No employee is immune from their responsibilities,” he said.

    Chief of which is toeing the party line. As I pointed out above, bureaucrats see only power issues and are oblivious to all other aspects of reality.”

    Well, yes, but there is also the issue of the extent to which an employee ought to be allowed to criticise his/her employer in public while continuing to take the employer’s money.

  43. DrBeauGan

    Chris
    #2712936, posted on May 17, 2018 at 1:21 pm
    I admit I prefer watching reasonably attractive chicks in leotards bouncing up and down on a big beach ball. Beats theology.

    In the best of all possible worlds, you can get attractive chicks teaching you theology!

    Where do I sign up? As long as it’s not uniting church theology. That would cancel out the leotards.

  44. DrBeauGan

    Trump called them “animals”. The entire left has gone berserk.

    When did they stop?

  45. Makka

    Trump called them “animals”. The entire left has gone berserk.

    And yet these leftscum are still in power in California. San Diego is turning into a bordertown Mexican shithole.

  46. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    How bad is Frydenberg going?

    Fairfax are running puff pieces on him.

  47. thefrolickingmole

    Ok thats weird.
    The left are going to pretend its a race issue when even other hispanics in prison hate the gang.

    Officers at the Prince George’s jail began to notice a rise in MS-13 five years ago. As the gang gained strength, it began to flex its muscle by demanding a “tax” from other inmates, particularly Hispanic convicts. Promising them protection, MS-13 members took a share of their commissary, including chips, candy, T-shirts and boxer shorts.

    “They control the Hispanic population,” the investigator said. “They make them pay rent like they do on the streets. They make them work out. They make them join with them in fights.”

    By the spring of 2016, however, inmates in two of the jail’s 18 housing units had grown tired of the extortion, the official said. Whenever an MS-13 member was transferred into those units, other inmates would immediately attack him.

    “When it happened two or three times in one month in the same unit, that’s when we figured out what was going on,” he recalled. “They said they couldn’t take it anymore.”

    An older inmate with MS-13 tattoos said he’d joined the gang as a teen in El Salvador to avenge his grandfather, who’d been killed by a machete-wielding robber. He’d then come to the United States in 2000. When he was deported in 2012, he came back a few years later to be with his wife and children.

    “I don’t kill nobody in the United States,” he said in English.

    Asked whether he could say the same about El Salvador, he laughed.

    “You know my answer,” he said before shuffling down the long white corridor toward his cell.

    How multicultural.

  48. DrBeauGan

    Well, yes, but there is also the issue of the extent to which an employee ought to be allowed to criticise his/her employer in public while continuing to take the employer’s money.

    In a university, as much as they like. I once signed an agreement not to criticise a university publicly, and had no difficulty complying. These days it’s a different matter.

    It all depends on whether you think a university is a bureaucracy which hires a small number of academics, or a community of academics who hire a small number of bureaucrats.

    The second perspective is obsolete, which is why they should be privatised ASAP.

  49. Snoopy

    Monty:

    As your link shows, oil production in America doubled under Obama, or thereabouts.

    That wasn’t your challenge, doofus.

    m0nty
    #2712799, posted on May 17, 2018 at 10:28 am
    I dare one of you to link a chart of positive recent economic activity in America where the trend line wasn’t already positive under Obama.

    The trend for oil production was strongly negative in the last two years of Obama’s reign. As others here pointed out, Obama was committed to the destruction of the fracking industry.

    You just can’t help looking like a complete idiot, can you Monty?

  50. Snoopy

    And what about coal production, shithead?

    That graph shows five years of decline.

  51. Cactus

    I have some knowledge of the coal industry and in the US. Under Obama it was common for many mines to operate with just 1-2 years of permits ahead of them. In mining to operate a mine without having a plan longer than 2 years makes it just really hard to survive. But there were also external market dynamics (gas fracking, a reduction in China’s imports) which put a lot of pressure on the industry.

  52. Geriatric Mayfly

    A postscript on dogs. Apparently, they are the only animals which respond to finger pointing by humans.

  53. pete m

    This former cop / utter subhuman (link to judgment), punched his 10 week old son so hard he shattered his liver and ruptured his aorta and most other internal organs, and our piss weak dpp did not proceed with a murder trial.

    He got 9 years must serve 5.

    5 years for killing his 10 month old son.

    RIP little Kye.

  54. OldOzzie

    Citizenship sage: Anne Aly curiosities remain, Christian Porter says – Ben Packham

    Attorney-General Christian Porter says some Labor MPs are yet to provide evidence that their dual citizenship has been renounced, and “curiosities” remain over the case of Labor’s Anne Aly.

    The Australian reported on Saturday that Labor MPs Emma McBride and Emma Husar had sought to renounce their dual citizenship, but failed to provide evidence that their requests were ever acted upon.

    Mr Porter told Sky News that failing to abide by the parliamentary register was a breach of parliamentary privilege.

    “The parliamentary register … requires that you show the finality, the end, the completion of the renunciation process,” he told Sky News.

    “Let’s forget the constitution for a moment. This is a registry required by the parliament which the Labor Party pushed for. And there are members of the Labor Party who just haven’t abided yet by the registry.”

    Mr Porter said the government was prepared to accept a letter from the Egyptian Embassy stating Dr Aly’s Egyptian citizenship had ben renounced as “an authoritative statement about citizenship”.

    However, he said there remained some unanswered questions over the undated letter.

    “There are some curiosities about this. It appears Anne Aly’s citizenship was able to be renounced by a Council of Ministers in Egypt inside 48 hours. That would be one of the more efficient bureaucracies on earth,” he told Perth radio 6PR.

    “This is an unsigned letter that appears to come from the Egyptian Embassy that says Anne Aly affected, so finalised, the renunciation of her citizenship.”

    The Australian revealed today that Dr Aly accepted more than $3000 in flights — ­including a trip to Cairo in July — from the Egyptian ­embassy, which last week issued the statement clearing her of being a foreign citizen.

    Legal experts questioned whether the letter confirmed Dr Aly had satisfied key tests in Egyptian nationality law, specifically article 10, article 16 and article 22.

    Constitutional law expert ­George Williams told The Australian there were a “number of MPs” who had come forward with “unverified statements as to whether they have renounced or hold citizenship under foreign law”.

    He warned that documents from foreign embassies produced by MPs could not be taken as proof that dual citizenship had been relinquished according to the legal mechanisms of a foreign country, following the High Court’s strict interpretation of section 44 of the Constitution.

  55. notafan

    Moreover they already have the concept of a human with a long gun

    Oh really?

    I can pick up and hold about anything in my hand and crows/ravens head for the hills.

    I can do a fake throw and they take off

    If they were really smart they should have worked out I throw like a girl anyhow.

    Reminding me of a person on Facebook I ended up blocking because of the constant flow of the stupid

    Crows are smarter than a child of seven!

    River in New Zealand declared sentient!

    And much other tripe

    Why don’t you join PETA and be done with it?

  56. thefrolickingmole

    peter m

    What a bastard.
    No great redeeming features at all.

    Kye was born on the
    14th of April 2014, and he was 10 weeks old when you killed him.

    Plus shagging the office help on the side.

  57. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    #2712942, posted on May 17, 2018 at 1:26 pm

    Good to see Monty is now pro Oil.

    Well, not entirely.
    He is pro Iran Oil, Qatari Oil and Obama-Oil (which analysis might show to be snake oil, and definitely not the ‘good oil’).

  58. nemkat

    Anne Aly must have a hide thicker than a rhinoceros.
    Mind you, Falinski’s hide would rival a blue whale’s.

  59. OldOzzie

    THE MOCKER
    The Mocker’s ABC: stars align at Planet Aunty

    Not even a year ago Media Watch host Paul Barry was castigating the government and the One Nation Party for their attempted reforms of the ABC. Among these were a proposed legislative amendment for the organisation to be “fair and balanced”, and the public disclosure, together with salaries, of the names of staff who earned over $200,000 per year. This, claimed Barry, amounted to “bashing the ABC”.

    Imposing such measures was “ridiculous” said Barry, pointing out that legislation already required the ABC to be “accurate and impartial”. The requirement to canvass opposing views would “doubtless be demanded on climate science, where deniers of man-made global warming would, in One Nation’s view, also need to be given equal weight.”

    “Perhaps also on whether the world is flat,” he sneered. That he resorted to a simplistic dichotomy in characterising the debate on climate change, together with equating ‘deniers’ with flat earthers, is revealing. You will never hear Barry apply such a term to those in the ABC who stubbornly insist, despite all the evidence to the contrary, that the organisation does not have a culture of systemic bias towards the left.

    Let’s examine a couple of examples only this week. On Monday, The Drum featured a panel comprising Sydney Morning Herald political and international editor Peter Hartcher, finance executive Ayten Saridas, Guardian columnist Van Badham, and Dr Ian Wilson of Murdoch University. It discussed a series of bombings, including the targeting of three Christian churches on Sunday in Surabaya, Indonesia, by Islamic fundamentalists. Saridas, a Muslim who had worked in Indonesia, was asked by host Ellen Fanning whether the bombings represented a radicalisation of religion in Indonesia.

    “It’s a very moderate country”, replied Saridas. “It’s very secular.” That must be news to a former governor of Jakarta, Basuki Tjahaja ‘Ahok’ Purnama, a Christian who last May was sentenced to two years imprisonment for blasphemy. And presumably Saridas has never heard of Aceh, the province which has the highest proportion of Muslims in Indonesia, which routinely canes and imprisons its citizens for violating sharia law. In fairness to Saridas, just last month Aceh’s governor, Irwandi Yusuf, announced reforms following pressure from human rights groups. Instead of being caned outdoors, violators will now be caned indoors. Spectators are still allowed to watch these barbaric punishments, but they will no longer be permitted to film them. Very moderate and secular, wouldn’t you say?]

    If that did not warrant Fanning’s interjecting, then Saridas’s next assertion certainly did. “This is not about our religion, she said serenely. “Our religion is a religion of faith at the – of peace – at the end of the day.”

