The priorities of Woolworths and Coles

Woolworths and Coles have both announced they will ban single use plastic bags, straws and other plastic items, apparently in response to customer demand.

In the old days a customer who didn’t want something would not buy it. The modern customer tries to stop other people from buying such products. Imagine a supermarket which stocked only those products which all of its customers wanted to buy – it would have a very limited range; certainly no meat, fish, eggs, dairy products since the vegans would see to that. Is that where we are headed? Today the humble plastic bag and straw, tomorrow the disposable nappy and so forth.

The Chief Executive of Woolworths, Brad Banducci, has said [in today’s Australian]

the four main issues customers cared about were food waste, reducing plastic, a sustainable supply chain and energy efficiency.

The four issues I care about are freshness, quality, price and food safety.

So how does Banducci discover what customers want? Why doesn’t he sell meat in paper bags? Sell old fruit rather than throwing it out? Reduce the lighting and heating/cooling in supermarkets to reduce energy consumption? Raise prices dramatically to pay farmers more to build that sustainable supply chain? Insist that customers prove their pantries and fridges are empty before allowing them the privilege of buying from Woolworths? Because apparently Woolworths customers want that. Who cares if people suffer food poisoning if we’re saving the planet?

Or is it that customers actually don’t want to ban these things? Is the CEO jumping on a bandwagon to prove his environmental credentials? Yet another example of a CEO trying to stake out the moral high ground and belong to that ‘enlightened’ group of people who can look down at the ‘little people’ who care about things such as price.

About Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

I'm a retired general who occasionally gets called back to save the republic before returning to my plough.
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122 Responses to The priorities of Woolworths and Coles

  1. Bugme

    So a company that sells petrol, cigarettes, alcohol and has thousands of pokies machine say banning plastic is it biggest problem!

  2. Diogenes

    I am also a tad annoyed at Colesworths. Every time I buy chicken I am forced to support the RSPCA.

    It was funny a few years ago, both companies did a major push to reduce cage eggs being sold, which failed spectacularly

  3. Old School Conservative

    Good point about the misuse of the word sustainable by environazis.
    It used to mean “long term future”.
    Now it means “beloved of the left and part of the destruction of western living standards”.

  4. Sparkle Motion

    So you think that the big supermarkets are… employing a straw man argument?

  5. Up The Workers!

    How fat is this Banducci’s backside?

    Is he personally volunteering to carry every single un-bagged item individually out to his inconvenienced ‘customer’s’ (read victim’s) car boot?

    Or would his massively over-stuffed wallet prevent him from personally doing that?

    On the other hand, is this just another slimy attempt to rip-off the consumer by selling them what they are presently giving away for free?

    Next (you can bet on it!) they will be reducing the volume of the bags they sell their victims, so that more need to be bought – at ever-inflating prices.

  6. amortiser

    So when I go to the veggie section there will be no plastic bags to put the produce in? They are single use plastic bags, even more so than the bags at the checkout. Every checkout bag, I reuse as a bin liner. The other bags go straight in the bin.

    This is just a ruse to charge for the bags. Coles and Woolies made a joint announcement of the decision to charge at the same time. In any other case the ACCC would be onto them in a flash.

  7. iamok

    I took issue when plastic bags were being phased out last time they tried it, and you were then shamed into buying a green bag. I immediately considered it a cynical green push which actually saved the supermarkets heaps of expenditure by buying less plastic bags, and a new income stream by selling the green bags. Hence I did not buy one of the bastards and never will.

  8. Percy Popinjay

    the four main issues customers cared about were food waste, reducing plastic, a sustainable supply chain and energy efficiency

    I shop at those dumps and couldn’t give a rodent’s backside about any of the idiocies mentioned above.

    Might have to start shopping elsewhere.

  9. Garry

    Another virtue signal that allows the supermarkets to cash in by selling these plastic bags that were once free. Note that they will still sell plastic bin liners etc. hypocrites. Over recent years I have changed from an environmentally conscious consumer to a person who actively hates anything that has the words ‘environment’ or ‘sustainability’ attached to them.

  10. stackja

    I don’t have these supermarkets in my suburb.

  11. Occupy Centrelink

    All plastic bags become my “rubbish bins” which are well and truly full in time for the garbo every fortnight. No value add for me here.

  12. Occupy Centrelink

    Correction – “week” … “fortnight” for recyclables

  13. H B Bear

    This latest plastic straw BS is right up there with hungry polar bears stuck on melting ice floes. Gotta love the way Big Green invents this stuff.

  14. Boambee John

    iamok
    #2728531, posted on June 5, 2018 at 8:29 am
    I took issue when plastic bags were being phased out last time they tried it, and you were then shamed into buying a green bag. I immediately considered it a cynical green push which actually saved the supermarkets heaps of expenditure by buying less plastic bags, and a new income stream by selling the green bags. Hence I did not buy one of the bastards and never will.

    The bags they sell carry their brand (you pay to advertise for them).

    If you shop at Woolies, buy some Coles bags and use them at Woolies. Vice versa if you shop at Coles. Or use bags from shoe or boutique dress shops.

  15. Roger

    If you shop at Woolies, buy some Coles bags and use them at Woolies. Vice versa if you shop at Coles.

    Excellent suggestion.

  16. Percy Popinjay

    This latest plastic straw BS is right up there with hungry polar bears stuck on melting ice floes.

    Turtles, Bear, Turtles. They inhale plastic straws like a fish inhales water.

  17. Mother Lode

    It is just so much bollocks.

    People who didn’t want to use the bags did not have to.

    This is about letting some people decide other people can’t use plastic bags.

    (Of course, it is more likely about saving money and pretending it is for our benefit).

    Like most people I used the once-off for household garbage. After the convenience of carrying my groceries they were then as good as any ‘once off’ as multix or glad bags. Any word on Coles phasing them out?

