Open Forum: June 16, 2018

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1,651 Responses to Open Forum: June 16, 2018

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  1. zyconoclast

    The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops opened its spring meeting this week with a stern reproach of the Trump administration’s latest immigration policies, with the group’s president suggesting the new rules on asylum are a “right to life” issue.

    Some bishops followed by urging protests, including “canonical penalties” for those who carry out the administration’s new rules.

    Within minutes of opening the USCCB’s biannual meeting in Fort Lauderdale on Wednesday (June 13), Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the USCCB and archbishop of Galveston-Houston, read aloud a statement deeply critical of Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recent announcement regarding asylum qualifications.

    “At its core, asylum is an instrument to preserve the right to life,” DiNardo said, reading from the statement. “The Attorney General’s recent decision elicits deep concern because it potentially strips asylum from many women who lack adequate protection.

    “This decision negates decades of precedents that have provided protection to women fleeing domestic violence,” DiNardo continued. “We urge courts and policy makers to respect and enhance, not erode, the potential of our asylum system to preserve and protect the right to life.”

    On Monday, Sessions reversed an immigration appeals court decision granting asylum to a Salvadoran woman who had claimed domestic abuse in her home country. His ruling effectively overturned an Obama administration practice of allowing women with credible claims of domestic abuse or those fleeing gang violence to seek asylum in the United States.

    DiNardo also criticized the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy, announced in May, which calls for prosecuting all those who cross the border illegally and separating children immigrating with parents from their families.

    “Our government has the discretion in our laws to ensure that young children are not separated from their parents and exposed to irreparable harm and trauma. Families are the foundational element of our society and they must be able to stay together,” DiNardo said.

    “Separating babies from their mothers is not the answer and is immoral,” he added.

    When he finished, DiNardo asked bishops to clap if they approved the statement. The room erupted in applause.

    During a question-and-answer session about immigration issues later in the day, several bishops suggested bold strategies for countering the policies, including two from states along the U.S.-Mexico border.

    Cardinal Joseph Tobin of Newark, N.J., proposed that a group of bishops be sent to the border to inspect the detention facilities where children are kept as a “sign of our pastoral concern and protest against the hardening of the American heart.” Bishop Oscar Cantú of Las Cruces, N.M., suggested “public gestures” such as prayer vigils in front of federal courthouses.

    Bishop Edward Weisenburger of Tucson, Ariz., made a bolder suggestion, raising the possibility of implementing canonical penalties for Catholics “who are involved in this,” referring to children being separated from their families at the border. Canonical penalties can range from denial of sacraments to excommunication, though Weisenburger did not specify what he intended beyond referring to sanctions that already exist for “life issues.”

    “Canonical penalties are there in place to heal,” Weisenburger said. “And therefore, for the salvation of these people’s souls, maybe it’s time for us to look at canonical penalties.”

    The immigration policies have triggered widespread outcry from faith leaders across the religious spectrum, including Catholics. Sister Norma Pimentel, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley who has been praised by Pope Francis for her work with migrants, told USA Today that separating families is “inhumane” and “cruel.”

    The bishops are meeting in Fort Lauderdale through Thursday.

  2. zyconoclast

    NEW SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION PRESIDENT URGES CULTURAL CHANGE, SUPPORTS WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP

    The Southern Baptist Convention elected J.D. Greear as president Tuesday, signaling Southern Baptists’ willingness to embrace massive cultural changes.

    Greear, at 45-years-old, is the youngest man to be elected president of the SBC in 37 years. He has spoken openly about abuse scandals that have recently rocked the Southern Baptist Convention and hailed them a sign from God of needed cultural change.

    “God is stirring in the SBC. He has exposed a startling amount of sin in our midst. He has shaken many of our foundations. And I actually think that’s good news, because whom the Lord loves, he chastens,” Greear wrote after his election. “He is inviting us, I believe, into an era of unprecedented effectiveness for the Great Commission, if we repent.”

    Greear recently called on his fellow Southern Baptists to embrace not a doctrinal change, but a cultural change with regard to their implementation of complementarianism, representation of minorities in church leadership, protection for the abused, and other changes that in many cases repudiated elements of culture that the recently disgraced Paige Patterson promoted.

  3. zyconoclast

    Ottawa library faces court challenge over cancelled screening of controversial anti-Islamist film
    The organizer claims the library’s decision to cancel ‘violated (her) constitutional right to free expression’ as well as the rights of the audience to see the film

  4. zyconoclast

    U.S. blocked Canada’s abortion agenda at G7 negotiations

    WASHINGTON, D.C. June 14 (C-Fam) – In the lead-up to this year’s G7 summit in Quebec, Canadian officials were explicit: women and children were going to be central, and an essential component of their health and empowerment is abortion. But when the final declarations were released, all language about “reproductive rights” was removed, and, according to Devex, “the U.S. delegation…was responsible for the softer official language.”

    Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, following the famous example of Sweden, has characterized his government and its foreign policy as “feminist.” He employs quotas to ensure that half his cabinet members are women and imposes regulations on his party to support only pro-abortion policies and candidates. For the first time, as G7 host, Canada established a Gender Equality Advisory Council which submitted its recommendations to integrate gender into the G7’s work. Other inputs included a statement from more than sixty feminists that included a call for an end to the “criminalization or restrictive regulation of abortion.”

  5. C.L.

    His ashes will be interred between major British scientific figures Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin at Westminster Abbey, a location made famous worldwide for generations of royal coronations, weddings and funerals.

    Members of the public from over 100 countries, selected by a ballot, will join friends and family for the service which will include a reading from actor Benedict Cumberbatch, who played Hawking in a 2004 BBC film.

    The physicist’s voice set to a piece by Greek electronic music composer Vangelis will be broadcast by the European Space Agency later on Friday.

    “The broadcast will be beamed towards the nearest black hole, 1A 0620-00, which lives in a binary system with a fairly ordinary orange dwarf star,” his daughter Lucy Hawking said in a statement.

    “It is a message of peace and hope, about unity and the need for us to live together in harmony on this planet.”

    As wanks go, this is cosmic.

  6. sdfc

    don’t want to offend Dot, but this is why people like Leigh come across as smarter than you.

    Leigh has argued that Trump is using mad dog Bolton to get a better deal out of Kim, whereas you deflect to Clinton.

    I’m not sure what argument you are trying to make in your last comment.

  7. Makka

    He can do anything;

    Donald J. Trump

    Verified account

    @realDonaldTrump
    Following Following @realDonaldTrump
    More
    Thank you for all of the compliments on getting the World Cup to come to the U.S.A., Mexico and Canada. I worked hard on this, along with a Great Team of talented people. We never fail, and it will be a great World Cup! A special thanks to Bob Kraft for excellent advice.

    4:06 AM – 15 Jun 2018

  8. .

    Leigh has argued that Trump is using mad dog Bolton to get a better deal out of Kim, whereas you deflect to Clinton.

    You deflected to the aims of the PNAC, which the Clinton’s supported.

  9. sdfc

    No I was referring to Bolton’s enthusiasm for war with Iran.

  10. .

    sfdc is just projecting Hillary Clinton’s own views onto Bolton.

    Risible, utterly risible.

    You’re just trolling to get people into stupid arguments, anything to make Trump look bad.

    You’re just too partisan give credit where it is due.

  11. JC

    I can’t get over this. Fox has written about it.

    In the interview with Fox’s Steve Doocy, Trump made it clear he considered Comey the leader of those “minions.”

    “I think Comey was the ringleader of this whole den of thieves,” Trump said.

    “If you took a poll at the FBI, [I would win],” Trump told Doocy. “I mean the real FBI, not the scum on top.”

  12. JC

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    This insane. They’re encouraging women to risk being murdered and raped for their ideological purpose. They’re happy when these things occur.

  13. BorisG

    Dot your panegyric to trump on the previous thread: was it toung in cheek?

    How do you like the tariffs?

    I checked about Pence and apparently he was strongly opposed to any reduction of sentences for drug offenses .

