Power crisis in NSW. But who needs aluminium smelters?

Jo Nova reports (as did The Weekend Australian) that the aluminium smelters in NSW are at risk from uncertain power supplies.

This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to Power crisis in NSW. But who needs aluminium smelters?

  1. stackja

    NSW premier GB is busy attending to virtue signaling on social matters.

  2. Entropy

    Thing is, why would you bother going to the trouble and expense of maintaining, let alone upgrading these smelters in an ever higher regulatory and cost environment, rather than just building a new one in another country?

  3. Myrddin Seren

    Thing is, why would you bother going to the trouble and expense of maintaining, let alone upgrading these smelters in an ever higher regulatory and cost environment, rather than just building a new one in another country?

    Other than getting subsidies – effectively renting out the plant to government, like the car makers did until even they couldn’t see value any more – you would not. Deindustrialisation of Australia – the Green Dream another step closer.

  4. Egor

    Yea of little faith, this problem is fixed in a jiffy with 500,000 acres of 250% taxpayer subsidised windmills and some batteries from Musk.
    The solution stares the deniers in the face. Next.

  5. De-industrialisation is underway.

  6. H B Bear

    Basically smelters produce solid electricity. They are located wherever the cheapest electricity can be sourced around the world and for a long time this included Australia. State governments were prepared to sign long term power purchase agreements that were barely profitable even at the time they were signed, often decades ago, continuing a long history of taxpayer industry subsidies.

    Until the renewable scam distorted the electricity market smelters and other large industrial users supported a high demand for baseload power meaning that the electricity network could support a smaller number of larger, fully utilised generators operating at maximum efficiency. Now these generators are rendered uneconomic as their low cost output is displaced by wind and solar when available and the defacto carbon tax under the NEG or whatever flavour of day government.
    interference is current. Under these circumstances coal generators are not able at maximum efficiency and fully recover their large capital costs.

    The loss of smelters is no great loss per se (except for the jobs and support services) but rather is just another sign of a deeply distorted and dysfunctional electricity market that is no longer fit for purpose.

  7. Singleton Engineer

    @HBB:
    Agreed.

  8. Myrddin Seren

    The loss of smelters is no great loss per se

    Competition is competition.

    But Australia is the Monty Python Black Knight of energy and resources. We chop our own legs off, yell it for the good of the planet, chop another limb off because it felt so good the first time, rinse, repeat.

  9. Dr Fred Lenin

    Let the smelter go broke and sack te workers and the company can move overseas . We can then borrow more money and buy aluminium from Canada that Trump tarriffed out of the USA,simple solution who needs industry when we can borrow money and buy from other countries .

  10. John Constantine

    As their ABC lecture us from their billion dollar a year bully pulpit:

    We are such a wealthy country we can afford to move to a services economy, as soon as we have mass imported enough millions of military age revolutionary freedom fighters from peasantistan to serve as consumption machines for our socialist services Ponzi.

    Comrades.

  11. RobK

    Basically smelters produce solid electricity. They are located wherever the cheapest electricity can be sourced around the world and for a long time this included Australia.
    It has been that way forever. A consequence is that the large Al producers have a history of investing in hydro. Whilst the price of Al has been depressed of late, the long established big players in Al have enjoyed playing the electricity market especially with “carbon credits”. Its a strange web we weave……

  12. anonandon

    Utterly predictable and it will solve the power shortage issue. They use a phenomenal amount of electricity and the price is just too high. P.S we’re fucked.

  13. Y

    Maybe a dumb question, but if renewables are so great why not build a lot of hydro? At least it works in the dark, and has a very long amortisation period.

    If you’re going to spend an absolute fortune, why not on something that works?

  14. anonandon I agree with your PS.

    Ignore it all there nothing much we can do that avoid the disaster over the next decade.

    Rephrased, it will take a decade to fix the mess. No government will do that.

  15. H B Bear

    Maybe a dumb question, but if renewables are so great why not build a lot of hydro?

    Try and build a dam and see how you get on. Good luck!

    And yes it was a dumb question.

  16. Dr Fred Lenin

    You are not allowed to build dams,you will drown the fish if you do ,and deprive vermin of water supply.its not on tovarishi!

  17. NB

    Excellent. Australia’s deindustrialisation continues apace. Soon we will be all living in small communities, growing our own organic food, following gardening hints and other directives from the ABC. And we won’t even have a refugee problem, except for those leaving. We will need a wall I guess.

  18. manalive

    Another huge coal breakdown — SEVENTH in past fortnight. This time sudden loss of 630MW at antiquated Vales Point Power Station. When will NSW Government begin to replace old coal with reliable 21st century reneables [sic] + storage? NSW way behind other states … (The Australia Institute).

    The only viable source of large scale storage at present would be pumped hydro that uses about 20% more electricity than it can generate.
    Even if feasible sites were available around the coast salt water would soon wreck the equipment so the only alternative would be damming existing watercourses, the same as traditional hydro, but apparently that’s OK with Richard Dennnisss and co.

  19. rickw

    De-industrialisation is underway.

    Yep.

  20. Roger

    Power crisis in NSW. But who needs aluminium smelters?

    Aren’t solar panels installed in aluminium frames?

  21. When you look around, it’s quite surprising where aluminium is used. Even wind turbines

  22. John Constantine

    Why would owners pay good money to maintain coal plants when their shorten looting cartel is being handed the next election, and the turnbullites are being paid 30 pieces of fivers to decolonise the place anyway?.

    Run them into the ground and hand the keys to the greens as you flee the ruins of the country.

    Comrades.

  23. Crossie

    NB
    #2732860, posted on June 10, 2018 at 2:42 pm
    Excellent. Australia’s deindustrialisation continues apace. Soon we will be all living in small communities, growing our own organic food, following gardening hints and other directives from the ABC. And we won’t even have a refugee problem, except for those leaving. We will need a wall I guess.

    Then we will be equal with the “First Nations” who will suddenly find out where the sit down money comes from.

  24. Spring is coming

    To do my but, I’ll take my beer in glass bottles. No can do.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.