    Freudian slip? As for Islam being a religion of peace, that claim is no longer a glib public relations line, nor a trite platitude. It is a passive aggressive obtuseness, an extended finger to a craven Western society obsessed with indulging and placating minorities. As with all propaganda, it derives strength not through persuasion but by imposing an orthodoxy that few in the commentariat will question. Unsurprisingly, neither Fanning nor Saridas’s co-panellists took issue with her statement.

    Consider some of the other Islamic apologist perspectives the show has featured. “Does the Orlando shooting need to be defined by the attacker’s religion,” it postulated in 2016 following the murder of 49 people by Afghan-American and Muslim Omar Mateen, who had sworn loyalty to ISIL before the attack.

    What about subjects like “Islamophobia, not Islam, is the real threat,” or “Are we too quick to link attacks to radical Islam? The Drum? More like The Drone. What was Barry saying about giving airtime to those who maintain the world is flat?”

    If you listened to ABC’s AM program on Tuesday you would have heard national education reporter Natasha Robinson’s segment about this week’s NAPLAN (National Assessment Program — Literacy and Numeracy) tests. “It’s always been a controversial assessment but never more so than right now,” she said, prior to giving numerous critics a platform. What followed was an entirely negative portrayal of NAPLAN, which is designed to give an indication of individual schools’ and students’ performance, and is strongly opposed by the left-leaning teachers’ unions.

    However, Robinson failed to mention a report by the Centre for Independent Studies released on Monday which found that the benefits of NAPLAN exceed the perceived negatives. Both The Australian and the Australian Financial Review gave wide coverage to the CIS report the previous day. What are the chances of Media Watch criticising Robinson and AM when its host scornfully dismisses calls for the ABC to be “fair and balanced”?

    On May 1 the Australian Communications and Media Authority found the ABC’s political editor, Andrew Probyn, had breached impartiality standards. Reporting on ABC News last October, he had labelled former prime minister Tony Abbott as “the most destructive politician of his generation”. The statement was, said ACMA, “judgmental”, and one that an ordinary reasonable viewer would perceive as “pejorative”.

    An ordinary reasonable person would also conclude that the ABC was obliged, at the very least, to report the ACMA finding. As Barry previously noted, it has a statutory obligation to be “accurate and impartial”. In a display of petulance and arrogance, it did not do so. It was not until May 7 that Barry conceded the lapse. “The ABC hasn’t even bothered to report the ACMA finding,” he said. “Which it really should have done.”

    Should have? This is the language of mild admonishment. Why did Media Watch, as it normally does with other organisations, not seek a written explanation from managing director Michelle Guthrie and news director Gaven Morris? Merely chiding the organisation plays down the seriousness of the matter. First, the political editor has one of the highest profiles in the ABC, and the organisation’s reputation as an impartial news service depends significantly on the performance of the incumbent. Probyn has compromised this. Second, the ABC’s internal complaint process rejected the initial complaint, despite what was obviously a breach of editorial policies. Third, in failing to report the ACMA findings, the ABC has not only demonstrated a contempt for accountability, but has also vindicated its critics.

    This is not a case of Probyn acting out of character. Last August, when senator Pauline Hanson donned a burka in the Senate chambers, his reporting was emotional, shrill, and exaggerated. “What Pauline Hanson did today was despicable and shameful, with the cheapest of stunts she vilified a section of our community, he said. “Worse, she risked inciting hatred against vulnerable women.”

    So much for the ABC’s requirement that its journalists “Gather and present news and information with due impartiality.” Why then does he act in flagrant contravention of these policies?

    Put simply, Probyn knows the ABC collective will applaud his actions. There will be little in the way of consequences; in fact, management may even reward him with one of the many generous taxpayer-funded bonuses it regularly bestows on staff. Have you heard anything from Guthrie about the failure to report ACMA’s findings? She has been vocal of late, but only in telling staff she would oppose the government’s decision to freeze the ABC’s budget at $3.16 billion from July 1 next year for three years. “In the coming year Australians will head to the polls for the next federal election. More than 80 per cent of Australians value the ABC, a point that should not be lost on anyone seeking government,” she told staff last week via video link. Like her predecessor Mark Scott, she sounds less like a managing director and more like the shop steward.

    Rather than obsessing with de-platforming the so-called climate denialists, the likes of Barry and Guthrie should concentrate on reducing the obnoxious emissions of the Charter denialists. There must be no questioning this, for the social science is settled. Entrusted with the valuable but finite resources that exist for the common good, these hubristic and privileged types have long exploited them for self-interest.

    Their continued failure to address a culture of arrogance and self-indulgence will ultimately have catastrophic – and perhaps permanent – repercussions for Planet Aunty.

  60. OldOzzie

    JUDITH SLOAN
    Economic reality put to one side as Bowen bakes magical pudding

    Hell will freeze over before Labor Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen presents a worse set of four-year budget figures than the Coalition’s during the next election campaign.

    He tried this trick last time and it blew up in his face. Assurances that Labor would put in a better budget performance over 10 years fell on deaf ears, in part because 10-year predictions are questionable at best.

    So how will Bowen achieve this? In addition to his ragtag collection of what he calls tax reform measures — pause for laughter here — he has added one that counts the most in terms of near-term revenue.

    By disallowing the payment of cash refunds for franking credits, he is expecting a short-term revenue surge — $10 billion over four years — that should mean he can boast, on paper at least, that the budget position under Labor will be better than that under a ­Coalition government. And in line with this magic pudding version of economics, he will pledge bigger short-term income tax cuts for low and middle-­income earners and even higher spending on health and education.

    But here’s the thing: eliminating cash refunds for franking credits for everyone apart from age pensioners (and charities and not-for-profits) is appalling, regressive policy. That $10bn is sourced from people with zero or low taxable ­incomes.

    The vast majority of them are just modest self-funded retirees whose assets and incomes put them just beyond the Age Pension. They earn between $3000 and $10,000 a year in cash refunds, on average.

    They are not wealthy, but they save taxpayers a lot by not depending on the Age Pension. But this is the group that Labor principally wants to punish.

    Wealthy retirees will have no problem avoiding Labor’s policy by rearranging their portfolios to continue to gain access to franking credits. That’s the Labor way these days — help the well-off while harming those who have worked hard to amass modest nest eggs for their retirements.

    If you have any doubt about Labor’s fiscal arithmetic, it will be OK because Bowen is sticking with the same three old wise men he used last time to check his figures: former PM&C head Mike Keating, former finance professor Bob Officer, and chartered accountant and company director James Mackenzie. I guess he thinks that arrangement worked so well last time.

    As for the rest of Labor’s proposed tax measures, the net effect will be to discourage hard work, risk taking, saving and investment. In other words, they run the risk of shrinking the size of the economic pie in the name of redistributing more income. Rather than tax reform, the measures are retrograde both in terms of their design and impact.

    But being high-taxing and high-spending doesn’t seem to worry Labor anymore. The days of Hawke and Keating are well and truly over. The driving force for Labor is to spend even more taxpayer money on health and education, thereby creating more jobs for Labor voters.

    No questions are asked ­whether this additional spending will achieve anything — our education standards have slipped in the face of massive increases in spending, but what the heck. The key is to outspend the Coalition while seeming to do more to repair the budget.

    It’s the politics of envy meets buying votes. The only upside is voters will have a clear choice of policies between Labor and the Coalition come the next election, sending Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum into an early, albeit possibly temporary, retirement.

  61. Stimpson J. Cat

    Yeah I’m still alive Stimpy. Firing on all eight cylinders.

    Excellent news.

  62. OldOzzie

    AFR Editorial – Blackmail is the CFMMEU’s business model

    What a sick joke. Victoria’s public prosecutor has dropped the blackmail case against Victorian Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union officials John Setka and Shaun Reardon, thus affirming the business model of monopoly thuggery over the nation’s construction sites. The charges came out of the Dyson Heydon-led royal commission into union corruption in 2015. They had been charged with threatening a secondary boycott against concrete company Boral, if it didn’t cease supplying concrete to builder Grocon. And of course the union did black ban Boral trucks from Melbourne construction sites. It might not have conformed with the dictionary definition of blackmail: threatening to reveal compromising information about someone unless they pay money to stop it. But it fits the colloquial understanding of the CFMMEU business model: do what we say, or we’ll smash your business.

    And why not? The titular head of the trade union movement, Australian Council of Trade Unions secretary Sally McManus reckons that it’s OK to break to the law if that law is unjust in some socialist left class warfare sense. And the Fair Work Commission can’t be relied upon to do much about it. It continues to legitimise the legal privileges of a law-breaking labour supply monopoly as part of some struggle between capital and labour, even though the union has paid $14.9 million in industrial fines and been described by Judge Salvatore Vasta as the “most recidivist corporate offender in Australian history”.

    And this is the mob that Bill Shorten relies on for his support as leader of the Australian Labor Party, despite it being the arch-enemy of his own former Australian Workers Union. This just reflects the two unions’ joint business model within the web of patronage that comprises the modern labour movement. While the CFMMEU operates as the industrial mafia, the AWU acts as a sort of respectable safe haven. And now, just to top it all off, the CFMMEU is making noises about taking the police to court over the case.

    The Federal Coalition called a double dissolution election in 2016 to pass a bill to return the rule of law to the nation’s construction sites. A hefty blow was struck against that goal yesterday.

  63. Dr Faustus

    Nup cohenite, the shale oil boom happened under Obama

    FactCheck: True – until the boom popped in 2015.
    Not much to do with Obama though. The massive technical/infrastructure development and tract sales that led to the shale boom all started in about 2006, when the oil price looked like it was going to stay above US$50/bbl and potentially make shale production economical.

    All that reservoir appraisal n’ geology stuff and them thar horizontal rigs and frac spreads didn’t just appear in the Winter of ’09 because of Hope n’ Change magic.

