Open Forum: June 9, 2018

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1,502 Responses to Open Forum: June 9, 2018

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  1. Infidel Tiger

    James Gleick
    @JamesGleick

    I was on a panel with Anthony Bourdain in Sydney ten years after 9/11 when a questioner asked us whether the attacks weren’t our (Americans’) own fault. While I mulled my answer, he replied: “Fuck you, and fuck the horse you rode in on.”

  2. squawkbox

    RIP Anthony Bourdain – totally f**d up junky chef, like a culinary Hunter Thompson. Didn’t he marry some MMA bimbo and was then totally surprised when he found out she was bonking her totally ripped trainers rather than his wrinkly old middle-aged carcase? Always entertaining though.

  3. Zyconoclast

    Lewis Hamilton goes full homo.
    He is free to give his 2017 earnings of $51M to women and poor white men any time he wants.

    Lewis Hamilton says society is “still in the stone age” when it comes to issues such as women’s pay rights and racial equality in sport.
    https://www.bbc.com/sport/formula1/44404995

  4. Well, at least it wasn’t Nigella.

  5. Baldrick

    Kate Spade yesterday, Anthony Bourdain today.
    Looks like Killary’s doing a bit of house cleaning.

  6. Pete of Perth

    More comments than a Q&A conservatives

  7. Pete of Perth

    .. conservative

  8. None

    Anthony Bourdain’s girlfriend too interested in hetself.
    Note the time date https://mobile.twitter.com/AsiaArgento/status/1005011494063534080
    (she RT’d something after this too)
    Note the time date on this (photo vs tweet)
    https://mobile.twitter.com/AsiaArgento/status/1005116310366269440
    You are saying, JC?

  9. Mark A

    None
    #2731871, posted on June 9, 2018 at 2:41 am

    Anthony Bourdain’s girlfriend too interested in hetself.
    Note the time date https://mobile.twitter.com/AsiaArgento/status/1005011494063534080
    (she RT’d something after this too)
    Note the time date on this (photo vs tweet)
    https://mobile.twitter.com/AsiaArgento/status/1005116310366269440
    You are saying, JC?

    Not a good look.
    As Stimpy says, “wamen”, all the bl…y time”

  10. brennan

    Having to get up early for work has it’s side benefits sometimes.

    A question if I may, for all Cats, especially those with a military service background. I need some great boots to hike and eventually run in and would rather the advice of those that have spent a lot of time in theirs, rather than some spotty git saleshack. What would you spend your money on? I’m looking for the quality, endurance and cost balance as I’m not rich but don’t want to buy junk.

    After a long illness, it’s been suggested by the Docs that I get really fit again as it may help. It certainly won’t hurt. And I really don’t want to see the inside of Westmead again for as long as possible, no matter how well the staff, especially the nurses, have treated me.

  11. johanna

    Anthony Bourdain was a luvvie in faux rebel clothing. He trashed Trump at every opportunity to stay friends with New York hipsters.

    Early reports are that he topped himself, unconfirmed.

  12. None

    Just an extract about the disgusting abusive filth that is the Australuan arts scene in today’s Oz:

    It’s easy enough to see why people might have envied the Lilley girls. Rozanna and Kate, daughters of celebrated playwright Dorothy Hewett and merchant seaman turned author Merv Lilley, spent their adol­escence and early teenage years at the heart of the 1970s bohemian arts scene — meeting the famous and feted at parties, rehearsals and film shoots; winning roles in high-profile films or radio plays with which their mother or her associates were involved.

    Swaggering, starry identities — among them Brett Whiteley, Patrick White, Martin Sharp, Bob Ellis and British photographer David ­Hamilton — passed through the girls’ lives; many illustrious names from the theatre, film, literary and visual art worlds were frequent visit­ors to the family terrace in Woollahra in Sydney’s east.

    Rozanna, now a 55-year-old anthropologist, author and autism researcher, characterises the Lilley family’s home as a “party house”. Her older sister Kate, 57, a poet and associate professor of English at the University of ­Sydney, is far more blunt. “It was just — as an acquaintance says — like a brothel without payment.”

    Four decades on, these daughters of true ­believers say they were casualties of a predatory sexual code within the 70s libertarian arts ­culture that saw underage and teenage girls as “fair game”. “People liked having us at a party. We were these nubile girls, we were interesting jailbait objects,” says Kate, who claims she was sexually assaulted by a film producer at 15 and raped by a visiting poet several months later.

    While the #MeToo movement has unearthed many grave allegations of sexual miscon­duct within the arts and entertainment business in recent months, the Lilley sisters’ story has an unsettling twist: both agree it was their mother, a revered feminist and left-wing radical, who encouraged their early ­sexualisation.

    Indeed, Kate maintains the abuse she and her younger sister endured was “facilitated” by Hewett, while Rozanna recalls how “my mum partly built her profile on these stories of being outrageous. People referred to her sometimes as being a female Don Juan. We were brought up thinking that was something to emulate; it was something to be. I would say she basically ­encouraged that … Mum had a strong belief that sex was good and she saw herself as having been ­constrained by Victorian parents. I think she genuinely believed she was offering this ­unfettered, uninhibited lifestyle to us.”

    Hewett was an ex-communist who had six children to three men. A highly regarded poet, novelist and author of plays including The Chapel Perilous and This Old Man Came Rolling Home, she had talent to burn, a rough charisma and she equated sex — even underage sex — with freedom.

    She died in 2002, and Rozanna recalls her mother reclining regally at home on a gold ­velvet sofa, beret atop her waterfall of white-blonde hair, smoking a diamante-encrusted pipe, holding court. (In her later years she was driven around town in a hearse by the mercurial Merv Lilley, whose widely admired book, Gatton Man, maintained that his father had been a serial ­killer. He too had many affairs while married to Hewett.)

    The girls initially bought in to their mother’s view that sex was in itself a form of liberation. Rozanna recalls that as she and her sister slept with men twice their age, “we felt we were ­special people doing special things”.

    By the time the girls turned 16, the legal age of consent, Kate had slept with six men and ­Rozanna with “at least a dozen”. Virtually all of them were older artists and allegedly included now-deceased figures, including writer and film director Ellis and painter Sharp. Photographer Hamilton took pornograph­ic images of Rozanna, she says, when she was “14 or 15” and met him for what she thought would be a modelling session. “It was unbearable at home,” says Kate, whose calm, measured way of speaking forms a striking contrast to the disturbing events she describes. “There were constantly men staying in the house and hardly any man came to the house who didn’t try to have sex with one or more of us (Kate, Rozanna or her mother).

    “I used to have sex with men to prevent them ­having sex with Rosie, and then I would find out they did have sex with Rosie. I think because Mum was this figure of ­sexual licence, we were particular targets.”

    She adds that when gay men from the theatre scene were around, the house felt safer.

    Parties where the girls were left to their own devices weren’t safe, either. Kate says that, when she was 15, she went to a party where a film producer pushed her into a toilet and ­masturbated against her body.

    Several months later, she says, she was raped in the family home when her parents were away, by a poet from interstate. “There were very few instances in which I said no (to men who wanted sex). We were not brought up to say ‘no’,” she reveals. She refused the poet’s advances, “but he was not in the slightest bit interested in that, so I just gave in. I was 15 then and told Mum about that. She didn’t believe me. She said she asked him, and he said that I had consented.”

    Poet and playwright Dorothy Hewett ‘had this ­fantasy of what a free life was, but she had no thought about us being kids’

    According to Kate, the poet who allegedly sexually assaulted her went on to have an affair with her mother. He was not only the man who slept with her and Hewett. “We were very ­explicitly encouraged, even enjoined by Mum to think, like her, that sexual attention was the be-all and end-all of everything,” says Kate.

    Echoing her older sister, Rozanna says their mother “would often say that the greatest thing in life was sex. So you sort of became quite keen to get involved because that is what she encouraged us to do.”

    For decades, the sisters refrained from discuss­ing their experiences of exploitation and abuse with each other or their parents. Rozanna says that, in the 1980s, her mother once ­demanded: “What’s all this shit about me being a bad mother?” She adds drily: “Mum tended to go on the offensive.”

    In an extraordinary coincidence of timing, both women have launched books this month that address their traumatising experiences of sexual abuse in the self-consciously bohemian 70s arts milieu.

    Kate’s new book, Tilt, is an elegant poetry collection that references her troubled teenage years, as well as the 70s green bans, Greta Garbo and organised crime. Rozanna’s book, Do ­Oysters Get Bored?, is a “hybrid” account of her “carelessly broken girlhood” and a wry, ­tender exploration of her later life as a committed ­parent to her autistic son, Oscar.

    Both books include emotionally stark poems that describe specific incidents of abuse the ­sisters endured as schoolgirls. Those experi­ences range from rape and molestation to ­consensual sex (including underage sex) with older men. None of the perpetrators are named.

    However, in candid interviews with Review, Rozanna and Kate reveal how they were ­sexually abused or exploited by Sharp, Ellis, Hamilton and several other men who are still practising artists.

    Rozanna says she had sex once with Sharp, Australia’s leading pop artist, when she was 15. “I had a terrible crush on him,” she recalls, but he didn’t reciprocate her feelings. Decades later, he phoned her to apologise. “You are the only one who has ever said sorry,” she writes in ­Mickey Mouse romance, a poem about her underage encounter with the painter, who was 20 years her senior.

    When she was “14 or 15”, she went to a ­Sydney hotel to meet visiting photographer Hamilton. Rather than taking anticipated ­modelling shots, Hamilton “photographed me topless and then he took photographs of my ­vagina. Close-ups.” She submitted to this after the internationally famous photographer showed her his child porn collection, “so that I would see other girls agreed to do this”.

    She adds, as an afterthought: “Honestly, I was not paid a cent, just to add insult to injury.” Hamilton, known for his images of naked ­pubescent girls, committed suicide in 2016 ­following child rape allegations.

    Both sisters allege they had underage sexual encounters — one was an alleged indecent ­assault — with Ellis.

    Kate claims she had sex with Ellis four times when she was 15 and 16 and still living at home. There was no coercion, “just an understanding that he wanted to have sex with me and I just did … whenever he turned up, he’d have sex with me. I didn’t at the time think that was some big, terrible thing … I was reasonably neutral about it. I didn’t hate him.”

    She recalls one of those encounters in a new poem, Chattel, while in her book Rozanna writes of how Ellis allegedly forced her “reluctant ­fingers” inside his “verbose Y-fronts”. That poem is called Come Here, Child.

    Rozanna says Ellis was simultaneously a friend and supporter: he tried to secure her film work and hired her as a school holiday nanny, thus adding to her confusion about the art scene’s sexual ethics.

    Kate reveals she has been through 20 years of therapy, partly because of the depression and anxiety that runs in her family, and partly ­because of her teenage experiences. She has written about the latter obliquely in earlier ­poetry collections, but the revelations of the #MeToo movement convinced her “this is a moment to risk something more explicit”.

    She says the past sexual violations she was subjected to form “a strong presence in the book, not sexual abuse only but a culture of sexual predation and objectification”. One poem, Party Favour, ends with the devastating memory of telling her mother about the rape she allegedly endured at 15, and realising “she’s not on my side”.

    In her essays, Rozanna writes of her adol­escence with more of a sense of regret than anger; her poems reveal more of her “hurt self”. She also told her story to the royal commission into child abuse, in a closed session that focused on the entertainment industry.

    She was just 13 when she was cast in a ­colonial-era film, Journey Among Women, about convict women who escape from their abusive guards and attempt to create a feral, women-only bush colony, complete with gratuitous nudity­ and lesbian romance.

    Rozanna had her first period while on the set, yet she appears topless and naked in this “schlock” film and has “a lesbian affair with a judge’s daughter, which is ridiculous … My first experience of faux intercourse was having an actor on top of me, pretending to rape me in that film. I looked back on that and I thought: ‘How extraordinary to put a young girl through that.’ ”

    The schoolgirl’s on-screen nudity attracted media attention and she ended up on the front page of a tabloid when Journey Among Women was released in 1977. Her father once rescued her from the set when she became nauseous and drunk from consuming alcohol used in one scene.

    She notes that “perhaps the really disturbing part is that my mother wrote the script, or ­sections of the script. She had a lot of fantasies about herself that she enacted through her daughters — and that would be a prime ­example.” The film is still being sold on DVD.

    Before they left school, both girls were cast in small roles in the classic film The Chant of ­Jimmie Blacksmith. Aged 15 and 17, and ­unbeknown to each other, they both slept with the same senior crew member.

    This is a complex and painful story, in which the women’s evident love for their parents ­collides with their ambivalence about how they failed to protect them from predators. Kate says that for all her mother’s flaws, “we loved each other hugely”. She edited the book Selected Poems of Dorothy Hewett, in 2010.