    Coles used to be on a good gig in Lindfield, NSW. There were no real choices.

    A couple of months ago a Harris Farm opened. Two weeks ago an IGA. The former has (free) paper bags with handles. The latter has 15c plastic bags which you can roll up – unlike the green things.

    They might want to reconsider what they can do to differentiate from these upstarts. When I am on the way home and remember I have to buy something, carrying it is an issue that will make my mind up for me.

  18. Roger

    In the old days a customer who didn’t want something would not buy it. The modern customer tries to stop other people from buying such products.

    Socrates identified the chief virtue as justice, which he defined as “the minding of one’s own business and not being a busybody.”

    The chief virtue of the Prog-Leftist is being a busybody in the name of justice.

  19. Allen

    Don’t use the plastic bags provide for fruit and vegetables, take the loose items to the register and let them weigh and price them individually. Should speed things up.

  20. nemkat

    The supermarkets used to pack groceries in sturdy paper bags. Produce lasts a lot longer in the fridge when it’s in a paper bag.
    Stainless straws work well, they’re sold with a pipe cleaner Italian delis stock them. About $7, last forever.

  21. DaveR

    I wonder how long Coles and Woolies will keep this virtue signalling going when their sales start to fall?

  22. Occupy Centrelink

    Mother Lode

    #2728556, posted on June 5, 2018 at 9:04 am

    A couple of months ago a Harris Farm opened. Two weeks ago an IGA. The former has (free) paper bags with handles. The latter has 15c plastic bags which you can roll up – unlike the green things.

    Aldi’s bags are also 15c. That might be 15c too much for some, but with Aldi’s lower prices I can live with it.

  23. egg_

    Big Supermarket cartel has spoken?
    Is this anything to do with Aunty’s ‘War on Waste’, perchance?

  24. DaveR

    Talk about penalising the customer! The plastics industry spent over 50 years stabilising various plastics from UV and other agents in the natural environment, so that they would not deteriorate. So its fair to say the industry has a fair knowledge on how to make plastic bags unstable and give them a life of say 6 months. Why not simply require supermarket plastic bags naturally destruct after that time, instead of penalising all shoppers (except green zealots)?

  25. cynical1

    An awful lot of meat, bakery products and fruit will need de-bagging before sale.

    And what is it that oats, sugar, rice, frozen veg and other items are wrapped in?

    My God! Why it’s plastic bags!

    Another brainfart from the sjw.

    Please, nobody mention frozen bait.

    Which is used with da evil hooks to traumatise the liddle fishies.

  26. Mother Lode

    I think it is just normal, basic, Australian, managerial spinelessness.

    There was a ‘report’ put about that mis-represented another report.

    The current belief that there are gangs of Coles/Woolies shopping bags roaming the ocean depths looking for turtles and dolphins to entangle and asphyxiate started out as a report than cut-off sections of plastic fishing nets were entangling some sea animals – which is, of course, what the nets are designed for.

    We seem to lack entrepreneurs with conviction and goals. No one seems to have an appetite for a fight. We instead have managers who just try manage all the dirty tricks played on them – and the other side couldn’t be more pleased.

    And when the big guys knuckle under they must stand by their decision and, therefore, ally themselves with the thugs. The little guy has no hope.

  27. nemkat

    Those biodegradable green bags are a health risk.
    Because the thing is degrading, there’s a reaction with any meat or produce that is in contact with the inside of the bag.
    Best to put all produce in brown paper bags.

  28. EvilElvis

    I’m not sure if anyone here is aware of a certain type of reusable, compostible bag that is being spruiked by various tax payer funded environment and sustainability groups. The bags are only compostible in a ‘commercial’ facility. Roll on another army of public servants to do gods recycling work. FMD.

    No mention of meat packaging, bread packaging etc etc. Fucking greens.

  29. nerblnob

    Talking to a UK fish and chip shop guy about the plastic bag rule.
    It’s 5p a bag there usually. Australia more than double that – of course.

    So the plastic bag inspectors go around in pairs. When they turn up, you have to show your bags in, bags out balance sheets and the bags out have to match the numbers of 5p collections.

    Like every stupid rule, it’s job creation for the unproductive, leeching off the real economy.

    And let’s never mention that 99% of the plastic in the sea comes from Asian and African rivers.

  30. EvilElvis

    Is this anything to do with Aunty’s ‘War on Waste’, perchance?

    Yep. It’s a common theme with my local ‘waste management’ guy and the local green councillor. The state has spoken and the narrative is set.

    No wonder I have no respect for anyone, anymore. Supposedly smart people are to easily drawn into this green crap. Still haven’t seen them come up with any solutions to all their problems though.

  31. Spider

    Allen

    Don’t use the plastic bags provide for fruit and vegetables, take the loose items to the register and let them weigh and price them individually. Should speed things up.

    I stood behind a couple of deadlocked hippies recently at the checkout as they unloaded a hemp bag of fruit and veg. It was tedious in the extreme watching the poor operator sort and weigh the lot.

  32. nemkat

    Micro plastic is a big environmental issue that isn’t being addressed, this plastic bag ban is just window dressing.
    The plastics industry have been free riders for ever. Their shit is indestructible, not reusable and a nightmare to get rid of.
    Time for them to take total responsibility, and/or be taxed out of existence.

  33. Mother Lode

    Aldi’s bags are also 15c.

    No Aldi in Lindfield.

    The 15c thing is annoying but there are somethings simply not available at the Harris Farm.

    I always held my nose going to Coles. All the placards and signs with beaming families touting one product or another reminded me of the vivid Soviet posters with godlike people and gleaming towers, hanging incongruously in their drab, grey, crumbling buildings.

