Wednesday Forum: June 6, 2018

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1,703 Responses to Wednesday Forum: June 6, 2018

  1. stackja

    Tel
    #2730555, posted on June 7, 2018 at 1:43 pm
    … 65 kilometres of pristine streams could be flooded for five weeks at a time …

    The pristine streams will get wet!!!

    What we see today is the result of another major development dating back to 1960 – the damming of the Warragamba River and construction downstream of a new dam (Warragamba) which was to provide the majority of Sydney’s water supply.

    In the process was created Lake Burragorang – which can be seen from the two lookouts today.

    The villagers and farmers were evacuated and the once fertile valley, its dwellings and town, now lie beneath the waters of the lake.

    The entire area is now a national park.

    The valley itself is over 80km long and the lake as you see it is 600 metres above sea level.

  2. thefrollickingmole

    Farming couple we know just had a big blow for the year.
    Brought a pile of hay as feed was a touch short while cropping was on.
    Bloke who sold it to them rang 2 days later “dont feed it to your stock”, but too late.
    Lost all their cattle and most of their sheep, ryegrass apparently.

    Nice couple, shes one of these ladies that nearly has a name for each animal on the place and fussess over them.

    Poor buggers.

  3. Stimpson J. Cat

    Bill Maher
    Bill Maher
    @billmaher
    Republicans, you’re the Alex Jones party now. There is literally nothing too stupid & conspiratorial that you
    will not swallow. #SpyGate #DeepState #RussiaGate #P$zzaGate #UraniumGate #FISAGate #DossierGate

  4. Top Ender

    Hilarious!

    Tasmania could become “the battery of the nation”, providing 20 per cent of dispatchable electricity needs at 20 per cent less than the cost of relying on gas to replace declining coal generation, a report suggests.

    Commissioned by the Australian Renewable Energy Authority, the study released today finds a massive expansion of Tasmanian generation — via upgraded hydroelectric schemes, new pumped hydro and new wind — could play a key role in national energy security.

    Combined with up to five cable interconnectors to export power to the mainland, it finds Tasmania could “meet 20 per cent of the total need for dispatchable capacity through to 2040”.

    While authored by Hydro Tasmania, which could be said to have a vested interest as it pushes the cause for a second interconnector under Bass Strait, the report was hailed by ARENA as proving Tasmania could play a “significant” role.

    “Tasmania’s vast pumped hydro and renewable energy reserves place it in a great position to increase capacity to the National Electricity Market,” said ARENA chief executive Ivor Frischknecht.

    “As renewable energy grows to comprise a larger percentage of the nation’s electricity the importance of storage for reliability also increases. (Tasmania’s) ‘Battery of the Nation’ (concept) has the potential to provide for the future needs of the NEM.”

    Tasmania, home to the Roaring 40s winds, has vast untapped wind generation potential. If used in conjunction with hydro-electrical storage, this could provide increased dispatchable energy.

    This is the state that got to 8% of its dam capacity a few years back and had to import diesel generators to cope.

    This is the state which had its extension cord to the mainland break several times.

    This is the state that hasn’t had the capacity to install its own “battery” in the form of pumped hydro to cope with shortages.

    What idiot wrote this?

    Oz with comments open

  5. Dr Faustus

    Team Mueller has smoking gun evidence of Manafort’s witness tampering.

    Now only inches away from turning him to destroy Trump.
    On toast. Only inches.

    Sworn duty.

  6. Jannie

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2730326, posted on June 7, 2018 at 8:35 am
    after having been ruthless and brutally kriptonited…

    That is good sound Zippy. Cheers.

  7. Zyconoclast

    Far right nationalists open private men-only clubs in Melbourne and Sydney

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-06-07/far-right-opens-men-only-clubs-in-melbourne-and-sydney/9836458

    How long before they close them down?

  8. jupes

    Studded with Muslim celebrities, almost 500 people including Muslim community leaders, members of parliament, councillors, commissioners from Victorian Multicultural Commission and movers and shakers who have served our communities, this year the Premier’s Ramadhan Dinner was the largest ever, held on Monday 21 May 2018 at the glamorous Sofitel Melbourne.

    Who paid for this suck fest do you reckon?

    The Premier announced that $7 million dollars in funding has been allocated for security upgrades at places of worship with $3 million dollars going towards Islamic places of worship.

    As SOG alludes to above, there is your diversity in action right there, but who exactly are they protecting them against? Australians might throw the odd bit of bacon into a mosque but any significant attack is done by Muslims of the other denomination.

    Of course it is also Muslims who attack churches and synagogues. But of course the premier knows that too.

  9. jupes

    Blair Cottrell is an excellent troll.

  10. Top Ender

    Thanks Zyconoclast for the post on rewarding failure.

  11. Top Ender

    Mr Wyatt ….was awarded the Australian Defence Medal in 2008.

    That’s the red and white one that comes up with the rations after four years.

  12. Immigration has turned 5 GOP states blue, according to study

    Fisky, where exactly are the Cato Institute on this?

  13. Senile Old Guy

    The ABC cannot help itself. In a piece about Sydney’s rock swimming pools, there is this:

    “Of course back then very few people are good at swimming, [because] very few non-Indigenous people have any surf skills, so they want nice safe places where they can enjoy the waves and the water,” she said.

    That would be the “non-Indigenous people” who sailed around the world to get there, using technology the indigenous people could not imagine.

    In Sydney’s east, Waverley Council began to build the iconic Bronte Baths and Bondi Baths in 1897, while champion long-distance swimmer Henry Alexander Wylie built Wylie’s Baths in Coogee in 1907.

    “Henry Alexander Wylie” does not sound that indigenous.

    At many ocean baths men and women had to swim at different times and in ‘appropriate attire’ under council regulations.

    You still have to wear “appropriate attire”.

    “Gentlemen could bathe between daylight from 10:00am to 4:00pm each day. Ladies could also bathe at the same time daily, except Sundays and public holidays which were reserved exclusively for men,” the regulations stipulated.

    So contrary to the previous statement, men and women could swim at the same time, most days of the week.

    Having said that, it is an interesting piece (and SOG spent much time in those pools in a distant youth).

  14. Zyconoclast

    In an otherwise very interesting article with some great pictures, they just couldn’t help themselves.

    Who built these ocean pools shaped by the natural rockface of the city’s beaches…?
    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-06-07/sydneys-ocean-pools-who-built-them/9808500?pfmredir=sm

    “Of course back then very few people are good at swimming, [because] very few non-Indigenous people have any surf skills, so they want nice safe places where they can enjoy the waves and the water,” she said.

  15. max

    He [Dan the Man] enthused about the importance of sharing our heritage and culture and explained that “Here in Victoria we don’t ‘tolerate’ diversity, we in every respect celebrate it and embrace it and recognise it to be our richest asset.”

    Andrews is cementing the Muslim vote for Labor for generations. It’s one of the reasons why he will be returned in the approaching election. The diversity guff goes down well in Melbourne because the liars sell it as a great success for all. The Libs need to counter with its link to Lornorder and ticky-tacky, boxy developments everywhere in the suburbs and the horrible Melbourne traffic.

  16. Atoms for Peace

    I will lose sleep unless someone informs me as to what the indigenous swimming style was. Did they also swim between ochre and yellow flags?

  17. Top Ender

    …very few non-Indigenous people have any surf skills…

    Implying Aboriginal surfers?

    Where? When? What sorta boards?

    There could be a whole new movie here!

  18. Fisky

    Fisky, where exactly are the Cato Institute on this?

    Writing dishonest reports such as the following –

    Our earlier research found that immigrants and native-born Americans have ideological, political, and public policy opinions that differ to a statistically insignificant extent

    Actually, immigrants vote about 7-3 for the Dems, but CATO found a way to massage out this disparity by “adjusting” for income/age/education differences, etc.

  19. stackja

    Top Ender
    #2730601, posted on June 7, 2018 at 2:40 pm
    …very few non-Indigenous people have any surf skills…

    Implying Aboriginal surfers?

    Where? When? What sorta boards?

    There could be a whole new movie here!

    Hawaiians visited here before Cook?

  20. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    House blocks in Penrith for £595
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9589080-1×1-940×940.jpg

    An end to the immigration ponzi and those golden days can return.

  21. stackja

    Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)
    #2730606, posted on June 7, 2018 at 2:45 pm

    Closer to Sydney a house block was £200.

  22. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Closer to Sydney a house block was £200.

    Once the mooching Boomers are dead and the immigration spigot is turned off, those halcyon days will be back.

  23. Senile Old Guy

    All your indigenous surfing questions answered:

    Aboriginal Surfing
    Reinstating Culture and Country
    Colleen McGloin, University of Wollongong, Australia
    Abstract: Mainstream surfing in Australia is a discursive cultural practice, institutionally sanctioned as integral to national identity. Surfing represents the nation through a mode of white heterosexual orientation that is encoded into its practices and its texts. Surfing represents an historical transformation in the national psyche from the bush, inaugurated by the nation’s literary canon, to the beach, which has become the modern site of the nation’s identity. Indigenous surfing provides an oppositional view of nation and country that reinscribesthe beach with cultural meanings specific to Aboriginal cultures. Surfing in this context can be seen as a reclamation of culture and a challenge to the dominance of white conceptions of nation and identity. This paper examines the indigenous surfing film, “Surfing the Healing Wave” and explores the film’s representations of histories that are relevant to Aboriginal people. The film’s narrative disruption of the surfing film genre instates a pedagogical practice that functions to reinscribe Aboriginal culture and Aboriginal histories through the contemporary event of the indigenous surfing contest.

    [Good luck finding a copy of that film.]

    Racism = bad.
    Surfing contest only for indigenous = good.

  24. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Once the mooching Boomers are dead and the immigration spigot is turned off, those halcyon days will be back.

    Miss out on inheriting the house, did you, Infidel Tiger?

  25. Snoopy

    I recall an Aboriginal Elder, relating in Brisbane’s Sunday Mail, how Aborigines on Fraser Island used to dive for Nautilus shells.

  26. Pete of Perth

    Re deadlyquestions. Seems alot if them are made up in the same vane as the penthouse forum letters.

  27. Snoopy

    House blocks in Penrith for £595

    45 minutes from the city!

  28. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Miss out on inheriting the house, did you, Infidel Tiger?

    Nah! Got the proceeds of one and other coming!

    And I got my own too!

    The housing ponzi is ridiculously good for spoilt rich brats like me. Not as good as it was for the laziest and most self involved generation in human history (that’s the Boomers in case you couldn’t follow) but it has still been really good.