    What Chauncey Obama did do however was personally create the boom in Apple iPhones…

  64. jupes

    Check out the loaded question asked of Izzy’s coach:

    Cheika, though, refused to be critical of the devout Christian when asked what would be his message to Folau if he was “a young gay rugby boy who’s ever read Izzy’s posts and wondering if he’d ever belong in rugby or in life“.

    Good on Cheika for refusing to fall for it.

  65. OneWorldGovernment

    Hey DRibble guts

    So you are not a lecturer nor a teacher.

    Do you like shark steak?

  66. JC

    Makkaroni

    JC, I blame you for this mOron being allowed back in.

    It wasn’t me at all. CL, Artiste and Gab begged Sinc to let him back on. Go check, as I was in fact all for the fat lesbia serving his lifetime ban. He was even paroled.

  67. Boambee John

    Des D at 1328

    Well, yes, but there is also the issue of the extent to which an employee ought to be allowed to criticise his/her employer in public while continuing to take the employer’s money.

    Can we, as employers, apply this rule to Their ABC?

  68. Confused Old Misfit

    Monty would have better luck selling Obummer as a gun salesman.
    That was an economic activity increase for which he was responsible!

  69. Tel

    How come Trump easily shrugs off the dramatic effects when Hamas uses bad acting to make the Israeli government look guilty?

    But at the same time Trump swallows it hook line and sinker when the White Helmets try to make the Syrian government look guilty with their bad acting.

    Weird… selective skepticism.

  70. Law of non-contradiction, Calli. It’s a rule in most sophisticated languages warning you not to assert A & Not A, where A is any statement whatever, because that isn’t the way the words And and Not are correctly used. There’s a reason why it’s a good rule.

    Calli, it even applies when the words AND and NOT are absent, for instance, when someone says, Your pants are on fire.

  71. pete m

    Tel, you assume much re inside knowledge of the white house re Syria. Remember it was timed to send a message to NK, and there is no doubt some collateral benefit in keeping Russia and Syria from going too hard on US assets in Syria.

    I very much doubt the fact it may have been staged was not considered as a likely chance by US intel etc.

  72. The trend for oil production was strongly negative in the last two years of Obama’s reign. As others here pointed out, Obama was committed to the destruction of the fracking industry.

    Oil and coal are dead long term, Snoop, since China changed the economics of renewables. If that dead cat bounce is all Trump can claim for his own as an economic achievement, it is nothing at all in the long run.

    To be fair, Trump inherited a pretty great economy at a macro level, so there was not much to fix other than inequality. But of course Trump doesn’t care about that.

  73. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    To be fair, Trump inherited a pretty great economy at a macro level, so there was not much to fix other than inequality.

    cut a fat cheque to the ATO or you will be forever branded an hypocrite.

  74. egg_

    How bad is Frydenberg going?

    Fairfax are running puff pieces on him.

    Peddling ruinable propaganda?

  75. Snoopy

    But at the same time Trump swallows it hook line and sinker when the White Helmets try to make the Syrian government look guilty with their bad acting.

    The OPCW investigation found evidence of chlorine gas in Douma. Only a very sophisticated chemical weapons program could produce chlorine. All fingers point to Syrian government. Despite multiple reports immediately after the attack the use of Sarin could not, inexplicably, be confirmed.

  76. Snoopy

    Oil and coal are dead long term, Snoop, since China changed the economics of renewables. If that dead cat bounce is all Trump can claim for his own as an economic achievement, it is nothing at all in the long run.

    Translation: Thwack, thwack, two more rakes.

  77. Gab

    China building a further 22 coal plants in June.

  78. Snoopy

    I think you’ll find they’re solar coal, Gab.

  79. Top Ender

    Fair go!

    A disgruntled passenger breached Melbourne Airport security this morning by running out onto the tarmac and trying to tear the door off a Jetstar plane.

    The man was at the Jetstar terminal when he broke through security and ran towards the plane at about 9.30am.

    Footage obtained by 9 News shows the man pulling at the aeroplane door and kicking it before being restrained by baggage handlers.

    The Herald Sun reports the man is believed to have been angry about missing a flight that departed hours earlier.

    You can understand a bloke trying to get off a Jetstar flight, but on seems a bit steep.

  80. Bruce of Newcastle

    Weird… selective skepticism.

    Tel – If he chooses to believe the White Helmets he:

    1. Sends a message to Syria to not defy the US
    2. Sends the same message to Russia
    3. And Iran
    4. Ditto Hezbollah
    5. Materially weakens the strongest side, especially if he splats air and AA assets
    6. Supports the Kurds, who Syria hates too (everyone hates the Kurds)
    7. Supports Saudi, the ally of this week
    8. Helps Israel
    9. Wedges the Left, as the White Helmets were big beneficiaries of the Obama regime
    10. May even be correct

    So even if he’s wrong, the result is in US interests. Choosing to believe Hamas, on the other hand, gets you nothing except death-to-America chants.

  81. OldOzzie

    Thread by @KimStrassel:- WSJ “1. So a few important points on that new NYT “Hurricane Crossfire” piece. A story that, BTW, all of us following this knew had to be coming. […]”

    1. So a few important points on that new NYT “Hurricane Crossfire” piece. A story that, BTW, all of us following this knew had to be coming. This is DOJ/FBI leakers’ attempt to get in front of the facts Nunes is forcing out, to make it not sound so bad. Don’t buy it. It’s bad.

    2. Biggest takeaway: Govt “sources” admit that, indeed, the Obama DOJ and FBI spied on the Trump campaign. Spied. (Tho NYT kindly calls spy an “informant.”) NYT slips in confirmation far down in story, and makes it out like it isn’t a big deal. It is a very big deal.

    3. In self-serving desire to get a sympathetic story about its actions, DOJ/FBI leakers are willing to provide yet more details about that “top secret” source (namely, that spying was aimed at Page/Papadopoulos)–making all more likely/certain source will be outed. That’s on them

    4. DOJ/FBI (and its leakers) have shredded what little credibility they have in claiming they cannot comply with subpoena. They are willing to provide details to friendly media, but not Congress? Willing to risk very source they claim to need to protect?

    5. Back in Dec., NYT assured us it was the Papadopoulos-Downer convo that inspired FBI to launch official counterintelligence operation on July 31, 2016. Which was convenient, since it diminished the role of the dossier. However . . .

    6. Now NYT tells us FBI didn’t debrief downer until August 2nd. And Nunes says no “official intelligence” from allies was delivered to FBI about that convo prior to July 31. So how did FBI get Downer details? (Political actors?) And what really did inspire the CI investigation?

    7. As for whether to believe line that FBI operated soberly/carefully/judiciously in 2016, a main source for this judgment is, um . . .uh . . . Sally Yates. Who was in middle of it all. A bit like asking Putin to reassure that Russia didn’t meddle in our election.

    8. On that, if u r wondering who narrated this story, note paragraphs that assure everybody that hardly anybody in DOJ knew about probe. Oh, and Comey also was given few details. Nobody knew nothin’! (Cuz when u require whole story saying u behaved, it means u know you didn’t.)

  82. notafan

    Even the Germans

    Meanwhile in Germany end of coal, i’m sure if you keep saying it it will eventually be true

  83. Tom

    I think you’ll find they’re solar coal, Gab.

    Thanks, Snoops. Belly laugh appreciated.

  84. Tel

    Only a very sophisticated chemical weapons program could produce chlorine.

    We did it in high school chemistry … admittedly not industrial scale production, but hey maybe you should visit a pool shop sometime.

  85. min

    Cruising down the Rhine Moselle where we have had a professor of history from Cologne university and afternoon tea at a forester’s house in Speyer. I asked them about energy and both said Germany is closing down nuclear and coal fired power stations and going all renewable. Brainwashed completely. However I have noticed turbines not moving when others in same group moving so think maintenance problems occurring. Interestingly neither knew new coal fired power being built . However lots of barges loaded with coal passed our boat.

  86. H B Bear

    The golden age of air travel is dead.

  87. egg_

    My dogs would know to piss on dribblebogan

    The other party to DrBG’s to-and-fro was commenting on yours truly’s comment addressing nota, from some time back.
    I read the Feizer link prior and the comments there became as banal as some of those here.
    Glad to see many of our Sciencematists’ anecdotes re animals’ concepts of quantity vs the dogmatic.

  88. egg_

    Imposing such measures was “ridiculous” said Barry, pointing out that legislation already required the ABC to be “accurate and impartial”. The requirement to canvass opposing views would “doubtless be demanded on climate science, where deniers of man-made global warming would, in One Nation’s view, also need to be given equal weight.”

    “Perhaps also on whether the world is flat,” he sneered.

    Climategate escaped our learned colleagues at Aunty?

  89. Boambee John

    m0nty at 1534

    Oil and coal are dead long term, Snoop, since China changed the economics of renewables.

    Which explains why the Chinese are currently building hundreds of coal fuelled HELE power stations with 50 or more years of economical life?

    I have a bridge I would like to sell you, oh great running dog lackey of the left fascist establishment.

  90. egg_

    Oil and coal are dead long term,

    Was that from the site’s Wrongologist in Chief?

  91. Snoopy

    We did it in high school chemistry … admittedly not industrial scale production, but hey maybe you should visit a pool shop sometime.

    I didn’t think I would need a /sarc tag. Wrong. Again.

  92. Confused Old Misfit

    Oil and coal are dead long term,

    In the long term we are all dead. (JMK)

  93. Slayer of Memes

    “Even if the government spends itself into bankruptcy and the economy still does not recover, Keynesians can always say that it would have worked if only the government had spent more.” – Thomas Sowell

  94. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Law of non-contradiction, Calli. It’s a rule in most sophisticated languages warning you not to assert A & Not A, where A is any statement whatever, because that isn’t the way the words And and Not are correctly used. There’s a reason why it’s a good rule.

    Ah, Dr. BG. The very stuff my first husband, Sydney University Medalist in Philosophy, was made of (Tinta knows why Johanna’s efforts to track him were thwarted, lol). His specialty was symbolic logic and some aspects of theories of language. We had reams of paper covered by abstruse logical equations littered around the place, including the toilet, which apparently assisted cogitation.