  34. Roger

    Let’s be clear: this is not about waste reduction or saving the oceans; if it were they would shift away from plastic bags entirely. Most people will wear the 15c per bag charge, as the supermarkets’ research has undoubtedly told them. This is about virtue signalling to the Prog-Left and, given the wholesale price supermarkets pay for plastic bags, introducing a new revenue stream.

  35. Gerard

    Having been involved in the plastic bag debate for over 20 years i can confirm it is just part of a greenie guilt campaign started by Greenpeace in the 90s. The fed epa plastic bag report wrnby a consultancy had an ex Greenpeace activist as author who deliberately misquoted a study to blame plastic bags whe when it was d

  36. Dr Fred Lenin

    So you shop at Aldi or IGA if you have to go to colesworths take the Aldi and IGA bags to carry your meagre purchases ,nothing hurts shops more than a boycott,the managers will be screaming at the SJWs to rescind thisstupid move . Let them spend some of their rip off profits getting rid of the plastic the third world pours into the ocean,by third worldI include China .

  37. Siltstone

    Don’t use the plastic bags provide for fruit and vegetables, take the loose items to the register and let them weigh and price them individually. Should speed things up.

    Excellent suggestion. Mix lots of beans and other small stuff in with the bigger stuff, dump it at the check out, and let them sort. When they ask do you want to buy a plasic bag, say “no, I have brought my own” and then produce a pocket full of the free skinny bags from the veggie section.

    In the self-check out section, just leave it all piled up, ask for plastic bag and when denied, walk away.

  38. Singleton Engineer

    Woolworths’ unwrapped food displays don’t have sneeze guards. And snotty-nosed kids are able to play with the produce.

    No wonder I am a little concerned about hygiene, especially regarding fruit and veg items that are generally consumed uncooked, eg apples and lettuce. That’s one reason why I generally purchase apples in packs of 10 or 12. The second reason is to avoid those tiny stickers that are on each apple which is NOT wrapped hygienically. If they are essential, then why aren’t there plastic stickers on lettuces and loose-displayed tomatoes?

    I could peel my fruit, but what about peeled grapes? Most people simply take their chances, perhaps after a quick splash under the tap. Besides which, apple skins taste good, add to the mouthfeel and are said to be the most nutritious part of the apple… or carrot… or…

    Something doesn’t make sense.

  39. Dave of Reedy Creek, Qld

    Looks like Australia is following the UK down the path to ruin. Same green rubbish with “climate change,” on power, now everything plastic. Its only a few weeks ago I read that Britain was removing plastics from sale. Things like plastic cutlery, straws and swab sticks, blind leading the blind. If you do a bit of research you will find 90-95% of all plastic pollution in the oceans comes from 4 rivers in Asia, but as usual we cop the outcome. We truly are bordering on insanity with our virtue signalling while the population gets slammed with the costs and inconvenience.

  40. MPH

    It’s typical leftism – invent a problem, punish those who aren’t contributing to it, studiously ignore the root of the problem.

    It boggles me how leftists decide to target their outrage – for it is very selective, but always seems to be aimed at things people can control in their daily life. Yet when it comes to criminal diversity via immigration, the outrage is nowhere to be seen. Any psychologists on board who could comment?

  41. Leo G

    “The four issues I care about are freshness, quality, price and food safety.”

    I think you may have misunderstood Bad Brad Banducci. When he said “the four main issues customers cared about were food waste, reducing plastic, a sustainable supply chain and energy efficiency”, he was defining his concept of a customer.
    Freshness, quality, price and food safety are reactionary concepts to Woolworths executives.

  42. Tel

    the four main issues customers cared about were food waste, reducing plastic, a sustainable supply chain and energy efficiency.

    The old concept of promoting managers who have worked their way up from the shop floor wasn’t such a bad idea, because clearly this CEO never spends time in the stores talking to customers.

    The four issues I care about are freshness, quality, price and food safety.

    And convenience, which is the main thing that keeps people going to those big stores.

  43. Bugme

    Don’t worry I have stopped buying petrol at Coles or Woolworths, stopped going to their licence venues, stopped buying alcohol from them as well…….. $1200 per month spent elsewhere !Green that …..

  44. mizaris

    A virtue signalling arse clown. I have 2 Aldi, 3 IGA within 5 mins of home. All are extremely competitive pricewise. All IGA still have shopper bags and Aldi has never had them so not an issue. Happy to take my own bags to Aldi coz I can reuse those lovely strong clothing boutique bags over and over. Fvck the “green” hypocrites at colesworths.

  45. Indolent

    Don’t use the plastic bags provide for fruit and vegetables, take the loose items to the register and let them weigh and price them individually. Should speed things up.

    Lovely. I can’t think of anything more unhygienic than sales staff who handle money all day touching each and every fruit and vegetable item. Talk about sharing!

  46. egg_

    Go back to wax coated paper straws FFS if microplastics are an issue.

  47. Kit H

    Has anybody arguing in favour of individual fruits and vegetables being wrapped in plastic, and single use disposable straws, been to a beach near a major city recently, or gone for a swim within say… Port Phillip Bay?

    The amount of plastic rubbish there is disheartening! Whilst there isn’t many shopping bags on the beach (shopping bags not being the demon they’re made out to be), there is a multitude of plastic straws and plastic packaging, of the exact sort that is being taken out of circulation.

    If people behaved responsible and disposed of their plastic rubbish in bins and recycled it (providing we deal with the fact China won’t take our waste) we wouldn’t have this problem. However there is an enormous amount of litter generated by lazy people who can’t be bothered to properly dispose of their rubbish, and that affects everybody who wants to experience our stunning natural environment in a pristine state.

  48. Louis Hissink

    Covering perishables in plastic or sealed containers is the result of avoiding litigation when a shopper buys something purported to be fresh and washed, and gets a dose of ecoli poisoning.

    Not to be ignored are the consumer advocacy groups who insist of date use by labels and other policies of avoiding risk.