  29. Tintarella di Luna

    Lovely article by the Mocker: Memo ANU: the role of university isn’t to indulge students but to expose them to debate

    Trigger warning: the following contains references to material that tolerant and progressive people will find distressing and offensive, including hate-speech and micro-aggressions. It portrays favourably the most racist, sexist, hegemonic, homophobic, and imperialist society known to peoplekind – the euphemistically titled ‘Western civilisation’. Students and academics alike are strongly advised not to read it. Should someone intrude upon your safe space and read this article aloud to you, we recommend you cover your ears, writhe furiously on the ground, and repeatedly scream ‘Narrative violation’ until a campus counsellor comes to your assistance.

    If any philanthropic body wished to fund studies into pusillanimity — that human condition better known informally as kowtowing, spineless, and lack of ticker — the Australian National University in Canberra would be the ideal institution to host it. Citing supposed concerns about institutional and academic autonomy last week, the ANU rejected an offer by the Ramsay Centre, chaired by former prime minister John Howard, to fund a Western civilisation program.

    As Australian Catholic University vice-chancellor Greg Craven observed, the ANU’s decision was “the greatest act of gutlessness since Trevor Chappell bowled under¬arm to New Zealand”.

    “What’s happening here is not an attempt to protect a diverse range of studies and views around civilisation,” he said, “but to make sure one particular view, as far as possible, is kept ruthlessly out of the university.”

    Craven is right. Only last month the left-leaning National Tertiary Education Union warned of a “backlash” against the proposed partnership, claiming it amounted to a “divisive cultural and political agenda”. Writing to ANU vice-chancellor Brian Schmidt, the NTEU’s ACT branch cited the “grave concerns” of academics that “the Ramsay Centre seeks to pursue a narrow, radically conservative program to demonstrate and promulgate the alleged superiority of Western culture and civilisation”. This extrapolation is alarmist. Is this really the union that speaks for Australia’s intellectuals?

    If only the histrionics were limited to the union. In March, the ANU Observer reported that the president of the ANU Postgraduate and Research Students’ Association, Alyssa Shaw, expressed “concerns of indigenous students with Ramsay centre’s affiliation with the [political] right”. What concerns? Apparently these students may “feel unsafe”. Not surprisingly, the bio of Shaw’s Twitter account proudly declares she is a “Wannabe social justice crusader”.

    Now imagine you were Raelene Frances, Dean of the College of Arts and Social Sciences, and that you had to respond to these concerns. Perhaps you might say, as tactfully as possible, that the Ramsay Centre is not known for advocating white supremacy. Or if you weren’t feeling so diplomatic, you could reply that a student with such concerns is in urgent need of a resilience coach. Frances, while encouraging students to enrol in the proposed program, instead said that “indigenous activists should have a deep knowledge of the colonisers’ ideas to better fight them”. If this is the prevailing mentality at our universities, should we just cut the funding and acknowledge we have lost our tertiary institutions to tribalism?

    Just consider how the ANU would react if Bruce Gilley, a professor of political science at Portland State University, were to speak at one of its conferences. Last year in a paper for Third World Quarterly he questioned the orthodoxy of condemning western colonialism, claiming that independence for developing countries had led to a “cesspool of human suffering”. Controversially, he also argued that Western rule should be reintroduced in those countries.

    In signing a Facebook petition calling for a retraction and an apology, ANU history lecturer Dr Patricia O’Brien linked Gilley’s views with “white supremacy movements”.

    “My first instinct was to not increase publicity for this latest outing of the ‘colonialism was good’ argument,” she wrote. “But like a dog returning to its vomit here it is again. And it’s no coincidence it appears now along with the recent rise of white supremacy movements in their many ugly guises.” You do not have to accept all of Gilley’s argument to acknowledge that many postcolonial developing countries are indeed basket cases, but that of course would be hate speech and racism.

    No doubt her legal anthropologist colleague Dr Siobhan McDonnell would agree. “Working alongside many @ANU_NCIS colleagues this #AustraliaDay in acknowledgment of the ongoing survival of indigenous Australians in spite of Australia’s violent colonial past and ongoing structural violence,” she tweeted this year. “We need to #ChangeTheDate #InvasionDay #SurvivalDay.” How incredibly woke is that?

    Not as woke as her science communication colleague Dr Lindy Orthia, the editor of the book Dr Who and Race. It features essays such as “The white Doctor’’, and “Conscious colour-blindness, unconscious racism in Doctor Who companions’’, and “Baby steps: A modest solution to Asian under-representation in Doctor Who’’.

    “We believe these essays make an important contribution to discussions of race and Doctor Who,” writes Orthia. “Most of the contributors, through identifying with diverse ethnic backgrounds, live in or hail from Australia or the United States, so many of the essays approach ‘race’ from perspectives…such as colonialism, the dispossession of indigenous lands and Europeans’ enslavement of Africans,” she adds. Given her expertise in analysing science fiction through these themes, perhaps she could ponder a scenario where a traveller from the Ramsay Centre were to land on planet ANU and seek a respectful dialogue with the natives based on peace and education. It’s not hard to imagine in response those high-pitched agitated voices and the frantic waving of appendages to the cries of “Exterminate, exterminate!”

    In an article last year for The Conversation titled “Monumental errors: how Australia can fix its racist colonial statues’’, ANU history professor Bruce Scates deplored the “sanitised symbols of violence and dispossession [which] have long stood unchallenged in the heart of our towns and cities.”

    “By occupying civic space they serve to legitimise narratives of conquest and dispossession, arguably colonising minds in the same ways white “settlers” seized vast tracts of territory,” he wrote. Colonising minds? Just a tip: if you resort to using the adverb “arguably’’ as a means of persuasion, chances are you are trying to buttress an assertion that lacks evidence. As big a stretch as that was, it wasn’t as risible as Scates’s next statement.

    “Would those opposing the altering of Australia’s colonial statues have also opposed the demolition of the Berlin Wall, or the toppling of statues of Saddam Hassein (sic)?” How is that for moral equivalence? If you are in favour of leaving our ‘colonial’ statues intact – even just for the sake of posterity – you must be as bad as the Communists or those of the murderous Ba’ath Party.

    As for ANU vice-chancellor Schmidt, he really needs to ponder this question: Given attitudes like this dominate on campus, do you really think the Ramsay Centre constitutes an existential threat? If the NTEU is such a strident defender of academic autonomy, why does it not voice opposition to the fact that 13 Australian universities host the China-funded Confucius Centres which are responsible for assigning teachers and dictating curriculum? What of the ANU’s Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, which accepts donations from countries such as the United Arab Emirates and Iran?

    Speaking at Schimidt’s investiture in 2016, chancellor Gareth Evans warned staff not to “make the mistake of thinking Brian should be a soft touch.” His backdown in this affair, however, has given exactly that impression. Your taxes subsidise a bunch of spoiled brats who refuse to share the sandpit with those who would build castles as opposed to undermining them. Would it be too much to expect Schmidt – who draws a salary of $618,000 – to stand up to his subordinates?

    When he began his term, Schmidt spoke of his desire to make the ANU a “happy workplace and a safe place to study”. Therein lies the problem. The role of a university is not to coddle students or to indulge them. Rather, it is to challenge them; to expose them to robust debate, irrespective of whether or not they find this confronting. If a university can teach romantic notions of primitivism or the victimhood-obsessed gender studies, surely it cannot hurt to provide balance and permit a degree dedicated to the positives of Western civilisation?

    Regrettably, it is too much trouble. So much for the university’s motto ‘Naturam Primum Cognoscere Rerum’ (First to learn the nature of things). It is time to consider a replacement motto. On that note what is Latin for “Now Political Correctness Rules’’?

  30. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Fascinating results of The Economist Poll on Migration!!
    Fisky, your thoughts?

    The Economist won’t be asking that question again.

  31. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The film’s narrative disruption of the surfing film genre instates a pedagogical practice that functions to reinscribe Aboriginal culture and Aboriginal histories through the contemporary event of the indigenous surfing contest.

    Sounds more like cultural appropriation of the surfboard to me.

  32. H B Bear

    I think the aborigines went surfing after they finished their shifts at the bakery. Just waiting on a research grant to confirm this.

  33. What idiot wrote this?

    Difficult question. So many to choose from.

  34. Pete of Perth

    My question at deadlyquestions.. why is domestic violence so prominent in remote aboriginal communities?

  35. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    that human condition better known informally as kowtowing, spineless, and lack of ticker — the Australian National University in Canberra would be the ideal institution to host it.

    Wasn’t it the ANU where those fearless ‘climate scientists’ who thought a gun-toting farmer was on campus then started having the vapors about ‘death threats’ for their brave support of the ‘climate consensus’?

    Spineless, much?

  36. Stimpson J. Cat

    Once the mooching Boomers are dead and the immigration spigot is turned off, those halcyon days will be back.

    The waiting is the hardest part.
    Millenials loath boomers far more than I hate hippies AND Commies.
    It’s actually quite frightening yet awe inspiring at the same time.

  37. Makka

    why is domestic violence so endemically entrenched in remote aboriginal communities?

    FIFY.

  38. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I think the farmer merely mentioned within their hearing that he could shoot and that he’d once shot a kangaroo. Absolutely no threat at all ever implied; in other words, fake news.
    Something as ridiculous as that anyway.

  39. Makka

    Once the mooching Boomers are dead and the immigration spigot is turned off, those halcyon days will be back.

    Doubtful. Your spoilt lot will manage to fk it it up like most other things you dipshits touch. When was the last time you made your own bed?

  40. Jessie

    Life is full of mysteries. In reference to an earlier post of which I had presumed the incontinence industry, Coles shopping bags or NDIS had got covered:-

    Experts explain the psychological drive behind pooping for all to see
    And the science of medical advice (with disclaimer) on the other hand
    Will check the DSM coding for the same. Psychology and your Lawyer.

  41. Baldrick

    TheirABC can’t help themselves Mark II, gleefully reporting:

    Inverted crosses installed by Dark Mofo offend some in Christian community


    Christians fear the organisers of Dark Mofo are inviting dark forces to Hobart by displaying inverted crosses around the city.
    As part of the city’s annual winter festival, several large red crosses, known as the Cross of Saint Peter, have been erected in prominent positions around the waterfront.
    Inverted crosses are also used as a symbol of the anti-Christ and many in the Christian community have expressed offence at the 20-metre-high art installations.
    Christians are an easy target. Once Dark Mofo start displaying effigies of Mohammed, I’ll take them seriously.