  14. BorisG

    JC, Comeys theatrics helped trump. That is quite clear.

  15. Old School Conservative

    Lisa, it’s simple.
    Teach the ten commandments.
    Get rid of marxist law makers.
    Between those two solutions at least 80% of rape will disappear.

    Your boys, Lisa, are not the rapists. Your insinuation that all boys are rapists is deeply wrong. It’s offensive to infer that all parents are also wrong for not teaching against rape. The vast majority of parents in Australia are good, decent people who abhor rape but you won’t have that will you.
    Anything for a headline eh Lisa.

    It must be hard competing for attention against the comedy line up called The Project.

  16. JC

    Hi Boris

    The IG report was very damning about Comey. It totally undercuts any thoughts Mueller had on going after Trump on obstruction grounds.

  17. .

    Tariffs are only another tax.

    Trump is wrong about this stuff, I’ve said this all along.

    You need to tone down the hyperbole Boris.

    Let’s be completely objective. Trump has had a great year and a half in office.

    Could we do better? Yes, but Rand Paul will probably never be President.

    I checked about Pence and apparently he was strongly opposed to any reduction of sentences for drug offenses .

    Boris, you have been lied to.

    From Reason (great article, BTW):

    http://reason.com/archives/2017/12/18/the-myth-of-the-playground-pus

    Groups of freshmen from Kauffman’s classes continued to bring their maps to the legislature over the next several years, and in 2014, then–Gov. Mike Pence signed a law, over the objections of the state prosecutor association, shrinking Indiana’s drug-free zones from 1,000 to 500 feet, reducing the sentences for school zone violations, and removing public housing complexes and youth centers from the designation.

    He stood up to the generally unscrupulous and unethical US district attorneys (ala Mike Nifong). He’s a good man.

  18. BorisG

    Dot, maybe this is not he full story. Have a look at this:


    ,

  19. OneWorldGovernment

    Glory be dot.

    I don’t know how some have survived without having you around to argue with nor abuse. lol.

  20. BorisG

    Dot, Pence is the most socially conservative VP for maybe a 100 years. Far more conservative than Trump, who has ridiculed his views. Libertarians are supposed to be economically conservative but socially liberal.

    I know like you he loves guns but I think there similarity ends.

  21. BorisG

    The IG report was very damning about Comey.

    Ok but It didn’t say which side his behavior helped. It is clear it was trump. Probably unintentionally.

  22. The IG report was very damning about Comey. It totally undercuts any thoughts Mueller had on going after Trump on obstruction grounds.

    Comey’s conduct in the Hillary email investigation bears no relevance to Mueller’s forthcoming report on Trump committing obstruction of justice and then admitting to the crime on national television. You are flailing, JC.

  23. EvilElvis

    Top 40. No doubt with some rehashed 80s tune spliced to shite rap music.

  24. classical_hero

    https://youtu.be/DDzInS6WXh8

    This is interesting, but be warned about the swearing, but it’s about 10 things why Australia sucks. It’s mostly humorous, but he does get serious, especially for numbers 1 and 10.

  25. classical_hero

    The drips are coming slowly for you monster.

  26. Tom

    Twitter has suspended the Poltoons account, which is used simply to post America’s wittiest cartoons and is a major source for my daily survey. Poltoons never posts offensive material. The ban would appear to be straight-up political censorship as Poltoons specialises in cartoons that do not fit the leftist straight-jacket.

  27. Bruce of Newcastle

    Payne for me! And Ramirez in the same vein. The contortions the Left are doing over Trump are wonderful to behold.

  28. Gary

    BorisG

    What candidate would have implemented not just supported the thing you claim to approve i.e. Jerusalem embassy?

    Just trying to work out weather your just gaslighting like Bush and many others.

    Cheers

  29. Bruce of Newcastle

    Let’s explode a few more lefty heads…

    Discussing U.S. politics with foreign reporters, [Dem pollster] Zogby said:

    “His approval ratings within his own party are high. If you look today, 87 percent of Republicans give him a positive approval rating. What’s that mean? At this point in his presidency, Barack Obama had a 79 percent rating among Democrats. The only president at this point in time in the presidency to outscore Donald Trump was George W. Bush at 95 percent, and of course, by this point in time, we had launched the war in Iraq. Ronald Reagan wasn’t this high. Jack Kennedy wasn’t this high. The GOP is the party of Trump.”

    Those Deplorables are so…deplorable!

    GOP wants Trump in 2020, more popular than Obama, JFK, Reagan

  30. struth

    Yesterday I went into Bunnings.
    Warren Trusss walked past.
    I said Gday and moved on.
    A bloody Bunnings shop assistant baled me up after and asked, you know who that was?
    I said yeah.
    He was second in the land once, said the assistant.
    And then blurted out, I wonder what he would be thinking about Trump and this North Korea bloody summit, hey.
    Dickhead I thought.
    I politely said, I don’t reckon he looks liked hed give a shit anymore I said.

    What is it with the brainwashed that they can’t work out that for a bloke to become President he must have millions and millions of supporters?
    Can you really be that thick to assume no one in the world likes him because Lisa Wilkinson or some other shameful wretch told you that?

  31. calli

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    How odd. I never felt the need to tell my son not to rape women. It was something he instinctively knew was wrong.

    The Fitzsimmons household must be a very strange place.

  32. Herodotus

    The Daily Telegraph ( paywalled) has an item called “Click Fix” which says that the NSW government will get public servants to advise consumers how to switch retailers and save up to $1000 per year on their elecricity bills. Feasible? I doubt it, even though shiny bums spend plenty of their working hours scouring the specials and advising each other how to do domestic stuff for less.
    It’s just more fudging around with the retail end of a badly flawed energy regime.

  33. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Yo montie! you hear that, don’t be no raping no women no more, you hear that!

  34. Herodotus

    Quite right, Calli.
    We now have on the one hand extensive denial that ME culture has a rape and violence problem, with repeated claims that any and every terrorist event or rape is just individual criminal behaviour or the product of a mentally disturbed person, while on the other it is being asserted that men generally have a cultural issue regarding rape and violence.

  35. Geriatric Mayfly

    Bulletproof glass around the Eiffel Tower
    Paris builds Eiffel Tower terror fence
    The city is placing bulletproof glass and high walls around the tower to guard against terrorism.

    The Bollards of Peace have a makeover. The description of a Terror Fence needs urgent revision however, as offence and sub conscious bias are implicit.

  36. rickw

    The Southern Baptist Convention elected J.D. Greear as president Tuesday, signaling Southern Baptists’ willingness to embrace massive cultural changes.

    Infiltrate, destroy.

  37. rickw

    Yesterday I went into Bunnings.
    Warren Trusss walked past.

    I thought for a second this was a joke about some prefabricated structural element.

  38. O)ldOzzie

    Tom,

    thanks – today’s wimmer A.F.Branco #1

  39. O)ldOzzie

    Tom, thanks as always – today’s wimmer A.F.Branco #1

  40. None

    NSW Nationals leader John Barilaro worried about losing next generation to ice after proudly walking with a woman to go kill her unborn child. These demented morons think we’re as stupid as they are.

  41. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    Migration success hinges on effective integration

    The unfortunate misappropriation of an American phrase about particular US circumstances aside, NSW Labor leader Luke Foley did the nation a service last month when he raised the issue of “white flight”. The term itself is unnecessarily divisive, ethnically inaccurate and highly emotive; besides, it just doesn’t apply to Australia. But the context in which he used it and the issues he was trying to highlight are very real and important. They deserve the serious attention of the public, politicians and policymakers. This newspaper has always supported a diverse, open and expansive Australia, but that does not mean we are blind to the challenges that can arise through immigration. On the contrary, to sustain high levels of immigration and underpin a pluralistic and tolerant society we need be alive to the social, economic, cultural and demographic challenges that manifest themselves in issues as varied as housing affordability, transport infrastructure, integration and the availability of government services. It is these stresses and strains created by dramatic demographic changes — especially in Sydney and Melbourne — that prompted Mr Foley’s intervention and into which we have delved deeply in today’s edition.