    Wrapping knives and scissors in impenetrable wrapping also minimises risk.

    And who instigated all this? The very same who instituted the policies in the first place: interfering busy-body, social justice types who prefer to blame each and everyone except their own misjudgements.

    Mind, if thinking and discrimination of sale goods is alien to you, then totalitarian paternalism would be preferred to freedom and the possibility of erring.

  49. Roberto

    The newly opened Woolies at North Sydney has jumped the gun and already dispensed with the free plastic bags – a fact I discovered when I took my basketful of goods to the checkout. When told that I had to purchase bags, I left the basketful of goods on the checkout and announced I’d buy them from the IGA just down the road.

  50. RobK

    I recall the waxed paper straws as a kid. They are comparitively hopeless for kids who wish to take their time to finish a drink because the jolly straw collapses .

  51. RobK

    Plastic bags are excellent fire lighters for enclosed wood heaters for those who don’t have neighbours close by.

  52. Boambee John

    Great moment when Used Carr was premier of NSW. There had been a deliberate contamination food scare, so Carr came out with a strong demand that food be sold in tamper-evident packaging. At about the same time, he criticised supermarkets for using excessive packaging!

  53. Tintarella di Luna

    I shop at those dumps and couldn’t give a rodent’s backside about any of the idiocies mentioned above.

    Might have to start shopping elsewhere.

    Those thieving scums — May I suggest you take along your old plastic bags all scrunched up and ask the cash register person to put the items you purchase in those bags or else if they won’t do that, just bring the bundle of bags out all at once with perhaps a mingling of life-like plastic mouse/snake/few plastic cockroaches to fall out of the bundle as you toil away stashing your stuff– or just take your time about it — the possibilities for chaos are epic – shop elsewhere which I do.

  54. Tintarella di Luna

    I left the basketful of goods on the checkout and announced I’d buy them from the IGA just down the road.

    Excellent, Roberto, I hope they get a lot of that. But then again I remember the string bag Mum used to take to the shops and it was very sustainable.

  55. Tintarella di Luna

    Don’t use the plastic bags provide for fruit and vegetables, take the loose items to the register and let them weigh and price them individually. Should speed things up.

    And won’t they love it at the self-service pens, this will be hilarious, I am having a great time sitting here imagining the scenarios

  56. stackja

    Tinta – my mum had a shopping stroller and shops had paper bags.

  57. Ellen of Tasmania

    The stupid never ends.

    Nor do the lies they tell. I want to see that customer survey that shows we all care more about ‘sustainability’ than we do about quality and value for money.

  58. pbw

    nemkat,

    Best to put all produce in brown paper bags.

    Stainless steel concertina bags are best. $140 at Italian delis. Last forever, or until you lose them. Don’t need pipe cleaners either.

  59. hzhousewife

    They still have paper bags for the mushrooms where I shop. Now I’ll use them for everything.

  60. The BigBlueCat

    Diogenes
    #2728508, posted on June 5, 2018 at 8:02 am
    I am also a tad annoyed at Colesworths. Every time I buy chicken I am forced to support the RSPCA.

    It’s worse than that – if I buy food that has a Halal certification on it I am (apparently) financially supporting a religion that I have huge concerns over, whose radical, fundamentalist followers would do me, my family and my community much harm and destruction unless we “submit”. The RSPCA is the least of my concerns.

  61. Crazyoldranga

    Please Cats, remember that the checkout staff did not implement this new policy and are just trying to earn a living. A lot of commenters here appear to just want to punish the workers, not the management. The best idea that I’ve seen here is what I already do; take a competitors bag when you do your shopping.

  62. Siltstone

    They still have paper bags for the mushrooms where I shop. Now I’ll use them for everything.

    good idea, put very individual bean in a paper bag, and when at the check-out they demand you buy a plastic bag, walk away.

  63. cynical1

    I suppose the fucking disposable nappies still come in a big plastic bag.

    Still, if the Indians can start fires with dung.

    Upwind and give it a few minutes before you toss the snags on.

  64. Tintarella di Luna

    Tinta – my mum had a shopping stroller and shops had paper bags.

    Sheer Lugzery! stackja

  65. Diogenes

    The RSPCA is the least of my concerns.

    With the Halal stuff that is the manufacturer making a choice, ie if Bega Halal certify Vegemite I have no choice to pay the tithe if I want Vegemite, no matter where I buy it from.

    Colesworths have decided all my chicken must be RSPCA certified, which is why I buy chicken at my local butcher (also my pork – I am protesting that fact that Colesworths have decided I want only sow stall free pork and give me no choice) – when they did the no cage eggs thing, we purchased our caged eggs elsewhere. I really don’t give a stuff if my chicken or pig is happy or not , only that they are 1) affordable, 2) delicious

  66. Tintarella di Luna

    The best idea that I’ve seen here is what I already do; take a competitors bag when you do your shopping.

    I agree that is the best, the rest for me are imaginings – but if you waste the time of the workers they’re still getting paid while chaos reigns and the workers will have had nothing to do with it.

  67. Customers demanded that Woolies stop selling them convenient stuff?

    Yeah, right.

  68. mh

    I commute via bus into Brisbane, and on the way home of an evening sometimes duck into Woolworths when there is enough time before the connecting bus arrives that will stop outside my house. This meat-head at Woolwoorths wants me to either:

    A: carry around shopping bags all day just in case I dash into Woolworths in the evening.
    B: purchase inappropriate bags every time I shop at Woolworths on my way home.
    C: shop at Aldi which is within walking distance from my house.

  69. nemkat

    The problem with reusable cloth bags is the hygiene issue.
    Brand new, cool bananas. After that, you’ve got bacteria living inside.
    Have second thoughts about any meat product wrapped in plastic cling wrap.
    The meat reacts with the chemicals in the plastic, and Plasticisers are a known cause of Testicular Cancer.