    Though her father was “a very difficult man”, Rozanna maintained a “huge well of affection” for Merv Lilley and helped look after him ­before he died in 2016. “They were both very ­damaged,” says Kate. “Dad made efforts to try to protect us but he was very mad … I assume he was bipolar; he was also violent.”

    Rozanna says her father “was busily running around chasing women and generally carrying on, often in a rather more aggressive way than my mother was”. Yet one of her poems, Soap Opera, tells how she once found her mother at home in bed with a strange man. Later that night, she saw her father washing the dishes and weeping.

  13. johanna

    I knew some of the people mentioned in that article about Dorothy Hewett’s unfortunate daughters, and others in that world. Don’t forget contemporary and member Richard Neville’s gleeful description of screwing underage girls in Playpower.

    There are similar stories about the ‘creative’ scene around San Francisco and LA around the same time.

    These people effectively pimped out their children in the name of sexual liberation. Yet Hewett is a revered figure in the pantheon of Australian writers. Donald Friend, painter and also in the clique, moved to Bali to more easily satisfy his yen for young boys.

    These people have/had no moral compass whatsoever, and inflicted it on their children and other young and vulnerable people who came into their orbit.

    At least David Williamson stuck to heterosexual adultery. In that world, he was a stuffy suburbanite.

  14. None

    And these paedophiles and pimps dare preach to us. Glad you survived intact, Johanna. What a bunch of sickos.

  15. None

    And these p**dophiles and pimps dare preach to us. Glad you survived intact, Johanna. What a bunch of sickos.

  16. Old School Conservative

    Has Brendan Nelson grown a spine?
    He has released a statement of full support for the SAS and Commandos. Even accepts some of the blame of putting them in harms way.
    Mentions their sacrifice, courage and professionalism.
    Suggests that any mistakes on the battlefield should be the responsibility of the political class and military leadership.
    Refers to fighting against child suicide bombers and those “unrestrained by the niceties of the values by which we live.
    Warns the nation to be “careful, very careful, in passing judgement.”

    Andrew Hastie has a bob each way. Says a lot of good things about the SAS personnel, then interjects the horrible “But…..I know everyone who wears the uniform is accountable to the Australian people.”
    As we know, anything that comes before a “But…” doesn’t matter.

    (From The Oz, today)

  17. johanna

    The US Senate’s ‘longtime’ Head of Security has been pinged for leaking against Trump to his young girlfriend, after which she got promoted from Buzzfeed to the New York Times.

    The propensity of middle aged men to think with their lower appendages never ceases to amaze me. She (probably literally) sucked him in a beauty.

    That said, who checks the security of heads of security? Admittedly, there were lots of red herrings because members of the committee also leaked now and then. Finally, it seems that Sessions has plugged a big leak, though.

    I rather suspect that the shadow boxing between Trump and Sessions is for show, while Sessions is pursuing and reeling in the perps. The head of security of a sensitive Senate Committee is a very large scalp. Other wrongdoers should be quaking in their boots.

  18. BrettW

    Good on Brendan Nelson.

    Politicians love to be photographed with the Special Forces. The Coalition in particular has relied on them to do the hard work in Iraq and Afghanistan thereby getting brownie points with USA. SF guys have done multiple tours at the direction of the political leadership and they and their families have suffered for it.

    Now is the time for the politicians to support the troops.

    #I’llridewiththeAustralianSpecialForces

  19. Some History

    Thank you, Tom.

  20. John Constantine

    Their global left enraged that Melania Trump will not attend their bitchfest gotcha cattiness at their g7 unflushed convention.

    Trumpnado himself will sweep away before the Stalin worshipping closing ceremonies.

    Their global left weep and gnash their orcfangs and wail that Hussein Obama would have never let them miss a chance to piss on America.

  21. Tom

    The left’s fascist thought police turn unis into zombie animal farms.

    Herald Sun:

    STUDENTS are being marked down for using “mankind” and “he or she” in essays in the ­latest university crusade against sexist language.

    Unis have officially banned words such as “manpower’’ and “workmanship”, instructing students and staff to use gender-neutral language.

    The University of Sydney insists “non-discriminatory language’’ be used in essays, assignments and lectures, even if it is grammatically wrong.

    Its Department of Gender and Cultural Studies has banned the traditional use of “he’’ to describe a generic person.

    “This has become unacceptable in recent years so it is important in your writing to include both men and women when referring generically to a person or persons,’’ the department’s style guide states.

    It says “they’’ should be used in place of “he” or “she” and cites the example, “If a student wants their results early, they should go to the student centre’’.

    The style guide adds: “Although this last sentence is grammatically incorrect, in speech it has become common practice to use the pronoun ‘they’ when referring to a generic person.’’

    Sydney’s UTS instructs students to “avoid sexism in language’’ by banning the words mankind, man-made or spokesman.

    But it gives students the grammatically correct advice not to use “their” or “they’’ instead of “him’’ or “her” when referring to one person.

    The University of Newcastle’s inclusive language guide bans “mankind’’, insisting that students use the terms humanity, the human race or human kind, despite them also containing the word “man’’.

    The University of Queensland has marked down students for using “gendered language’’ in essays.

    A politics student was penalised for using the grammatically correct pronoun of “she’’ to describe a car. And a science student lost marks for using “mankind’’ in an essay about the scientific method.

    “I lost 10 marks — it’s such a stupid thing to be marked down for,’’ the student said.

    “I heard of a girl in a different course who was marked down for using the words ‘man-made’ and ‘sportsmanship’. It’s a bit ridiculous — you can’t just ban every word with ‘man’ in it.’’

    The uni’s essay guide for political science says students must not use “female pronouns’’ for objects, such as referring to a boat as “she’’.

    But the Oxford Dictionary states that “she’’ can “refer to a ship, vehicle, country or other inanimate thing regarded as female’’. And the Macquarie Dictionary defines “mankind’’ as “human beings collectively’’.

    Monash University tells staff and students to use “workforce’’ instead of “manpower’’, and “artificial” instead of “man-made’’.

    It says it is not politically correct, but accurate, fair and respectful.

    Federal Education Minister Simon Birmingham slammed the policies, declaring it wrong that universities were dictating “nanny state stuff’’ to students.

    “This just reinforces the stereotype of academic elites in ivory towers judging everyday Australians,’’ he said.

    “Our universities should be better than this rubbish.’’

    Link.

  22. Bruce of Newcastle

    Interesting news from Ontario. Anyone who follows Blazing Cat Fur has been seeing their many posts on the state election. Last week the polls were apparently neck and neck. Now:

    Anti-Elite Canadian Conservative Leader Doug Ford Wins Landslide in Ontario as Liberals Wiped Out

    Anti-elite Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Doug Ford has won a landslide victory against the Canadian political establishment beating back the former ruling Liberal Party which have been reduced to so few seats they have lost official party status.

    Ford and the Progressive Conservatives (PC) won a total of 76 out of 124 seats in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario Thursday forming the first PC majority government in the province since 2003.

    The former ruling Liberal Party under leader Kathleen Wynne, a staunch ally of federal Liberal party leader and current Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, saw a catastrophic collapse at the polls going from 55 out of 101 seats to a mere seven seats which disqualifies them for official party status in the assembly.

    That looks more like an avalanche than a landslide.

    So what gives with polls these days? More shy conservatives?

  23. Eyrie

    WTF is with a party that calls itself the PROGRESSIVE conservatives?

  24. Some History

    “Our universities should be better than this rubbish.’’

    But they aren’t.

  25. Tom

    Green lunacy update:

    SUPERMARKET checkout workers are facing a torrent of abuse from customers frustrated by plastic bag bans, the retail union has warned.

    With Coles and Woolworths set to ban plastic bags from all stores this month, the SDA has prepared a campaign to head off abusive behaviour.

    The Don’t Bag Retail Staff campaign comes off the back of union research that found more than 85 per cent of retail and fast food workers had copped abuse from customers.

    So the union supports the management’s virtue signalling but wants to be protected from the consequences — just like the Australian ruling class.

    Link.

  26. John Constantine

    Interesting that their Sydney arts scene had a culture of covering up and keeping silent about child sexual abuse.

    Those preaching from their abc taxfunded bully pulpit would be moving in the circles that are well aware of who is screwing who while helping the kid with their high school homework.

    Why not hold those preaching from their abc bully pulpit to the exact same standards, no more, no less, than they rage to have applied to catholic clergy that remained publically silent?.

    Is their honor soit and their guardian and their crikey and their Fairfax and their abc liable for financial payouts to compensate victims for the mafia Omerta cone of silence that protects predator child abusers if they are freedom fighters in Stalin’s grand push to topple old Australia?.

    Comrades?.

  27. Some History

    For anyone interested.

    Volume up.

    Live at The O2, London (2009)

    I Wish / Isn’t She Lovely – Stevie Wonder

  28. John Constantine

    No hashtag metoo threat to predators from their left, as long as they stay faithful to the cause.

    Blokes can rock up to their abc offices to progress the revolution against Tories, every abc employee in the building knows the senior lefty figure collects schoolgirl panties, or goes to Asia for young boys, but as long as the predator sticks to the script of Stalin, they are:

    Comrade Maaaates.

  29. johanna

    Americans seem to be obsessed with toilets, not least because they insist on calling them ‘bathrooms.’

    The weird Left spend huge money and effort on allowing blokes into girls’ toilets. Starbucks has just announced that letting anyone and everyone use its toilets is company policy. Now, via Tucker Carlson, we find that historic Penn Station is redesigning its toilets.

    All decsribed as ‘bathrooms.’

    What is it with Americans and The Room That Shall Not Speak Its Name?

  30. Zatara

    A question if I may, for all Cats, especially those with a military service background. I need some great boots to hike and eventually run in and would rather the advice of those that have spent a lot of time in theirs, rather than some spotty git saleshack.

    Brenman – I’d give some very serious thought as to why I wanted to run in boots at all. There are too many potential injuries and ailments running in boots can cause if there is no specific reason for it. Frankly, if the surface/terrain is too rough to wear running shoes on it’s probably too rough to safely run on at all. If the boots are for adding difficulty to your task, run an extra mile instead. Risk vs. Gain.

    Hiking boots are an entirely different topic and would depend on the whats, wheres and hows of your intended hiking.

  31. Entropy

    A question if I may, for all Cats, especially those with a military service background. I need some great boots to hike and eventually run in and would rather the advice of those that have spent a lot of time in theirs, rather than some spotty git saleshack. What would you spend your money on? I’m looking for the quality, endurance and cost balance as I’m not rich but don’t want to buy junk.

    After a long illness, it’s been suggested by the Docs that I get really fit again as it may help. It certainly won’t hurt. And I really don’t want to see the inside of Westmead again for as long as possible, no matter how well the staff, especially the nurses, have treated me.

    It depends on what you mean by hiking, Brennan.
    Hiking boot tech has changed a lot over the years. When I was young a one piece leather boot like a Scarpa was the go to keep out water, but really, you would have to be a serious hiker for those because $. Also technology means you don’t have to spend a lot and still get a decent boot.

    If you mean short or even one day bush walks with a light daypack, get hiking shoes. Basically you could get away with ordinary athletic shoes, the difference being hiking shoes have bigger grips, and emphasise stability control rather than flexibility. Merrell are the traditional ‘it’ hiker, but by all accounts aren’t what they used to be. Personally I go for Salomon X ultra 3. I love the quick tighten laces that nicks out of sight and don’t become seed collectors. Depending on your climate, decide on goretex to keep water out. However, in a warm climate GTX can get a bit warm and it might be better to save some money.

    On several day hikes, you want to get a mid size boot to give your tired ankles more support. The idea is to reduce the risk of ankle roll. Again go for the Salomon X ultra 3 in a mid size boot, with or without GTX. If you have a wide foot, maybe something from Keen. That said, Miss Entropy just got some Oboz Bridgers from Kathmandu because she got them with a third off the price which made them the cheapest oboz Bridgers in the world, and she liked the red leather TBH. A women’s mid size. On that matter don’t buy house brand boots from places like Kathmandu, they’re rubbish.
    Also find out which one you want by visiting stores then look on line. Eg wiggle.com.au are hard to beat.

  32. Entropy

    Oh, and by the time you get into trail running, if you ever do, definitely trail running shoes rather than boots, such as Salomon speedcross. But they aren’t the shoes to get first.

  33. Entropy

    What Zatara said too.

  34. Tintarella di Luna

    Why does a photo of my talentless, fat-faced, feckless local federal member come up on my computer and on my husband’s ipad. We have not signed up to anything that useless SOB is involved with and how do we stop it?

    Any help would be appreciated I can stand looking at the creature.