    He is still captive to academe and its political obsessions, although inclining towards Buddhism in his later years. Thankfully, neither interests me. My politics changed decidedly more than ten years ago, and the religious blow has never struck me in any way, except as a vague feeling when I look out over the Okhotsk Sea during a strangely mysterious sunset with the peak mountains of bear territory reflected in a mirror of seeping water. Today we crossed the mountain spine of this peninsula (daylight travel only through bear territory; check your times as they lock the gates) and understood the Google weather forecast at last: we had read it as raining in the morning, sunny in the afternoon; in fact it meant raining on your side, and sunny on the other.

    At the mountaintop we drove in thick fog on the ridge looking down into gullies of snow, where the mists turned the special pure white small mountain birches into spectral forms. It was easy to see how these trees and their white bark stripped into pennants became sacred to the Ainu’s animism, imbued with a ‘spirit’ as were the the wind and stones and the sea itself. The bear retained a special anthropomorphised place as a ‘deity’, sharing a cosmology with other animals. From the weirding tops we descended into a tidy little fishing village, fishing industrial proportions with modern technology boats.
    We then had to return to the other side before the 5pm curfew.

    This Shiretoko Peninsula is now declared a World Heritage Area for its particular ecology and positioning. The eastern side is one of the coldest places on earth due to the sea ice phenomenon due to desalination via meltwater that I mentioned previously, enhanced by the winds off Siberia. It is a fabulous place to visit and so little known outside Japan. The interpretation centres are excellent and provide English alongside Japanese; the unusual climatic phenomena are fully explained and climate change is given only the briefest of attention (Hairy noted they had a ‘declining ice’ chart that would also decline if the starting point was used to go backwards, because they had chosen a high point in a cycle as their base). Hairy also points out how the marine biodiversity, the wealth of minerals soaking into the sea here, and the high incidence of krill, do much to explain climatic variation (especially the role of krill in the CO2 cycle), exemplified here very much for all to see. Perhaps more Australians could visit this area as well as only taking the big highway from Sapporo up to the ski fields.

    Now contemplating an onsen bath in the hotel’s onsen.

  95. Rae

    I have noticed turbines not moving when others in same group moving so think maintenance problems occurring.

    Maybe. More likely not enough demand, so some are closed down/curtailed temporarily.

  96. Tom

    Thread by @KimStrassel

    Thanks for posting that, OldOzzie @ 3.55pm. Kim Strassel is one of WSJ’s best reporters. Her work is as bankable as that of the Paywallian’s Hedley Thomas (who’s evidently on long-service leave at the moment).

  97. JC

    Oil and coal are dead long term, Snoop, since China changed the economics of renewables.

    How long is long term, Monster?

  98. DrBeauGan

    OK Notafan. You’ve convinced me that you’re smarter than the average crow.

    And I’ve been a long time supporter of PETA.

    That’s People for Eating Tasty Animals, right?

  99. Tel

    Slayer of Memes #2713002,

    They did say that, exactly as Sowell predicted, when it came to Greece. Here’s Krugman in 2015:

    Does Greece Need More Austerity?

    As many of us have noted, it’s hugely unfair when people claim that Greece has done nothing to adjust. On the contrary, it has imposed incredibly harsh austerity and substantial reforms on other fronts. Yet you might be tempted to argue that the results show that Greece hasn’t done enough — after all, last year it was running only a tiny primary budget surplus (that is, not counting interest), and this year it has slipped back into primary deficit. So more adjustment is needed, right?

    So the Greek government literally spent everything it could possibly find, ran itself massively into debt, even defaulted on the bondholders, but hey Krugman says they didn’t spend enough.

  100. Boambee John

    egg_
    #2712999, posted on May 17, 2018 at 4:09 pm
    Oil and coal are dead long term,

    Was that from the site’s Wrongologist in Chief?

    Who else could be so consistently wrong?

  101. Bruce of Newcastle

    Oil and coal are dead long term

    Long term?

    What to do about North Sea coal: the 23 trillion ton question (2014)

    THE energy potential buried deep under the North Sea is vast almost beyond comprehension.

    Under the UK-owned part alone, there is said to be 23 trillion tonnes of coal – enough to keep the country’s lights on for generations to come.

    That is enough for 3,000 years at the current world rate of consumption. Oil is easily produced from coal – several plants are in operation now, and are likely making money at current oil prices.

    Since CO2 is harmless we can keep on burning it. Agriculture will boom with the free fertilization!

  102. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    On the sunny side today we also could clearly see the island chain disputed between Russia and Japan. Russia holds them (marched in on the last days of WW2) and sans the bomb may well have taken all of Hokkaido, with its very low population levels at that time. Coming into the area yesterday we passed by a very large spread out convoy of Japanese army vehicles, big troop trucks and a few auxiliary jeeps. Made me get something of the feeling of how we white-skinned blonde foreigners might have felt as Nippon moved down the Malay Peninsula more than seventy years ago.

    We are the only Europeans we have seen here, probably mainly because it is early in the season, although one suspects not too many make it this far. Created something of a stir when we entered the dining room last night.

  103. rickw

    That is enough for 3,000 years at the current world rate of consumption. Oil is easily produced from coal – several plants are in operation now, and are likely making money at current oil prices.

    Australia also has almost immeasurably vast reserves of coal.

  104. JC

    Bruce

    I have no crystal ball, but I reckon we’re going electric with motor vehicles – at least those used in city commutes. They’re going to be dirt cheap. Also fusion should be worked out by 2070 making energy limitless and dirt cheap.

  105. Rae

    Since CO2 is harmless we can keep on burning it. Agriculture will boom with the free fertilization!

    And the increased uptake of CO2 will reduce the zinc, iron, and protein levels in wheat, rice, peas, and soybeans.

  106. JC

    Australia also has almost immeasurably vast reserves of coal.

    We aren’t allowed to use them anymore. You’re not allowed to build coal plants.

  107. notafan

    much I care for your opinion of my intelligence DrBG

  108. Myrddin Seren

    The golden age of air travel is dead.

    All down hill to flying cattle cars from this legendary point.

  109. Bruce of Newcastle

    And the increased uptake of CO2 will reduce the zinc, iron, and protein levels in wheat, rice, peas, and soybeans.

    Rae – If that were a significant problem people wouldn’t be using greenhouses. Greenhouse operators artificially boost pCO2 to about 1,000 ppmV or so.

  110. rickw

    Translation: Thwack, thwack, two more rakes.

    More like getting hit with a shipping container load of takes, while they’re still in the container.

  111. JC

    And the increased uptake of CO2 will reduce the zinc, iron, and protein levels in wheat, rice, peas, and soybeans.

    The goog is going all scfi

    What’s the movie where another planet had to be found, because crops would no longer grow on earth? I forget.

  112. Myrddin Seren

    What’s the movie where another planet had to be found, because crops would no longer grow on earth? I forget.

    Interstellar ?

  113. JC

    That’s it. Interstellar.

    Great plot. We could time travel, but unable to grow crops on earth as we weren’t tech advanced enough.

  114. areff

    Chlorine gas ain’t hard to make, Snoop.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4767506/Mother-accidentally-creates-CHLORINE-GAS-kitchen.html

    Further, you’re in a bombed-out wreck of town. What do you need to make the water potable? Chlorine.

    They’d have had lots of it, and those “bombs”, of which we saw pics the other day, look an awful lot like standard-issue commercial tanks.

    It was no tragedy that a bunch of nasty specimens copped a good bombing. But that ‘gas attack’ was a stage-managed burlesque. Just look at the way they were hosing down the kids. I think I saw Buster Keaton in the background.

  115. areff

    Silent Running with Bruce Dern

  116. JC

    On the subject of crops , I was reading that a firm has come out with some really nifty wheat. It has much high levels of good things and much lower bad stuff.

  117. Rae

    And the increased uptake of CO2 will reduce the zinc, iron, and protein levels in wheat, rice, peas, and soybeans.

    Rae – If that were a significant problem people wouldn’t be using greenhouses. Greenhouse operators artificially boost pCO2 to about 1,000 ppmV or so.

    Increasing CO2 threatens human nutrition

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a substantial global public health problem. An estimated two billion people suffer these deficiencies1, causing a loss of 63 million life-years annually. Most of these people depend on C3 grains and legumes as their primary dietary source of zinc and iron. Here we report that C3 grains and legumes have lower concentrations of zinc and iron when grown under field conditions at the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration predicted for the middle of this century. C3 crops other than legumes also have lower concentrations of protein, whereas C4 crops seem to be less affected. Differences between cultivars of a single crop suggest that breeding for decreased sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 concentration could partly address these new challenges to global health.

  118. cuckoo

    A disgruntled passenger breached Melbourne Airport security this morning by running out onto the tarmac and trying to tear the door off a Jetstar plane.

    My gut says Mainland Chinese. But could also be some kind of Leb/Middle Eastener.

  119. rickw

    China building a further 22 coal plants in June.

    Communists saying one thing on alternative energy, and being believed and applauded by morons like munty, meanwhile they do the exact opposite. They understand the importance of cheap energy in a way that no one in any of Australia’s Governments do.

    With this basic sleight of hand they are able to ramp up manufacturing and living costs in The West whilst driving their own lower. Consider the importance of this when real manufacturing costs are essentially levelling out due to automation.

  120. JC

    Michigan State to Pay Nassar Abuse Victims $500 Million

    Michigan State University has reached a settlement for $500 million with 332 victims of sexual abuse by former sports medicine doctor Larry Nassar.

    Michigan State University agreed to pay $500 million to more than 300 victims of sexual abuse by Larry Nassar, the sports-medicine doctor it employed, a sum that is among the largest for victims of abuse and leaves unclear the future financial path for one of the nation’s top public universities.