  70. nemkat

    I really don’t give a stuff if my chicken or pig is happy or not , only that they are 1) affordable, 2) delicious

    I care even less about pigs and chickens, but the facts are that if tey’re kept cooped up, they’ll suffer disease, which is proactively treated with Antibiotics, and who knows what.

    Then you show up at Casualty wit something infectious, and they find out you’re immune to every Antibiotic known to Man, thanks to the greed of Fatguts the Factory Farmer.
    Best of British luck then, you’re gonna need it.

  71. Boambee John

    hzhousewife
    #2728735, posted on June 5, 2018 at 11:31 am
    They still have paper bags for the mushrooms where I shop. Now I’ll use them for everything.

    Won’t work, they will charge you mushroom prices for everything!

  72. nemkat

    No they won’t, i did it for years.
    Not a peep.

  73. hzhousewife

    Won’t work, they will charge you mushroom prices for everything!

    And well may they try ! I’m up to those tricks!

  74. C.L.

    the four main issues customers cared about were food waste, reducing plastic, a sustainable supply chain and energy efficiency.

    A totally made up lie.

  75. EvilElvis

    However there is an enormous amount of litter generated by lazy people who can’t be bothered to properly dispose of their rubbish, and that affects everybody who wants to experience our stunning natural environment in a pristine state.

    So get off your fat arse and go and marginalise the ones who litter, kit. You’ll probably find they’re the types you’ve invited into Australia and aren’t culturally aware of the fact the majority of us like our clean air and beaches and environment in general. Oh, that’s hard though, so just blanket ban items even though us thoughtful people use and dispose of them in a sustainable fashion. Dickhead.

  76. Siltstone

    Please Cats, remember that the checkout staff did not implement this new policy and are just trying to earn a living. A lot of commenters here appear to just want to punish the workers,
    We know it is not their policy, and we are not against the front-liners. In fact they are allies because usually they hate their bosses and are only to happy to pass a headache on up the chain to some wanna-be.

  77. Tel

    With the Halal stuff that is the manufacturer making a choice, ie if Bega Halal certify Vegemite I have no choice to pay the tithe if I want Vegemite, no matter where I buy it from.

    If you are deeply worried, there are a number of Asian products very similar to Vegemite which are mostly fermented soy and are never going to get Halal certified. IGA is probably your friend.

  78. Target tried this a few years back and had to go back to offering free bags after vocal customer disatisfaction.
    I’ll be damned if I will be bullied into not using plastic bags by a supermarket that sells all of its cucumbers in vacuum wrapped plastic.
    I have a great local IGA surrounded by bakeries, butcher and fruit shop…all of which provide plastic bags. Coles and Woolies can stick their SJW stupidity up their profit and loss spreadsheet

  79. Up The Workers!

    There’s one simple answer to this act of unmitigated greed and extortion by Colesworths – that is to put all your shopping on the checkout and before paying for it, demand that the Store Manager personally come and carry it out to your car, in the absence of the previously-provided bags.

    If possible, grab the microphone next to the till and make your request publicly over the P.A.system – that’s always had immediate results, on the three or four times I have done it. (Tell the miserable cheapskate that his carrying all your grocery items out to your car, will “save the planet!” – after all, that’s the bulldust codswallop he’s gillarding you with).

    If (and when) they refuse, just leave your shopping there where it sits, and walk straight out of the cheapskate’s store to take your business to a place that appreciates your custom more than the mercenary money-gouging bludgers at Colesworths do.

  80. Jannie

    Best of the comments:

    Bugme
    #2728502, posted on June 5, 2018 at 7:56 am
    So a company that sells petrol, cigarettes, alcohol and has thousands of pokies machine say banning plastic is it biggest problem!

    amortiser
    #2728524, posted on June 5, 2018 at 8:20 am
    So when I go to the veggie section there will be no plastic bags to put the produce in? They are single use plastic bags, even more so than the bags at the checkout. Every checkout bag, I reuse as a bin liner. The other bags go straight in the bin.

    Garry
    #2728534, posted on June 5, 2018 at 8:38 am
    Over recent years I have changed from an environmentally conscious consumer to a person who actively hates anything that has the words ‘environment’ or ‘sustainability’ attached to them.

    iamok
    #2728531, posted on June 5, 2018 at 8:29 am
    I took issue when plastic bags were being phased out last time they tried it,

    Boambee John
    #2728552, posted on June 5, 2018 at 8:57 am
    The bags they sell carry their brand (you pay to advertise for them).
    If you shop at Woolies, buy some Coles bags and use them at Woolies. Vice versa if you shop at Coles.

    nemkat
    #2728584, posted on June 5, 2018 at 9:27 am
    Those biodegradable green bags are a health risk.

  81. JohnJJJ

    I think they should ban plastic money, the plastic around their checkout machines, plastic shelving, and plastic credit cards. My survey showed that customers prefer not to pay for food.

  82. Mark M

    Churchill and Coombes was formed in 1928 as a trader in hessian sacks. In the late 1960s as it became clear that plastics were the “way of the future”; Churchill and Coombes began developing its plastic bag making capabilities.. 

    https://www.plasticbags.com.au/collections/stock-bags/products/singlet-bags-white

    MED HD 240 + 120 Side Gusset x 500  –  20 Microns 2,000 Bags per Box @ $58 + GST per box

    Also “People who post negative things about plastic bags on Face book should be banned from using them.” sign the petition here: http://chn.ge/2FXfbTR

    Local shop is selling bags @10c ea.

    Queried this site about a government regulation on how much can be charged for individual bags?

    http://qldbagban.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/QLD-BAG-BAN-factsheet-KEY-FACTS.pdf

    Received a phonecall from David Stout, who runs the site on behalf of QLD govt.