  35. Tintarella di Luna

    I mean I can’t stand looking at the creature but you know that

  36. feelthebern

    I reckon Fairfax has been sold a pooch with this Afghan story.
    One of the books I read about the Afghan invasion was how the CIA turned up & started giving cash rewards for locals to turn in Taliban.
    All the Afghans did was identify the money lenders in town.
    The yanks took those guys away & it was weeks before they realised the pattern.

  37. Tintarella di Luna

    Is their honor soit and their guardian and their crikey and their Fairfax and their abc liable for financial payouts to compensate victims for the mafia Omerta cone of silence that protects predator child abusers if they are freedom fighters in Stalin’s grand push to topple old Australia?.

    They were very shtum about ABC employee Jon Stevens recently gaoled for child sexual offences, lauded to the high heavens ABC luvvie Peter Roebuck and wasn’t there an ABC Chairman/Managing Director who urged us all to be understanding of pederasty?

  38. feelthebern

    The SASR member who reckoned he saw the body at the bottom of a cliff from 200 meters away, from a helicopter, as it got out of there.
    Seriously?
    What a load of hog shit.

  39. Brennan;
    Re your question about boots for hiking in.
    I only spent three years in the Army, and not a lot of it was marching/slogging etc.
    For my money, the best boots I ever had were the standard issue GP boots. Now that is going to set the cat amongst the sparrows, but the GP boot was OK.
    THE issue was in the breaking in.
    First buy one set of boots and first day you put them in a placcy bag and fill them with water. Second day you put them on and allow them to stay wet. Wash the car, go swimming in fresh water, whatever. Just keep them wet.
    By the end of day two, the leather is quite supple. Put them upside down to dry, and when that happens get yourself some memory foam inserts, put them in the boot and wearing your two best pair of Explorer socks, go for a walk. Doesn’t have to be a long walk, just whatever you are doing at the time in your recuperation plan.
    Repeat.
    The issue is to get the boot formed to your feet in the shape your feet are when your body weight is on them. This shape is different to your normal standing shape – the foot is flatter and the bone structure is in a slightly different position, ligaments are also in a slightly different state of tension.
    Two pairs of socks are for those times you don’t have the ability to change and wash your socks. You can however take the boots off and swap the inner socks for the outer. I don’t see that this will be an issue for you, considering your circumstances.
    Use Dubbin or a similar product to keep the leather supple.
    There are a lot of good boots out there, but they can be exceedingly expensive and not really fieldworthy. Take your pick, but the old GP boot with proper break in and care is the best bet.

  40. Eyrie

    ” talentless, fat-faced, feckless local federal member”
    We too have one of those here in Groom, Tinta.

  41. Zatara

    Brennan – I agree with Entropy regarding the Salomon X Ultra 3. Both the low tops and the high tops.

    I know several people who completed the 2200 mile Appalachian Trail last year wearing them (and have heard of more than a few who are mid-hike this year in them). They are excellent trail and climbing footwear for the price.

  42. nemkat

    Dorothy Hewett would’ve been in her 50s at the time, and not very alluring, to say the least.
    So, she pimped out her teenage daughters to the movers and shakers of the day to keep her career alive.

    There were similar rumors about a couple of blokes in Qld, now dead.

  43. Vicki

    Has Brendan Nelson grown a spine?
    He has released a statement of full support for the SAS and Commandos. Even accepts some of the blame of putting them in harms way.
    Mentions their sacrifice, courage and professionalism.

    Really pleased to hear that. Had the opportunity to raise the matter of the concerted attack on our Special Forces from some quarters with him.

    As for Andrew Hastie – don’t rush in to judgement just yet. Remember that he too was attacked not too long ago for his role in the SASR. I suspect that he does not wish to appear that he is trying to deflect examination.

  44. calli

    ” talentless, fat-faced, feckless local federal member”
    We too have one of those here in Groom, Tinta.

    Ditto.

    They’re machine made.

  45. miltonf

    Who is that Tintarella? Laundry?

  46. Vicki

    SF guys have done multiple tours at the direction of the political leadership and they and their families have suffered for it.

    Absolutely! The multiple tours are definitely something that should be looked at. The toll on the most professional of combatants is enormous. Likewise on families. I hope many of the Cats contribute to “Soldier On,” because they do excellent work with our wounded warriors.

  47. Vicki

    Has Brendan Nelson grown a spine?
    He has released a statement of full support for the SAS and Commandos.

    (From The Oz, today)

    Any chance of getting a full report on that, Old School Conservative? I am on the land at the moment, not able to get a newspaper, & don’t have a subscription to The Oz.

  48. miltonf

    Sounds like Laundry anyway- as you say Calli machine made

  49. Brennan, as to running, why the hell would you do that? Running is no good for you unless you’re being pursued by something large, carnivorous and hungry.
    Forget the running. Fitness is about muscle mass and cardiac rate.
    Never run, it just means you die tired.

  50. C.L.

    What is it with Americans and The Room That Shall Not Speak Its Name?

    I’ve been laughing about this for years.
    “Rest-room” is the funniest.
    Who ‘rests’ in the dunny?

    Say it, Americans: TOILET.

  51. calli

    Chuckle. Ramirez for me, again.

    The word for today is “prepared”.

    Is Trump prepared, or not? He says he doesn’t have to prepare much but he is prepared. Apparently this is intelligible gibberish. The odious Mark Riley and Mon giggle like schoolgirls, as Riley claims Trump cheats at golf.

    These people are insane.

  52. Zatara

    Running is no good for you unless you’re being pursued by something large, carnivorous and hungry.

    And you don’t have to outrun the carnivorous thing, just your mates.

  53. Senile Old Guy

    The South Australian Government has scrapped a process to negotiate treaties with the state’s Aboriginal nations. It comes on the same day the Northern Territory pledged to work towards a treaty with its Indigenous peoples.

    Great timing.

    Mr Thomas today said that Aboriginal people had told him they were keen to start a conversation on a treaty but “overwhelmingly” preferred to negotiate separately as nations rather than collectively.

    As discussed yesterday, a nightmare, negotiating with many different tribal groups, when even people in the same tribes may not want the same thing.

  54. Tintarella di Luna

    Who is that Tintarella? Laundry?

    What gave it away miltonf? was it talentless, fat-faced or feckless or all three. I wonder if Daddy’s money or the trust fund paying for it. I want those intrusions gone.

  55. miltonf

    All three Tintarella. I thought he was trying to plonk himself in a ‘safer’ safe.

  56. Megan

    As someone who is not afraid of a long walk or three and is planning to do the Coast to Coast next year I would also endorse the Salomans as a great all round, all terrain hiking boot. I did the Dales Way in the low top version. I am a firm believer in the Giretex version but have to say that after 4.5 hours of solid New Zealand rain pouring into them that they will eventually leak.

    That said, I replaced them with a pair of Zamberlan 960 boots last year and am a total convert. Most comfortable boots I’ve ever owned.

    And thanks Winston for the trip down memory lane on what was required to make your army issue boot your friend. Once completed, they were a work of art.

  57. Megan

    Gortex….The bloody phone keeps insisting on Girtex or Vortex despite my best efforts to override it. It’s a sneaky little beggar.

  58. OldOzzie

    Tom,

    thanks – cartoons pretty poor today – probably a mention for Paul Zanrtti

  59. min

    Out of interest how many people in an aboriginal nation , more than one tribe?
    I seem to remember that more than 20/30 in a tribe was unmanageable so if twins born one left behind..

  60. Zatara

    House votes for regular audits of Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation

    It’s about time someone put some adult oversight on what was a magic unlimited checkbook. Mueller reportedly pissed away $17 million+ in his witch hunt so far with absolutely no results relevant to his tasking.

    Or, as Mr Trump says:

    Donald J. Trump
    ‏Verified account @realDonaldTrump

    ….At what point does this soon to be $20,000,000 Witch Hunt, composed of 13 Angry and Heavily Conflicted Democrats and two people who have worked for Obama for 8 years, STOP! They have found no Collussion with Russia, No Obstruction, but they aren’t looking at the corruption…

  61. miltonf

    The whole mueller thing is seriously outrageous- trying to overturn the 2016 result. Similar to the way the 2013 result was overturned here. I hope Trump is tough enough. Go Trump.

  62. Entropy

    The whole concept of an aboriginal nation is cultural appropriation.

  63. Atoms for Peace

    If an SAS member is taken to task over this, put me down for any crowd funding site that should be set up.

  64. OldOzzie

    Bill Shorten hits out at ‘whitefellas’ as he promises summit on indigenous child removal – Rachel Baxendale

    Bill Shorten says too many indigenous children are being taken away from their families, vowing to hold a summit to tackle the issue in his first 100 days as prime minister.

    Visiting Barunga, east of Katherine, on a three-day trip to the Northern Territory, the Labor leader hit out at “whitefellas” who “come in paternalistic”, saying he wanted to hold a gathering of indigenous leaders, healthcare workers and families to tackle the problem.

    “Too many indigenous kids are being taken away from their families. In the last 10 years the number has doubled to about 17,000 or 18,000,” Mr Shorten said.

    “When you take kids away from their connection to culture and country, to language and to family, you make the chances of their success steeper and steeper. The climb is steeper and steeper.

    “So we need to bring together the frontline healthcare professionals, the people who are working in communities.

    “That doesn’t mean that you ignore challenges or problems in keeping families together. Raising kids is hard enough anyone.

    “It takes more than parents to do it these days, but it seems to me that we’ve got to be smarter than starting a new round of taking children away from their parents.

    “Personally as a parent I would be horrified at the prospect that because … that I could have my kids taken away from me, yet for too many aboriginal mums that’s the very real prospect they wake up with even now, and we can do better.

    “That’s why we’re going to tackle it in our first 100 days.”

    Sky News Northern Australia correspondent Matt Cunningham challenged Mr Shorten over the wisdom of opposing child removals, citing the horrific rape of a Tennant Creek toddler in February who had remained with her family despite 52 notifications to child protection services.

    Mr Shorten said it wasn’t an “either/or” issue.

    “I did say that the solution doesn’t mean you ignore the problems,” he said.

    “That of course is just shocking, what you described. There’s no excuse, and the fact that the system failed to pick up the problems is a disaster, but I’m also saying to you surely the solution isn’t just the wholesale moving of kids away from their extended families and the land on which they should have a connection with.

    “Surely we are smarter than: either leave a kid in vulnerable and dangerous circumstances, or totally excise their relationships from region and country.

    “The status quo is not acceptable as you quite rightly say, but the solution is too blunt as well, and in too many cases it creates further problems which you were trying to solve in the first place.”

    Asked what his government would do to address the problem, Mr Shorten said he would get the “smartest people in the nation together” and get indigenous Australians in the room.

    “The last thing they need is some know-it-all whitefella to come in paternalistic, as has been happening for 200 years, and say, ‘listen you’re just children and we’ll just fix it all for you’,” Mr Shorten said.

    “Unless you have the people about whom you’re making the decisions in a position to be part of the decision-making, I guarantee you, failure.”

    Comments not very kind to Bill ShortPants

    – children as young as 4 with STD’s.. there are bigger problems in their community then “white fellas”

    – The genius of Bill Shorten is a spectacular sight I must say! Mr Fixit in action spouting his know how in this most difficult scenario? He will undoubtedly undo years of good work.

    – Only fools would take note of the Leader of the Opposition Bill Shorten

    – That seems to work well, leaving them alone to parent by their natural instincts. Why is there too often another fresh news story about child rape and domestic violence in another NT town? Why does my imparja tv channel have advertisments trying to highten awareness about everything from turning your garden hose off to save water and closing doors and windows to enhance the efficency of your house heating system, to openly advertising the need for syphillis injections? These people need help but they also need to help themselves. Politicians have proven they are too clueless and out of touch to manage this task, hence throw more money at it so you can state amounts instead of results. If these people want to be left to their own cultural devices of parenting, let them do it for a decade and see what results. Incapa-Bill is going to ge t the smartest people in the country on the job….. what a dumb statement. This situation doesn’t need the smartest people in the country, of whom I doubt would be in Bill’s circle, it needs people who are honest and in touch with the problem

    – I have noticed that other news outlets have not reported on this particular offensive press conference bs did about whitefellas. If it was the PM or any other Liberal that said this it would be wall to wall coverage on every newspaper and news program in the country.

    – Bill has outbilled Bill on this one. What a spectacle he has made of himself. Countless reports and billions of dollars over decades and Bill will tackle the issue in his first 100 days. His disparaging use of the word “whitefella” is shameful and insulting to those people who have tried their best to improve the lives of aboriginal people. The divisive nature of his public declaration is mindboggling in its ignorance, hypocracy and opportunism. It is hard to imagine he can sink any lower on a credibility scale than this, but unfortunately his past form would indicate he can.