    Demographer and The Weekend Australian columnist Bernard Salt has analysed census data that reveals the inescapable facts about the changing dynamics in our biggest cities. As they swell with our growing population, many suburbs in Melbourne and Sydney are transforming in their ethnic and socio-economic mix. About two-thirds of the people leaving certain western Sydney suburbs come from Australian-born or Anglo backgrounds and about two-thirds of those moving in are from non-Anglo backgrounds. In the suburbs of northern and western Melbourne the mix is about 50-50 for those moving in but those moving out are more than two-thirds Australian-born or Anglo. So these areas clearly are changing rapidly. Whether the motivating factors here have anything to do with the changing cultural or socio-economic make-up of the areas is, to a large extent, guesswork. We can only rely on examples and anecdotes. As Salt argues, a variety of factors are at play. Families move out to buy homes with more space, change lifestyles, follow work or capitalise on increased property values while others move out to retirement locations.

    From the historic Chinatowns in our major cities to the Italian heartlands of Carlton in Melbourne and Leichhardt in Sydney, we have long seen character developments in our suburbs that are based on culture. This is part of what gives cities their charm and vibrancy. Migrants from Vietnam have left an indelible mark on Cabramatta and Footscray while Indians spice up Harris Park to rival the Chinese in Chatswood. In Inquirer today Caroline Overington provides a snapshot of the Iraqis in Fairfield. If we are happy to discuss the benefits of all this we must be willing to have a dialogue about the challenges.

    Our reporting today focuses on some of the concerns as aspirational families move out of these areas to be replaced by newcomers, often migrants, who have lower incomes, higher levels of welfare dependency and sometimes inadequate English or skills to find work or training. This only hampers integration into the wider community; and this is the vital factor that enables economic engagement, self-reliance and social cohesion. Federal, state and local government policy must be co-ordinated to tackle these issues as they arise. It is not just about ensuring we have enough roads and train stations; it requires social infrastructure. Work availability, education, training and language proficiency are crucial.

    Federal Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs Minister Alan Tudge has spoken frankly about some emerging problems with integration stemming from clusters of people with poor English skills, low employment rates and inadequate education in some suburbs of our major cities. He also has proposed stricter language demands for the granting of permanent residency and citizenship. Provided adequate training is available and there is sufficient flexibility for exceptional circumstances, this policy push makes enormous sense. Malcolm Turnbull has endorsed this approach. “We have the most successful multicultural society in the world and it is based on integration, and the key to integration is obviously English,” the Prime Minister said. “That’s the national language, that’s how you can engage in the economy, in society and education, and so it’s in everyone’s interests to do that.”

    No one needs to overstate the problems but neither should we be too timid about identifying them. We want our cities to be lively but functional and our culture to be diverse but integrated. We expect politicians and other community leaders to engage on these issues without the fear of finger-waving and abuse from the politically correct. This debate is not about undermining our tolerance and multicultural success story but precisely the opposite — it is about protecting and sustaining it.

  42. BorisG

    Gary, did I criticize trump or Pense for that? I am just questiong inconsistency in dot’s views. I do not share dot’s views myself, not all of them.

    And yes I am conflicted about Trump. He is a flawed character but has done great things. And some stupid things too, like these tariffs. Analogy with Nixon is appropriate. Nixon was definitely a flawed character and was even impeached for that, but he threw a lifeline to Israel in time of need, and we will never forget that.

  43. rickw

    Let’s explode a few more lefty heads…

    I was sitting at a bar with some USAF personnel last night. Two most interesting points in wide ranging discussions. They knew quite a lot about what was being done to George Pell, this surprised me, they brought it up. They had no idea that Australia had been giving money to the Clinton Foundation. We raised our glasses to DJT, we concluded that the strangling to death of everything that is good about the USA and The Anglosphere had possibly turned a corner.

  44. None

    I noted on the other thread that SpongeBob square head Daniel Andrews distance himself from the police chief who suggested women assess risks. Let’s be blunt here the young woman who was brutally raped and murdered was well aware she was taking a risk because she texted to her friend that she was almost home “safe”. It is not her fault she was killed it is not her fault that she was raped but she was well aware she was taking a risk and unfortunately her assessment this time was wrong. Most other women would have not taken that risk and certainly not walking through a park at night. The only person responsible for her death was the murderer but she increased her chances of being a victim. That is the sad fact of life. Blaming all men is demented and unjust. All men are not rapists and certainly not screw ball stalker type rapists like this guy seems to be. By bowing down to the feminazis -hello Lisa- like Daniel Andrews has done these fuckwits are sending the message to young women that they should just walk around with impunity without assessing risks while discouraging young men from insisting on accompanying them should I need to walk to a car etc yes they be accused of being chauvinist pigs. It is precisely these frigid feminazis and their pin prick male enablers who allow these rapists on the street, whether they be on bail or otherwise certifiable and who encourage women to take unnecessary risks and discourage men from protecting them.

  45. None

    I noted on the other thread that SpongeBob square head Daniel Andrews distance himself from the police chief who suggested women assess risks. Let’s be blunt here the young woman who was brutally r**ed and murdered was well aware she was taking a risk because she texted to her friend that she was almost home “safe”. It is not her fault she was killed, it is not her fault that she was r**ed but she was well aware she was taking a risk and unfortunately her assessment this time was wrong. Most other women would have not taken that risk and certainly not walking through a park at night. The only person responsible for her death was the murderer but she increased her chances of being a victim. That is the sad fact of life. Blaming all men is demented and unjust. All men are not r**ists and certainly not screw ball stalker type r**ists like this guy seems to be. By bowing down to the femin*zis -hello Lisa- like Daniel Andrews has done these f***wits are sending the message to young women that they should just walk around with impunity without assessing risks while discouraging young men from insisting on accompanying them should they need to walk to a car or wherever lest they be accused of being chauvinist pigs. It is precisely these frigid feminazis and their pin prick male enablers who allow these r**ists on the street, whether they be on bail or otherwise certifiable who encourage women to take unnecessary risks and discourage men from protecting them. As such they have blood on their hands.

  46. OldOzzie

    Complex truth of ‘white flight’ revealed in data – Brad Norington

    Demographic shifts driven by Australia’s immigration program threaten to lock Sydney’s western suburbs and parts of Melbourne into a bleak future, as low-income ethnic clusters struggle to cope with congestion and social dislocation, experts warn.

    Large numbers of new arrivals who have difficulty finding work have poured into Sydney’s west, according to census-based research commissioned by The Weekend Australian.

    “Uncompromisingly direct” evidence from the research confirms an exodus of affluent locals from western Sydney is occurring at an equally significant rate.

    Over five years to 2016, according to the research conducted by The Weekend Australian’s columnist and demographer Bernard Salt, up to two-thirds of the 266,000 new arrivals in Sydney’s western suburbs were not Australian-born and had a “non-Anglo heritage”.

    Of those who departed over the same period, 63 per cent of the 183,000 total were Australian-born and a further 5 per cent were born in Britain or New Zealand.

    Melbourne is experiencing a similar pattern, though not as ­intense, reflecting cheaper housing as more land is opened up in outlying suburbs.

    Debate over migrant enclaves was reignited last month when NSW Labor leader Luke Foley spoke out about “white flight” from a middle-ring of Sydney suburbs “where many Anglo families have moved out”.

    Graphic: Migrant hotspots

    While pressured to apologise for using the term “white flight” — first coined in the US to describe white residents leaving in ­response to inflows of African-Americans — Mr Foley said he was empathising with migrants in the west who were denied jobs and other opportunities that were taken for granted elsewhere.

    He named Fairfield, Guildford, Granville, Yennora, Sefton and Regents Park — some of which fall in his electorate of Auburn — as suburbs with a high concentration of Syrian and Iraqi refugees.

    Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs Minister Alan Tudge raised concerns about the social integration of “parallel” Asian and Middle Eastern migrant communities this week when he flagged government plans for a mandatory basic English requirement for all new permanent ­residents.