    Turns out there is no limit to what they can charge for plastic bags.

    Retailer could charge .005c per bag, or 10c.

    He kept repeating that it is designed to change behaviour.

    Most scary is this.
    I asked him when should a government consider it is ok to suffer government inspired media criticism for not complying?

    WHAT ARE THE PENALTIES FOR NOT COMPLYING?
    To ensure that all retailers are on an even playing field in regards to the ban, and that real change is accomplished, fines will apply after 1 July 2018 and could be over $6000 per offence.
    In addition, retailers who ignore the bag ban may suffer consumer boycotts or media criticism.

  83. Mark M

    Plastic Bag Ban Responsible For Spike In E. Coli Infections, Study Says

    Laws against plastic bags often encourage the use of reusable totes to transport groceries. But as people tend to neglect washing those bags, increased food contamination becomes likely.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/plastic-bag-ban_n_2641430

  84. Boambee John

    Mark M

    Ask that website bloke what level of e coli infections is considered acceptable in the cause of saving the planet.

  85. Garry

    I actually don’t mind paying the 15c for a reuseable bag at ALDI. They at least admit that these bags are about reducing cost which they say is then passed on to the consumer. Coles and Woolworths however are hypocritical grubs who pretend to be doing this to save the environment – bullshit!

  86. Our local IGA at Bungendore went plastic bag free several months ago. As I don’t buy much there anyway I now simply load the groceries into a trolley (even if it is only a single small item) and leave the trolley in the carpark for someone from the supermarket to retrieve. Childish I know but I am sick of this worthless virtue signalling and profiteering in the name of sustainability!

  87. Kit H

    So get off your fat arse and go and marginalise the ones who litter, kit. You’ll probably find they’re the types you’ve invited into Australia and aren’t aware of the fact the majority of us like our clean air and beaches and environment in general. Oh, that’s hard though, so just blanket ban items even though us thoughtful people use and dispose of them in a sustainable fashion.

    As you state Elvis, it’s far easier said than done to marginalise people who have already marginalised themselves into their own communities and don’t care about being marginalised by people who subscribe to a Judeo-Christian way of life. Whilst the ideal solution would’ve been for Australia to have never brought in vast amounts of people opposed to our way of life, the fact is, they’re here and public pressure will have limited success in changing their behaviour.

    Anyway, there are no items being outright banned in this instance, you can still buy metal straws, you can still get every fruit and vegetable that you’ve always been able to get, and the fruit and veg is not even more expensive. The change being that food with an impermeable easily cleanable skin will not be individually packed in plastic that does the same thing as simply washing your raw food. Hope you have a pleasant day and don’t mistake me for someone who votes for the Greens

  88. nilk

    Another virtue signal that allows the supermarkets to cash in by selling these plastic bags that were once free. Note that they will still sell plastic bin liners etc. hypocrites. Over recent years I have changed from an environmentally conscious consumer to a person who actively hates anything that has the words ‘environment’ or ‘sustainability’ attached to them.

    So I’m not alone any more.

    How about all those kids’ toys, especially for little girls, like Shopkins where you have a dozen tiny little pieces in a huge box and trapped in moulded plastic like amber? I’ll believe they’re worried about plastic when they reduce that packaging. That’s an amazing amount of single-use packaging right there.

  89. Roberto

    I now simply load the groceries into a trolley (even if it is only a single small item) and leave the trolley in the carpark for someone from the supermarket to retrieve.

    Even this small act of insurrection is impossible at my local Coles, where the trolley’s wheels are magnetically locked if you attempt to wheel it our of the shop.

  90. hzhousewife

    Even this small act of insurrection is impossible at my local Coles, where the trolley’s wheels are magnetically locked if you attempt to wheel it our of the shop.

    Imagine Xmas ! Often during that week I see families with several trolleys loaded to the gunnels, pouring out of the shopping centre into the car park. No trolley out to the car even ! What do people do? Bring their own trolley into the checkout ! ?

  91. Roberto

    No trolley out to the car even ! What do people do? Bring their own trolley into the checkout ! ?

    This is the Coles in inner city North Sydney, so there’s no carpark. You park as close to shop as you can and lug your groceries back to your car by hand.

  92. Borders, that most SJW of bookshops, was an early adopter of “save da planet” plastic bag bans.
    Young lady who rang up my several hundred dollars bill for a swaying pile of novels then informed me that a bag would be Ten Cents.
    I wouldn’t have noticed or cared if they’d shoved 10c on the price of one of the books, heck, on all of them, heck, even added $1 to each book.

    It wasn’t the cost, it was the principle, as the full blown SJW lecture I got to justify the 10c included “changing your behaviour” and other such nanny smugness.

    Left the entire pile of books.
    Never got a chance to boycott the shop, it was gone next time I was in the smoke, & a dress shop or something in its place.

    Don’t think telling Coles to shove it will have quite the same satisfaction, it’ll be more like cutting yer nose off to teach yer face a lesson.

  93. jock

    Just teceived a woolies catalogue in the mailbox. At the expense of a dollar i am sending it yo the ceo of woolies with a note about his virtue signalling. Why dont you all send catalogues to him. He does it to us.

  94. mareeS

    Quite so, Lucius.

    I now have a Nanna trolley, whilst I an not a Nanna, and use free plastic bags from the fruit and veg section for disposing kitchen leftovers and kitty poo, now that there are no checkout bags.

    Virtue signallers don’t have a clue about lateral thinking.

  95. Steve Smith

    remember that the checkout staff did not implement this new policy and are just trying to earn a living.

    That’s true but they represent the company. If you don’t express your views to them at the time, what can you do? Hopefully your displeasure will filter back through management.

  96. Craig Mc

    Brad’s in for a rude shock when I abandon a checkout full of groceries the first time they insist I pay for a bag.