    The paternalistic whitefella is Shorten. He’s only there talking about the treaty to ward off The Green vote and appease his own Left wing of Australia-haters.

  65. nemkat

    Nelson can announce support all he likes, but so what?
    It’s either true, or it isn’t.
    Our blokes were in a bad situation in Afghanistan: Bases surrounded by villages that hated them.
    If a crew of them headed down into one of those villages late one dark night, and next morning there were 50 other men dead from stab wounds, it would’ve sent a message that Aussies prefer peace.
    Not saying it happened, but realistically, you’re dealing with Afghans, Brownies selling biscuits door to door isn’t gonna work over there.

  66. Shy Ted

    Thank you Starbucks but I’ll have my toilet the way nature intended – seat up, yellow stains on the bowl, floor and nearest wall and smelling like a urinal.

  67. Up The Workers!

    So Leftard Louis Hamilton reckons “society id still in the stone age” regarding womens’ pay in sport?

    Certainly on any gender-equality view of the salaries paid to all the male drivers, as opposed to all the female drivers who will be lining up behind him on the Formula 1 grid in Montreal next Sunday, it must be said that the scales seem to be tipped somewhat in favour of the drivers of the masculine persuasion.

    Perhaps he would care to donate half of his personal $51 million annual salary to the wymminses, and either cull 11 male drivers from the grid, to be replaced by female drivers, or alternatively add another 22 cars to the grid, all piloted by wymminses on equal pay? Half the excitement of the race would come in seeing all the wymminses park their chariots by touch in their respective grid places before the start.

    In other news, it is tragic to hear about the shock death of internationally known Leftard cook, Anthony Bourdain. He had been suffering from an acute bout of T.D.S. for at least the last 18 months or more. It was probably something he ate, which finally did him in.

    Most likely the extra helpings of ‘Humble Pie’ after the Ku Klux Klintons were so comprehensively Trumped!

  68. W Hogg

    That looks more like an avalanche than a landslide.

    So what gives with polls these days? More shy conservatives?

    They were right about the likely vote. 40 PC 37 LIB. But the extreme Left vote split between LIB NDP And GRN. So it ended up a 40-60 landslide – to the 40.

  69. nemkat

    Bill Shorten says too many indigenous children are being taken away from their families

    What number would Bill Shorten consider ”just right” for Aboriginal Child removals?

  70. Old School Conservative

    Here you go Vicki. Unfortunately, the full text of the statements by Hastie and Nelson are in a format that won’t copy/paste.

    SAS general urged troops to write of abuse
    The Australian12:00AM June 9, 2018

    PAUL MALEY
    DEFENCE EDITORSydney
    @paul_maley

    The SAS became so concerned about alleged misconduct by its elite troopers that in late 2015 then SAS commander Major General Jeff Sengelman invited every member of the regiment to write to him personally about alleged misconduct.

    The extraordinary meeting ­was convened amid an atmosphere of deepening anxiety about alleged battlefield excesses, poor practices and a toxic culture within Australia’s special operations community.

    General Sengelman, who declined The Weekend Australian’s request for an interview and who has since left the military, is understood to have become so concerned about mounting allega­tions of abuse, misconduct and even battlefield war crimes, that he resolved to personally petition the troops for information.

    Former SAS captain turned Liberal MP Andrew Hastie was among those asked to write. He said yesterday “many good men and women had served in the SAS” but he supports an ongoing investigation into allegations of war crimes while Australian War Memorial director Brendan Nelson cautioned against “seeking to tear down” the SAS.

    Mr Hastie said: “War is a terrible, degrading thing. Our soldiers have had to make tough decisions in complex, dangerous and uncertain environments. People are imperfect. But I also believe that everyone who wears the uniform is accountable to the Australian people. That is why these grave allegations of war crimes must be ­answered.”

    Dr Nelson, a former defence minister, said SAS troops “for ­almost two decades have been sent repeatedly into dark places others dare not go with lists of terrorist insurgents to capture or kill” and that many had paid a heavy price, physically and psychologically.

    “To the nation, I say, ‘be careful. Be very careful in passing judgment on them’,” Dr Nelson said.

    “Whatever wrongs may have been done, let us not become a people unworthy of the extraordinary courage of these young Australians. If anyone bears responsibility, let it be the political class, including me who sent them and the military leadership tasked with­ ­adherence to the truths by which we live.”

    General Sengelman is understood to have addressed the troops at Campbell barracks at Swanbourne, Perth, with the ­imprimatur of Lieutenant General Angus Campbell, then chief of army. It is understood about 200 SAS operators attended the meeting and General Sengelman ­received about 200 letters in reply.

    None of the letters contained allegations of criminal behaviour, which the army would have been obliged to report. Instead, they ­revealed a tsunami of drug and ­alcohol abuse, violence and bullying, reinforcing a concern already widespread in the army that the SAS’s elite and secretive culture had contributed to a breakdown of professional standards.

    General Campbell would go on to ask Air Chief Marshal Mark Binskin to call in the Defence Inspector-General to investigate the more serious allegations, partly based on feedback from the troops. Those allegations form the basis of the Inspector-General’s inquiry, which is due to finish later this year. One source familiar with the inquiry said General Sengelman’s appeal to the troops was a well-intentioned attempt by a commanding officer to sort gossip from fact.

    “Angus’s starting point was very simple,’’ a source with knowledge of the inquiry told The Weekend Australian. “There’s just too much of it for all the allegations to be wrong.”

    News of the letters came as ­reports emerged of a 2016 report into the SAS commissioned by General Sengelman. The report, conducted by defence consultant and sociologist Samantha Crompvoets, drew on interviews with serving SAS troopers who spoke of “unsanctioned and illegal application of violence on operations”, as well as a culture of drug and alcohol abuse.

    Australian Defence Association executive director Neil James pointed out that General Campbell and Deputy Chief of Army Rick Burr were ex-special forces. “The two of them initiated this inquiry. If the two of them ­initiated this there would have to be a bloody good reason. Neither of them are idiots and they’re straight as a die,” Mr James said.

    Air Chief Marshal Binskin said it was not appropriate to comment during the investigation.

  71. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    Our universities recoil at how the West has won

    If we believe the “long march through the institutions” has been successful then it follows that any pushback is going to encounter resistance. That, in essence, is what is happening as the Australian National University rejects a study and scholarship proposal from the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation and other university faculties prepare to erect the barricades. The episode is a sad indictment on the politicisation of academic institutions and a clear demonstration of just why self-made healthcare and media billionaire Paul Ramsay came to believe such a project would be so vital. Without doubt it is being opposed because it seeks broadly to be in favour of Western civilisation rather than to be ambivalent or antipathetic. This might not be too much to ask from any Western university or, indeed, any institution vaguely familiar with human history and the prosperity, systems and liberties that have been developed. It should almost go without saying that this does not and cannot mean any consideration of Western civilisation should be uncritical — that would be absurd. But it ought not be too much to expect that any organisation aiming to deal in intelligent inquiry can recognise the trend of progress in arts and literature, politics and democracy, academia and innovation, as well as many other spheres.

    Certainly, while supporting the stated aims of the Ramsay centre, The Weekend Australian understands the need for academic freedom. Yet it seems incomprehensible that a suitable arrangement could not have been struck; indeed, our understanding is that the draft agreement ensured the ANU would have a majority on the selection panel and therefore a veto power over academic appointments. This would be similar to arrangements for other donor-sponsored programs and grant the fail-safe provision required. It seems likelier, on the evidence available, that the ANU and its vice-chancellor, Brian Schmidt, cowered in the face of strident and politically motivated opposition from student activists and the academic union. Now we have seen staff at the University of Sydney launch a pre-emptive strike against the centre. Led by activist academics who support odious campaigns such as the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement against Israel, they oppose the centre because it has connections to people who have been active in the Liberal Party (never mind it includes ALP figures on its board, too) and they claim it will push a chauvinistic view about a “European supremacism”. This is jejune, even undergraduate, behaviour and it tends to underscore exactly the sort of capitulation to superficiality and green-left activism that the Ramsay centre aims to guard against in the ongoing contest of ideas.

    Some well-meaning observers, in our pages and elsewhere, suggest it is just too difficult to change the ways or overcome the jaundice of universities and that, to achieve its aims, the Ramsay centre ought to establish itself as an independent institution or in cahoots with a private university. This would be a surrender to those who seek to use our publicly funded universities for their own ideological ends. The great universities of Australia should do better than this; they must become truly pluralistic academies mindful of their heritage and responsibilities, and capable of hosting a centre on Western civilisation without recoiling and becoming bastions of resistance.

    As John Carroll has written so eloquently in Inquirer, there is an imbalance that requires correcting. “The rage against a culture that has lost authority has percolated more and more widely through left-green political culture, if usually in more mellow tones,” Professor Carroll writes. “Generations of students in schools and universities have now been subjected to Marxist ideology, teaching them about the West’s capitalist exploitation of other peoples, of its own minorities, and of the disadvantaged in general. That the West is evil has become the default reading for much of the tertiary-educated upper middle class. Yet only a small, noisy minority are rancorous. For most, a vague reflex view of the world has come to prevail, ignorantly held and often naive, while occasionally grounded in genuine empathy for those who are less well off.”

    Labor and Greens politicians and media organisations who have similar world views pretend there is no issue here. But preserving and enhancing our educational institutions and broader culture should be first-order priorities for leaders. “Central to any viable idea of the university, whether Christian, humanist or other, is a retelling of the human story as a kind of epic, with gravity and dignity, following the diverse ways it plays out its fateful tragedies,” argues Professor Carroll. “This requires interpretations of the story that reveal that life is more than an egoistic performance governed by power struggles.” For this reason, the Ramsay centre and its supporters must struggle on, and top universities ought to find a way to partner in its mission.

  72. DrBeauGan

    C.L.
    #2731936, posted on June 9, 2018 at 8:26 am
    What is it with Americans and The Room That Shall Not Speak Its Name?

    I’ve been laughing about this for years.
    “Rest-room” is the funniest.
    Who ‘rests’ in the dunny?

    Say it, Americans: TOILET.

    Toilet replaced lavatory which replaced WC which replaced water closet which replaced …
    Back to Jakes.

    It’s a persistent attempt to make it sound ‘nice’ and cover up what actually happens there.

    Much like calling homosexuals gay.

  73. None

    Mark my words Coles and Woolworths don’t give a s*** about the environment, plastic bags or virtue signalling. They support the plastic bag ban because it’s all about profit. They spend tens of thousands of dollars each week on supplying plastic bags which only cost them one or two cents if that – but now with the ban people will forget to bring their own shopping bags and buy bag $0.10 to $0.15. Because Ithey also don’t have the cheap plastic bags which they reuse for rubbish and the like they will also now buy garbage bags and bin liners which they didn’t buy before so this is all a great money spinner for them. If they tell you they care about the environment it’s a lie.

  74. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    If an SAS member is taken to task over this, put me down for any crowd funding site that should be set up.

    I do already contribute to the Special Air Services Resources Fund, but, yes put me down for any crowd funding as well.

  75. egg_

    Defence Minister Marise Payne has been briefed on the report’s contents.

    Well that’s it then. It’s all over.

    Chain of command, you’re welcome to sh1t sandwiches at 11.

  76. 2dogs

    Bill Shorten says too many indigenous children are being taken away from their families

    Can he identify a single instance of an aboriginal child being removed from their family who should not have been removed?

  77. OldOzzie

    Old School Conservative
    #2731958, posted on June 9, 2018 at 9:06 am

    Thanks, you beat me to the topic

    Dr Nelson sums it up besr – the UK has been tearing itself apart on conocted atrocities in Iraq

    Dr Nelson, a former defence minister, said SAS troops “for ­almost two decades have been sent repeatedly into dark places others dare not go with lists of terrorist insurgents to capture or kill” and that many had paid a heavy price, physically and psychologically.

    “To the nation, I say, ‘be careful. Be very careful in passing judgment on them’,” Dr Nelson said.

    “Whatever wrongs may have been done, let us not become a people unworthy of the extraordinary courage of these young Australians. If anyone bears responsibility, let it be the political class, including me who sent them and the military leadership tasked with­ ­adherence to the truths by which we live.”

  78. Eyrie

    Queensland has banned plastic bags so it isn’t Coles and Woolies here. Pony girl’s government legislated and the STUPID.FUCKING.LNP supported the legislation.

  79. None

    Our universities are toilets.

  80. Snoopy

    Fairfax
    Nick McKenzie and Chris Masters

    Crompvoets was given free rein. She spoke to people from the Chief of Defence Force downwards in preparing her highly confidential 2016 report, which Fairfax Media has seen.

    Time to loose the bolt cutters starting with McKenzie and Masters.