    Officials at the 50,000-student campus declined to say how they would pay for the settlement, and it isn’t clear if they have figured out how. They declined to rule out raising tuition or a state bailout, and they can’t use the university’s endowment. Michigan State’s interim President John Engler also didn’t rule out bankruptcy in testimony before the Michigan State Senate in March.

    The East Lansing, Mich., university will pay $425 million to the victims, or about $1.25 million each. It will set aside an additional $75 million in a trust to protect any future claims of sexual abuse against Nassar.

    I understand this was terrible for the victims, but why is the university at fault?

  121. Nick

    My gut says Mainland Chinese.

    My first guess too, but didn’t look like it.

  122. notafan

    Are people arguing that animals see and understand the world exactly the same as humans but language?

    I don’t disagree that they have a limited capacity to sense friend, foe, food and some might be able to count to seven.

    But we started with what assumptions dogs, cats and cockroaches made about the world not Barkie reminding us it was dinner time.

  123. rickw

    Great plot. We could time travel, but unable to grow crops on earth as we weren’t tech advanced enough.

    Great movie, villan aptly named Dr Mann.

  124. Tel

    Chlorine gas ain’t hard to make, Snoop.

    He admitted it was sarcasm but since we live in a post-Onion world now and a substantial number of people really believe stuff like that, I dunno where to go anymore.

  125. JC

    Increasing CO2 threatens human nutrition

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a substantial global public health problem. An estimated two billion people suffer these deficiencies1, causing a loss of 63 million life-years annually. Most of these people depend on C3 grains and legumes as their primary dietary source of zinc and iron.

    To extend this further, Gargs, what you’re suggesting is that the closer to the equator the less nutrients found in food sources (grown in the equatorial regions) compared to the cooler climes.

    Obviously untrue. Fake Science you oppositional, stupid fuckwit. Get back in the basement and go check on the latest victim. Seriously, get the fuck out of here, you piece of human junk.

  126. Delta A

    It’s great reading people’s travelogues and thinking, “Yes, I wanna do that too!” or , “No, thanks, not for me.”

    It’s been a few years since we last travelled overseas, but in that time we have discovered Beautiful Australia. And my goodness, there are some breathtakingly beautiful spots in Oz. Bright, Victoria, for example.

    We’ve just spent 10 days in Bright. This is where the term ‘a kaleidoscope of colours’ originates. A busy, rather wanky tourist town, Bright’s autumn spectacular is best viewed from the mountain lookout (if you don’t faint in fright from the narrow, rocky track leading up there). From above, the town is a carpet of scarlet red, gold and palest yellow amid green pines and bordered by snow-capped alps.

    Just stunning!

  127. Chris

    My gut says Mainland Chinese. But could also be some kind of Leb/Middle Eastener.

    My appendix says ice user. The issue isn’t big enough to get my gut involved.

  128. JC

    Great movie, villan aptly named Dr Mann.

    I was disappointed with the plot line, Rick.

    The rockets could approach the speed of lights, yet the earth was short of crops and getting worse. Also the farm house was so low tech to what you would expect 150 years hence. Literally the house was like it was in a 1930s warp.

  129. rickw

    The trend for oil production was strongly negative in the last two years of Obama’s reign. As others here pointed out, Obama was committed to the destruction of the fracking industry.

    Let’s not lose sight of the big picture, despite Obama being a monumental ass, Americans carried on regardless:

    They drilled and fracked until they became a net oil exporter.

    They brought more AR-15’s than anyone ever thought was possible.

    Obama was the greatest gun and oil man ever!

  130. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Bright’s autumn spectacular is best viewed from the mountain lookout (if you don’t faint in fright from the narrow, rocky track leading up there). From above, the town is a carpet of scarlet red, gold and palest yellow amid green pines and bordered by snow-capped alps.

    Sounds just the ticket, Delta A, and I wouldn’t have to take my bear bell. 🙂
    Where is Bright though, so I can file it in my mind for a future trip?

  131. JC

    The gerbil warming is going to suck nutrients out of our crops. Unreal.

  132. Snoopy

    areff
    #2713025, posted on May 17, 2018 at 4:42 pm
    Silent Running with Bruce Dern

    Great movie.

  133. rickw

    Literally the house was like it was in a 1930s warp.

    Typical farm house, you don’t build a new one until the old one falls down!

  134. Tel

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a substantial global public health problem.

    A completely solved health problem. Zinc supplements cost a few cents a day and eating bacon and eggs really is good for you, all we need to do is hunt down all those do-gooder dieticians who tried to push us onto the wrong track. I won’t get back the years of my life when I believed that diet shit but protecting others might be a win/win social benefit.

  135. Tom

    Where is Bright though, so I can file it in my mind for a future trip?

    In northern Victoria, next to the tourist mecca called Dull.

  136. JC

    I can’t recall any scfi that isn’t big government and that the earth is going fail for humanity because of extreme avarice. There’s never any optimism, so I stopped watching them.

  137. dopey

    ABC News: Chimpanzee nests are cleaner than human beds.

  138. Bruce of Newcastle

    Increasing CO2 threatens human nutrition

    GIGO. They are trying to make the case for controlling CO2 emissions. The list of author affiliations reeks of climate money.

    While I’m not an ag person I know zinc and iron chemistry well enough to know that adding soluble zinc and iron will lead to increased uptake in plants. I used to track hyperaccumulator projects for site remediation applications. All this is saying is you should add zinc and iron with your fertilizer. And if we’re talking poor people the amount of climate money consumed by luminaries such as these would pay for fertilizer for all. Or for that matter iron tablets – ferrous sulphate is a byproduct of paint plants who’ll give you as much as you want if you offer to take it away.

    If there is a problem then the answer is not controlling CO2, which would be catastrophic for the world economy. More people would die of actual starvation and other issues in such an event than any amount of zinc and iron deficiency.

  139. Rae

    Stormy Daniels will perform with naked Trump statue in Oregon

    Fake news. Here’s the actual story:

    Stormy Daniels will not perform with naked Trump statue in Oregon

  140. Makka

    I can’t recall any scfi that isn’t big government and that the earth is going fail for humanity because of extreme avarice. There’s never any optimism,

    Millennial target audiences think the world will end tomorrow. It’s dire, apparently.

  141. rickw

    crows can count up to seven by inspection

    On the farm, any crow landing and calling was on a 10 second countdown to a loud bang and an explosion of black feathers*. I still can’t get used to this not happening when I see them in the city!

    *Every able bodied person would scramble to the nearest available rifle and nail it!

  142. Eyrie

    I’ve know sparrows that can tell the difference between a long object held by a human and an air rifle held by a human. we tested it one night in a pal’s hangar by going out of the office door into the hangar one at a time with both. Take the rifle and the sparrows all bailed. Take the long object and they stayed and just looked at us.

  143. Delta A

    Sounds just the ticket, Delta A, and I wouldn’t have to take my bear bell.

    No bears, but you’ll need your fluffy slippers. The temp fell to minus 2 most nights we were there. But the cold, of course, is the catalyst for the intense colours.

    Bright is 325 kms north east of Melbourne, on the Great Alpine Road which runs through Mt Hotham (50 kms from Bright) right through to Gippsland 230 kms away. We did that trip with our van several years ago. Scaredy cat that I am, I kept my eyes shut tight almost the entire way.

  144. JC

    A completely solved health problem.

    There’s no problem to solve. According to the shysters, nutrition falls in plant growth that live in warmer climes. The shystering is extraordinary.

  145. Delta A

    Where is Bright though, so I can file it in my mind for a future trip?

    In northern Victoria, next to the tourist mecca called Dull.

    🙂

  146. Geriatric Mayfly

    The golden age of air travel is dead.

    You can say that again. The hosties don’t even do the rounds with a bowl full of barley sugar sweets before take off.

  147. Makka

    The same effeminate creep who handed over millions in taxpayer hard earned to the Clinton Crime Gang. To keep what quite, I wonder.

    Then fulfills his globalist responsibilities by crawling to the FBI;

    Former Australian ambassador to the UK, Alexander Downer, broke with diplomatic protocol to take part in a highly-secretive interview with the FBI about Russian election meddling, according to new reports.
    In a long piece detailing the early stages of the probe into suspected Russian meddling in the 2016 US presidential election, the New York Times revealed that Downer was interviewed by two FBI agents in London just hours after the probe opened in August, 2016.

  148. egg_

    But we started with what assumptions dogs, cats and cockroaches made about the world not Barkie reminding us it was dinner time.

    Someone challenged a dog’s notion of time, which got us to ‘dinner time’.
    Much of this has to do with denying animals a soul IMHO.
    Even if that were the case, they are not mere automatons, which was the other long debate – the greater that AI increases, the more that dogma/Luddites will rail against it.

  149. Snoopy

    I can’t recall any scfi that isn’t big government and that the earth is going fail for humanity because of extreme avarice.

    I found The Expanse intriguing. On Netflix. Not something to watch while you’re doing something else though.

  150. Frank

    I remember that spiel about plant’s nutritional value from a few years back. I think it turned out that the increase in plant yield due to extra CO2 more than made up for the lack of protein per unit anyway. Or something, don’t really pay that much attention to the save the whales caste these days.

  151. thefrolickingmole

    On crows.

    Quite a while ago there was a “were all dooooomed” interview on the ABC with a chap mentioning the huge increase in the number of crows in urban areas was a sign of Gais anger and we need to go and live in yurts and eat each other till she was appeased*
    I mentioned it to my father and his response was “any crow that shoed its head near town in my day would have had a dozen kids taking pot shots at it”

    Made sense to me.

    *may not be exactly his solution, but close enough.

  152. notafan

    I don’t know Egg

    What I do know is that everyone I know gets upset when their pet dies

    Then goes and gets another one

    As for cockroach souls

    I have my doubts

  153. rickw

    The same effeminate creep who handed over millions in taxpayer hard earned to the Clinton Crime Gang. To keep what quite, I wonder.

    What gauge wire do you think will be needed to suspend this fat idiotic traitor?