  42. Baldrick

    Blockquote fail.
    The last sentence is mine.

    Christians are an easy target. Once Dark Mofo start displaying effigies of Mohammed, I’ll take them seriously.

  43. H B Bear

    They love that sh1t at the Anyone But Christians staff co-op. Cutting edge.

  44. Makka

    Like ” I can pardon myself” , this is masterful trolling;

    Kim Jong-un ‘got on hands and knees and begged’ for summit: Giuliani

    Blowing up thousands of leftard heads, one tweet at a time.

  45. Rae

    D-Day passes in Australia now with nary a mention.

    Has D-Day ever been very relevant to Australia? Pretty sure Australia was busy fighting the Japanese on 6 June 1944.

  46. Jessie

    Much like the breadth in ABS statistical nomenclature, I had had no idea that this issue had such prevalence in terms of the economy and share-market reach.
    Fecal incontinence affects nearly 20% of men and approximately 12.9% of women in Australia

    This surely would seem somewhere in the public health index under issues of tobacco and sugar ?

  47. Confused Old Misfit

    Has D-Day ever been very relevant to Australia?

    Would have been bloody well relevant if it hadn’t worked!
    Christ Almighty!

  48. Makka

    Great pics, thanks Inco.

  49. Viva

    Just in case you aren’t completely clear about the left’s agenda here is Daniel Finkelstein writing in The Times (reproduced in today’s Oz).

    …the very forces that lead us to cooperate with those we are familiar with lead us to resist those we see as “others”. And the groups clash with each other each seeking domination. This is a pessimistic view because it suggests that ethnic and group conflict has its roots in nature and evolution, but it is not entirely a hopeless one. I see in it room for optimism.

    The modern consumer market economy based on mass communication and global trade means that those who once seemed like strangers are gradually coming to seem like part of one large supergroup. “Others” are beginning to look to us less alien than they once did. The circle of people we feel we can trust is growing larger.

    And with it, those parts of our behaviour that we use to mark out our groups and exclude strangers – religious fundamentalism, for instance – will begin to fade. There may be a certain melancholy in the upending of tradition but the gains from a common humanity will be greater.

    So buying and selling in the same global shopping mall will supposedly replace values and shared history as the glue holding this new supergroup together? Tell that to the Bosnian Christians and Muslims who lived and shopped side by side for a century or more before turning on each other.

    Finkelstein continues:

    Yet such developments will take a long time to happen. … It is therefore right to argue for control and moderation in allowing the migration that creates ethnically diverse societies; essential to recognise that integration is extremely challenging and will require great political effort; vital to see that civic equality will not happen by itself and prejudice will not easily disappear both needing to be driven by enlightened leaders.

    In other words, boil that frog slowly and don’t frighten the horses.

  50. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Has D-Day ever been very relevant to Australia?

    Would have been bloody well relevant if it hadn’t worked!
    Christ Almighty!

    Certainly relevant to the few thousand Australians who were actually there, and the several thousands who were serving in the European theater of war at the time.

  51. Senile Old Guy

    D-Day:

    Australia, with the great bulk of its forces fighting Japan in the south-west Pacific, took a relatively small part in the operation, but the invasion force included up to about 3,000 Australians.

    About a dozen Australian soldiers were attached to British army formations, learning the ropes in preparation for amphibious operations in the Pacific later in the war. Some 500 Australian sailors served in dozens of Royal Navy warships, from battleships and corvettes down to motor torpedo boats and landing craft. Several Australians commanded flotillas of tank-landing ships, while others piloted landing craft carrying British and Canadian infantry onto the beaches.

    Australia’s main contribution was in the air. Between 2,000 and 2,500 Australian airmen served in dozens of RAF and ten RAAF squadrons of all kinds. Australian aircrew served in transport and glider-towing squadrons which carried airborne troops, fighter-bombers and fighters operating directly over the beach-head, and many in heavy bomber squadrons which dropped thousands of tons of bombs in support of the landings. Coastal Command squadrons operated far from the beaches of Normandy, protecting the Channel crossings from German naval forces.

  52. Confused Old Misfit

    And certainly relevant to each and everyone alive and in receipt of the benefits that might not exist were it not for the blood spilt on those beaches.
    Western civilization is far from perfect but no one has yet come up with a better alternative.

  53. jupes

    My question at deadlyquestions.. why is domestic violence so prominent in remote aboriginal communities?

    What was the answer?

  54. Baldrick

    The appropriate response to Rae the Troll 👹™ is, “Fuck off”.

  55. Confused Old Misfit

    Sorry Baldrick.
    I shall consider myself in receipt of one scathing reprimand. 🙁

  56. calli

    Speaking of mooching boomers, today I was offered all manner of home services provided for elderly (!) patients convalescing at home. One of them included cleaning.

    Oh, how I was tempted, but resisted womanfully.

    I had to hire some medical furniture. On the form was some box ticking – aboriginal, torres straight islander, both, neither. I wonder if they use special walkers or shower chairs?

  57. Top Ender

    Has D-Day ever been very relevant to Australia?

    Lotsa Aussies around the neighbourhood.

    Hal Farncomb was commanding the aircraft carrier HMS Attacker for example, from May.

    Down in Hobart at present, living quietly in Kingston, is an ex-Marine from the British forces, who was part of the force which stormed the beaches on D-Day. A privilege to know him.

  58. calli

    On anticipating an entire generation to turn up their toes and die – sorry I can’t oblige. I’m planning on living forever.

  59. Senile Old Guy

    Cheers, ZK2A.

    For those with an interest in the war in the Pacific, as it affected northern Australia, there are these:

    Whispering Death, Mark Johnston
    Darwin Spitfires, Anthony Cooper
    The Empire Strikes South, Tom Lewis

  60. Stimpson J. Cat

    Doubtful. Your spoilt lot will manage to fk it it up like most other things you dipshits touch. When was the last time you made your own bed?

    I can’t speak for IT but as he is married I would expect his wife made it for him as it is her job after all apart from shoes.
    I however made mine this morning.
    As did my millenial kid.
    As did my other millenial son, in the house he bought with his own money.
    I am fairly sure they will be fine.
    😁

  61. Eyrie

    “In December 2016, a High Court judge ordered a Russian billionaire who has owned a home in England since the 1990s, to pay the equivalent of $US646 million to his ex-wife, Tatiana Akhmedova.”
    Hope she has good security who can’t be bought off. What does the Russian mafia charge for a hit?

  62. Stimpson J. Cat

    I wonder if they use special walkers or shower chairs?

    Cupholders.

  63. thefrollickingmole

    Stimpson J. Cat

    That link is great, the Economist got beaten like a red headed stepchild.

    Im not sure Sholmo Sheckelstein was posing under his real name though.

    I have a migration experiment Id love to try.
    Get a greenie type and have them agree to take in a reffo for 3 months as a social experiment. Agree to pay them $300 a week for expenses & tucker.
    Then after a week start dropping one more every 2-3 weeks.
    But no increase in expenses money, after all he can just borrow money for the common good.
    Then really ramp up the psychological pressure by having them complain about his house/what he wears/eats/watches on Tv etc, and want it put to a vote how they live.

    Id be guessing by the time the virtue signalers got to the 3rd reffo/ 6th week 3/4 would have had breakdowns trying to find a non racist way to tell them to f off out of their house.

    Would make some fun TV, especially when you pointed out the scenario is effectively the position the government is in if they adopt green/left open borders policy.

  64. egg_

    On anticipating an entire generation to turn up their toes and die

    Hunch might donate his 2nd liver to Arky?

  65. nemkat

    Zyconoclast
    #2730596
    In an otherwise very interesting article with some great pictures, they just couldn’t help themselves.
    ,“Of course back then very few people are good at swimming, [because] very few non-Indigenous people have any surf skills …
    Cringeworthy.
    Back when Lionel Rose died, ABC radio described him as ”The only Australian Aboriginal to win a World Title in any sport”, which sounds like a backhanded compliment to me.
    On the inside back page of today’s The Australian I see the phrase ”Evonne Goolagong Cawley won her only French Open Title …”
    For mine, they could’ve left ”her only” out, and replaced it with ”the”.

    Looks to me like Media, particularly the ABC, is big on myth making about Aborigines in general, but can’t resist putting the stiletto in and giving it a twist when it comes to actual achievements of particular
    Aborigines.

  66. Dark Mofo is having a panel called Should the Church be saved? The panel includes Paul Collins, David Marr, and Barney Schwartz. Seriously.

  67. C.L.

    Studded with Muslim celebrities …

    LOL.

  68. egg_

    Id be guessing by the time the virtue signalers got to the 3rd reffo/ 6th week 3/4 would have had breakdowns trying to find a non racist way to tell them to f off out of their house.

    If that, NIMBYs.

  69. calli

    Cawley is like Bess Price. The wrong kind of aborigine.

  70. egg_

    ”Evonne Goolagong Cawley won her only French Open Title …”

    Not bad for a grass court player.

  71. H B Bear

    I don’t think you become a Russian billionaire by giving a rats arse about the law or what a court tells you to do.

  72. egg_

    The wrong kind of aborigine.

    +1

    An achiever, not a whinger.

  73. Rae

    Yes, I know there were about 3,000 Australians serving under the command of the British in almost overwhelmingly non-combat roles supporting the D-Day landings. But that was primarily for the Allies to re-take Europe from the Germans.

    Australia, as I said, was busy fighting the Japanese on 6 June 1944. Far away from the beaches of Normandy. To the north of Australia where its real peril lay.

  74. thefrollickingmole

    Indigenous surfing provides an oppositional view of nation and country that reinscribesthe beach with cultural meanings specific to Aboriginal cultures.

    So more “history” written on beach sand?

  75. zyconoclast

    And wait, there’s more!

    ‘Walking in their tracks’: How Sydney’s Aboriginal paths shaped the city

    Many of Sydney’s roads and side streets are based on the original tracks and pathways created by Aboriginal people before the First Fleet arrived in 1788, experts say.

    Director of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research at Sydney University, Jakelyn Troy, said Sydney was laid out along the routes Aboriginal people used to follow.

    “Actually the way Sydney is laid out now, it’s mirroring and in fact using the boundaries and connecting thoroughfares that Aboriginal people used as well.

    “We are living a very Aboriginal existence in Sydney by walking in the tracks of the people who were here and living in the spaces of the people who lived here until 1788 and for a long time beyond, and are indeed still here.”