  97. calli

    If you shop at Woolies, buy some Coles bags and use them at Woolies. Vice versa if you shop at Coles.

    Excellent suggestion.

    Always escallate.

    I intend to rock up with a variety of difficult-to-pack random bags – billums, drawstrings, calico totes, you name it. Hand them to the checkout chick with an air of righteousness and enjoy the restive queue as she attempts to pack them.

  98. Bad Samaritan

    OK, so we have a trolley full of stuff pre-packaged in plastic. Almost everything frozen or refrigerated, plus tonnes of dry stuff like biscuits, pasta, rice, cereals, peanut butter, lollies, bread, drinks and so forth. What does come in a cardboard box is often in an interior plastic bag.

    As has been pointed out many times, everything from the F+V and the deli and meat and fish etc is all packed into plastic bags and tubs….and that’s not to consider the trolleys (trimmings) nor the carry baskets and all the rest.

    At the checkout a miniscule, wafer-thin carry bag is added to the pile. This last item is the problem which must be solved?

    Losing the plastic carry bags actually doesn’t bother me all that much since I can grab a cardboard carton, or take a box with me (plenty at the bottle shops). It’s more a laugh at the inanity of big companies and their wanker execs for me.

    Truly; I find it all so comical. Why get annoyed by stupidity when there’s no cure for it?

  99. The Barking Toad

    Over recent years I have changed from an environmentally conscious consumer to a person who actively hates anything that has the words ‘environment’ or ‘sustainability’ attached to them.

    Garry – way up the fred at 8.38am.

    Agree – that’s why my recycling bin is now just another rubbish bin.

  100. The BigBlueCat

    jock
    #2728865, posted on June 5, 2018 at 2:09 pm
    Just teceived a woolies catalogue in the mailbox. At the expense of a dollar i am sending it yo the ceo of woolies with a note about his virtue signalling. Why dont you all send catalogues to him. He does it to us.

    Excellent idea! I might save up a few ….

    I reckon that the alleged carbon footprint of all their paper catalogues they force on us far outweighs any alleged carbon footprint of those bags (which if reused properly enter the waste stream efficiently and effectively). But not being a student of Green policies or SJW causes what the deuce would I know?

  101. Delta A

    Some good suggestions above, but spare a thought for the checkout operator who might be a student working after school. Even the regulars have very little clout; management won’t give two hoots about their combat with customers.

    I suggest that everyone sends an e-mail to Coles and Woolies head offices. Sure, they have a PR person to swat away initial complaints, but keep at it. Ask about the researchers/polls etc that told them customers are most concerned about food waste, reducing plastic, a sustainable supply chain and energy efficiency.
    Ask will they pass on to their customers their savings from no plastic. (While you’re at it, ask why there is no discount for using self-serve checkouts.)

    I often complain or compliment supermarkets via e-mail. Management does seem to take this contact seriously.

  102. Squirrel

    Virtue-signalling, and (probably) charging more for the same is so much easier than simply explaining that the problem with plastic straws etc. is the small proportion of pig people who apparently dump these things in the ocean. Get on to that and leave the rest of us alone.

  103. notafan

    People should source grey singlet bags from the supplier and byo

    that is what I am trying to organise

  104. Roberto

    People should source grey singlet bags from the supplier and byo

    I’ve been stocking up on the grey bags ever since the announcement of their phasing out was made. Each time I’ve shopped I’ve put 2-3 items max in a bag, thus taking around 10-12 bags. I’ve added them to the pile of bags that I already had. I must have close to 1,000 now. I plan to re-use these well into the future.

  105. EvilElvis

    The change being that food with an impermeable easily cleanable skin will not be individually packed in plastic that does the same thing as simply washing your raw food.

    That’s not what is being banned. Although despite not voting green that is your end game though isn’t it, kit. All plastics banned as no one can be trusted and it’s the right thing to do. And you admit that it’s all to hard to target the actual attitudes of the people who litter. Pathetic and piss weak. How about the resources that go into manufacturing metal straws, keep cups and reusable shopping bags, let alone the waste of the most precious resource, water, being used to clean all these environmentally friendly apparatus? Nope, don’t think about it, it’s all about the feels and the fuzzy buzz you give yourself inside.

  106. nemkat

    Left the entire pile of books.
    Never got a chance to boycott the shop, it was gone next time I was in the smoke, & a dress shop or something in its place.

    Good for you.
    You get that a bit in Health Food Stores and Organic Shops.
    These kids are mostly students, and haven’t got a clue about service, but it’s still the fault of the managers.
    All the kid has to do is ask ”Bag or box”?
    I bought 2 x 2L. Bottles of Bath Milk, a bottle of Organic Tomato paste, a bottle of Organic Pear Juice, and half a dozen Organic navels about an hour ago. Cost $30. The girl asked if I wanted a bag.
    I knew she was going to say that, so I didn’t fall out of my tree, or get sucked into her silly game, either.

  107. Tim Neilson

    Agree – that’s why my recycling bin is now just another rubbish bin.

    Toad, your local totalitarians will eventually catch up with the People’s Republic of Yarra. They have cameras in the garbage trucks to CCTV the recycling going in. Seriously.

    So if your recycling bin has your house number on it, better paint over that, which should give you some more breathing space till they make covering the recycling bin number a criminal offence.

  108. nemkat

    All plastics banned as no one can be trusted and it’s the right thing to do. And you admit that it’s all to hard to target the actual attitudes of the people who litter.

    It’s not a litter issue. Seen one turtle, you’ve seen them all.
    The issue is micro-plastics from Styrofoam and other junk ending up in the Food Chain, i.e., actually part of the things we eat out of the ocean.
    This is just P.R. that won’t cost Plastics Manufacturers [think Oil & Gas Industry] a penny.

    Woolies and Coles used to be variety shops, they should never have been allowed to sell groceries, let alone food.