  154. areff

    Bird thoughts:

    the cockies play tennis with the wind vane on my roof. Two knocking it back and forth, the rest of the clan on the roof crest cackling and shrieking at what fun it is! Meanwhile the crows take all the bread off the back lawn and ferry it up to the neighbour’s roof, where they can eat as a family without sharing. In the front yard, the wattle birds give the indian mynahs a little bit back of what they give the sparrows.

    Are magpies corvids and how closely are they related to crows? The magpies also stash the bread and so forth when they get to it before the crows.

    Altona is chocka with crows. So many you couldn’t hear the Dawn Service for the racket they were making in the tree behind the bowling club.

  155. Leigh Lowe

    JC

    #2713026, posted on May 17, 2018 at 4:42 pm

    On the subject of crops , I was reading that a firm has come out with some really nifty wheat. It has much high levels of good things and much lower bad stuff.

    Which means it will taste like shit.

  156. areff

    mole: there;’s a good book to be written on the urban ecology and how various have adapted. It would put pay to the notion that Nature is pristine wherever you find it.

    In Melbourne, possums everywhere because roses are so tasty and plentiful.

    Crows doing well by emptying rubbish bins.

    And foxes! They’re everywhere. I’ve seen a pair boxing on the footpath near the corner of Glenferrie and Toorak roads in the wee hours. And a couple of weeks ago, I looked out the second-floor window and there was one padding across my neighbour’s roof. It departed quickly when I turned the outside lights on.

  157. Eyrie

    Re MH 370: Well Boeing sure will be happy people believe it was a murder/suicide. Are you all aware of the Airworthiness Directives on the crew oxygen flexible hoses which have caused numerous incidents including some where a hole was burned in the side of the aircraft in short order?
    AD 2018-09-12 SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747-200B, 747-300, and 747-400 series airplanes. This AD requires replacing certain low pressure oxygen flex-hoses with new non-conductive low-pressure oxygen flex-hoses in the gaseous passenger oxygen system in airplanes equipped with therapeutic oxygen. This AD also requires a general visual inspection of the low-pressure passenger oxygen system to ensure there is minimum clearance of the oxygen system components from adjacent structure and systems. We are issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.
    This AD was prompted by reports of low-pressure flex-hoses of theflightcrew oxygen system that burned through due to inadvertent (??) electrical current from a short circuit.
    They forgot to add that the fuselage side also burnt through in all these instances (as noted at the links above, and at earlier post MH370 AD’s for all Boeing types including 787’s). Depressurization plus unavailability of Flt Crew oxygen +ITCZ turbulence of flight through CB’s in March = disrupted headings but static after spit-out from heavy cloud/turb. Flight to South and clear of ITCZ and climbing [autopilot off with weight redn due burn-off] plus unique characteristics of 777 flight control system = MH370
    DATES: This AD is effective May 30, 2018.
    Note the bit about the unique characteristics of the B777 flight control system. Anyone who claims that with autopilot off the B777 will spiral into the sea doesn’t know what he/she is talking about.
    “Auto-pilot OFF, a 777’s uncommanded wing-drop is wing-leveled within micro-seconds – which leads to a very stable auto-pilot OFF heading stability (except when severe turbulence intervenes -as in ITCZ conditions or orographic turb (such as standing waves off of Sumatran Mountain ranges) – and all inherent stability bets are then off due to convective air-mass mix complexity). But upon regaining clear air, the ejectment heading is then maintained +/- around 5 degrees max for very long periods (i.e. longitudinally sinusoidal to a very very minor degree). Similarly the pitch phugoid damping is excellent and highly responsive to mild disruptions. With no pax or crew movement, the fuel burn-off just allows a continuous stable climb-rate of a few FPM. As the airplane ended up on a Southerly heading after the last ejectment, it was climbing into quite smooth cloud-free air to the south of the ITCZ and increasingly with a greatly reduced chance of bumbling into a CuNim and having the new base course heading change at all – compared to unpiloted ITCZ flight).”
    Also interestingly enough: “The simulator flown by airlines is quite different in the reproduction of this FCS characteristic but Boeing’s iron bird sim faithfully reproduces the flight characteristics”
    Flash oxygen boosted fire leading to either intentional de-pressurisation (to try to put out the fire) or as a result of the fire plus the rest sounds about right to me.
    Alternatively, while they aren’t meant to (Qantas had one), the Flight Crew oxygen bottle explodes. It is under the flight deck in the avionics compartment. Blows hole in side of A/C. I’d love to know where the coax to the radio and transponder antennas runs. In any case depress at 37000 feet and no crew oxygen. Time of useful consciousness 10 to 15 seconds. The rest follows as above.
    BTW this theory is not allowed to be discussed at pprune.org

  158. Gary

    Not to spoil it for those interested but Deadpool 2 has Jared Kushner in it.

  159. egg_

    As for cockroach souls

    They are a part of human civilization and move about with us – hence, the distinctions German/American etc. with “their” filthy ‘roaches.

  160. rickw

    And foxes! They’re everywhere. I’ve seen a pair boxing on the footpath near the corner of Glenferrie and Toorak roads in the wee hours. And a couple of weeks ago, I looked out the second-floor window and there was one padding across my neighbour’s roof. It departed quickly when I turned the outside lights on.

    The UK is unbelievable. For a typical after midnight stroll from Epsom town centre the Chalk Lane Hotel the theoretical fox shooting score was in the 3-5 range.

  161. I read the Feizer link prior and the comments there became as banal as some of those here.
    Glad to see many of our Sciencematists’ anecdotes re animals’ concepts of quantity vs the dogmatic.

    egg, which Feser link? People that frequent/ed the comments there like grodrigues, the late Scott, TheOFloinn, Untenured, rank sophist, Mr. Green, Greg, Crude, machinephilosophy, to name a few, are never banal. Frankly, reading their comments is always a pleasure and an education. Anyhow, you’ve moved from ‘concept’ to ‘number sense’ now. You just knocked your king over without noticing.

  162. cohenite

    Oil and coal are dead long term, Snoop, since China changed the economics of renewables.

    Renewables don’t have economics because they don’t work. China builds solar panels for export to dumb-arse Western nations which have a preponderance of dipshits like you inventing policy.

  163. egg_

    you’ve moved from ‘concept’ to ‘number sense’ now.

    You just knocked your king over without noticing.

    More banality.

  164. I found The Expanse intriguing. On Netflix. Not something to watch while you’re doing something else though.

    It was excellent. What did you think of the Belters’ political views, Snoop?

  165. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Not to spoil it for those interested but Deadpool 2 has Jared Kushner in it.

    What a coincidence. So does Ivanka Trump.

  166. notafan

    Cockroaches are everywhere they can get a feed and do a bit of reproduction, humans or no.

  167. egg_

    Is ‘notafan’ an example of LNC?

  168. Much of this has to do with denying animals a soul IMHO.
    Even if that were the case, they are not mere automatons, which was the other long debate – the greater that AI increases, the more that dogma/Luddites will rail against it.

    egg, animals have souls, not immortal ones, but souls, nonetheless, as even plants do, since a soul is simply the substantial form of living things. So the denial that dogs have ‘concepts’ has nothing to do with your surmise.

  169. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I have just finished reading Anne de Courcy’s “The Husband Hunters – Social Climbing in London and New York”, a well-researched historical account of the 400 women who from the 1870’s to 1910 married into the British aristocracy in an exchange of American wealth for the social standing a coronet brought in the trans-Atlantic world. This phenomenon was due to the desire of the American nouveau riche to break into the tightly controlled world of New York Society and the 70’s depression in agriculture that severely wounded aristocratic finances. Cora, the Earl of Grantham’s wife in Downton Abbey exemplified the trend. American women were also seen to be better educated, more spirited, greater beauties and more interesting dinner companions than their British rivals.

    When it comes to wealth, celebrity and the media, then, as we prepare to indulge in another orgy of trans-Atlantic marital bliss, via Royalty no less, we may see that plus ca change:

    By the late 1890’s spending had become more than just a mark of status, a weapon for rising in society, a wish to be surrounded by only the best, a form of self-aggrandisement, or even a way of giving pleasure to others, but simply an end in itself and even a validation of identity -I spend, therefore I am.

    Gilded New York was pouring out its money in and endless cornucopia of extravagance, on houses, horses, clothes, paintings, marbles, yachts, cigars, wine, j3wels and trivia………..

    .. Frivolity ruled. ‘The newspapers take much more interest in international matters than in Congress’ wrote the British Diplomat Cecil Spring-Rice to his sisters in March 1895. ‘When Miss Gould married a Frenchman there were whole sheets of vivid description for days … one one paper is prosecuting another for stealing pictures of the bride’s underclothing’.

    Social crazes became wilder and wilder …. Above all, there were parties, parties, parties, each more extravagant and outre than the last. “

    Buying your family a Coat of Arms was popular. Marrying one was even more valued.
    The book is written with an amusing style, and details the lives of some of the women.

  170. rickw

    Answer: Overstated.

    Lots of graphs.

    ABC staff don’t live in the west or north, zero interest in the truth.

  171. you’ve moved from ‘concept’ to ‘number sense’ now.

    You just knocked your king over without noticing.

    More banality.

    Is it really? You don’t like being corrected, do you, egg.

  172. How long is long term, Monster?

    Until the Sun runs out of juice, JC. Even you won’t live that long.

    The Chinese changed the game by applying supply-side stimulus to the solar panel industry. Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month. If/when Elon Musk figures out the battery problem to cover baseload needs at night and improve car energy storage, we won’t need anything other than solar. (Big ask, but he’s got the best shot.)

  173. egg_

    dover_beach
    #2713090, posted on May 17, 2018 at 5:40 pm

    Ape judges dogs on ape terms.

  174. rickw

    Lucky the weather in Fiji is good, because the service is rotten.

  175. Stimpson J. Cat

    What the hell’s LNC?
    Is it like an the ANC but for Light-skinned people?

  176. JC

    Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month.

    You’re hallucinating again.

  177. rickw

    Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month.