  81. Old School Conservative

    Aussie boxer uses weight loss technique many of us have been aware of for ages.

    Horn initially clocked in at 148 pounds (67.13 kilograms) at the weigh-in on Saturday morning (AEST) at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, where the bout will take place.

    He then stripped naked and was at 147.5 pounds (66.9kg) — still over the 147 pound (66.67kg) welterweight limit.

  82. OldOzzie

    Key Evidence in House Hacking Probe Mysteriously Disappeared

    Trump says server connected ‘to much of the corruption we see today’

    A server belonging to the House Democratic Caucus went missing in early 2017 after it had been identified by the inspector general as a key piece of evidence in a hacking probe.

    The Office of Inspector General had found months earlier that a group of House IT workers had logged in to the server 5,735 times during the surveyed period between October 2015 and April 2016.

    The IT workers, most of whom were members of the Awan family, were working at that time for dozens of House Democrats, earning an estimated $7 million since 2004.

  83. Entropy

    A politican finally admitting there is a political class. Oh, sorry, a former politician.

  84. Snoopy

    Never an outfit able to forgo an opportunity for self promotion, the International Criminal Court is now itching to get involved in investigating our special forces.

  85. None

    Good on Brendan Nelson for supporting the troops- I hope he’s not just trying to cover his arse. I don’t want to be quick to judge either but sometimes soldier does cross the line into sadism and it’s our duty to pull him back or to stop him from continuing down that path. However it’s a bit too late when you’re talking about stuff years down the track and said soldiers have long since left the force or are wandering aimlessly in Africa or Asia or else have sold their souls to Middle East dictatorships. They’re probably more Australian SAS serving countries like Qatar than there are at home. There are times when you have to just let sleeping dogs lie.

  86. egg_

    So Leftard Louis Hamilton reckons “society id still in the stone age” regarding womens’ pay in sport?

    Ape jockey of white man’s uber technology throws sh1t?
    Arian are you, boy?

  87. nemkat

    Can he identify a single instance of an aboriginal child being removed from their family who should not have been removed?

    If the child’s life becomes a disaster 10 years later, which is highly likely, isn’t it reasonable to ask whether the kid might have been better off left where he was?

  88. egg_

    Interesting that their Sydney arts scene had a culture of covering up and keeping silent about child sexual abuse.

    Doctor Blake will be right onto it, oh wait…

  89. Nick

    go for Salomon X ultra 3. I love the quick tighten laces that nicks out of sight and don’t become seed collectors. Depending on your climate, decide on goretex to keep water out. However, in a warm climate GTX can get a bit warm and it might be better to save some money.

    Same recommendation from me. I wore mine in Tibet to the Everest base camp. Still have them.

  90. John Constantine

    The concept of elite male fighting forces is a thoughtcrime against the Revolution.

    Australia’s military is being framed to fulfil a diversity revolutionary narrative of equality and quotas and Emily’s list, not Dambusters or D-Day or Dunkirk.

    Until the Armed Forces look as optically diverse as Australia’s inner city shopping streets, the freedom fighters will struggle with every weapon for the transformation.

    To their left, Australia is an outpost of an evil colonial empire, the left feels that sabotaging the evil empires armed forces is literally just like fighting Nazis.

    Comrades.

  91. Boambee John

    Winston Smith
    #2731922, posted on June 9, 2018 at 8:03 am
    Brennan;
    Re your question about boots for hiking in.
    I only spent three years in the Army, and not a lot of it was marching/slogging etc.
    For my money, the best boots I ever had were the standard issue GP boots. Now that is going to set the cat amongst the sparrows, but the GP boot was OK.
    THE issue was in the breaking in.

    The Foreign Legion technique for breaking in boots was supposedly to get together with some fellow recruits and some cheap wine. Drink the wine, urinate in the boots, let soak in, empty boots, put them on and start walking.

  92. Snoopy

    Forty years on Chris Masters is still dining out on his uncovering ‘The Joke’ in Queensland. What’s less widely known is that he either didn’t understand the true nature of the ‘The Joke’, or that he couldn’t resist applying that name to the web of corrupt payments.

  93. candy

    Toilet is a crass word. The American “restroom” or just bathroom does not feel difficult to say in more social/work occasions, whereas saying “toilet” just feels not quite right somehow.

  94. Snoopy

    The word ‘bog’ should be adopted universally. Speakers of any language in the world can pronounce the word clearly.

  95. candy

    they oppose the centre because it has connections to people who have been active in the Liberal Party
    They mean Tony Abbott. The uni/left entities hate him because to them he epitomises Western civilisation.

    I know little about Australian universities but it does seem their top people hate Western civilisation yet live here with fantastic salaries in gorgeous homes in white suburbs, sending their children to the very top private schools etc, creaming off the best of Western civilisation – but hating it. go figure, as they say.

  96. Boambee John

    Some well-meaning observers, in our pages and elsewhere, suggest it is just too difficult to change the ways or overcome the jaundice of universities and that, to achieve its aims, the Ramsay centre ought to establish itself as an independent institution or in cahoots with a private university. This would be a surrender to those who seek to use our publicly funded universities for their own ideological ends.

    No, it is simple recognition of reality.

    Most of the yartz faculties of current Australian public universities are beyond redemption, and the rot is spreading to other faculties. Make the Ramsay Centre a stand alone institution that can be a beacon for those (however few they might be) rational faculty and students now suffering under the yoke of political correctness and self hate.

  97. zyconoclast

    Thank you Starbucks but I’ll have my toilet the way nature intended – seat up, yellow stains on the bowl, floor and nearest wall and smelling like a urinal.

    That sounds like a description of their coffee.

  98. Megan

    While Colesworths continue to sell cucumbers vacuumed sealed in plastic I will refuse to take their plastic bag ban seriously.

  99. Roger

    While Colesworths continue to sell cucumbers vacuumed sealed in plastic I will refuse to take their plastic bag ban seriously.

    They’re not banning plastic bags, Megan, they’re going to sell them for 15c each.

    It’s not about saving the oceans, it’s about caving to the Prog-Left & opening up a tidy new revenue stream. I saw some calculations that concluded the big two will garner $71m p.a. from this exercise, making c. 6c profit on every bag they sell.

    Good luck to them, they’re in the business of making a profit, it’s the virtue signalling that annoys me.

  100. egg_

    Colesworths continue to sell cucumbers vacuumed sealed in plastic

    Lesbians try before they buy?

  101. Nick

    it’s the virtue signalling that annoys me.

    At my local shopping centre, you can rest assured that despite a line, a hard faced woman, carrying a recyclable bag with a few scant purchases along with a yoga mat, will push in ‘oblivious’ to those who have been patiently waiting.

    Yoga mats are the new leisure wear , with women intoning they do yoga as some sort of badge, invariably with a dose of smugness.

  102. Roger

    For a little bit of consumer’s revenge: go to Aldi and buy a bunch of their multi-use plastic bags with their advertising on them and proceed to use them at Coles and Woolworths.

  103. DrBeauGan

    candy
    #2731993, posted on June 9, 2018 at 9:38 am
    Toilet is a crass word. The American “restroom” or just bathroom does not feel difficult to say in more social/work occasions, whereas saying “toilet” just feels not quite right somehow.

    Thank you Candy for confirming that we are talking about the endless and futile pursuit of gentility.

  104. Percy Popinjay

    Dispatch from the supermarket frontline, o9:00 hrs 9 June 2018:

    Single use plastic bags still available, repeat, single use plastic bags still available

  105. egg_

    Thank you Candy for confirming that we are talking about the endless and futile pursuit of gentility.

    Fuck.me.dead“?
    Da ironing.

  106. stackja

    DrBeauGan
    #2732016, posted on June 9, 2018 at 10:05 am
    candy
    #2731993, posted on June 9, 2018 at 9:38 am
    Toilet is a crass word. The American “restroom” or just bathroom does not feel difficult to say in more social/work occasions, whereas saying “toilet” just feels not quite right somehow.

    Thank you Candy for confirming that we are talking about the endless and futile pursuit of gentility.

    Bloke used unit block pathway.

  107. BrettW

    I like the idea of using Aldi bags in Coles and Woolworths.

  108. stackja

    egg_
    #2732022, posted on June 9, 2018 at 10:15 am
    Crapper?

    WC?

  109. Nick

    For a little bit of consumer’s revenge: go to Aldi and buy a bunch of their multi-use plastic bags with their advertising on them and proceed to use them at Coles and Woolworths.

    Was just thinking the same

  110. Roger

    Toilet is a crass word. The American “restroom” or just bathroom does not feel difficult to say in more social/work occasions, whereas saying “toilet” just feels not quite right somehow.

    The word toilet actually came into English usage from the French via the Americans as a synecdoche, i.e. a part for the whole – the word referred to the room where washing took place, the Americans applied it to the piece of hardware.

    So there!

  111. Percy Popinjay

    In the “polite” company I move in it’s referred to as the Ladies, or the Gents – and fuck it, apostrophes are optional in this case.

    Every other time it’s the good ol’ dunny (or “duny” as a paralytic mate of mine once misspelled it).

  112. Atoms for Peace

    Given that a lot of the problems in remote communities are alcohol / drug related, please remind which party argued that alcohol bans were discriminatory ??

  113. Percy Popinjay

    Bill Shorten says too many indigenous children are being taken away from their families

    Would that cretinous drooling union glove puppet care to elaborate on the why the kiddies are being removed?

    No, thought not.

    In the meantime, I demand a royal commission be held to investigate the monstrous sexual abuse of the kiddies of hippie yaartz luvvies.

  114. stackja

    Atoms for Peace
    #2732034, posted on June 9, 2018 at 10:31 am
    Given that a lot of the problems in remote communities are alcohol / drug related, please remind which party argued that alcohol bans were discriminatory ??

    Who cares? They don’t. Never have.

  115. DrBeauGan

    In the “polite” company I move in it’s referred to as the Ladies, or the Gents – and fuck it, apostrophes are optional in this case.

    Hence the old fashioned lady of aristocratic birth who asked a doorman “Kindly direct me to the ladies’room, because I am desperate for a shit.”

    There you go Candy. That’s how real ladies speak. They aren’t like you. They simply don’t care what anyone thinks of them.

  116. Roger

    Given that a lot of the problems in remote communities are alcohol / drug related, please remind which party argued that alcohol bans were discriminatory ??

    Against the pleas of the womenfolk of these communities for bans in many instances.

    Shorten then has the hide to tell the nation that white people shouldn’t tell indigenous people how to run their communities.

  117. H B Bear

    Aboriginal children are at much greater danger than a girl attending a Young Labor camp.

  118. Rockdoctor

    Plastic bag ban, no one seems to talk about the 40 plus green groups that this was almost a single issue for. However seems to be the same across the green spectrum, take some half truths embellish them with dodgy North Pacific photos attributed to the GBR then book some sympathetic TV advertorial time tarted up as serious issue & voila. I see it all the time against my industry. You always hear about big oil but big green seems to get a pass.

    These groups aren’t going away so what next? Well we have already seen a preview next will be straws then cutlery, then all other plastics. States like SA & ACT will be the next front. These people are zealots and aren’t satisfied to live their own lives virtue signalling they have force everyone else to be like them. Also they seem totally oblivious to the improved hygiene these items have bought and the extra costs that will be bourne by those who can least afford it.

    As for the Qld LNP, I made my displeasure known to them at the time they voted for this sideshow and that would flow into the Qld election. I didn’t expect a reply and didn’t receive one, however Andrew Cripps is now an ex member in my area so obviously there are others in this electorate unhappy with the LNP’s direction.

  119. cuckoo

    Heard yesterday that the jihadi who killed five with a truck attack in Stockholm in 2017 has been sentenced to “life” in prison. I was puzzled, because I thought the enlightened progressive liberal Swedes had gotten rid of life sentences as being ‘inhumane’. In the next breath the (ABC!) announcer helpfully added “Typically, a life sentence in Sweden is sixteen years“.

  120. areff

    Rockdoctor: The submission from the spearhead anti-bag group to the Victorian inquiry makes it clear that banning grey singlet bags is but the first step. Those re-usable bags we’re being told are just lovely? The submission says they will need to go too, sooner or later.

    The long march is one small step at a time.

  121. entropy

    Speaking of your electorate RockDoctor, how is that new Katter Party member doing? Never hear a thing about him, Nick Dementia or something like that?

  122. Boambee John

    areff

    The long march is one small step at a time.

    A march of 10,000 li starts with the first step. Chairman Mao.

  123. H B Bear

    The endpoint. Once again the Noble Savage shows us the way.

  124. Dr Faustus

    It’s not about saving the oceans, it’s about caving to the Prog-Left & opening up a tidy new revenue stream. I saw some calculations that concluded the big two will garner $71m p.a. from this exercise, making c. 6c profit on every bag they sell.