    Shane Connelly, who is originally from Perth, asked: Which Sydney roads were originally Aboriginal trackways? I’ve heard that Oxford Street and Old South Head Road, King Street in Newtown, and Parramatta Road were used in this way.

    That was the question ABC News in Sydney was asked to investigate through Curious Sydney, our series that reports on stories based on your questions.

    When the new settlers arrived, Sydney Cove was a challenging place for them.

    They had to negotiate heavily forested valley floors and shrubby woodlands on rugged slopes and hilltops.

    It makes sense that they would follow already established paths and tracks Aboriginal people used for visiting family, collecting food or conducting ceremonies, Professor Troy said.

    “If they didn’t do what Aboriginal people guided them to they’d end up all tangled up in the bush and having a very difficult time of it.”

    What’s the evidence?
    The State Library of NSW is often asked whether Aboriginal paths and tracks were the forerunners to Sydney Streets but there are no maps, drawings or settlers’ accounts that refer to Aboriginal tracks specifically.

    “It is thought that some of Sydney’s main thoroughfares, such as George Street, Oxford Street and King Street in Newtown, followed Aboriginal tracks that had served as trading routes between farmed grasslands or bountiful fishing areas,” the City of Sydney’s Barani website says.

    Paul Irish, author of Hidden in plain view, The Aboriginal people of Coastal Sydney, said while the evidence was “pretty sparse”, “we can infer it in other ways because we know that there were networks of Aboriginal pathways around Sydney”.

    “We know that often Aboriginal people were traversing the landscape using ridge lines and other areas or pathways to get between camp sites, to access resources or perhaps ceremonial places,” Dr Irish said.

    “So some of the roads have followed similar pathways. Whether those relationships were direct, in the sense that Europeans deliberately chose that route because there was an existing path, is hard to document in the historical record but is quite likely in some cases.”

    George Street figures largely in the minds of Aboriginal people, as it was so close to a source of vital fresh water near the coastline.

    “George Street was the first street or walking trail that came straight into the water into Sydney Cove, it also had a fresh water tank stream at the end of it,” Shannon Foster, a D’harawal woman from the University of Technology Sydney, said.

    “So around about where King Street is now, and where Pitt and George Street come almost their closest onto King Street, is right where that fresh water tank stream would be.”

    Sydney not built on a grid

    While Adelaide and Melbourne were carefully planned on grids, Sydney was more haphazard, “largely following either ground contours or Aboriginal tracks”, according to the Dictionary of Sydney.

    Early attempts to plan roads were chaotic, despite their vital importance to the economy and public order in the small convict colony.

    In 1788 Governor Phillip instructed the surveyor-general, Augustus Alt, to draft a plan for Sydney’s streets: “The principal streets are placed so as to admit a free circulation of air, and are 200 feet wide …”

    But Sydney’s CBD continued to grow organically until 1810 when Lachlan Macquarie arrived and attended to the state of the roads.

    “I think it’s a lovely reminder when you’re stuck in wicked traffic: OK I can handle this, these are the paths my ancestors took.”

    Governor Macquarie pushed ahead with key roads like Parramatta Road and South Head Road (now Old South Head Road) for access to better food sources and security.

    Caring for country

    The original paths were cared for by hand or by burning back the scrub to allow access to food sources or encourage regrowth to attract kangaroos for a hunt.

    “They were about a metre wide so two people could walk along them, they were maintained using fire and usually on a daily basis with tiny little spot fires that would be stamped out as you go along,” Ms Foster said.

    “They then became very quickly walking trails for many people, trails with horses, then horses and carts, then vehicles.”

    Oxford Street or the ‘Maroo’
    Historians have studied the origins of Oxford Street, which runs from the CBD to Bondi Junction in the eastern suburbs, then connects to Old South Head Road, known once as South Head Road.

    “By the mid 1790s, a rough walking track had been established between Sydney Cove and the South Head,” Clive Faro’s book Street Scene: A history of Oxford Street says.

    “In all probability this track (often referred to locally as the Maroo) followed existing paths which had been long established by the Aborigines. Captain Hunter’s Map of the settlement in 1791 showed just such a track.”

    “Europeans continued to do that, but so did Aboriginal people who were the descendants of those who had made the original track.”

    The track was recognised as a vital link to the signal station and a planned lighthouse at South Head, so the road was built by 1811 using convict and military labour.

    And today Oxford Street remains a major thoroughfare in Sydney’s east.

    (I’m surprised they don’t claim Mardi Gras)

  76. Macbeth

    6 June 1944. Watching for Japanese intruders. Picked up news of invasion from BBC. Colleague beside me kept saying, ” Oh boy, am I glad I’m not a German.” Don’t know why I remember that; nothing much else came through.

  77. nemkat

    Has D-Day ever been very relevant to Australia?
    No.
    Never saw it mentioned here until the 40th Anniversary.
    Our blokes were still up in the Islands fighting the Japs
    Interesting that today the ALP are agonising over the bludgers on Manus Island.
    The War in the pacific ended on August 9, 1945, but the then ALP Government left a lot of blokes up in New Guinea well into 1946, citing concerns about excess labor in Australia as the reason.

  78. H B Bear

    The Noble Savage replaced by the Noble Brah.

  79. Stimpson J. Cat

    Yes, I know there were about 3,000 Australians serving under the command of the British in almost overwhelmingly non-combat roles supporting the D-Day landings.

    Come now Grigs.
    Let us be honest.
    You mean that Wikipedia knows.
    The only thing you know is this week’s Aldi specials.

  80. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    So more “history” written on beach sand?

    More “stories that my Nanna told me?”

  81. Stimpson J. Cat

    Our blokes were still up in the Islands fighting the Japs

    NumptyKat you saying “blokes” is like Malcolm Turnbull saying “fair dinkum”.
    It’s just not right.

  82. Tintarella di Luna

    The serial pooper caught with his pants down in Greenslopes – how absolutely gross and there he was white privilege and all.

  83. thefrollickingmole

    Yes I can see how the failure of D-Day would have had no effect on the war against the Japanese by freeing up massive amounts of manpower of equipment.

    What was “Germany first”?
    Rainbow -5 stipulated as its premise that the United States was engaged in war against the three Axis powers, Japan, Germany and Italy. This plan specified that American military power would be deployed against Germany and Italy as a priority even if Japan had already entered the war as their ally. Until Germany and Italy were defeated, Rainbow -5 required the United States to adopt a defensive posture in the Pacific behind lines linking Hawaii to Alaska and Panama. The Rainbow -5 war plan clearly involved abandoning everything west of Hawaii to the Japanese, including the Philippines and Australia.

    Obviously the war going badly or longer in Europe was irrelevant eh?

  84. H B Bear

    Nothing says white privilege more than taking a dump on you neighbour’s driveway.

  85. Tintarella di Luna

    Nothing says white privilege more than taking a dump on you neighbour’s driveway.

    I wonder if it was an attempted virtue signalling his indigeneity?

  86. Stimpson J. Cat

    The serial pooper caught with his pants down in Greenslopes – how absolutely gross and there he was white privilege and all.

    Yet another all too common case of ordinary citizens having to deal with Boomers sh$t.

    😁

  87. OldOzzie

    Trump Transition Team Goes to War Over Rogue FBI Agent

    The Trump transition team may demand an investigation after tens of thousands of emails were handed to the Mueller probe without consent or warrants.

    At the time, it was one of the more controversial moments of Robert Mueller’s probe: Late last year, news broke that a federal agency turned over tens of thousands of private emails of Trump transition team officials to the special counsel’s team—without a warrant, and without getting the officials’ permission.

    Now, according to communications reviewed by The Daily Beast, the transition team is fighting back. They are threatening to call for an inspector general’s investigation of the General Services Administration (GSA), which gave the emails to Mueller, and to potentially try to have officials there sanctioned by the D.C. Bar.

    The transition team also charges that the GSA is trying to cover up the involvement of controversial FBI agent Peter Strzok in the allegedly illegal seizure of their emails. A lawyer for the transition team wrote that Strzok “played a larger-than-previously known role in unlawfully seizing our client’s records.”

    The dispute is over communications that members of the transition team had over phones and laptops between Election Day and the inauguration. After the inauguration, those phones and laptops—and the communications made over them—were handed off to the GSA for safekeeping. According to the transition team communications reviewed by The Daily Beast, the GSA’s then-General Counsel Richard Beckler assured the transition team that it was merely housing the materials, and that any communications would be locked securely away from prying eyes.

    “Mr. Beckler further acknowledged that, if a third party such as the special counsel’s office were to request copies of the PTT [Presidential Transition Team] emails, TFA [Trump for America] would and should be afforded an opportunity to identify and designate privileged materials that should not be reviewed by third parties,” the letter continued.

    But that didn’t happen. Instead, when officials from Mueller’s special counsel probe asked the GSA for the materials, officials at the GSA acceded to their request, turning over tens of thousands of emails, as well as laptops and cellphones.

    And, according to transition officials, the GSA didn’t tell the transition team about it.

  88. Rae

    Stimp the Gimp.

    You’re still trying to scratch an itch. Just wash the black rubber suit more often. Make sure you dry it properly, inside and out. And sprinkle some Johnson’s Baby Powder on it. (Forget about the cancer scare).

    You got anything more brewing with Butch and Marcellus? Maybe something more personal with Quentin?

  89. Zatara

    (Bear in mind that the Americans give out decorations more freely than Anglo-Australian armies).

    Dunno about that. It took 23 year for this American to receive his medal.

    On May 2, 1968, a 12-man Special Forces patrol, which included nine Montagnard tribesmen, was surrounded by an NVA infantry battalion of about 1,000 men. Benavidez heard the radio appeal for help and boarded a helicopter to respond. Armed only with a knife, he jumped from the helicopter carrying his medical bag and ran to help the trapped patrol. At one point in the battle an NVA soldier accosted him and stabbed him with a bayonet. Benavidez pulled it out, yanked out his own knife, killed the NVA soldier and kept going, leaving his knife in the dead soldier’s body.

    Benavidez “distinguished himself by a series of daring and extremely valorous actions… and because of his gallant choice to join voluntarily his comrades who were in critical straits, to expose himself constantly to withering enemy fire, and his refusal to be stopped despite numerous severe wounds, saved the lives of at least eight men.”

    The six-hour battle left Benavidez with seven major gunshot wounds, twenty-eight shrapnel holes, and both his arms were slashed to the bone by bayonet. He had shrapnel in his head, scalp, shoulder, buttocks, feet, and legs, his right lung was destroyed, and he had lost many of his his teeth and suffered a broken jaw from being clubbed with a rifle butt. A bullet shot from an AK-47 entered his back and exited just beneath his heart.