  109. Rossini

    Kit H
    #2728691, posted on June 5, 2018 at 10:45 am
    Has anybody arguing in favour of individual fruits and vegetables being wrapped in plastic, and single use disposable straws, been to a beach near a major city recently, or gone for a swim within say… Port Phillip Bay?

    The amount of plastic rubbish there is disheartening! Whilst there isn’t many shopping bags on the beach (shopping bags not being the demon they’re made out to be), there is a multitude of plastic straws and plastic packaging, of the exact sort that is being taken out of circulation.

    If people behaved responsible and disposed of their plastic rubbish in bins and recycled it (providing we deal with the fact China won’t take our waste) we wouldn’t have this problem. However there is an enormous amount of litter generated by lazy people who can’t be bothered to properly dispose of their rubbish, and that affects everybody who wants to experience our stunning natural environment in a pristine state.
    I see no evidence of the above twaddle where I live . Very rare to see a plastic shopping bag except on a dog lead….as for straws..give us a break

  110. areff

    Woolies PR office: 02 8885 1033

    PR guy: Mike — 0437 743 001

  111. calli

    Singlet bags – grey. $3 for 250 from Officeworks on special. One cent a bag.

    You’re welcome.

  112. Robin Burns

    Here is the Woolworths webpage for customer feedback. I’ve submitted mine.

    https://www.woolworths.com.au/Shop/page/help-and-support-faq?faq_id=40

  113. Mizaris:

    I have 2 Aldi, 3 IGA within 5 mins of home. All are extremely competitive pricewise. All IGA still have shopper bags and Aldi has never had them so not an issue. Happy to take my own bags to Aldi coz I can reuse those lovely strong clothing boutique bags over and over

    We have one IGA in Barky. There’s also a smaller shop that survives somehow. There’s another in Longreach 105 K away. There’s another in Emerald – 310 k away.
    Over the last two years I have noticed the prices have risen between 15 – 50%. Yes. 15 to 50%.
    Just a couple of items – tins of cat food went from the occasional special of 1$ a tin and went straight to $3.35 and have not moved in price. They haven’t moved off the shelf either. Things like Arnotts Shapes which could vary in price between $1 a pack to $2.50 went to $3.50 a pack and haven’t seemed to have moved. I bought a kilo of diced steak today with the aim of turning it into a curry. I got half way through cutting out the gristle and fat, and realised the chuck away pile was the same size as the meat pile. This is from the beef area of Australia!
    There is little effective competition in rural Australia, and we are being taken to the cleaners by the grocery monopolies. And it gets rubbed into my face every time I visit the Big Smoke and see the variety, quality and competitive prices available.
    I had need of a neodymium magnet a week ago. Got on the intarwebs and priced the Australian stuff. About $30 for what I wanted. Plus about $8 postage.
    “Bugger that,” said Winston. I went to cheap Chinese Stuff – bought the same product for $5.50 with free postage. And with Australia Post deliveries typically taking a week to get here, the OS stuff is about the same time frame.
    I’ve a feeling this is where so much of our cost of living is coming from – a class of merchant resellers who are getting filthy rich without actually producing anything. I’d be interested in everyone else’s opinion on this.

    If we could get even the original price we paid for our home here, we’d move.

  114. Tinta:

    And won’t they love it at the self-service pens, this will be hilarious, I am having a great time sitting here imagining the scenarios

    Each bean will be bar coded, just like every bolt and nut you buy at a hardware place.

  115. mh;

    carry around shopping bags all day just in case I dash into Woolworths in the evening.

    That was one of the notable things about the USSR – everyone carried a just in case bag. Just in case they saw a que forming, then they’d have a bag to carry it home in. Didn’t matter what was on sale, if you didn’t need it, you bought it anyway and traded it for something you wanted.
    There was a whole generation of Babushkas that would have traded the underwear off Trump and made a good bid for the KFC stains on his shirt.

  116. Cactus

    I just complained to woolworths online form. Sure its going to be one of many but i feel the need to do it. I dropped AGL because they said they are getting out of coal and told their churn staff repeatedly.

    What now? I guess i will have to buy a whole bunch of plastic bags and take them in. Not sure my wife will be happy but you have to stand for something. Plan to use them in the self service area. Will take a long time to do it all and productivity per machine will drop. This way i dont take it out on front line staff.

  117. Nilk:

    How about all those kids’ toys, especially for little girls, like Shopkins where you have a dozen tiny little pieces in a huge box and trapped in moulded plastic like amber? I’ll believe they’re worried about plastic when they reduce that packaging. That’s an amazing amount of single-use packaging right there.

    I see your point and it annoys the fuck out of me when I have to use a Stanley knife to get my new Stanley knife out of its plastic cocoon, but in that case the extra placcy wrapping is about making things difficult for shoplifters.

  118. Lady Nilk, Iron Bogan

    I see your point and it annoys the fuck out of me when I have to use a Stanley knife to get my new Stanley knife out of its plastic cocoon, but in that case the extra placcy wrapping is about making things difficult for shoplifters.

    So rather than being more proactive about catching shoplifters the rest of us have to deal with boxes and plastic and little wire ties just in case. I’m so tired of that one size fitting all. Like ATMs requiring bar staff approval if there are pokies at the pub. Because I need the approval of someone half my age to access my own money because of problem gamblers. Or the well-used road that gets updated with several sets of speed humps. In that case, there had been some complaints about hooning so the council took action.

    Too bad the road was also a school bus route and the humps also made it less desirable to access the small struggling shopping strip. One of the teachers complained that the buses used to take detours to avoid the humps. SMFH.

  119. mh

    I heard 2gb’s Luke Grant last night playing a pre-recorded interview with Josh Fraudenberg.

    Josh praised Coles/Woolworths for their planned ban on shopping bags. It sounded like he wanted to take some credit for the move.

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