    Coles New Farm has a sign displayed promising that “10 cents, or more, from the sale of each bag” will be donated to charity.

    Alibaba tells me that, bought in lots of 100,0000, custom printed bags can be had for less than 1 cent. So, it is safe to assume:

    – Coles is making net +10cents per bag;
    – Once the special introductory charity offer is over, they will be on a nice little earner.

    Oh, and fuck you too for making charitable decisions on my behalf.

  125. cuckoo

    SUPERMARKET checkout workers are facing a torrent of abuse from customers frustrated by plastic bag bans, the retail union has warned.

    But that’s unpossible! Every time I see some idiot CEO of Coles/Woolies on TV he assures me that the bag ban has only been brought in because their customers have been begging for it. I’d love to issue the following challenge to one of these wankers. We’ll go to any supermarket of his choice, anywhere in the country, and wait in the checkout area for 30 minutes. For everyone who brings their own bag, I ‘ll give him $10. For every disposable bag used, he gives me $1. I just hope he brings a full wallet.

  126. Percy Popinjay

    Woo-hoo! I’ve just been on the receiving end of a devastating riposte from ScientisticMichael over on Blair’s blog (after they delayed posting my comment by a day).

  127. egg_

    In a new interview with GQ, Fieri says that the Parts Unknown host has “definitely gotta have issues, ‘cos the average person doesn’t behave that way,” referring to Bourdain’s continuous jabs at pretty much every Food Network star (with extra snark reserved for Fieri).

  128. candy

    There you go Candy. That’s how real ladies speak. They aren’t like you. They simply don’t care what anyone thinks of them.

    DrBeauGan, it’s just the word “toilet” does not come easily for me to say in some social/work situations. I feel it should be said quietly, for some reason, like it’s offensive. Saying “Ladies” sounds a bit formal but easier to say. Pedantic nonsense I guess.
    At home or at a mate’s place it’s completely different.

    There’s probably a word you find a bit difficult to say, due to some personal indiosyncrasy?

  129. stackja

    Roger
    #2732057, posted on June 9, 2018 at 10:54 am
    Forty years ago yesterday: Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Harvard Commencement: A World Split Apart

    Harvard’s Incoming Class Is Majority Nonwhite For the First Time

    The majority of Harvard University’s incoming class is nonwhite for the first time in the university’s 380 years, officials say.

    The Boston Globe reports that 50.8% of the incoming freshmen class are from minority groups, up from last year’s 47.3%. Of the students admitted from minority groups, 22.2% are Asians, 14.6% are African American, 11.6% are Latino and 2.5% are Native American or Pacific Islander.

    Merit?

  130. Boambee John

    candy

    The word is not “toilet”, it is “ilet”.

    The whole thing is the result of bad signwriting. All those signs that say “Toilet” were meant to say “To Ilet”, but the first signwriter stuffed the task up, and the rest just did an early version of “Copy and Paste”.

    Might not be entirely accurate historically.

  131. Roger

    Solzhenitsyn’s conclusion:

    “the current of materialism which is most to the left always ends up by being stronger, more attractive, and victorious, because it is more consistent. Humanism without its Christian heritage cannot resist such competition. We watch this process in the past centuries and especially in the past decades, on a world scale as the situation becomes increasingly dramatic. Liberalism was inevitably displaced by radicalism; radicalism had to surrender to socialism; and socialism could never resist communism. The communist regime in the East could stand and grow due to the enthusiastic support from an enormous number of Western intellectuals who felt a kinship and refused to see communism’s crimes. And when they no longer could do so, they tried to justify them. In our Eastern countries, communism has suffered a complete ideological defeat; it is zero and less than zero. But Western intellectuals still look at it with interest and with empathy, and this is precisely what makes it so immensely difficult for the West to withstand the East.”

    John Paul II was elected pope that year (1978), the following year Reagan was elected POTUS – heady days! But the defeat of Marxism in the East over the next decade led Western intellectuals to regroup and take on neo-liberalism in the West, a struggle they are winning. Solzhenitsyn was right, although nobody at the time thought it possible.

  132. Rockdoctor

    Entropy, I don’t know whether Nick Damento is being ignored by the media of if he is coasting along. Gut feel is former as he has been out & about in the Northern Beaches of Townsville in the last week or two hold community meetings about youth crime with very little written about it. Same happens with Robbie Katter having to fight to get airtime. I am still on the fence about him, he needs to find something to break through. Something like taking on the dysfunction & shady deals/identities with the Townsville City Council would be ideal as there is another possible Ipswich there but I guess he would stir up the whole ALP machine in the process.

  133. Up The Workers!

    H.B.Bear, at 10.39am said:

    “Aboriginal children are at much greater danger than a girl attending a Young Labor camp.”

    Quite so, but those same children – if they are genuine aboriginal children and not comparatively wealthy white-skinned urban lefties whose skin periodically “chooses” to identify as black – are far less likely to be accosted by a certain accused child-molesting rapist who travels the nation at taxpayers expense, preaching about his deep and abiding respect for wymminses. His dalliances, thus far have all been with victims of a paler hue.

    If memory serves, the A.L.P.’s sacred mantra of ‘diversity’ on this issue however, is amply catered for by senior Party figures such as Milton Orkopoulos and Bob Collins, who both had a similarly “philanthropic” attitude to the health and welfare of genuinely disadvantaged indigenous children.

  134. Snoopy

    FMD, the RSL has chuggers outside my local Coles. After all the revelations of the looting of RSL funds by insiders they have a hide.

  135. calli

    I always ask for the ladies’ loo wherever I am in the world. It gives the staff a bit of a giggle, and I’m happy to oblige.

    They know the question before you ask it though. And you can always tell by the queue.

  136. Colonel Crispin Berka, Kings' Fusiliers Corps.

    Ex-Fox News military analyst says the USA is currently in a constitutional crisis.
    [ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKuat8VJxq8 ]
    This is apparently because Trump thinks he’s above the law, but does not say specifically what it is that Trump has done against the law.

  137. entropy

    I wondered about that RockDoctor. With the ALP now with a majority the Katters seem to have lost relevance, and Robbie is a much more rational actor than his Dad so over the top attention getters is not his style.
    A paranoid person would also suggest the strange looking electorate boundary changes to Hinchinbrook and Charters Towers had the twin aims of reducing the influence of the Katters and Andrew Cripps.

    And yes, while I don’t know about corruption, the TRC seems the just one of those go to places for a nepotistic infestation of ALP insiders. The bolthole for team loyalty when greater things (temporarily) don’t work out.

  138. stackja

    calli
    #2732066, posted on June 9, 2018 at 11:13 am
    I always ask for the ladies’ loo wherever I am in the world. It gives the staff a bit of a giggle, and I’m happy to oblige.

    They know the question before you ask it though. And you can always tell by the queue.

    Why doesn’t ALP have gender inequality plans with loos?

  139. OldOzzie

    President Trump and Emmanuel Macron Bilateral Session…

    The best laid plans of mice-like men simply collapsed when the shadow of President Trump entered the G7 in Charlevoix, Canada.

    It’s one thing to talk about the boss when he’s out of town; it’s another thing entirely when he’s sitting next to you. POTUS Trump sets the standard for the scale of influence. Really, it’s such a basic truth – it becomes self-evident. Watch, it is remarkable:

  140. mh

    Anthony Bourdain – was he about to come out with information that would upset the globalists? What did he know about the Clintons?

  141. Rockdoctor

    Glad I am not the only rational person who has raised his eye at the electoral boundary changes around here.

    For a snapshot of the dodgy deals going in in the council a blog Townsville Magpie by Malcolm Weatherup (Former Bulletin journo) is good but trigger warning he doesn’t like Trump much. Opened my eyes to the extent of said ALP bolthole & undercurrent of deals going on below the surface.

  142. Top Ender

    Brennan:

    the GP boots I were issued with in 2005 for overseas deployments were great. They are those fawn ankle-high things with long laces. Lasted long, tough, and very comfortable.

    Better than the black leather ones I had before, which were wrecked firefighting in 2002.

  143. DrBeauGan

    There’s probably a word you find a bit difficult to say, due to some personal indiosyncrasy?

    No, Candy, I don’t have any linguistic taboos. Or any others, really. Unless my dislike of being touched counts as one. I feel uncomfortable shaking hands and hate being touched by anyone except by females under rather special conditions. It’s easier being touched by females than males, but not pleasant except under the aforementioned special conditions.

    Fortunately my quack is female.

    But words are just conventional noises.

  144. Eyrie

    stackja, those things look like a lot of fun!

  145. Infidel Tiger

    FMD, the RSL has chuggers outside my local Coles. After all the revelations of the looting of RSL funds by insiders they have a hide.

    If they want to be a charity they should be forced to give up their poker machines.

  146. stackja

    Eyrie
    #2732080, posted on June 9, 2018 at 11:43 am
    stackja, those things look like a lot of fun!

    And they call the wind Maria!

  147. Vicki

    Here you go Vicki. Unfortunately, the full text of the statements by Hastie and Nelson are in a format that won’t copy/paste.

    Very grateful to you Old Schoolie!

  148. Senile Old Guy

    Hahahaha! Talk about lack of insight:

    The very complaints process by which the ABC operates — which for good reason obliges a level of response other media organisations do not apply to themselves — can too easily end up being used as a tool to bully the organisation and erode the trust of its audience.

  149. egg_

    The very complaints process by which the ABC operates — which for good reason obliges a level of response other media organisations do not apply to themselves — can too easily end up being used as a tool to bully the organisation and erode the trust of its audience.

    A case of the bully pulpit projecting?

  150. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Better than the black leather ones I had before, which were wrecked firefighting in 2002.

    At, one stage GP boots were such rubbish that the joke was that the A. D. F had two major enemies – the nation that lived to our North that had no name, and the contractors who supplied the boots.

  151. Bruce in WA

    Speaking of linguistics “delicacy” —

    I was watching an episode of Gordon Ramsay (yeah, I know) where he was in the USA, on an army base, Fort Benning in Georgia. The idea was he would hunt, butcher and cook a wild pig. He set off, accompanied by a Major from the base.

    They discover some pig droppings. “Pig scat”, says the officer.

    “Pig shit”, says Ramsay.

    “I’m trying to use the biological name, but you are correct, sir”, mumbles the officer.

    A little later on they find a tree where a pig has been rubbing against a tree.

    “Smell that”, offers the officer.

    “So the pig has rubbed against that tree and what I’m smelling is pig’s arse”, offers Ramsay.

    More mumbling and stammering.

    “I wasn’t going to tell you that but yes, that’s correct, what you’re smelling is its … (long pause) … derriere.”

    By that stage I was laughing too much to see if anything else was said.

  152. H B Bear

    FMD, the RSL has chuggers outside my local Coles. After all the revelations of the looting of RSL funds by insiders they have a hide.

    They are one of the easiest ones to tell to piss off. Same with the Surf Livesaving tin rattlers anytime they are around. Still respect the rank and file on the ground though.

  153. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The British middle classes tend to use the word ‘loo’ for the upper class ‘lavatory’; I don’t know the derivation of loo, but my guess is it bears some association with lavatory. The British working classes used to say ‘the lav’ or ‘lavvie’, a derivative. Lavatory probably comes from the French “laver: to wash”. So we’re back to the bathroom, in a roundabout sort of way! Toilet is also French of course, and refers to making oneself look fit for public presentation, as in a Lady’s Toilette, and it is still considered impolite and very Mrs. Bouquet by the middle and upper classes in Britain. I’ve also heard these people say ‘toot’, something no working class person would even recognize, but not with the long ‘o’ as in the sound a trumpet makes, although I suspect that may be the derivation.

    Ain’t language wonderful in all of its striving for acceptability as well as mere communication? 🙂

    Oh, and weren’t the seventies a disgrace of a decade after the debacles of the sixties? Some nasty things crawl out from under when those free-spirited literary stones are upturned. That tale of two sisters is a cautionary one, although I do wonder what the other four children of Hewett did or thought about it all. A reminder too that pendulums can swing too far, in either direction. Today’s new puritanism of the left, pushed along by ‘me too’ revelations, requires a careful and rational assessment.

    I always thought Big Sis and I drew the short parenting straw with my mum and dad, but they were paragons in comparison. Sheer neglect interspersed with psychotic screaming matches and grinding poverty can sometimes be better than Dorothy’s and Merv’s sort of instructive parental all-in-name-of-the-family approach.

    Well, I didn’t need 20 years of therapy anyway.
    Just a divorce out of a toxic left culture, and a secure life and babies with a loving Hairy Ape. 🙂

  154. herodotus

    The recent fuss over the “defacing” or graffitification of Meanjin’s cover raises the question of the left’s adherence to the strange notion that all aboriginal words are sacred. The ABC has a spot on Radio National which has indigenes explaining a couple of their favourite words. This has no useful purpose except to maintain another myth.