    After the battle, he was evacuated to the base camp, examined, and thought to be dead. As he was placed in a body bag among the other dead in body bags, he was suddenly recognized by a friend who called for help. A doctor came and examined him but believed Benavidez was dead. The doctor was about to zip up the body bag when Benavidez spat in his face, alerting the doctor that he was alive.

    Yes, those Americans just give those medals away in their C-Rats.

  90. Delta A

    Has D-Day ever been very relevant to Australia?
    No.
    Never saw it mentioned here until the 40th Anniversary.

    As children we were very aware of D-Day, especially after seeing the 1956 (slightly soppy) movie.

    I remember our high school teachers talking about the battle on subsequent anniversaries. It wasn’t as big a deal as Remembrance Day, but we were certainly aware of it.

  91. Baldrick

    ‘Walking in their tracks’: How Sydney’s Aboriginal paths shaped the city

    I’m sorry but until they find an aboriginal midden on the Moon I won’t be convinced.

  92. Australia, as I said, was busy fighting the Japanese on 6 June 1944.

    At that time, the Pacific front was north of the Philippines. There was hardly any peril remaining to Australia’s north.

  93. egg_

    Brian Cox’s appeal to Authoriteh! re an airliner ‘not being a democracy’ and passengers don’t get a say – what if it’s hijacked by Green zealots who object to it running on fossil fuel (kerosene), Perfesser?

  94. Stimpson J. Cat

    Just wash the black rubber suit more often. Make sure you dry it properly, inside and out. And sprinkle some Johnson’s Baby Powder on it. (Forget about the cancer scare).

    This is incredibly specific, detailed, and rather expert sounding advice, Grigs.
    Is there something you are trying to tell us?
    😁

  95. Delta A

    I’m sorry but until they find an aboriginal midden on the Moon I won’t be convinced.

    Or the Koolyanobbing Commercial and Community Banking Corporation.

  96. cohenite

    I’m sorry but until they find an aboriginal midden on the Moon I won’t be convinced.

    They’ve been to the Moon alright; how else do you explain the absence of megafauna there.

  97. nemkat

    NumptyKat you saying “blokes” is like Malcolm Turnbull saying “fair dinkum”.

    Has Malcolm Turnbull ever said ”Fair dinkum”?
    I find it hard to believe.
    Stimpson: Are you the Poo Jogger?
    It’s okay to fess up here, you’re among friends.

  98. Stimpson J. Cat

    I’m sorry but until they find an aboriginal midden on the Moon I won’t be convinced.

    There is a reason it’s called The Dark Side of The Moon.
    Jesus Christ why do I have to be the one with common sense all the time.

  99. herodotus

    ‘I felt objectified in pageant bikini comp’
    Aussie beauty queen Tegan Martin — who placed in the top 10 at Miss Universe in the United States — said she felt “objectified” when she represented Australia in 2014 …

    It’s terrible how many women are forced to go to the beaches and be objectified on most warm summer days, particularly on weekends.

  100. thefrollickingmole

    Scenes from a certain cellar.

  101. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Yes, those Americans just give those medals away in their C-Rats.

    A policy adopted after the First World War – the American Expeditionary Force was noted for the time consuming process for awarding decorations, and they noted that there were too many cases where someone had been killed, while his decoration was still being processed.

  102. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    ‘I felt objectified in pageant bikini comp’
    Aussie beauty queen Tegan Martin — who placed in the top 10 at Miss Universe in the United States — said she felt “objectified” when she represented Australia in 2014 …

    No one would even know your name without that bikini comp.

  103. JC

    Okay, who got him started with the military tourettes?

  104. Delta A

    I felt objectified in pageant bikini comp

    She entered a beauty pageant, where the objective is to be look at, and is now a victim because people looked at her.

  105. nemkat

    And sprinkle some Johnson’s Baby Powder on it. (Forget about the cancer scare).
    I say Stimpson should be careful.
    Sure Johnson & Johnson have replaced ground up Talc with Cornflour, but I think there may be links between Corn consumption and Schizophrenia.
    Just to clarify, Stimp, is Schizophrenia what you’re claiming to suffer from this week?

  106. Eyrie

    “They’ve been to the Moon alright; how else do you explain the absence of megafauna there.”
    There is also nothing left growing there.

  107. egg_

    Aussie beauty queen Tegan Martin — who placed in the top 10 at Miss Universe in the United States — said she felt “objectified” when she represented Australia in 2014 …

    Can she spell “objectified”?

  108. stackja

    First Commercially Operated A380s to be Dismantled
    Posted on: 2018-06-06 / Categories: Special Event
    In 2007, the first Airbus A380s entered commercial service with Singapore Airlines. Now just 11 years later the first two A380s to fly paying passengers are slated to be dismantled and sold for parts. After trying unsuccessfully to find a lessee for the two aircraft, aircraft owner Dr Peters Group decided that the sum of the parts is greater than the whole.

  109. egg_

    Grig’s maintenance of @rseless wetsuits and skin suits is second to none, innit?

  110. stackja

    Miss Australia was successfully conducted for 45 years as a major fundraising medium for The Spastic Centres of Australia. Over its duration the entrants, their families, committees, sponsors and the general public of Australia raised in excess of $87 million.

    The first Australian beauty contest in 1908 was sparked by an American Newspaper claim that Miss Margaret Frey, winner of one of the first US beauty contests, must be “the most beautiful woman in the world”.

    Australians refused to concede this and set about finding a girl to answer such a challenge on behalf of local womanhood. The result was Miss Alice Buckridge who wore boots, scorned make-up and weighed 70 kilos.

    Australia’s second beauty contest was staged in 1911 at the Sydney Stadium, but the winner, Miss Millicent Mahy never got around to collecting her prize – a Venus statue valued at ₤100.

    Beauty contests were few and far between in those days and the next national competition did not take place until 1928 when Miss Beryl Mills became Miss Australia.

    It was the first to be officially named the Miss Australia Contest.

    The contest lapsed until 1953, when it was revived by Bernard J. Dowd, Managing Director of Dowd Associates, marketers in Australia of the American Hickory garments, to promote their products.

    Contestants were sourced through newspaper advertisements seeking photographs of young girls from which a panel of judges, appointed by Hickory in each state, would privately select a winner.

  111. Gab

    Good to hear from you, Macbeth. Don’t hesitate to share your memories. Ever. Yours are welcome here.

  112. Gab

    organisers of Dark Mofo are i… are displaying inverted crosses around the city (hobart)

    Say wasn’t it the Hobart new age morons that started casting spells on Trump to ensure he didn’t get elected? Or was it somewhere else?

  113. Stimpson J. Cat

    Just to clarify, Stimp, is Schizophrenia what you’re claiming to suffer from this week?

    My little Grigs.
    The differences between us are very simple, yet quite stark indeed.
    You see, I know most of the things that are wrong with me, while you believe it is perfectly normal behaviour to get kicked off a website because you are unwanted, and then to return continuously as someone else.
    Am I wrong?

  114. thefrollickingmole

    Going to be hard to judge those “beautiful baby” pageants if its based on their life achievements so far.

    What they are in essence announcing is it will become a “most beautiful facial features” pageant instead.

    Time to bring out a joke that nearly got me kicked out of bed by my ex.

    Once upon a time there was a man who never got married.
    And he lived happily ever after…

  115. egg_

    “They’ve been to the Moon alright; how else do you explain the absence of megafauna there.”
    There is also nothing left growing there.

    Things were really cooking, until the oxygen ran out.

  116. Rae

    Australia, as I said, was busy fighting the Japanese on 6 June 1944.

    At that time, the Pacific front was north of the Philippines. There was hardly any peril remaining to Australia’s north.

    Sure, Dover. Guess we can forget about Australias New Guinea Campaign against the Japanese, that continued from 1942 until the end of the War in 1945.

    All good then.

  117. Delta A

    Another excellent post from you at 4.44 pm, stackja. Next major milepost in that history would surely be the lovely Tania Verstak who took the prize in 1961, then went on to win Miss International.

  118. Baldrick

    The next Trump Derangement Syndrome scandal …

    Trump takes water off the table. Mike Pence follows.

    You just know Leftards are going to find some collusion here.

  119. Bruce of Newcastle

    There is a reason it’s called The Dark Side of The Moon.

    The Moon doesn’t have a dark side Stimpy, only a dark bottom.

    Over the past year, scientists have found more and more convincing evidence that the moon, once thought desert dry, holds significant amounts of water ice within the deep, eternally dark craters near the south pole.

    Don’t go near those craters. You never know what might come out of them.

  120. Stimpson J. Cat

    Sure, Dover. Guess we can forget about Australias New Guinea Campaign against the Japanese, that continued from 1942 until the end of the War in 1945.

    What does P have to say on the matter?
    She was there, after all.

  121. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Once upon a time there was a man who never got married.
    And he lived happily ever after…

    I know a bloke who worked out how to play his wedding videos backward.

    He says the thrill he gets, watching himself walk out of the church, a free man, is indescribable.

  122. stackja

    Delta A
    #2730737, posted on June 7, 2018 at 4:52 pm
    Another excellent post from you at 4.44 pm, stackja. Next major milepost in that history would surely be the lovely Tania Verstak who took the prize in 1961, then went on to win Miss International.

    Thank you.

  123. Baldrick

    Going to be hard to judge those “beautiful baby” pageants if its based on their life achievements so far.

    Next year’s Miss America pageant is shaping up to be a hoot.

  124. Eyrie

    “Don’t go near those craters. You never know what might come out of them.”
    Yeah, look what happened to the guys on Apollo 18.

  125. Harlequin Decline

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2730739, posted on June 7, 2018 at 4:53 pm
    There is a reason it’s called The Dark Side of The Moon.

    Don’t go near those craters. You never know what might come out of them.

    Very true.

  126. Stimpson J. Cat

    Don’t go near those craters. You never know what might come out of them.

    I do actually Bruce.
    Dust and rocks and ice, obviously.

  127. Delta A

    Next year’s Miss America pageant is shaping up to be a hoot.

    Where was the warning, Baldy?

    You’re getting as bad as C.L. with this site bombing.

  128. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    ‘I felt objectified in pageant bikini comp’
    Aussie beauty queen Tegan Martin — who placed in the top 10 at Miss Universe in the United States — said she felt “objectified” when she represented Australia in 2014 …

    She felt objectified… by herself I guess:

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bi-c7JOhzas/?hl=en&taken-by=tegan.martin

  129. Rae

    Sure Johnson & Johnson have replaced ground up Talc with Cornflour, but I think there may be links between Corn consumption and Schizophrenia.