    Mr Tudge said research showed a lack of English language skills among migrants had contributed to social fragmentation. He cited suburbs where one in three could not speak English well, or at all.

    Bob Birrell, head of the Australian Population Research Institute, said evidence proved Mr Foley was right about population movements in the western suburbs, even if his choice of phrase was politically unfortunate. “It’s a real phenomenon,” Dr Birrell said.

    He said cheaper housing was forcing migrants west, and prompting an outflow of residents who no longer recognised their suburb and could afford to move. The only immediate solution to “take the heat” out of ­population stress, he said, was to cut back on overseas migration.

    Mayor of Fairfield Frank Carbone said migration to his area was so rapid that services were falling behind.

    Mr Carbone said Fairfield took 7000 Syrian refugees in a short time, over and above the general intake of 1000, following former prime minister Tony Abbott’s decision to accept Syrian Christians dislocated by civil war.

    As a consequence, he said, Fairfield had the highest household occupancy rate and highest unemployment jump in the nation. Migrants who could not find work were forced to stay with family or others they knew, compounding the population concentration.

    “The government may have stopped the boats — but they put them on buses to Fairfield,” Mr Carbone said.

    “All I’m saying is that the federal government has a responsibility — I’m not critical of refugees coming here but we have to make sure our existing resources are not strained beyond what we can cope with. Fairfield has done the heavy lifting for the nation.”

    While Mr Carbone said he disagreed with Mr Foley’s use of language, the NSW Opposition Leader had raised valid issues. “What’s pushing people out is the strain on resources,” he said.

    Speaking ahead of Tuesday’s state budget, Treasurer Dominic Perrottet said the state government did not control immigration, because it was a federal matter. He said the state’s challenge was to deliver the right infrastructure to meet the needs of a growing population. “There is no doubt some pressure is being felt by this growth,” he said.

    Mr Foley argues that more planning is needed in the west for transport, education and employment opportunities.

    Writing in The Weekend Australian today, Salt says Australian cities do not have the racial mix of US cities, but do have large concentrations of Anglo and non-Anglo popula­tions that cluster. Across urban Sydney, 39 per cent of the population was born outside Australia — compared with 29 per cent in greater New York, Paris (22 per cent), Berlin (13 per cent) Tokyo (2 per cent) and Shanghai (1 per cent).

    “No other nation, and few other developed-world cities … ­accommodate the scale of immigration that is right now being ­injected into Australia’s biggest city,” Salt writes.

    The influx of migrants to Sydney’s west — in Fairfield, Liverpool, Canterbury-Bankstown and Parramatta — has placed enormous strain on services that have not kept pace with population growth. But these areas face other problems. While the in-shifting cohort is more likely than locals to have a tertiary qualification, a lack of jobs awaits them, fuelling overall economic decline with low incomes and poverty encouraging some ethnic groups to shut themselves off further from the wider community. At the same time, better-off ­locals — mainly Australian-born but also financially successful migrants — have moved out to areas including the Hills Shire (16,100), Campbelltown (11,000), Camden (9800) and the central coast (9000).

    Dr Birrell said that, just as ­arriving migrants found their living circumstances difficult, “Anglo” locals experienced strains because sudden high concentrations of newcomers with non-English-speaking backgrounds and different cultures led to noticeable changes in the composition of schools, clubs, civic associations and shopping areas. Residents often no longer recognised their suburb, and felt uncomfortable.

    Schools figured as a “big” issue motivating departures, Dr Birrell said. A 60 to 70 per cent influx of migrants could greatly alter cultural concentration in the classroom. “Anglo” parents sought schools outside the area with more familiar settings. Dr Birrell said recently arrived migrants with non-English-speaking backgrounds settled in the western suburbs primarily because housing was cheaper — but jobs were scarce.

    Apart from migration cutbacks, Dr Birrell said the remedy was to address accommodation shortages that had pushed up house prices and rental costs by opening more residential space, and making housing less attractive to investors. Mr Carbone said Fairfield needed more accommodation and services to cope with congestion. The other challenge was unemployment, he said. ­Migrants would get jobs if they had better language skills.

    Ernest Healy, a Monash University researcher on migrant settlement and social cohesion, has attributed many of the problems faced by immigrants to housing shortages. According to research conducted with Dr Birrell, Dr Healy found income levels were critical to flows in and out. Low-income people with non-­English-speaking backgrounds were “locked into these areas”.

  47. Gab

    BOOM! In an impromptu Press Conference the President gave this morning, he was asked by an obnoxious reporter “Why are you now supporting Kim Jun Un”? He said, “Because I don’t want to see you and your family destroyed by a nuclear war.” @realDonaldTrump what a great answer! MAGA

  48. None

    We want our cities to be lively but functional and our culture to be diverse but integrated.

    no one has ever asked the Australian people whether they want their culture to be diverse never mind integrated. The latter is a given. No people want to live in chaos. The problem is some people like to integrate into ethnic ghettos and parental societies. The real truth is it has been a long-standing divide amongst Australian and leaks as to whether multiculturalism should be pursued or not and even then multiculturalism means all sorts of different things to different people. There is actually nothing wrong with a White Australia Policy – it actually meant diverse an integrated culture. When they relaxed it they rightly sought migrants who shared our common values are Judeo Christian values bearing in mind that 73% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders self identify as Christian – yes an even higher percentage than average non-indigenous Australians. In the meantime our fukwit moronic leaders have been letting him people who not only don’t share out they lose but are attempting to create parallel societies and even more ludicrously virtue signal that they are letting it refugees while simultaneously also letting in their persecutors. It should be possible to have an adult discussion and debate about immigration without being called a racist xenophobe or God knows what else but our leaders and elites are certainly incapable of it.

  49. rickw

    “Because I don’t want to see you and your family destroyed by a nuclear war.” @realDonaldTrump what a great answer! MAGA

    Owning generation retard with ease.

  50. OldOzzie

    Shifting shapes of a migrant nation – Bernard Salt
    Demographe

    NSW Opposition Leader Luke Foley caught hell last month for suggesting there was a “white flight” from certain parts of Sydney. But the census data suggests he wasn’t wrong: about two-thirds of those leaving Sydney’s western suburbs are Anglo, while a similar proportion of those moving into the area are non-Anglo. The Bishops, who moved from Quakers Hill in Sydney’s west to Narara on the NSW central coast, are typical “out-shifters”, looking to escape the rat race and give their two children a safe space in which to grow. Meanwhile, Iraq-born barber Alaa Moussa arrived in 2007 and set up shop in Fairfield. An “in-shifter”, he loves it in Fairfield, but he worries there are too many other Iraqi barbers in the area. And Iraq-born Bella Zaia wonders where all the Australians have gone.

    A significant demographic issue has surfaced in Australia in recent weeks. A statement has been made that “white flight” is affecting migration flows in western Sydney.

    The term “white flight” is an American term coined in the 1950s and 60s to describe the outflow of white residents in response to an inflow of black residents.

    Australian cities do not have the racial mix of American cities, but there are large concentrations of Anglo and non-Anglo popula­tions that can and do sometimes cluster.

    Across urban Sydney, 39 per cent of the population was born outside Australia. In greater New York this proportion is 29 per cent, in Paris it is 22 per cent, in Berlin it is 13 per cent, in Tokyo it is 2 per cent and in Shanghai it is 1 per cent.

    Australia is, Sydney is, an exemplar of global proportions in the business of absorbing immigrants. No other nation, and few other cities in the developed world — although Auckland comes close — accommodate the scale of immigration being injected into Australia’s biggest city.

    This is particularly the case in western Sydney.

    It is possible, using census data, to track the number and composition of migrants coming into and out of any set of geographies across Australia.

    We have conducted precisely this analysis for a group of municipalities comprising western Sydney and for a broadly equivalent area in western and northern Melbourne. Here is what we found.