    There was and is no single language that can claim leadership of the hundreds of now mostly extinct languages that had currency only among individual tribes and in local areas across this vast continent. There was no Esperanto (now also a dead duck), no Latin equivalent to unite the “nation” which activists now claim existed then and still gets a push in agitprop now.

    The situation that we now have is that in some areas schools might teach an aboriginal language, but at the same time there’s a lack of the essential skills in English, Maths and Science which would help “bridge the gap” over time and aid the elevation of these people, duded extensively by the left, into a viable way of life.

  155. Snoopy

    They are one of the easiest ones to tell to piss off. Same with the Surf Livesaving tin rattlers anytime they are around. Still respect the rank and file on the ground though.

    I always donate to the Legacy collections around Anzac Day and Armistice Day.

  156. Top Ender

    Re Brendan Nelson….

    When he was defence minister he made a visit to us in Iraq. We were being shelled and rocketed and mortared regularly so a brave call I suppose. Lots of us were ordered to make the trip to where he’d be speaking to us – free arvos too.

    For some reason someone decided for Nelson’s “protection” we should all leave our weapons outside. This resulted in an immediate uproar as a) we were supposed to be armed 24 hours a day, and b) we were all responsible for our stuff and could be charged if it went missing.

    The biggest uproar of course though was the suggestion the Defence Minister was at risk from his own troops.

    Don’t know who made the initial statement but the whole thing died off; Nelson didn’t, and we got a good afternoon tea. (The speech was the usual stuff about how wonderful we all were, and how the country was behind us.)

  157. DrBeauGan

    I think there’s some value in recording as much information as possible about aboriginal languages before they die out. A language is a way of seeing the world, it tells you something about human variation, so is worth keeping. But there is no good reason to teach it to children. Or to try to perpetuate aboriginal culture, which is keeping people in squalor and poverty, a monstrous wickedness.

  158. Empire 5:5

    Re the Wolf indictment, it seems Ali Watkins has been pimping poontang for intel since she graduated j’ism school.

    https://firenewsfeed.com/politics/1655203

    These people really are Maxipad Waters stupid.

  159. Dr Faustus

    Secret ex-Muslim network in Australia fear disownment and abuse

    In the United States, 23 per cent of Americans raised as Muslims no longer identify with the faith according to the Pew Research Centre.

    A surprisingly interesting ABC piece – worth a 2 minute read.

  160. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    No, Candy, I don’t have any linguistic taboos. Or any others, really. Unless my dislike of being touched counts as one.

    That counts as a taboo in my book, Beaugy.

    Must be careful if we ever meet not to give you my impulsive kiss hello and hug goodbye. Last night Hairy and I met up with Percy Popinjay (who is a sartorial Beau Brummel not a BeauGan) and the charming Harlequin Decline. We discussed a wider meet up of Cats and Kittehs who live in Sydney. Stay tuned.

  161. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I think there’s some value in recording as much information as possible about aboriginal languages before they die out. A language is a way of seeing the world, it tells you something about human variation, so is worth keeping. But there is no good reason to teach it to children. Or to try to perpetuate aboriginal culture, which is keeping people in squalor and poverty, a monstrous wickedness.

    +1

    It would be interesting to see how many of these ‘600’ languages are really independent languages rather than just dialects, and to do some linguistic time-depth tracing of their variations from whatever common stock, or stocks, can be discerned (as linguists have done with extant languages of Indo-European derivation, tracing them back to common ‘core’ words). As you say, all languages are worth recording for specialist analysis in their own right, and also for recognition of an occasional borrowing into, or heritage from, other world languages.

  162. nemkat

    Just on Dorothy Hewett running a free brothel at home, according to her daughters.
    Where was Child Protection?
    I’m sure if there was only a rumour of that happening in an Aboriginal family in Sydney, all the children would’ve been removed quick smart, and sent on a certain route to prison, degradation, and an early death.

    Maybe some of the pro child removal Cats could contact Hewett’s daughters, who are both Associate Professors, and ask them if they regret not being removed from their family at a young age?

  163. Some History

    A question if I may, for all Cats, especially those with a military service background. I need some great boots to hike and eventually run in and would rather the advice of those that have spent a lot of time in theirs, rather than some spotty git saleshack.

    These are supposed to be great, particularly in rough terrain. 🙂

    https://imgur.com/JXjGr9F

  164. Top Ender

    ABC Radio in Darwin have the afternoon news in what they call “creole.”

    An aboriginal language speaker then comes on for three minutes or so.

    That this can be understood by only a few hundred people in ONE tribe IF they are listening to the radio, AND if it’s the ABC seems to have missed them. But then again just virtue-signalling.

  165. Infidel Tiger

    What a load of shit that fairfax report on the SAS is.

    Credit to the Left though. Their indefatigable spirit has now captured every institution in the country.

    It’s over for Australia.

  166. DrBeauGan

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2732102, posted on June 9, 2018 at 12:35 pm
    No, Candy, I don’t have any linguistic taboos. Or any others, really. Unless my dislike of being touched counts as one.

    That counts as a taboo in my book, Beaugy.

    Must be careful if we ever meet not to give you my impulsive kiss hello and hug goodbye. Last night Hairy and I met up with Percy Popinjay (who is a sartorial Beau Brummel not a BeauGan) and the charming Harlequin Decline. We discussed a wider meet up of Cats and Kittehs who live in Sydney. Stay tuned.

    And if you forget I’ll try not to take defensive action and sock you one.

    I’ve met Percy in another incarnation, and he dresses as, and indeed is, a gentleman.

  167. zyconoclast

    Europe Pledges $40M to Help Venezuelans

    The European Union will spend more than $40 million to help Venezuelans suffering through a deepening humanitarian crisis even as the country’s leaders have steadfastly denied it needs any foreign assistance.

    Venezuela was once one of Latin America’s wealthiest countries, sitting atop the world’s largest oil reserves. Mismanagement and a drop in global oil prices have left it in a deepening economic and political crisis, marked by shortages of food and medicine and mass migration.

  168. Infidel Tiger

    Ice Man is right.

    Media seems to be celebrating suicide this week. Nice change from celebrating abortion last week though.

  169. candy

    Suicide seems contagious this last week.

    The fashion lady Spade had a 13 year old daughter. She simply just destroyed the girl for the next few years, who will probably blame herself as the people left behind do.

  170. C.L.

    Will the Australia Council apologise for giving multiple fellowships and a lifetime emeritus fellowship to hideous child sex-ring organiser, Dorothy Hewett? Will Australian Federal Police investigate what AC principals knew and when they knew it? Will state police investigate all the literature luvvies who r-aped her daughters? If not, why not?

  171. H B Bear

    Media seems to be celebrating suicide this week. Nice change from celebrating abortion last week though.

    If only those unborn babies could off themselves and spare their “mothers” the guilt.

  172. DrBeauGan

    Media seems to be celebrating suicide this week.

    This should be encouraged. The more lefties off themselves the better. This is the whole rationale for the JC hotline.

  173. Oh come on

    Anthony Bourdain – was he about to come out with information that would upset the globalists? What did he know about the Clintons?

    Not bloody likely. I suspect TDS drove him over the edge. I wonder if the Hotline supported him in following through.

  174. C.L.

    Watch carefully as the Australian left and Australian feminists totally and absolutely ignore revelations about federally-funded child molester Dorothy Hewett.

    The two victims have said that literature figures r-aped them in 1970s.
    When will we see arrests?

  175. nemkat

    Will Australian Federal Police investigate what AC principals knew and when they knew it? Will state police investigate all the literature luvvies who r-aped her daughters? If not, why not?

    ” Child Protection” turf, C.L., and the answer to your query is:

    Not at the moment.
    Due to the fact that all hands on deck are investigating the Northern Beaches High School scene of the early 80s to discover if any teacher rootin’ hotties of the day, all in their fifties now, were a few days short of the Age of Consent at the time the rootin’ took place.

    It’s all about priorities.

  176. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    And if you forget I’ll try not to take defensive action and sock you one.

    I’ll tell Hairy to pin my arms down.
    It will keep his defensive reactions on my behalf under control too. 🙂

    Perhaps I am over used to social hugs and kisses (kisses more than hugs actually).
    I have been socially kissed hello by some true frogs during Hairy’s career.
    I’ve always thought it was a rather nice traditional greeting, friendly, barriers-down stuff.
    There is a long tradition of social kissing in England.
    It is mentioned in Tudor times and some foreign observers thought it strange.
    Now social kissing (on both cheeks) is widespread on the Continent.
    Even between men. Definitely not done here socially between men.

  177. OldOzzie

    8 Times Obama’s Intelligence Agencies Set People Up To Fabricate The Russia Story

    These events should anger any red-blooded American who believes in representative democracy and the importance of the rule of law.

    The intelligence bureaucracies spied on the Donald Trump campaign: Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act warrants were granted because of a Hillary Clinton-funded and unverified document, national-security letters were issued to allow warrantless spying, and the unprecedented but not-illegal-per-se unmasking of Trump officials’ conversations with non-U.S. persons was shockingly routine.

    Yet the news of a CIA-connected human source operating as far back as April or May of 2016 is about more than just spying. It is the latest example in what now looks to be a long line of attempted setups by the Clinton team, many times aided and abetted by our intelligence bureaucracies.

    These events should anger any red blooded American who believes in representative democracy and the importance of the rule of law. Let’s review eight examples.

    1. CIA And FBI ‘Human Intelligence’

    2. The Trump Tower Meeting

    3. Mike Flynn And The Logan Act

    4. Andrew McCabe Sets Up Reince Priebus

    5. Brennan Shops Dossier To Harry Reid

    6. Comey And Clapper Give CNN A Reason To Publish The Dossier

    7. The Jeff Sessions Recusal

    8. Rosenstein Recommends Comey Firing, Appoints Special Counsel

    It now looks like the corrupt and highly partisan upper-echelon of the U.S. intelligence community started their preliminary investigation as soon as the Clinton people — in the run-up to the Democratic convention — began claiming that there were ties between Trump and Russia. During this same time, Clinton and the DNC paid Fusion GPS, which hired Chris Steele to dig up ties between Trump and Russia.

    This is nothing more than prosecutorial point and shoot, where corrupt big-government politicians send the corrupt and sympathetic federal bureaucracy after their political enemies. It’s no different than what happened with Lois Lerner at the Internal Revenue Service. Democrats gave speeches and sent official letters, Obama implied he wanted action, and dutiful bureaucrats did the rest.

    With the intelligence agencies on board, legitimacy was lent to the Hillary Clinton campaign’s wild claims. All the media had to do in the weeks before Election Day was to frantically report that Trump’s campaign was being investigated, and that a document containing allegations of Trump-Russia ties (the “dossier”) was being seriously looked into by intelligence officials. That fed back to the voters, and certainly made many feel a little bit better about voting for Clinton, or not voting for Trump.

    After the election, it has been all about C.Y.A., because these corrupt bureaucrats leading these intelligence bureaucracies never imagined Trump would win. Here, ladies and gentleman, is your real election interference and collusion: between the massive, all-powerful and unaccountable intelligence bureaucracies, the media, the Obama administration, and the Clinton campaign.

  178. Boambee John

    If she had been a prominent Catholic, would those priorities have changed?

  179. nemkat

    Watch carefully as the Australian left and Australian feminists totally and absolutely ignore revelations about federally-funded child molester Dorothy Hewett.

    Action more likely on the Academic Front.
    Both Hewett’s frumpy daughters are Academics, probably not for very much longer.

  180. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    One cheek or two cheek kissing? It is always a dilemma.
    I always wait a short moment to see if I need to proffer the other cheek.
    Is that where ‘turn the other cheek’ comes from?
    I only do one cheek kissing when I am the initiator, although some expect two.
    You have to catch up quickly then. 🙂

  181. DrBeauGan

    Even between men. Definitely not done here socially between men.

    Not if the male social kisser wishes to survive.

  182. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Action more likely on the Academic Front.
    Both Hewett’s frumpy daughters are Academics, probably not for very much longer.

    No. They will be lauded as ‘brave’, and Hewitt’s behavior explained away as simply stemming from false consciousness due to the patriarchal ‘male gaze’ to which she and all women have historically been subjected.

    There will be no push back on this. I promise you.
    They’ll be fine as long as they don’t start to teach Western Civilization.

  183. nemkat

    If she had been a prominent Catholic, would those priorities have changed?

    She probably was a Catholic, Bob Ellis was a Catholic, more than likely most of the still living Luvvies are Catholics, could be a backlash, and the daughters will decide discretion is the better part of valour.