    That’s a whole container ship of rakes.

  178. Ape judges dogs on ape terms.

    Don’t speak in riddles, egg.

  179. egg_

    dover_beach
    #2713093, posted on May 17, 2018 at 5:43 pm

    Philosophy is not my game – I deal with the material world.
    You are well noted at shifting the goalposts here.
    Have you ever lost an argument here?
    Care to cite a case?

    Even dot could concede an argument, but you relentlessly* grind away till the other party gives up – it doesn’t mean that you win.

    *Doggedness.

  180. Stimpson J. Cat

    Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month.

    Monty you Goddamned idiot.
    I don’t have time for this.
    I am a very busy man Jesus Christ.
    Honestly why do I bother.

  181. Eyrie

    The Expanse could have been great. I was expecting a “Moon is a Harsh Mistress” type political intrigue/independence movement but they had to fuck it up with the “protomolecule” nonsense.
    The dumb arse UN lady didn’t seem to realise that the reason the teeming masses on Earth were poor BECAUSE of the UN. Loved the Martian Marine lady, the sets, Detective Miller but the plot – gaaaah!

  182. Bruce of Newcastle

    Great pic.

    Reminds me of a certain farmer:

    On February 20, 1943 a farmer, Dionisio Pulido, and his wife Paula were burning shrubbery in their cornfield when they observed the earth in front of them swell upward and crack to form a fissure about 2 meters across. They heard hissing sounds and saw smoke rising from the fissure, which they later described as having a repugnant smell of rotten eggs. Dionisio Pulido was not sure what it was, but it frightened him enough to flee the scene.

    The next day, Dionisio, along with several others from the village, went out at dawn to examine the site. What they saw both amazed and terrified them. Rocks and smoke were shooting into the sky while the cone was growing before their very eyes. After little more than a day the cone was already 50 meters high, and within a week it had reached 100 meters, and lava began flowing out onto the surrounding land.

    For the next nine years the volcano continued to erupt, although this was dominated by relatively quiet eruptions of lava that scorched the surrounding 25 square kilometers of land. In 1952, the eruption ended and Parícutin went quiet, attaining a final height of 424 meters (1,391 feet) above the cornfield where it began.

    Bit of a bummer to have a thousand foot high volcano suddenly appear in the middle of your cornfield. The poor people in that subdivision in Hawaii know how it feels.

    Paricutin, The Volcano That Grew Out Of A Cornfield

  183. egg_

    Don’t speak in riddles, egg.

    DrBG and others would know exactly what I mean.

  184. Nick

    Altona is chocka with crows.

    That explains Gillards’ beak and voice.

  185. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    animals have souls, not immortal ones, but souls, nonetheless, as even plants do, since a soul is simply the substantial form of living things.

    Interesting. The Ainu would agree as they see spirit in all living things, and also in inanimate objects and concepts too. The early bones of religion. Something in the human mind.

  186. Dr Faustus

    Communists saying one thing on alternative energy, and being believed and applauded by morons like munty, meanwhile they do the exact opposite. They understand the importance of cheap energy in a way that no one in any of Australia’s Governments do.

    They do.
    China doesn’t have a first world electricity system, or expectations. It’s a huge place. Sometimes it is quicker and cheaper to put in a wind farm that provides intermittent power than run a hundred kilometre distribution line connecting to coal/nuke baseload. So that’s what happens.

    The punters are allowed to whinge about the crap power supply. But the local Party is quick to point out the alternative.

    Do this 100 times over and, suddenly, it looks like they are true believers in renewables.

  187. Stimpson J. Cat

    Not to spoil it for those interested but Deadpool 2 has Jared Kushner in it.

    J$ws in Hollywood?
    That’s a new one…….

    Ha ha ha ja ja ha ja ha ha ja ja ja!!!!

  188. Gab

    Solar and wind are now the cheapest energy around—as long as you don’t add in all the taxpayer-funded subsidies.

  189. Geriatric Mayfly

    Do dogs in particular make conscious decisions? Having had them as close company for forever, I see the rudiments almost every day of decision making. Once it used all be bundled together under the heading ‘instinct.’ But I am not so sure this covers what seems to be planned and deliberate behaviour.

  190. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I have just finished reading Anne de Courcy’s “The Husband Hunters – Social Climbing in London and New York”,

    “Few could have mastered the blistering retort of the novelist Marie Corelli, when asked why she remained single. “I never married because there was no need. I have three pets at home, that answer the same purpose as a husband. I have a dog that growls every morning, a parrot that swears every afternoon, and a cat that comes home, late, at night.”.”

  191. Snoopy

    It was excellent. What did you think of the Belters’ political views, Snoop?

    Self defeating. But Fred Johnson is Trumpian.

  192. JC

    Monster

    Quartz is a leftwing magazine with fake news and fake science.

    Renewballs make energy prices go up. Fact.

    You’re hallucinating.

  193. Snoopy

    Solar and wind are now the cheapest energy around—unless you need to store it

    Or make it.

  194. Egg I’ve noticed a certain bias before.

    Don’t worry about ‘winning’.

    It is truth that matters

    I doubt DrBg believes in souls, human or animal.

  195. Bruce of Newcastle

    Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month.

    ROFL yet again.

    A question that gives pause: If Solar And Wind Are So Cheap, Why Are They Making Electricity So Expensive? (16 May)

    The author is a Green.

  196. Snoopy

    Or convert them to electricity.

  197. Snoopy

    Breaking News!

    I doubt DrBg believes in souls, human or animal.

  198. Geriatric Mayfly

    The Israeli military says it has carried out air strikes on militant sites in Gaza overnight in response to machine gun fire that hit a building in the Israeli city of Sderot.

    Is there no end to the misery these Arabs must suffer? The IDF has been roundly rebuked already this week, and here they are at it again.

  199. JC

    LOl

    The film is about four older women reinvigorating their sex lives after reading Fifty Shades of Grey. The only problem? The studios did not want older actors.

    Jane Fonda, 80, said ageism was “alive and well” in Hollywood after revealing that studio executives had demanded that younger actors should replace her and Diane Keaton, 72, in the forthcoming film Book Club, which also stars Mary Steenburgen, 65, and Candice Bergen, 72.

    The director, Bill Holderman, said that studios had applied a “tremendous amount of pressure” to reduce the ages of the characters to their late forties

  200. egg_

    Eyrie
    #2713076, posted on May 17, 2018 at 5:24 pm

    Old ground, but weren’t the last moments of MH370 consistent with it running out of fuel and gently gliding into the ocean?

  201. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Bit of a bummer to have a thousand foot high volcano suddenly appear in the middle of your cornfield. The poor people in that subdivision in Hawaii know how it feels.

    We passed by one of these just recently. Details from Lonely Planet:

    Volcanoes in Shikotsu-Toya National Park. In 1943, after a series of earthquakes, Showa-Shin-Zan emerged as an upstart bump in some vegetable fields south east of Toya-Ko Onsen. It then surged upwards for two more years to reach its present height of 398 metres. At the time Japanese officials were keen to hush it up as they thought it was a bad omen and might portend an inauspicious end to WW2. Local officials were urged to douse the volcanic flames (they didn’t) so that Allied aircraft couldn’t use them for orientation. (it) is still belching sulphurous fumes creating an awesome spectacle for visitors and keeping local officials nervous about its next move.

    page 593 in our much thumbed old edition which is out-of-date in many aspects now, but we stick with it still.

    New ones are a surprise, but still occur, and belching volcanoes are common enough around Hokkaido.
    We decided to eschew visiting a sulphur plume the other day, driven back by the rotten egg gas.

  202. Self defeating. But Fred Johnson is Trumpian.

    LOL, that is a big call on Johnson. Considering how he gypped the evangelicals to join the #Resistance, I am not sure that quite computes. More like if Ollie North led a Million Man March on Washington arm in arm with Bernie Sanders.

  203. Stimpson J. Cat

    I doubt DrBg believes in souls, human or animal.

    Look no one cares about souls anymore.

    Monty wouldn’t sell his to me, I’m over it.

    How about something interesting.

    Everyone post their definition of what Love is.

  204. Beachcomber

    ‘Monty’ is not only a leftard drone, he’s also an Elon Musk fan-boy. Stupidity doesn’t get any deeper.

  205. Philosophy is not my game – I deal with the material world.
    You are well noted at shifting the goalposts here.

    You went from dogs have concepts to dogs have ‘number sense’, so the goal-shifting was your own.

    Have you ever lost an argument here?
    Care to cite a case?

    I don’t know. I don’t engage in order to win arguments. I typically do it in order to sharpen my arguments, to learn where they’re weak or need work, and so on.

    Even dot could concede an argument, but you relentlessly* grind away till the other party gives up – it doesn’t mean that you win.

    Actually, the argument over marriage I’ve engaged in over the last, what, at least 10 years, here with dot and others, have seen my argument change over the period. Still, when did persistently making an argument become a vice? And why would anyone concede if they thought they were right? Anyway, I have on many occasions left an argument go by if I couldn’t get back to it in 1-2 days.

    DrBG and others would know exactly what I mean.

    But you were addressing me.

  206. Senile Old Guy

    ABC Fact check: Have robberies, assaults and burglaries increased in Victoria since Labor was elected?

    Answer: Overstated.

    In other words, the claim is correct, otherwise they would say that the claim was incorrect. Since the claim is essentially correct, they nit pick in an attempt to muddy the water.

  207. Chris

    Hmm. Feeding crows? I wonder about a net gun over the lawn, and some quick work with an axe handle.

  208. egg_

    notafan
    #2713119, posted on May 17, 2018 at 5:55 pm

    I avoid conversing with ‘dover beach’.
    ‘Winning’?
    The reference to being a chess klutz?
    The ‘truth’ about humans judging animal intelligence?
    An exercise in banality?
    /Earth over and out.

  209. egg_

    dover_beach
    #2713131, posted on May 17, 2018 at 6:07 pm

    Mate – shove it.

  210. Snoopy

    Answer: Overstated.