    Aha. Hard to tell what your tongue was doing behind that zipper, Stimp the Gimp. But there, surely, is the reason for your frantically bulging eye rolls when you were waiting for Butch to get his hands on you. And here was I thought it was real acting on your part. Maybe you didn’t deserve a Best Australian Gimp in Pulp Fiction after all.

  130. old bloke

    Turnip
    #2730300, posted on June 7, 2018 at 8:00 am

    Mobile network advice please. I use my mobile data heavily and have A 50g monthly allowance on Optus but reception is generally rubbish. Call dropouts, slow speeds, etc
    Vodafone now have a sort of unlimited plan (shaped after a point) but what is the network like? Are they all rubbish? Not paying the premium for Telstra.

    Vodaphone were piggy-backing off Optus infrastructure (towers, etc.) as a wholesale reseller, I don’t know if that’s still the case. If so, and if you’re in a poor Optus reception area, I wouldn’t expect any improvement with Vodaphone.

  131. Aha. Hard to tell what your tongue was doing behind that zipper, Stimp the Gimp. But there, surely, is the reason for your frantically bulging eye rolls when you were waiting for Butch to get his hands on you.

    Put down the crackpipe and move away from the keyboard.

  132. Boambee John

    From the Mocker article.

    Not surprisingly, the bio of Shaw’s Twitter account proudly declares she is a “Wannabe social justice crusader”.

    She needs to get properly woke. Crusader is a trigger word to many on the Social “Justice” scene.

  133. Nick

    Walking in their tracks’: How Sydney’s Aboriginal paths shaped the city

    I heard one indigine intoning about how earlier Aborigines had once walked a track that is where Oxford St now runs. Quite an achievement that /sarc.

  134. Senile Old Guy

    Australia, as I said, was busy fighting the Japanese on 6 June 1944.

    At that time, the Pacific front was north of the Philippines. There was hardly any peril remaining to Australia’s north.

    According to Tom Lewis (The Empire Strikes South), the last Japanese air attack was 20 July 1944. It was doing reconnaissance.

  135. DrBeauGan

    I use Vodafone. Works well.

  136. stackja

    old bloke
    #2730755, posted on June 7, 2018 at 5:09 pm
    Turnip
    #2730300, posted on June 7, 2018 at 8:00 am

    Mobile network advice please. I use my mobile data heavily and have A 50g monthly allowance on Optus but reception is generally rubbish. Call dropouts, slow speeds, etc
    Vodafone now have a sort of unlimited plan (shaped after a point) but what is the network like? Are they all rubbish? Not paying the premium for Telstra.

    Vodaphone were piggy-backing off Optus infrastructure (towers, etc.) as a wholesale reseller, I don’t know if that’s still the case. If so, and if you’re in a poor Optus reception area, I wouldn’t expect any improvement with Vodaphone.

    See whirlpool forum May 2018

  137. Nick

    Septimus?

    A manager for a major aged-care provider has resigned after being outed as a serial public defecator by vigilant neighbours.

  138. Stimpson J. Cat

    Grigs do you ever actually read what you type before you post it?
    Maybe try it sometime.
    You seem…….confused.
    Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

  139. egg_

    Vodaphone were piggy-backing off Optus infrastructure (towers, etc.) as a wholesale reseller, I don’t know if that’s still the case.

    Not for some years, I believe.

    Vodafone to build more mobile towers in regional Australia

  140. Stimpson J. Cat

    Honestly Grigs, I would hate for you to become the kind of person that eavesdrops on a private conversation between nurses about cannibalism.
    I’m just trying to help you.
    Don’t become that guy.

  141. Delta A

    To Farmer Gez and 132andBush (and all other Cat farmers) who have finished sowing and are now waiting for this predicted rain burst, I hope it buckets down for you… and continues to do so at advantageous intervals. Please keep us posted.

    Here at Halls Gap (we’ve been here for three weeks now) we have had only a few rainy days, the gloominess frowning down at as from the surrounding mountains, daring us to venture outdoors.

    I love dramatic weather and we’ve had it all this trip – including snow! On the road again tomorrow.

    I love retirement! 🙂

  142. Tel

    Vodafone now have a sort of unlimited plan (shaped after a point) but what is the network like? Are they all rubbish? Not paying the premium for Telstra.

    I get very good results on Vodaphone in some areas, and crap results in other areas (even when signal strength isn’t significantly different). Fortunately the good areas cover most of the places I go, so I stick with it. Telstra does tend to be better, but as you say it’s a premium service at a premium price, depending on how bad you want it and how far you travel.

    Suggest you get a pre-paid SIM and give it a try, don’t sign up for a plan, and then you can abandon the option fairly cheaply.

  143. Rae

    Septimus?

    A manager for a major aged-care provider has resigned after being outed as a serial public defecator by vigilant neighbours.

    Bit young at 64? Septimus was here a few months back celebrating his 50th Wedding Anniversary.

    [Not to self: Look up Septimus in the Cat archives]

  144. H B Bear

    She felt objectified… by herself I guess:

    I’m guessing Tegan doesn’t do self awareness.

  145. H B Bear

    Bit early for Sock hour Graeoogs. Give it another 45 minutes.

  146. Gab

    She felt objectified

    You’ve got tickets on yourself, love. No one was looking at you. They were looking past you.

  147. egg_

    Septimus was here a few months back celebrating his 50th Wedding Anniversary.

    Whereas Grigs claimed to be in his early 50s IIRC.

  148. Spider

    Van Badham on The Drum. Holy shit. I almost threw my remote at the screen. Is she the most annoying doctrinaire person who has ever fronted a microphone.

    We hear from her that she has had an insecure work history. I wonder why?????

  149. dopey

    Where’s the evidence against the public defecator?

  150. Spider

    Mind you Dr Hannah McGlade from Curtin University on The Drum telling the most outrageous falsehoods linking Darwin to aboriginal massacres comes close

  151. Snoopy

    Sure, Dover. Guess we can forget about Australias New Guinea Campaign against the Japanese, that continued from 1942 until the end of the War in 1945.

    All good then.

    After the the late 1943 battles which ensured Port Moresby’s safety it was became completely unnecessary campaign which cost hundreds of Australian lives for no benefit to the outcome of the war.

  152. Harlequin Decline

    Mobile network advice please.

    Regarding coverage you get what you pay on average. Telstra has the best overall coverage, Optus next then Vodafone. Vodafone is the cheapest, Optus next cheapest and Telstra the most expensive.

    Voda and Optus had a sharing deal for a number of sites( not all) so their coverage was the same in a number of places and quite different in others. In certain areas of the country special sites were put in by various carriers for minesites, corporate requirements and State Government initiatives to improve coverage. To add to this there are spurious areas of coverage resulting from carriers tuning their network and consequent spillover coverage.

    Hence across the Nullarbor Telstra provides the only coverage but up in the Kimberley at one remote place surprisingly Optus has the only coverage. Even more surprisingly out west from Glenn Innes in a couple of places Voda has the only coverage.

    Since coverage may vary from place to place the recommendation from an earlier poster- buying the cheapest prepaid sim and trying out the carriers before deciding is the best option.

  153. Nick

    What would Rae care about Septimus being accused as being a phantom crapper? Oh, hang on..

  154. Delta A

    Suggest you get a pre-paid SIM and give it a try, don’t sign up for a plan, and then you can abandon the option fairly cheaply.

    Agree. And check out Aldi Mobile. It uses Telstra network and so has excellent coverage.

    We pay $15.00 per month for unlimited standard calls, unlimited standard SMS and 1.5G standard data. For $55.00 (top plan) you get all of the above plus unlimited calls to 15 countries plus 22GB data. Plus more options.

    Check out their website.

  155. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    After the the late 1943 battles which ensured Port Moresby’s safety it was became completely unnecessary campaign which cost hundreds of Australian lives for no benefit to the outcome of the war.

    Those campaigns were fought purely for political purposes – to ensure Australia a place at any post war peace negotiations.

  156. nemkat

    After the the late 1943 battles which ensured Port Moresby’s safety it was became completely unnecessary campaign which cost hundreds of Australian lives for no benefit to the outcome of the war.

    Those campaigns were fought purely for political purposes – to ensure Australia a place at any post war peace negotiations.
    That may, or may not, be true.
    The issue is how relevant D-Day 12,000 mies away was, when we had tens of thousands of blokes up in the Islands fighting the Japs.
    Answer: Not relevant.

  157. The issue is how relevant D-Day 12,000 mies away was, when we had tens of thousands of blokes up in the Islands fighting the Japs.
    Answer: Not relevant.

    Yes, the most pivotal theatre of the war to our major allies is ‘not relevant’.

  158. Stimpson J. Cat

    The issue is how relevant D-Day 12,000 mies away was, when we had tens of thousands of blokes up in the Islands fighting the Japs.

    See, you did it again.
    It just sounds fake when you say it, like you are trying too hard.
    Sorry Grigs.

  159. Rae

    What would Rae care about Septimus being accused as being a phantom crapper? Oh, hang on..

    Rae … that’s me … cares to the extent of pointing out that you are likely wrong about the one who fascinates you so. Not really different to me pointing out that someone is wrong about anything else (see Dover upthread).

    As I said: I must look up Septimus in the Cat archives. There is surely some reason for your continued fascination with him.

  160. Rockdoctor

    Harlequin Decline
    #2730785, posted on June 7, 2018 at 5:40 pm

    Same Bowen Basin in places hence why I run dual sim. Had Optus service when I did a project at Ellensfield near Moranbah but no Telstra service.

  161. thefrollickingmole

    Troll again makes dumb oppositional statement with no factual backing then runs off to mummie to squeal with delight
    “Someone responded to me, see mummie Im not the pissant failure you always said I was”.

    But mummie stays silent, what can he do to hear he voice of approval?
    He knows, another fact free oppositional statement which might invite a response.
    He rushes back to the keyboard, ignoring the whimpering in the cellar from the next skin suit donor….

    ignore the troll, it hurts it more.

  162. Tel

    Yes, the most pivotal theatre of the war to our major allies is ‘not relevant’.

    At the time we were British, so it was not our major allies, it was us.

  163. Atoms for Peace

    Frockling. The trolls’ mum just breaks out VIPoo when the sock comes a slithering.