  184. calli

    Hand shaking for me. Definitely no kissie-kissie, from which I duck hastily and extend the arm for a handshake.

    And no huggie-huggie either!

    My personal space is my own and Space Invaders beware.

  185. Baldrick

    Looks like another weekend where the Cat has to babysit dumbkat.

  186. Excellent points, CL. I have quoted you on Twitter and #auspol. Worth retweeting it if any of you are also on twitter.

  187. Macbeth

    Lizzie, I doubt that I will be able to recount much about WW2 that has not been covered by better writers than I. My memory is fading and most of active my service was in isolated areas and not in the public domain. There is no “Official Secrets Act” in Australia, but a section of Crimes Act 1914 applied and still does.
    BTW, I heard and saw the young Prince Charles, when he was learning to fly, saying that the trim control on the aircraft looking like a “loo chain”. In regard to the aircraft he was flying, quite an accurate observation. There was something else, but now I forget. Cheers.

  188. DrBeauGan

    My personal space is my own and Space Invaders beware.

    Yup. I find I can get out of a handshake by raising my right hand and saying Hi.

    My personal space extends to about a kilometre.radius.

  189. She probably was a Catholic, Bob Ellis was a Catholic, more than likely most of the still living Luvvies are Catholics, could be a backlash, and the daughters will decide discretion is the better part of valour.

    Hewett was an atheist, like much of the rest of the Sydney luvvies involved, including Ellis.

  190. Vicki

    It would be interesting to see how many of these ‘600’ languages are really independent languages rather than just dialects

    Yes Lizzie, I’m always confused by the different anglicised spellings of the same words even in one tribal group (e.g. Wiradjuri). I guess early attempts to record words & place names just transliterated the sounds.

  191. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Handshakes are fine too, but not as friendly or feminine. More remote. More equalizing too.
    When you are with a prominent male socially, as a female, he handshakes and you allow a cheek kissy, as long as the kissy male is of similar status. Otherwise, you nod or thrust out a hand. It’s horrendously complicated. When the introduction is to a high status female, then you handshake her lightly. Or just nod nicely. If you are receiving an award, the tendency is for the superior male presenting it to do a cheek kissy. If a woman is presenting to a woman, you shake hands, or just look delighted. Goodbyes amongst friends after a few drinkies are often huggy-kissy between the girls and the guys.

    I am concerned that all of this ‘me-too’ stuff and ‘correct’ distancing, plus wanting men and women to behave in exactly the same way in all things, will remove some of the simple courtesies between men and women that have evolved over centuries to make social life both pleasant and interesting.

  192. Confused Old Misfit

    Speaking of greeting etiquette, what do the kittens here think of the hand kiss? A brush of the lips on the back of the fingers.
    Or as is the practice in some societies of raising the lady’s hand towards the lips but actually only kissing one’s own thumb.

  193. DrBeauGan

    I am concerned that all of this ‘me-too’ stuff and ‘correct’ distancing, plus wanting men and women to behave in exactly the same way in all things, will remove some of the simple courtesies between men and women that have evolved over centuries to make social life both pleasant and interesting.

    If you want to exchange germs with your social superiors, that is your right as a freeborn Australian, Lizzie.

    I haven’t got any.

  194. Some History

    I am concerned that all of this ‘me-too’ stuff and ‘correct’ distancing…

    How about a simple

    Owzit Garn, Mate?

    🙂

  195. Roger

    Surprisingly in the Washington Post

    Trump is presiding over extraordinary growth. G-7 leaders should notice.

    ABC headline: G-6+1 as Trump isolated on world stage.

    No bias. No agenda.

  196. Some History

    If you want to exchange germs with your social superiors, that is your right as a freeborn Australian, Lizzie.
    I haven’t got any.

    Germs?

  197. DrBeauGan

    Some History
    #2732156, posted on June 9, 2018 at 1:57 pm
    I am concerned that all of this ‘me-too’ stuff and ‘correct’ distancing…

    How about a simple

    Owzit Garn, Mate?

    Quite right. This is how you treat your social equals. Which in Oz is everyone.

  198. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    My memory is fading and most of active my service was in isolated areas and not in the public domain. There is no “Official Secrets Act” in Australia, but a section of Crimes Act 1914 applied and still does.

    Hearing what the men on the ground were thinking about the war and why they thought they were there and what you actually did, under what orders, would be a great piece of oral history, Macbeth. As for the Crimes Act, I’d say let ’em come and get you*. 🙂

    As you recall things, just jot down a line or two here. It doesn’t have to be perfect, just how you experienced things. But only if you feel up to it. Take care.

    * I think Macbeth is in his hundredth decade, our oldest commenter.

  199. Roger

    The Ramsey bequest is $3bn.

    Why are they shopping the concept around universities which aren’t interested?

    American philanthropists and church bodies established independent liberal arts colleges, many of them very highly regarded tot his day. That’s the model the Ramsey Centre should be pursuing. There is no cachet to be had by associating themselves with Australia’s second rate universities.

    If they can’t establish their own centre for learning they aren’t serious.

  200. DrBeauGan

    Some History
    #2732159, posted on June 9, 2018 at 1:59 pm
    If you want to exchange germs with your social superiors, that is your right as a freeborn Australian, Lizzie.
    I haven’t got any.

    Germs?

    I expect I have my quota of skin bacteria. But I haven’t found a social superior yet. I’m an everyone’s equal bloke.

  201. Infidel Tiger

    Watch carefully as the Australian left and Australian feminists totally and absolutely ignore revelations about federally-funded child molester Dorothy Hewett.

    The two victims have said that literature figures r-aped them in 1970s.
    When will we see arrests?

    It’s terrible. George Pell once through a child in the air at a public swimming pool.

  202. Senile Old Guy

    How about a simple

    Owzit Garn, Mate?

    Or…

    You again, D*ckhead?

  203. calli

    But I haven’t found a social superior yet.

    Yes, they seem to be very thin on the ground.

    But that’s because I’m a Princess. 🙃

  204. nemkat

    Hewett was an atheist, like much of the rest of the Sydney luvvies involved, including Ellis.

    Confessing Atheism is required of these people, if they want to be promoted.
    I think you’ll find, though, that whether it’s Bob Ellis, Germaine Greer, Dorothy Hewett, Frank Hardy or any other notable member of The Push, they were born Catholics, were given a great Catholic education, and had a Catholic burial when they passed on.

  205. Dr Fred Lenin

    I see the comrades at the alpbc are still going to play all three episodes of the Russia Lies Show ,question. Did the board and management approve of this excuse for hilarity the crooks defeat ,what the frig has that to do with Australia ? Why was Australian taxpayer money spent on this tissue of fabricated lies ?
    Now if they want a Real story ,investigate what happened to our money-y that the thief giliard gave to the thief hilarity’s so-called foundation ? did the thief giliard gain any personal advantage for giving away our money ? Did any of it end uo]p in turnbull or downers Cayman island accounts ?
    Now there is something worthy of a Real investigative journalists time and worth the money to find out,and long jail time for the guilty.

  206. Infidel Tiger

    You watch what happens to that Ramsay endowment.

    Within a decade it will be a mutli billion dollar GetUp! war chest.

  207. Some History

    But that’s because I’m a Princess.

    [24 seconds]

  208. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    what do the kittens here think of the hand kiss?

    It’s only happened to me once, in Europe, and I felt very honored and valued. Same as when I was ceremonially presented with the traditional single red rose in Italy on Sancta Geordi’s day.

    I agree that in Australia the kissy niceties towards women are beginning to fade out of practice.
    Mainly they are now the domain of older men and I’ve come across it far more in Britain and Europe than here in Oz. Hairy doesn’t do it at all, except in friendship groups saying goodbye to the girls.

  209. DrBeauGan

    calli
    #2732168, posted on June 9, 2018 at 2:05 pm
    But I haven’t found a social superior yet.

    Yes, they seem to be very thin on the ground.

    But that’s because I’m a Princess.

    Never mind, Calli. Accident of birth, no doubt. I’m still prepared to say g’day, how’re ya goin? to you. Hell, I’d even treat Prince Charles as an equal.

  210. Infidel Tiger

    Increasingly, Australia stands alone. Vaping nicotine is legal in Britain, the US and Canada, and New Zealand effectively legalised it courtesy of a court decision in May. But in Canberra, Health Minister Greg Hunt remains vehemently opposed.

    “The overwhelming medical advice and evidence is that it’s likely to lead to the uptake of smoking and we cannot support that,” his spokesperson says.

    In case you weren’t depressed enough about the future of this country.

    Time for drinks.

  211. The Ramsey bequest is $3bn.

    Why are they shopping the concept around universities which aren’t interested?

    American philanthropists and church bodies established independent liberal arts colleges, many of them very highly regarded tot his day. That’s the model the Ramsey Centre should be pursuing. There is no cachet to be had by associating themselves with Australia’s second rate universities.

    If they can’t establish their own centre for learning they aren’t serious.

    Exactly.

  212. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    If you guys think that in politics and the law, in academia, the defense forces and in senior corporate life people don’t still behave as though the Ministers, the High Court Judges, the Chancellors, the Governors, the Military Top Brass and the top CEO’s should be given some social deference then you are nuts. That is the way of the world, Australia or anywhere else.

    I’ve met a few of these with Hairy and have been taking anthropological notes.
    In a civilized manner, of course. 🙂

    And for the record, I don’t think anyone is any better than I am. Anywhere.
    And I came from Mt. Druitt.

  213. DrBeauGan

    dover_beach
    #2732185, posted on June 9, 2018 at 2:23 pm
    The Ramsey bequest is $3bn.

    Why are they shopping the concept around universities which aren’t interested?

    American philanthropists and church bodies established independent liberal arts colleges, many of them very highly regarded tot his day. That’s the model the Ramsey Centre should be pursuing. There is no cachet to be had by associating themselves with Australia’s second rate universities.

    If they can’t establish their own centre for learning they aren’t serious.

    Exactly.

    +1000^(1000)

  214. DrBeauGan

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2732186, posted on June 9, 2018 at 2:25 pm
    If you guys think that in politics and the law, in academia, the defense forces and in senior corporate life people don’t still behave as though the Ministers, the High Court Judges, the Chancellors, the Governors, the Military Top Brass and the top CEO’s should be given some social deference then you are nuts. That is the way of the world, Australia or anywhere else.

    I’ve met a few of these with Hairy and have been taking anthropological notes.

    I don’t do deference, Lizzie. Nor do I want it from others. Its too vulgar.

  215. Nick

    what do the kittens here think of the hand kiss?

    They were ok around 1979. I can’t believe that Gene Simmons has recanted his earlier rooting.

  216. dopey

    SMH Good Weekend Quiz.
    ” In which African country did Israel seize 100 hostages in 1977?”
    I’m sure they mean rescue.

  217. Confessing Atheism is required of these people, if they want to be promoted.
    I think you’ll find, though, that whether it’s Bob Ellis, Germaine Greer, Dorothy Hewett, Frank Hardy or any other notable member of The Push, they were born Catholics, were given a great Catholic education, and had a Catholic burial when they passed on.

    Rubbish. Ellis was raised a Seventh-Day Adventist and was an atheist as an adult. Dorothy Hewett attended an Anglican School and was an atheist all her adult life. Germaine Greer was a baptised Catholic that rejected her religious patrimony for feminism. I don’t even know if Hardy was baptized a Catholic as his father was an atheist, nor whether his primary education was Catholic at all. Also, to claim that members of the Sydney Push rejected Catholicism only as a gesture to their peers is too silly for words.

  218. “The overwhelming medical advice and evidence is that it’s likely to lead to the uptake of smoking and we cannot support that,” his spokesperson says.

    Dumb as a bag of rocks, or they think most of us are.

  219. Cactus

    Anthony Bourdain is very sad news. One of the only celebrity deaths that has actually moved me. I watched all his shows. I really liked how he loved to drink and didnt try to sanitise his shows at all. I dont have much interest in Michelin star restaurants, and while he did do that, he also ate a lot of street food and local stuff and showed reverence towards it. He would go to a place like Prague and find a Korean Pho place. Eat hotdogs at 3 in the morning and smashing a beer. He more than anyone else on TV looked like someone who would always be fun to hang out with. Im not surprised he topped himself though. There was always a dark edge to him, and he appear prone to cave to addictions.

    Firat celeb death that makes me feel like I have lost something.

  220. Some History

    From a commenter elsewhere:

    Opinions are like butt holes. Everybody has one. They all stink except mine.

  221. Boambee John

    Macbeth

    Were you involved with B-24s in northern Oz?

  222. candy

    Handshakes are fine too, but not as friendly or feminine. More remote.

    I kind of think the opposite. Handshakes can be quite friendly as you look someone in the eyes too. A genuine meeting.

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