    Their explanation is it’s true but misleading. LOL

  211. Chris

    Everyone post their definition of what Love is.

    Careful research shows that love is a many-splendor’d thing. It fainteth not, and neither is weary. It is without end, and sacrifices all.

  212. thefrolickingmole

    Everyone post their definition of what Love is.

    Bacon?

  213. egg_

    DrBG and others would know exactly what I mean.

    But you were addressing me.

    I will comment on this.
    It’s an open thread (forum) with many lurkers – we’re not the only ones here.
    I have been addressing nota and DrBG, not you, and prefer not to converse with you.

  214. Everyone post their definition of what Love is.

    What’s this thing called love?

    Add punctuation according to your taste..

  215. thefrolickingmole

    Speaking of Fatham, it has a vile piece up on the killings in Margret River.

    Starting with the obligatory virtue signaling and spiraling down into misandry without missing a beat.
    Occasional lapses into gibberish such as this line.
    Cynda’s home was her husband, Peter, who was looking for work, and her adult daughter, Katrina, who’d brought her four children back home to live with her parents when her relationship ended.

    What did they hollow him out and use him as a tent?

    Reports of the far-away murders broke over my own phone, and I sobbed.

    Apparently people voicing opinions like they thought the murderer was a “good bloke” before he killed people is bad because it magically causes or legitimizes their actions…somehow.

    Whatever may have transpired in Margaret River that morning, the narrative of the “good bloke” who “snaps” and kills his family is myth, whether it’s “what people thought of him” or not. And maintaining it as a frame for news reporting provides external validation to potential murderers that their inclinations towards violence are not unconscionable.
    ..
    We do not owe sympathy to perpetrators. We owe it to the abused, dead and living, to condemn their suffering without equivocation. When we personalise tender excuses for male violence, we don’t, actually, minimise the hateful horrors that curdle beneath it. We do, alas, encourage them.

    She set up the largest most stupid straw man in history and flailed away at it like a bath salts bingeing hamster on a red cordial and crack bender.

  216. Mate – shove it.

    I expect nothing less from you, egg. You’ve done this before. When a disagreement emerges you run for cover.

  217. Snoopy

    LOL, that is a big call on Johnson.

    All this time and blather and you still don’t understand Trump.

    Sad.

  218. Tel

    Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month.

    Wonderful, no more need for subsidies then. Time to end the RET, no more quotas, no more Paris “agreement” and no more need for worldwide junkets climate scientists.

    Phew! Glad we got that sorted out.

  219. JC

    You know, if Maduro wins the election, which I think is this weekend, we could be seeing the beginnings of the disintegration of a modern state in the 21st century. I mean everything in the place just stops working. I can’t see how it can function any longer.

    Venezuela’s leader, Nicolás Maduro, may well retain power after Sunday’s presidential election. But his government faces a mounting threat from something he can’t control: creditors targeting the oil shipments that provide nearly all the country’s foreign income.

    A series of court orders in recent days has authorized U.S. oil giant ConocoPhillips to seize as much as $2.6 billion in Venezuelan oil from Dutch Caribbean islands as compensation for assets that Venezuela’s Socialist government expropriated from the company in 2007.

    The rulings are a major blow to the cash-strapped and increasingly isolated nation at a time when its once-thriving state energy monopoly, Petróleos de Venezuela SA, or PdVSA, has been left in tatters after years of mismanagement.

    Conoco’s aggressive actions, the latest in a decadelong legal battle, threaten to further undermine Venezuela’s diminished ability to store, refine and export crude oil, which it needs in part to ship to China as repayment for loans.

    They follow efforts by a pair of mining companies to enforce payment of $2.6 billion won in separate arbitration cases. The companies are now seeking court approval to seize Venezuela’s external assets, including Citgo Petroleum Corp. in the U.S. Investors holding at least $2.5 billion in defaulted Venezuelan bonds could also target Venezuelan assets.

    Conoco wants it money back.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/venezuelas-creditors-are-cutting-its-crude-oil-lifeline-1526496625

    Hey Monster,

    Is Venezuela a good example of socialism, or not?

  220. I will comment on this.
    It’s an open thread (forum) with many lurkers – we’re not the only ones here.
    I have been addressing nota and DrBG, not you, and prefer not to converse with you.

    You quoted me directly so stop bullshitting.

  221. JC

    Even Kellogg, the cereal maker has left Venezuela.

    Caracas/Valencia | Reuters — Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro blasted U.S.-based cereal maker Kellogg Co. on Tuesday for pulling out of the country due to the economic crisis and vowed to hand over the company’s factory to workers.

    At a campaign rally ahead of Sunday’s presidential election, which Maduro is expected to win, the president called Kellogg’s move illegal and told cheering supporters that Venezuelans’ favourite cereal would continue to be produced.

    “We’ve begun judicial proceedings against the business leaders of Kellogg’s because their exit is unconstitutional,” Maduro said.

    “I’ve taken the decision to deliver the company to the workers in order that they can continue producing for the people.”

    Kellogg announced its retreat earlier on Tuesday, making it the latest multinational to exit the oil-rich country, which is heaving under hyperinflation and strict price controls.

    “In December of 2016, Kellogg deconsolidated its Venezuela business from the company’s results. The current economic and social deterioration in the country has now prompted the company to discontinue operations,” Kellogg said in a statement.

    Kellogg did not specify the difficulties it was facing in Venezuela, but companies have typically been struggling to find raw materials due to product shortages and currency controls that crimp imports.

    Kellogg did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Maduro’s plans to hand its local unit over to workers.

    The company in its statement warned against sales of its products or brands in Venezuela “without the expressed authorization of the Kellogg Company,” adding that it would like to return to Venezuela in the future.

    Maduro’s government also stops companies from raising prices to keep up with hyperinflation, denting profits and sometimes rendering operations unsustainable.

    The closure is not expected to significantly worsen food shortages in Venezuela, but it was a further blow to morale for many Venezuelans as Kellogg’s is the most popular and available cereal in the country.

    Stunned workers were barred from entering Kellogg’s plant in the central city of Maracay and massed outside, seeking information, local business sources said.

    Other multinational companies that have given up on the OPEC country, abandoning assets or selling them cheap, include Clorox, Kimberly-Clark, General Mills, General Motors and Harvest Natural Resources.

    Venezuelans are struggling under quintuple-digit annual inflation and millions suffer food and medicine shortages. Even so, Maduro is expected to win re-election on Sunday in a vote the main opposition coalition says is a sham.

    Maduro blames Venezuela’s crisis on an “economic war” he says is waged by Washington, greedy businessmen and coup-mongers.

    Monster, I ask again. Is Venezuela a good example of applied socialism? There’s certainly has been lots of equality created over there in the past 20 years or so, hey?

  222. Rae

    Great news! Obama defeated again!

    Obama HHS Abortion Mandate Suffers Another Defeat, Can’t Force Christian Universities to Fund Abortions

    In 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court sent the case, consolidated with several other similar cases, back to the lower courts for potential resolution by the parties. ADF attorneys and allied attorneys continue to litigate numerous other lawsuits against the mandate.

    I reckon it will be back in the Supreme Court very soon.

  223. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hmm. Feeding crows? I wonder about a net gun over the lawn, and some quick work with an axe handle.

    I usually chase them away as they eat noisies if they can catch them, but made an exception for this kiddie 18 months ago. He was very hungry and was taking food from my hand in a couple days. But then his family found him and chased him far away. It’s a hard life if you’re a young male crow.

  224. Geriatric Mayfly

    On the topic of birds, the house magpie is once again tailor trim, after getting around in rags over the summer. Not one filament of a feather out of place. Insulation is a primary concern at the moment, but it will not be long before one must look one’s best if walking out a lady.

  225. Leigh Lowe

    Crows never sneak up on anyone.
    They stomp across the tin roof like pissed rhinos.

  226. Chris

    Crows never sneak up on anyone.
    They stomp across the tin roof like pissed rhinos.

    Only when you are trying to sleep.
    If you are armed and dangerous, they hide behind a branch VERY effectively.

  227. C.L.

    You know Mueller’s investigation must be going well when Alexander Downer is the key player.

  228. C.L.

    Pausing this wretched century for a moment to re-live a golden era of cool …

  229. Gab

    this wretched century

    spot on. If centuries had tag lines, THAT’s the one for the 21st.

  230. Stimpson J. Cat

    Come on people, seriously.

    What Is Love?

  231. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2713110, posted on May 17, 2018 at 5:50 pm
    Solar and wind are now the cheapest energy around—unless you need to store it

    LOL. The link is to Greentech Media, a totally unbiased source.

    Still, let’s take them at their word, and end the RET and all other subsidies to solar and wind. The screams would be audible on Pluto.

  232. cohenite

    The Chinese changed the game by applying supply-side stimulus to the solar panel industry. Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month.

    You’re an idiot.

  233. Boambee John

    Beachcomber
    #2713130, posted on May 17, 2018 at 6:06 pm
    ‘Monty’ is not only a leftard drone,

    Please give him his fuol title.

    Running dog lackey of the left fascist establishment.

  234. JC

    cohenite
    #2713166, posted on May 17, 2018 at 7:15 pm

    The Chinese changed the game by applying supply-side stimulus to the solar panel industry. Solar is now cheaper than any fossil fuel tech, and getting cheaper by the month.

    You’re an idiot.

    ‘sactly. Now you know how I feel when you say stupid shit. I’m glad you finally saw the light ( pun intended).

    Monster, stop saying stupid shit, as it’s really getting annoying.

  235. Boambee John

    The day the Trump Tower transcripts were released and m0nty is going all in on solar and wind power.

    Clearly such a nothing burger that the best spin doctors of the DNC, Soros and the rest of the left fadcist establishment are trying to bury it in solar cells.

  236. Boambee John

    Fascist, but given that the discussion is ruinables, fadcist works quite well.

  237. JC

    Used to love the opening of that show, CL. I thought those pink pelicans were so exotic.

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