    During the five years to 2016, a total of 266,000 people moved into western Sydney directly as immigrants from overseas or from elsewhere within Australia.

    Regardless of whether these in-shifters came from other parts of Sydney (as many did) or whether they came from overseas, we have established their country-of-birth profile. About 60 per cent of the ­in-shifters were born in what might be termed non-Anglo countries (45 per cent from Asia, mostly China and India), with the balance coming from a range of countries including the Middle East and Africa. About 35 per cent of in-shifters were born in Australia or in Britain or New Zealand.

    It is true that some of the Australian-born in particular, and some of the UK-born and the New Zealand-born, could be of non-Anglo heritage and so, technically, up to two-thirds (say, 66 per cent) of in-shifters might have some non-Anglo heritage. And especially if people of Mediterranean heritage are added to the non-Anglo group.

    The out-shifters are different in volume and composition, according to the census.

    A total of 183,000 western Sydney residents left for other destinations in Australia during the five years to 2016.

    The in-shifters are a bigger group than the out-shifters, which has led to population growth and congestion in western Sydney.

    I should add that this analysis excludes natural increase caused by more births than deaths. It also excludes those who left western Sydney to move overseas and so are lost to capture by the Australian census.

    Most out-shifters (63 per cent) are Australian-born. A further 5 per cent were born in the UK or New Zealand.

    Again, allowing for the fact some out-shifting Australians might have non-Anglo heritage, it is reasonable to assume that about two-thirds of out-shifters are Anglo, and that about two-thirds of in-shifters are non-Anglo.

    But before I come to the discussion of “is this white flight?”, it is instructive to get a better understanding, from the census, about who is coming and going; and also to draw some comparisons with the equivalent area in Melbourne.

    Let’s start with Melbourne’s west and north.

    During the five years to 2016, the western and northern suburbs of Melbourne attracted 202,000 in-shifters comprising (using the same methodology as for Sydney) 47 per cent Australian-born and Anglo, and 49 per cent Asian and other. (I’m still in two minds as to how to treat the Mediterraneans.) Melbourne’s in-shifters are 50:50. Sydney’s in-shifters are one-third two-thirds in favour of non-­Anglos.

    Out-shifters from this part of Melbourne numbered 97,000 and comprised 73 per cent from ­Australia and Anglo nations and 24 per cent from Asia and other areas. Melbourne’s migrant inflow incorporates a notably bigger proportion of Australian and Anglo-born but, again, there is the caveat that part of this group at the very least would have some non-Anglo heritage. At face value the numbers do suggest non-Anglo migrants are moving into western Sydney and Australian-born and Anglo residents are moving out. But the question is whether a single demographic factor “causes” the other. Or are the motivations behind these movements far more complex? Let’s look at the profiles from the census.

    Of the Australian-based in-shifters to western Sydney during the past five years, most moved there from the inner west (11,100), the Hills Shire (10,800), Ryde (8000) and Georges River (7600).

    Western Sydney attracts Australian-based residents (some of whom may have been born overseas) from other parts of Sydney, probably because of the desire to secure access to more affordable housing. For those people who left western Sydney in the five years to 2016, the most popular destinations were the Hills Shire (16,100), Campbelltown (11,000), Camden (9800) and the NSW central coast (9000).

    Western Sydney exchanges residents with its neighbours — 11,100 come in from Hills Shire and 16,100 go back to the Hills Shire — and it projects others to retirement destinations such as the central coast. Close to 5000 moved from western Sydney into the City of Sydney, presumably to access education or job opportunities or simply to pursue a hipster lifestyle.

    The census profiling shows that the in-shifting cohort is young, includes kids (but not many teenagers), is twice as likely as the locals to have a tertiary degree, struggles to find work, is likelier than the locals to believe in a god of some sort and, for those who are in full-time work, earns a bit less than the locals and quite a bit less than the out-shifters.

    The out-shifting cohort is older, is likelier to include teen­agers, includes a sizeable 50-something component and is quite well-to-do in comparison with western Sydney averages. And it may also be said that if this lot is, indeed, “fleeing” then they don’t flee very far.

    Often the shift is to adjacent suburbs with more space — for teenagers perhaps — and maybe also with a bit less congestion (for example, Camden).

    The numbers are uncompromisingly direct. Non-Anglos are moving into western Sydney in greater proportions than Anglos and in comparison with the Melbourne benchmark. But is the outflow of the predominantly — but by no means exclusively — Anglo cohort from western Sydney a response to the heritage composition of those coming in? After all, there is a greater proportionate outflow of Anglo residents from the equivalent area in Melbourne.

    This is an issue that cannot be definitively answered without surveying the motivation of out-shifters. And even then I am not convinced that you would get an accurate response.

    There is an alignment of data — the two-thirds, one-third fact — that has allowed the white-flight narrative to surface.

    My assessment, based on an interpretation of census data, is that there is no significant single cause prompting the outflow of Australian-born residents from western Sydney. Or from Melbourne’s west and north, for that matter.

    The census data shows out-shifters from western Sydney are a mixed bag: they’re richer so they’ve prospered; they have teenage children and so they may want bigger and frankly more aspirational accommodation; some are retirees who would likely move to a retirement destination regardless of who was moving in; and some are moving into the City of Sydney where there is an even greater proportion of migrants (students, mostly) than there is in western Sydney. Because this is an issue that relates to motivation, it is unlikely that it is going to be resolved one way or the other any time soon. In the meantime, I see western Sydney as the pointy tip of Australia’s immigration program. Sydney and Melbourne are global cities powering ahead attracting migrants and aspirants in equal measure.

    From the data that I have seen measuring and comparing the ins and outs of the immigrant strongholds of Sydney and Melbourne, I see places of stresses and strains for sure, but I also see places of hope and opportunity where we scoop up people and give them a shot at the Australian dream.

    Maybe Parramatta council should look at developing a Statue of Liberty kind of monument, or a local version of the St Louis arch signifying the gateway to America’s west, to show that what lies beyond — western Sydney — real­ly is the beating heartland of our immigrant nation.

    Bernard Salt is managing director of the Demographics Group. Research by Simon Kuestenmacher.

  51. rickw

    no one has ever asked the Australian people whether they want their culture to be diverse never mind integrated.

    Of course not! They’re not about to ask permission for what is designed to destroy Australia!

  52. OldOzzie

    ARTS
    Hewett to writer: ‘Do you want sex with my daughters?’ – Rosemary Neill

    A prominent writer has revealed that playwright and feminist Dorothy Hewett asked him at a 1970s conference: “Aren’t you going to f..k my daughters?’’

    This extraordinary conversation reportedly occurred when Hewett’s elder daughter, Kate ­Lilley, was 15, and her younger daughter, Rozanna Lilley, was 13.

    Then aged in his 30s, the writer told Hewett: “I’m not interested in f..king children.’’ To which Hewett replied: “You’re the only one around here who isn’t.’’

    The writer describes this unsettling exchange in a letter he sent to Kate Lilley this week, following allegations unveiled by The Weekend Australian that Hewett “encouraged” and “facilitated” her daughters’ early sexualisation in the predatory 1970s arts scene.

    Kate, a poet and an associate professor of English at Sydney University, said last week that during the 70s, her family’s home in Sydney’s east was “unbearable’’ and “as an acquaintance says — like a brothel without payment … There were constantly men staying in the house and hardly any man came to the house who didn’t try to have sex with one or more of us.”

    Yesterday she said the exchange between her mother and the writer would have taken place at the 1976 National Playwrights Conference in Canberra, where her mother’s play, The Golden ­Oldies, was being workshopped.

    The writer said in his letter: “I wasn’t shocked (by Hewett’s question). I just thought that Dorothy was simply encouraging you (Kate) to rebel against the mores of the time.

    “Merv (Lilley, Kate’s father) was at the conference, so he must have been complicit. Two old lefties, I thought, still trying to liberate society, starting with their daughters.’’

    Kate confirmed she did not sleep with this writer, but had ­underage sex with a director at the playwriting conference, who was also in his 30s.