  164. I’m starting to think Rae is Steve of Brisbane.

  165. thefrollickingmole

    Naughty word used…

    Stimpson J. Cat

    The invisible head job [email protected]*ist strikes again….

  166. Stimpson J. Cat

    Ben Shapiro
    @benshapiro
    If you mocked Obama for bringing in George Clooney to talk Middle East policy and you’re celebrating Trump for bringing in Kim Kardashian to talk prison reform, you’re doing it wrong.

  167. nemkat

    Yes, the most pivotal theatre of the war to our major allies is ‘not relevant’.
    This was the most pivotal theatre of the War at the time of D-Day:
    Summer 1944
    Main articles: Crimean Offensive (1944), Operation Bagration, Lvov–Sandomierz Offensive, Battle of Tannenberg Line, Warsaw Uprising, Slovak National Uprising, Battle of Romania (1944), Battle of Debrecen, and Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive.
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Front_%28World_War_II%29

    Was it relevant in Australia?
    No, we had blokes up in New Guinea and the Islands fighting the Japs.

  168. Stimpson J. Cat

    It gets worse Stimp

    Oh no you don’t.
    I am not following that link you evil b$stard.

  169. nemkat

    This was the most pivotal theatre of the War at the time of D-Day:
    Summer 1944
    Main articles: Crimean Offensive (1944), Operation Bagration, Lvov–Sandomierz Offensive, Battle of Tannenberg Line, Warsaw Uprising, Slovak National Uprising, Battle of Romania (1944), Battle of Debrecen, and Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive.
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Front_%28World_War_II%29

    Was it relevant in Australia?
    No, we had blokes up in New Guinea and the Islands fighting the Japs.

  170. thefrollickingmole

    Has anyone pointed out to little Ben that unlike Obama Trump actually delivered after his celebrity visit?

    A felon a week pardoned and Trump could unscrew 1/2 the “black” vote from the Dems.

  171. Top Ender

    At that time, the Pacific front was north of the Philippines. There was hardly any peril remaining to Australia’s north.

    Last enemy aircraft shot down over the NT: 12 June 2944.

    Last enemy aircraft shot down over Australia: 20 July 1944, in northern WA.

    Both “Dinah” high speed and altitude recon aircraft. Both lost with their two man crews.

    Source: The Empire Strikes South, page 199, appendix summary of descriptions of the incidents.

  172. H B Bear

    It’s hillarious. DO IT!

  173. nemkat

    This was the most pivotal theatre of the War at the time of D-Day:
    Summer 1944
    Crimean Offensive (1944), Operation Bagration, Lvov–Sandomierz Offensive, Battle of Tannenberg Line, Warsaw Uprising, Slovak National Uprising, Battle of Romania (1944), Battle of Debrecen, and Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive.

    Was it relevant in Australia?
    No, we had blokes up in New Guinea and the Islands fighting the Japs.

  174. Roger

    14 Australians killed on D-Day, 2 sailors & 12 airmen.

  175. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    My little Grigs.
    The differences between us are very simple, yet quite stark indeed.
    You see, I know most of the things that are wrong with me, while you believe it is perfectly normal behaviour to get kicked off a website because you are unwanted, and then to return continuously as someone else.
    Am I wrong?

    You are too kind Stimps, tell the bugman to f*ck off and go back to his Cock Hero.

  176. Rae

    Yes, the most pivotal theatre of the war to our major allies is ‘not relevant’.

    At the time we were British, so it was not our major allies, it was us.

    Please try not to make Dover any more confused than he already is.

  177. Snoopy

    Is Ben Shapiro the Gen Y Paul Ryan?

  178. Snoopy

    Source: The Empire Strikes South, page 199, appendix summary of descriptions of the incidents.

    How reliable is that source? 😀

  179. OWG;
    I had a look at the link you provided and – sorry – none of those women were beautiful. One was pretty, only a couple were attractive, none made me sit up and say hubba hubba.
    Bloody tragic.
    Mate…

  180. Nick

    The Greens:
    We want Open Borders
    We protest against raising the wall of Warragamba Dam as a means of increasing its supply and saving thousands of homes in its path.

  181. C.L.

    Paul Irish, author of Hidden in Plain View, the Aboriginal people of Coastal Sydney, said while the evidence was “pretty sparse”, “we can infer it in other ways because we know that there were networks of Aboriginal pathways around Sydney”.

    “We know that often Aboriginal people were traversing the landscape using ridge lines and other areas or pathways to get between camp sites, to access resources or perhaps ceremonial places,” Dr Irish said.

    So then: there is no evidence whatsoever that Sydney Town was laid out according to existing Aboriginal tracks but Dr Irish concludes it must have been because Aborigines used to walk.

  182. Stimpson J. Cat

    You are too kind Stimps, tell the bugman to f*ck off and go back to his Cock Hero.

    I can’t help it.
    I see those poor unfortunate souls unable to interact with normal humanity and my heart cries out to help them.
    It’s my kindly heart.
    It’s as big as Baldricks after the operation.
    We are both just really kind people.

    😁

  183. Rae

    I’m starting to think

    An evidence-free statement.

    Rae is Steve of Brisbane.

    No. Others have suggested so before. They too were wrong.

  184. Infidel Tiger

    Is Ben Shapiro the Gen Y Paul Ryan?

    Ben’s the Hall Monitor for the right wing.

    No wonder he was badly bullied at school.

  185. Top Ender

    Just for interest here is a summary of enemy aircraft brought down over northern Oz in 1943:

    Feb: 1 x Dinah

    Mar: 2 x Zero; 1 x Dinah

    Apr: 1 x Jake

    May: 3 x Zero; 1 x Jake; 4 x Betty

    Jun: 2 x Helen; 1 x Oscar; 1 x Betty

    Jul: 1 x Jake; 1 x Rufe; 1 x Betty; 1 x Dinah

    Aug: 1 x Jake; 1 x Rufe; 4 x Dinah

    Sep: 1 x Zero

    Nov: 1 x Betty

    All crews died in the crashes. The Bettys were big bombers with crews usually of 7-8.

    Same source – all based on Japanese records, Tokyo.

  186. Stimpson J. Cat

    Is Ben Shapiro the Gen Y Paul Ryan?

    Ben Shapiro doesn’t care about the Black vote, only the J$wish vote.
    True Story!

  187. Infidel Tiger

    I’m starting to think Rae is Steve of Brisbane.

    C’mon. I knew Steve. Steve and I are friends. Rae is no Steve.

    There’s more than one idiot on the internet fellas.

  188. Oh no you don’t.
    I am not following that link you evil b$stard.

    It’s Ok

    It’s just Mangina Prime Minister Justin Beiber girly kicking a balloon.

  189. egg_

    Gary Marks copping it from both frightbats* simultaneously on Teh Dumb but pressing on well.

    *Van Badass and Hannah McGlade.

  190. Lizzie;

    Dismissed in five years, in ten years, or will it take twenty years?
    Or will ‘climate change’ – the most pernicious of the lefty lies – never die?

    Do you remember ‘Earthsicle’? You know, snowball earth? Glaciers in Honolulu, five mile thick snow slabs over New York?
    I forgot what it was about, but it was for real if we didn’t do what the Lefties demanded we do – for the planets sake.

  191. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    A POTENTIAL cure for cancer may have been found in the US after a woman suffering from an “incurable” breast cancer that had spread to some of her organs was cured of the killer illness.

    Judy Perkins, 52, had received a number of failed treatments when she joined a study trialling a new kind of therapy.

    The new treatment finds T-cells that are successfully killing the patient’s tumours and manufactures billions of clones in the laboratory. Doctors then drain the defective white blood cells and inject the patient with the new super clones.

    Ms Perkins had 62 mutations in her tumour cells. But after receiving the new treatment, her cancer – which had resisted chemotherapy and hormonal therapy – was annihilated.

  192. Herodotus

    There may be an argument for saying that roads followed cart tracks and that later the roads for cars stayed on much the same alignment – until the volume and speed increased to such an extent that a complete rebuild became necessary.
    Walking trails? Fuggedaboudit.

  193. Senile Old Guy

    Source: The Empire Strikes South, page 199, appendix summary of descriptions of the incidents.

    Already posted up thread, TE. I have a copy and read it with interest. Also have”A war at home”, which I find interesting because of the many illustrations. Both recommended to those with an interest in such things.

  194. Top Ender

    Hi Snoopy. The records are quite accurate. The Japanese kept good lists, just like the Romans. Even records such as aircraft carrier deck logs can be found.

    They are called by the term “kodochosho”; that is, the record of the Japanese imperial forces in WWII. They are open to research scholars in the National Institute for Defence Studies, Tokyo. Of course, they have to be translated.

  195. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    https://www.change.org/p/immigration-minister-peter-dutton-our-rapists-need-to-leave/d?source_location=combo_psf

    Tegan Wagner is an incredibly gutsy lady, who was raped by a gang of Pakistan brothers in the early 2000’s. They made a mockery out of the courts and the legal processes. One of them gets out of gaol today, and she’s arguing they should be deported.

  196. Senile Old Guy

    Do you remember ‘Earthsicle’? You know, snowball earth? Glaciers in Honolulu, five mile thick snow slabs over New York?

    Yes: massive global cooling caused by pollution:

    The story observed – accurately – that there had been a gradual decrease in global average temperatures from about 1940, now believed to be a consequence of soot and aerosols that offered a partial shield to the earth as well as the gradual retreat of an abnormally warm interlude.

    Alarmists now like to claim that it was not really a big story but I remember it and it was a fairly big thing and would have been bigger if the internet existed then. Having said that, air pollution back then was a bit of an issue in bigger cities.

  197. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    THE NATION
    Tegan Wagner says freed gang r#pist should be sent to home country

    The Australian
    6:32PM June 7, 2018
    Save
    Rhian Deutrom
    Reporter
    Sydney
    @Rhi_lani

    One of the victims of a gang of Sydney r#pists has launched a campaign to reform immigration laws that would see foreign-born Australians, with dual citizenship, sent back to their home country after committing violent sexual offences.

    It comes as one of her attackers, known only as MMK, was released from prison this afternoon.

    Tegan Wagner, 30, was sexually assaulted by three Pakistani-born brothers, including MMK, at a house party in Sydney’s inner-west in July, 2002.

    In a conference room in Sydney this afternoon Ms Wagner was shown footage, captured by Channel Seven, of MMK walking from prison in a grey shirt, cargo pants and bright red Nike shoes.

    She stared intently at the footage in an attempt to recall all the features of her attacker, now 16 years older.

    “I’m trying to pick out all of those features because I need to remember what he looks like,” she said. “I’ll be ready for him now that he is out”.

    The three brothers secured Australian citizenship when they were minors, after emigrating from Pakistan, and formed a gang which was responsible for a series of sexual attacks on young girls in Ashfield over a six-month period that year.

    Ms Wagner was one of the gang’s first victims and told The Australian her brutal ordeal began after she shared her first kiss with one of the brothers.

    “One of them kissed me, it was my first kiss ever. So I didn’t want to be doing it but I was still curious as I had never kissed a boy before,” she said.

    “But when I tried to stop kissing him and draw the line, that’s when I was pushed into further activity.”

    From the Oz. These ar$ewipes treated the whole court and justice system as a joke – they played the poor, persecuted picked on Muslim card at every chance.

  198. Mother Lode

    Praise the Lord!

    (Waffleworth, that is)

    The SMH is honoured to advise that the Australian economy is bucking world trends and performing stupendously!

    Consumer spending is essentially stagnant, but exports are growing.

    (Doesn’t that mean other economies are doing the growing for us?)

    Whatever!

    Praise the Lord!

  199. calli

    “We know that often Aboriginal people were traversing the landscape using ridge lines and other areas or pathways to get between camp sites, to access resources or perhaps ceremonial places,” Dr Irish said.

    In other words, the tracks were the most efficient way to get from Point A to Point B.

    Remarkable.

    Even more remarkable that stupid, non juju whitey thought the same.

  200. Eyrie;

    “Could Australia be anything but better off were it to use a Big Chainsaw to cut a circle 50km in radius from each GPO, and use tugboats to tow away the resulting islands, mooring them to Japan or somewhere.”
    What’s wrong with nuclear weapons?

    It’s a valid point you raise, esteemed one.
    I have a personal liking for the Larry Niven ‘Slaver Disintegrator.’
    Point it at Canberra and it blows apart in a cloud of monatomic dust. Same for all the targets you want to dispose of safely, cleanly and with a mineable residue.
    And just think of the water storage and waterfront ares you could create!
    Watch out for the side effects of tearing apart a couple of thousand cubic meters of water, but.

  201. old bloke

    egg_
    #2730768, posted on June 7, 2018 at 5:25 pm

    Not for some years, I believe.

    Thanks egg.

  202. calli

    Tegan Wagner is a very courageous young woman.

    Her attacker makes pond scum look noble.

  203. C.L.

    There may be an argument for saying that roads followed cart tracks and that later the roads for cars stayed on much the same alignment – until the volume and speed increased to such an extent that a complete rebuild became necessary.

    See Waterworks Rd in Brisbane. Basically an old dray track become modern road.

  204. nemkat

    From the Oz. These ar$ewipes treated the whole court and justice system as a joke – they played the poor, persecuted picked on Muslim card at every chance.

    Yeah, but what about the 14 year old girl at a house party with 3 Pakistanis?
    Who is she to be giving advice on right and wrong?

  205. C.L.

    Tegan Wagner says freed gang r#pist should be sent to home country

    Or just Pinochet him from a helicopter.

  206. Snoopy

    In other words, the tracks were the most efficient way to get from Point A to Point B.

    Remarkable.

    Even more remarkable that stupid, non juju whitey thought the same.

    Exactly.

  207. Roger

    Tegan Wagner says freed gang r#pist should be sent to home country

    Should be but can’t be unless for fraud in relation to obtaining citizenship or if he – and his brothers – were not citizens when convicted (which appears not to be the case in this instance).

    Law reform required – over to you, Peter Dutton. It could be called Tegan’s Law.

  208. wivenhoe

    In other words, the tracks were the most efficient way to get from Point A to Point B.

    Of course it was, the easiest way from Point Piper to Bondi beach is to take the short cut up over the Blue Mountains, Everyone knows this, just ask Stimpy.

  209. Entropy

    Agree. And check out Aldi Mobile. It uses Telstra network and so has excellent coverage.

    Work phone on Telstra, family phones on ALDI. While ALDI is a Telstra MNVO, it doesn’t have the same speed or quite the same coverage if you go bush. But the price is right.
    I think Boost might be the only 4GX Telstra MNVO, not sure about coverage.

  210. Boambee John

    SOG

    The BBC put on a TV series and companion book on the theme The Weather Machine and the Threat of Ice. All copies have probably been “disappeared” by now, like Their ABC’s records of the p’ph1le interview in the mid 1970s.

    The series concluded that cold was a far greater threat than heat, and recommended raising atmospheric carbon dioxide to increase the temperature, even if some sea level rise and coastal flooding resulted.

    They wouldn’t like a replay of that series up them!

  211. Snoopy

    When will Isaac el Matari get a gig on Q&A?

  212. stackja

    Roger
    #2730873, posted on June 7, 2018 at 7:12 pm

    ALP/Greens like law as is.

  213. Snoopy

    Hey wivenhoe, do you ever get into Brisbane? The Whistle Stop?

  214. John Constantine

    Their left know that it isn’t ‘rape’ rape if it is a revolutionary act of decolonialisation theory, striking at the racist oppressor settler class.

    Can’t steal from a racist settler thief and you can’t rape a racist settler slut. Even ‘Women Against Rape in War’ have shut down because they can’t protest against revolutionary raping.

    Can’t have a revolution without raping a few eggs.

    Comrades.

  215. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    From the Oz. These ar$ewipes treated the whole court and justice system as a joke – they played the poor, persecuted picked on Muslim card at every chance.

    “Finally, in one shining example of how the legal system can respond to elements of a problem, but rarely the whole, the K family which had scarred so many lives almost since the day it arrived, had cost the Australian taxpayer millions of dollars, and would cost Australia more for years to come – was rewarded by the Australian Government.

    In July 2005, as Junior was giving evidence in court – ludicrous, patently false evidence – and as four other brothers sat, in prison, convicted of gang r#pe and the eldest two faced further r#pe convictions, their mother, Mrs SNK, and the eighth K child, yet another son, arrived in Sydney. They had been granted residency status in Australia.”

    Paul Sheehan “Girls Like You”, page 359. Over to you, Mr Dutton. As Roger suggests, it could be called “Tegan’s Law.”

  216. John Constantine

    The future for the revolutionary activist decolonialists that have done a bit of jail for violently acting to overthrow racism does seem to tend towards going onto the disability pension for life, traveling overseas and marrying a cousin, then returning to Australia to demand the best of taxpayer services for the tribe of kids you pump out.

    Their revolution is subsidised.

    Comrades.

  217. rickw

    Julie Bishop appears to have discovered The Pacific, on a whirlwind tour around Micronesia and The Marshall Islands my sources tell me.

  218. calli

    Perhaps she’ll find some unfussy canibals.

  219. Gab

    Perhaps she’ll find someone to give our tax dollars too. I know, I know, she’s not very good at giving away billions of taxpayers’ money, but I’m sure she’ll give it a red hot go.

  220. rickw

    Perhaps she’ll find some unfussy canibals.

    Not even good for soup is the word.

  221. Death Giraffe

    Someone tell I Am Spastic to cut down on the number and frequency of posts.
    Give your arse a chance, Spoofheadicus*.
    🙂
    [*Smiley face inserted to avoid offence]

  222. nemkat

    Read recently that the Turnbull Government have been steadily reducing the DSP rolls, as opposed to the Abbott Government, which spent 2 years talking about it.

  223. Baldrick

    Perhaps she’ll find someone to give our tax dollars too. I know, I know, she’s not very good at giving away billions of taxpayers’ money, but I’m sure she’ll give it a red hot go.

    Almost $8 million to be exact.

  224. calli

    Bone broth is popular. Hipster canibals.

  225. cohenite

    Australia is officially bizario world. Clive Hamilton being interviewed by ben fordham on the bolt report about his new book and Chinese meddling in Australia; apparently clive’s first publisher was scared off by Chinese interference which clive says is ironic because his book is about Chinese interference and how can we maintain a democratic freedom of expression in such circumstances. This is the same clive Hamilton who called for democracy to be suspended to combat globalls warming.

  226. Death Giraffe

    Can’t have a revolution without raping a few eggs.

    ..
    Watch your ass, Egg.

  227. calli

    cannibals

    So hungry they ate the ‘n’.

  228. Dave in Marybrook

    Tell him yourself, Death Giraffe.
    Is that what someone is meant to say in response?
    … you are trolling, aren’t you?

  229. old bloke

    Rockdoctor
    #2730797, posted on June 7, 2018 at 6:01 pm

    Same Bowen Basin in places hence why I run dual sim.

    I tried a dim sim once, no ongoing costs but it made a mess in my phone (coverage was pretty poor too).

  230. Death Giraffe

    Snoopy
    #2730854, posted on June 7, 2018 at 6:48 pm
    I’m teasing, TE.

    ..
    Online, no one can hear you’re teasing.
    (unless you insert smiley face).
    The last thing we want is another bunch of cats threatening to beat the shit out of each other in real life.

  231. Death Giraffe

    Dave in Marybrook
    #2730904, posted on June 7, 2018 at 7:48 pm
    Tell him yourself, Death Giraffe.

    ..
    Oh no.
    The smiley faces don’t work.

  232. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Tegan Wagner is a very courageous young woman.

    She gave up her right to anonymity, while the “K” family all had their names suppressed by the court.

  233. nemkat

    Further to that, I heard about a Pakistani woman with 11 kids who was given a Housing Qld. house in Runcorn.
    About a month later, a kitchen fire caused major damage, so they moved them to another large house that had become vacant.
    Soon, another kitchen fire destroyed that house.
    Housing Qld. then helped the family into private accomodation. After about a month, they were evicted.
    Don’t know what the Qld Gov’t are doing for them now, but the house at Runcorn was purchased by the Dept. to house them for around 670K, and the cost of repairs was about 240K, the cost of building a large house.

  234. Roger

    ANU VC Brian Schmidt on 7:30 says universities take a critical approach to every subject.

    I wonder if their Islamic Studies department applies a critical hermeneutic to the Quran?

    Perhaps they do, but I doubt it given some of their major funding sources.

  235. Rockdoctor

    old bloke
    #2730905, posted on June 7, 2018 at 7:50 pm

    Pre paid makes it worthwhile these days…

  236. Bruce of Newcastle

    ANU VC Brian Schmidt on 7:30 says universities take a critical approach to every subject.

    Quite so. If you disagree with leftist orthodoxy they go critical and nuke you. Just ask Peter Ridd.

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