    She said she found the letter “brutal”, as the writer “thought nothing of it (her mother’s question). That is exactly the kind of salacious conversation that went on,’’ she said.

    Although the letter writer was “saddened” to read about the negative effects of the abuse Kate and Rozanna suffered, Kate said that ultimately “I didn’t take the letter as a gesture of support … it was just another person saying don’t damage your mother’s reputation’’.

    The writer, now in his 70s, went on to say that “as a result of (The Weekend Australian’s) ­article, Dorothy’s reputation as a writer may be harmed” and “this would be our loss’’.

    The letter has come to light as divisions within Hewett’s ­family widen over the abuse allegations. Kate and Rozanna’s half-brother, Joe Flood, and his ex-wife, Adele Flood, said they were distressed and angry about the claims, and remember Hewett as being “kind” and “supportive” ­towards all her children.

    In contrast, Kate has alleged that a visiting poet who raped her at her family’s home when she was 15, went on to have relationships with her mother and sister.

    She and Rozanna also alleged that well-known artists Bob Ellis, Martin Sharp and David Hamilton assaulted, exploited or had underage sex with them.

  53. rickw

    Migrants would get jobs if they had better language skills.

    Or skills period, clearly hasn’t taken an African taxi ride lately.

  54. Snoopy

    we concluded that the strangling to death of everything that is good about the USA and The Anglosphere had possibly turned a corner.

    You blokes must have really turned one on.

  55. Shy Ted

    Astonishing start to the soccer World Cup. No, not the 5 goals in game 1 or 6 in game 2. Not a single wymmyns in any of the teams. No wymmyns referees, no wymmyns assistant referees. It’s in Russia and if that’s not evidence of collusion I don’t know what is. Also Iran beat Morocco. Not a single niqab or hijab in the crowd. Most sexist World Cup ever.

  56. C.L.

    Strange that Australian feminists – lately crying about the r-ape and homicide of a woman by a retarded teenager – have said absolutely nothing about serial child r-ape faciltator Dorothy Hewett and the many leftist men who r-aped her daughters. They always – always – give a pass to leftist men to r-ape and abuse women and children.

  57. None

    Dear God you have to feel for Kate Lilley to have to receive such a self-centred letter like that. Name and shame, Kate.

  58. None

    Strange that Australian feminists – lately crying about the r-ape and homicide of a woman by a retarded teenager – have said absolutely nothing about serial child r-ape faciltator Dorothy Hewett and the many leftist men who r-aped her daughters. They always – always – give a pass to leftist men to r-ape and abuse women and children.

    All that matters to the left, is being left.

  59. C.L.

    It was the biggest diplomatic breakthrough for world peace in a generation …
    The ABC is indescribably sour about it:

    Good news: Stories you probably missed when Donald Trump met with Kim Jong-un.

    The 10-year-old on a mission to warm Hobart’s homeless

    Everyone stopped to watch a raccoon scale a skyscraper

    French demolition workers found a pot of gold

    Shooting survivors wowed Tony Awards crowd

    Doggie blood donors are saving fellow bush canines

    Gardeners in Perth are sharing their food for free

  60. None

    Agree, Bruce. Payne nails it. Thanks, Tom.

  61. John Constantine

    If only they had have had a ‘Safe Arts Scene’ program going on in their predatory 1970’s.

    The kids would have known not to feel bad about it, because it was natural and there is nothing wrong with anything natural.

    [ as long as it is never spoken about,]

    Lucky we have advanced to 2018 and we have safe schools, liberating the kiddies from being puppets of capitalism, and freeing them up to party hard with older and more experienced men.

    Comrade kindermaaaaates.

  62. A Lurker

    Then aged in his 30s, the writer told Hewett: “I’m not interested in f..king children.’’ To which Hewett replied: “You’re the only one around here who isn’t.’’

    and

    “Merv (Lilley, Kate’s father) was at the conference, so he must have been complicit. Two old lefties, I thought, still trying to liberate society, starting with their daughters.’’

    and

    The writer, now in his 70s, went on to say that “as a result of (The Weekend Australian’s) ­article, Dorothy’s reputation as a writer may be harmed” and “this would be our loss’’.

    Now compare and contrast with the hue and cry raised against a certain Cardinal and the Roman Catholic Church.

  63. BorisG

    I agree with None 7:40

    Maybe the first time I agree with her. Btw is she SRR?

  64. None

    Gardeners in Perth are sharing their food for free.

    Gee, the rest of humanity have been doing that for millenia.

  65. BorisG

    It was the biggest diplomatic breakthrough for world peace in a generation …

    LOL

  66. None

    Maybe the first time I agree with her. Btw is she SRR?

    I have no idea what SRR is, Boris but maybe you explain and then ask me. And yes, dot has never ever provided proof of his demented accusations towards me. He’s just a cry baby.

  67. BorisG

    Now compare and contrast with the hue and cry raised against a certain Cardinal and the Roman Catholic Church.

    Good point.

  68. C.L.

    LOL

    What was the bigger breakthrough for world peace post-USSR, Boris?
    Try making an argument instead of being a manic, monosyllabic nitwit.

  69. None

    I suppose the Toga Party is postponed this year. Damn you Trevor Fosdyke.

    As I said on the other thread, the university has no business interfering in what students do for their party down the pub. They do have every business to remove their apartheid policies and enforced thought police policies on campus.

  70. John Constantine

    The Australian Dream means different things to our quisling elites than it does our desperate clinging obsolete class.

    Their anc’s Kindly Kommunist, uncle phillip adams put it best when he described on abc radio national how he had travelled the depths of the country, calling into representative selections of the meanest hovel-villages and rudest shantytowns on a government funded expedition for the Bi-centennial.

    Meant to discover what people felt about Australian culture that could be used in the advertising program.

    Their uncle phil and their Carmen Lawrence would roll their eyes at each other in secret mocking communication, as the doomed Australians of 1988 talked about a culture that was always intended to be replaced in a revolutionary fundamental transformation. Then would mockingly laugh at the naïve Neanderthals that hadn’t recognised the superior strain of god-humanity that had passed before them that day, and the genocidal fate that had been decreed for the culture of agricultural peasantry.

    Comrades.

  71. Infidel Tiger

    Professional wrongologist Paul Kelly claims Trump has ended the US alliance.

    Using history as our guide, we can safely say that he has now strengthened it.

  72. OldOzzie

    Editorials – The IG Report Shows That The Fix Was In From Start Of The Clinton Email Investigation

    Scandal: The long-awaited report from the Justice Department’s inspector general about the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email scandal seems to absolve the bureau of any political bias. What it really shows, however, is that the FBI — under pressure from President Obama — was just going through the motions the whole time.

    Most of the focus of the report in the news has been on its criticism of then FBI director James Comey. The IG says that some of his actions were “extraordinary and insubordinate” — a scathing indictment if there ever was one. It is another black mark on Comey’s already badly tarnished reputation, and well deserved.

    However, the report also finds that there was “no evidence that the conclusions by department prosecutors were affected by bias or other improper considerations.”

    Naturally, that’s what Democrats have seized on as proof that, aside from Comey’s bungling, the FBI did its job.

    But look at the report in its totality and you see that time and again officials made “judgment calls” that weakened their investigation. In other words, from the range of options available to them, they consistently chose the less aggressive course of action.

    It says, for instance that “We questioned why the Midyear team” — referring to the “Midyear Review” code name given to the Clinton investigation — “did not serve subpoenas on or seek to obtain search warrants related to the last known persons to possess devices that the team was never able to locate.”

    At another point it says that the FBI had considered obtaining permission from the Department to review certain classified materials that may have included information potentially relevant to the investigation.” And while “the Midyear team drafted a memorandum to the Deputy Attorney General in late May 2016 stating that review of the highly classified materials was necessary to complete the investigation and requesting permission to access them, the FBI never sent this request to the Department.”

  73. John Constantine

    The Australian Dream for our politicals class is simple.

    “Get Mine Now”.

    Doesn’t matter where the bags of tenners comes from, whether it is from having an Islamic dictator Maaaate ordering one of the people he has power of life and death over to pay big money for a worthless piggery, or having chicoms pay you huge dollars in ‘consultancy fees’, or having transnational looting cartels [ that you donated Australian taxdollars to in a flood of unsupervised generosity] give you excellent opportunities.

    Doesn’t matter, you grift and you graft, then you spend, shag and die. Hopefully in Paris and London and New York.

    Fuck the Australian proles, they are to be replaced like the Neanderthals were.

    Comrades.

  74. OldOzzie

    The FBI Hates Trump—and His Voters, Too

    Tax-Funded Contempt

    Buried toward the end of the report are shocking comments from three unnamed FBI officials. The inspector general slams the three—as well as Strzok and Page—for “conduct [that] has brought discredit to themselves, sowed doubt about the FBI’s handling of the Midyear investigation, and impacted the reputation of the FBI.” Two FBI agents repeatedly referred to Trump as “drumpf.” In an exchange in September 2016, one agent joked about not wanting to spend time with his colleagues: “i (sic) would rather have brunch with trump and a bunch of his supporters like the ones from ohio that are retarded.”

    The day after the election, one FBI officials lamented, “Trump’s supporters are all poor to middle class, uneducated, lazy POS that think he will magically grant them jobs for doing nothing. They probably didn’t watch the debates, aren’t fully educated on his policies, and are stupidly wrapped up in his unmerited enthusiasm.”

    An FBI attorney responded: “I’m just devastated. I can’t wait until I can leave today and just shut off the world for the next four days.”

    Then this gem: “I honestly feel like there is going to be a lot more gun issues, too, the crazies won finally. This is the tea party on steroids. And the GOP is going to be lost, they have to deal with an incumbent in 4 years. We have to fight this again. Also Pence is stupid.”

    Keep in mind, these are the idiots sending messages like this on government devices.

    All of the FBI officials cited in the report claimed their personal and political views did not impact their professional work. Incredibly, Inspector General Michael Horowitz seemed to agree. His report concludes that his team “did not find evidence to connect the political views expressed in these messages to the specific investigative decisions that we reviewed.”

  75. None

    The long-awaited report from the Justice Department’s inspector general about the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email scandal seems to absolve the bureau of any political bias.

    Trump had an interesting take on that in that impromptu “door stop”. I note Chris Kenny today doing his usual fence sitting – Trump is an idiot yada yada but he can communicate. He has no filter, no connection between brain and mouth but the people love him because he has no connection between brain and mouth (sub text: Trump appeals to the stupid masses). I used to like Chris Kenny until I worked out his schtick: the people are authentic morons which is why they find Trump authentic. So glad I don’t subscribe to that shitty paper any more. No Chris, the people may not be articulate or even given the opportunity to get their voice heard, but they worked out the chattering class a long time ago.

  76. John Constantine

    We love Good Senator Dave because the poor honest Good Bastard is too simple to be grasping the opportunity to set himself up for consultancy jobs with transnational looting cartels after politics is over.

    Everybody else does it.

    Comrades.

  77. dopey

    US Open. One player under par. Course must be too easy.

  78. BrettW

    Front page story in the Oz about “law fare crusader” Garry Burns and his many complaints made against Bernard Gaynor and others.

    One para indicates that in one year he was probably responsible for half the complaints investigated by the NSW Anti Discrimination Board. The irony is his complaints are one of the main reasons they are employed ! Where is the incentive for them not to accept his complaints ?

  79. Big Moose

    Lisa Wilkinson fails to understand that we don’t live in utopian world and risk mitigation is required to deal with the predatory nature of various individuals.

  80. Geriatric Mayfly

    Gardeners in Perth are sharing their food for free.
    Gee, the rest of humanity have been doing that for millenia.

    Quite so. In the Australian context, I think the ubiquitous Jar of Jam must be at the top of the list as a token of esteem, closely followed by Green Tomato Pickle. In the good times, the largesse of a Dozen Eggs might be sacrificed in the spirit of generosity.

  81. BorisG

    CL, awarding the Little Rocket man a meeting with a leader of the free world for nothing in return is the biggest flop in decades, of not a breakthrough.

    When Kim has dismantled his nukes then come back to us.

  82. None

    Conservative Liberal Party forces have rolled a party official aligned to Christopher Pyne and Simon Birmingham.

    Yesss. Pyne and Birmo as he loves to fashion himself are the two most useless tax hoovering frauds in the Liberal Party.

  83. Baldrick

    So many distraction squirrels from TheirABC today and so little reporting of yesterday’s IG report. Anyone would think the ABC was trying to control the narrative:

    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    These are the ‘war games’ that Donald Trump is pledging to stop
    (Big concession to Kim)
    ____
    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    Americans should ‘sit up at attention’ like North Koreans, Trump jokes
    (Trump has foot in mouth)
    ____
    ABC News @abcnews
    Good news: Stories you probably missed when Donald Trump met with Kim Jong-un
    (Denuclearised Korean peninsula not a good news story)
    ____
    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    Have we seen this all before? The Trump-Kim summit statement, annotated
    (Meh, it’s just a document)
    ____
    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    ‘Managing the Donald’ keeps Turnbull in a tight spot
    (Lara Tingle – nuff said)
    ____
    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    Trump’s former campaign chief Manafort jailed
    (Trump must be corrupt)

  84. Lisa Wilkinson calls attention to the most important person in the Eurydice Dixon story: herself.

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    It shits me when my wife on occasions put that shit show on, and I copped this fair in the face.

    I wanted to turn the TV into shards of glass. WTF does she think we teach our boys? This shit will turn into $1billion of taxpayers money in compulsory training to achieve diddly squat.

    And women will still get murdered. And women won’t be allowed to carry any weapons of self defence. And psychopaths will still be allowed to wander the streets.

    And for effect, and effect only, she turned on the tears. Ratings down, my dear? FME.

  85. zyconoclast

    Yesterday I went into Bunnings.
    Warren Trusss walked past.

    I thought for a second this was a joke about some prefabricated structural element.

    You are right. That’s what affluent rabbits need for home construction.

  86. BorisG

    None, srr was the most prolific commentator on cat in living memory. If you have been here at least for a year and haven’t noticed her, you must be blind. She was banned, not sure what for exactly.

    How long have you been reading cat?

  87. Mater

    Daniel Andrews
    @DanielAndrewsMP
    So our message to Victorian women is this: Stay home. Or don’t. Go out with friends at night. Or don’t. Go about your day exactly as you intend, on your terms. Because women don’t need to change their behaviour. Men do.

    …and you too can be the most righteous person in the morgue!

  88. twostix

    Lisa Wilkinson wouldn’t have walked across that park.

    Beware the fading over the hill crone dishing out “advice” to young girls.

  89. CL, awarding the Little Rocket man a meeting with a leader of the free world for nothing in return is the biggest flop in decades, of not a breakthrough.

    When Kim has dismantled his nukes then come back to us.

    LOL, Trump already dismantled them, boofhead.

  90. OldOzzie

    I will make a comment that I think this is a very fair article by Chris Kenny – OldOzzie

    No filter makes Trump a great communicator – Chris Kenny

    “F..k Trump!” Robert De Niro ­finally got to write his own line; and its pithy, inane vehemence eloquently exposed the rage of the anti-Trump cohort. Grown men and women at New York’s Radio City Music Hall laughed and cheered. Trump derangement syndrome remains in full ­febrile flight across the dominant media/political class of all Western liberal democracies.

    The President’s successes only intensify the visceral reflux of politicians, entertainers, academics, journalists and commentators who seem to define themselves by the viciousness of their disdain for one man. Many were on the public record throughout the Trump campaign (and even after the polls closed) declaring he could not win, so his victory humiliated them. They seem to think impeachment or failure would somehow vindicate their misjudgments, erase their mistakes or at least deliver vengeance. Also, as with all virtue-signalling, their contempt for Trump is designed to amplify their own merit.

    It is embarrassing to watch, and unhealthy for the players as well as the democracies they serve. Rather than learn anything from the Trump ascendancy they seem determined to teach their nemesis a lesson. But their vitriol can only help Trump, bringing his defiance of the media/political class into sharper focus, highlighting his achievements and ensuring his enemies are stuck in the mire of their disastrous 2016 campaign instead of thinking about how they might do better in 2020. This must be the longest dummy spit in political history.

    Coverage of Trump’s Singapore summit with Kim Jong-un underscored how the zeitgeist deals with this President. Over the space of just six months mainstream commentators have sought to blame Trump for the nuclear weapons conundrum he inherited on the Korean peninsula, condemn him for threatening military action instead of talking, accuse him of risking a nuclear war, frame him for jeopardising any diplomatic resolution, downplay his achievement in having a summit, mock him for cancelling the summit, criticise his handling of the summit, slam him for shaking hands with a tyrant, question the summit’s worth and dismiss its undertakings.

    Trump is changeable, to be sure, yet clearly his media critics are even more nimble, shifting positions constantly in order to be at odds with him. You don’t have to be a Trump fan to see that the starting point in much coverage is to line up against him and shape the narrative from there. Media which rail against his fake-news jibes constantly spin the news to shape their anti-Trump agenda.

    There is much that most of us don’t like about Trump. He has been crude, sexist and xenophobic in some of his comments in the past. He has been inconsistent, brash and self-obsessed. He is divisive, confrontational and unorthodox. Above all he is driven by ego. We get this. Those who feel the need to point it out daily have become tiresome. They might as well be informing us that Vladimir Putin is macho or Justin Trudeau is shameless.

    Most of the Trump descriptors could apply to successful political leaders of the past. Trump encapsulates them in a particularly brazen and vulgar style. Within reason, political leaders should be judged on results rather than personal characteristics.

    The loathing expressed daily by anti-Trump commentators doesn’t amount to much and newspaper columns are full of what Trump does wrong, so let me leave those well-ploughed furrows for now. What is more interesting is why he has been politically successful — especially given the antipathy generated by his personal style — and why he so riles his opponents, including mainstream media.

    In Singapore, Trump gave a free-ranging press conference the likes of which we seldom, if ever, see from a US president. He fielded questions from all comers for more than an hour, offering free assessments of journalists’ work as he went along. By any stretch it was extraordinary, not least for the way in which he, characteristically, injected personal anecdotes into answers and swerved so far away from talking points that you could almost feel the advisers and diplomats wincing at the back of the room.

    Yet it underscored two points about Trump’s style that help to explain why he resonates. The first might be uncontentious but the second is counterintuitive.

    Trump speaks to voters. Most politicians get stuck addressing the journalists who ask the questions, shaping answers to fit within the invisibly constrained, politically correct confines of what passes for acceptable, risk-averse dialogue within the media/political class. But this anti-politician speaks directly to his constituents. It is simple and effective. He understands the media only gets in the way of his conversation with voters.

    When most other politicians here and overseas are speaking in interviews and media conferences, you sense they are thinking more about what they should not say rather saying what they think. For Trump it is the opposite. He says whatever occurs to him and worries (maybe) about the consequences later.

    This sounds easy but is no mean feat and constitutes, in my view, the most important basis for political communication. Some politicians do it better than others — many are hopeless — but Trump is the exemplar at targeting his audience. I reckon this delivers a second advantage (perhaps just finish that mouthful of breakfast lest you choke on this): it makes Trump a more authentic and honest communicator than other politicians. Even when he says something that contradicts an earlier message, or gives away more than he should, there is an unvarnished quality about the revelation that makes clear he is saying what he thinks.

    Hence when Trump called Kim “rocket man” and threatened “fire and fury like the world has never seen” last year when he wanted North Korea to cease missile tests, then praised him as “very talented” after this week’s summit, journalists played up the inconsistency to attack Trump. Bureaucrats, no doubt, also rolled their eyes because this volatility is the antithesis to the desired incrementalism of diplomacy. But in the real world everyone knew why the emphasis was different in the changed circumstances. On each occasion the message and intent were clear. And, bizarrely, even with these conflicting missives, the take-out for voters, despite the indignation of the media, is a more authentic and frank real-time appraisal of events than we get from the usual doublespeak of global leaders.

    In other words, even though he sometimes thinks different things at different times and sometimes gets things wrong, Trump says what he thinks. There is no filter. He doesn’t care about the parsing in full carried out by journalists; he tidies up ­directly with the public.

    Most politicians are all filter — filters of political correctness, diplomatic caution, populist instincts and focus group-tested lines. With Trump there is either no spin, or there is spin so obvious that we are all in on it — like praising an adversary to seal a deal.

    Trump is happy to go to war with media rather than cower before them like most politicians. When he says they are biased, tricky and fake, he is often right. When he is wrong they should contest the facts. Instead he has got them claiming victim status — that by hitting back at the media he threatens their freedom — so they attack him in ways that confirm his critique. If voters are offered a choice between backing the media or the President, it will be a no-brainer for many.

    We might prefer politicians who are as consistent, informed and competent as possible. But the notion that they should say what they think is also hugely appealing. It should not be too much to ask and it is anathema in contemporary affairs.

    The missing filter between Trump’s brain and his tongue creates all kinds of risks and controversies. It consistently throws up inconsistencies. But it is also central to his political success. We are about to see whether it will work in international relations.

    From the Comments

    – Inconsistent? Compared to some of our blathering politicians he is rock-solidly consistent. Perhaps he could come here and clean-up Australian politics after he concludes his 2nd term as POTUS.

    – When history is written, he will be up there with Washington and Lincoln.

    Oh all these tanties are fun! But if opinions were facts, the USA would be in a major depression and at war with half the world.

    – And he will win the next election!!!

    – Trump is only hastening the demise of the media classes, by demonstrating just how irrelevant most of them are. Naturally, they do not take this message too kindly.

    – I see that the Elites are continuing their tantie. What are they going to do if it succeeds? Probably whing about the colour ink he signs with.

  91. None

    Lisa Wilkinson fails to understand that we don’t live in utopian world and risk mitigation is required to deal with the predatory nature of various individuals.

    Andrews is worse now saying women should not change their behaviour. No, women who take unnecessary risks SHOULD change their behaviour to reduce the risk of being a vicitm. But otherwise you are right. We don’t live in a utopian world where all is sweetness and light. Some people are bad, even seriously fucking evil. That includes you and I. None of us are saints. But what marks off the civilised from the barbarian is recognising human nature is flawed and walking a path between denying one’s baser instincts and striving to cultivate and achieve one’s noblest aspirations.

  92. twostix

    After a girl was found raped and murdered in a park at 2am the seedy bugman establishment lines up to tell girls to walk through parks at 2am.

  93. None

    Where is the incentive for them not to accept his complaints ?

    They have the power to throw out vexatious complaints but they don’t (I believe he has been found to be a vexatious complainer in a local court). The comment by Arthur on this thread is instructive.

  94. Death Giraffe

    Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    ..
    Idiot child.
    0.5 to 1% of the population are reptilian, sociopathic monsters.
    Statistically, when out and about, you walk past dozens of people who would cheerfully fillet you.
    Think about that, Lisa.
    Someone twitter or facebook this to the dangerous, over- emotional loon.

  95. H B Bear

    Garry Burns gets it. The process is the punishment.

  96. twostix

    Daniel Andrews wouldnt have walked through that park.

    These people are dangerous.

  97. Bruce of Newcastle

    awarding the Little Rocket man a meeting with a leader of the free world for nothing in return is the biggest flop in decades

    Boris – This is not about the Norks. It is about China. The Chinese told Kimmy to go meet with Trump. Kimmy first tried to fart about by having his guys forget to turn up to a premeeting meeting, and Trump called his bluff. Xi then told Kimmy that if he wants to live he has to behave. Hence the Norks falling over themselves to reboot the June 12 meeting.

    Trump by meeting Kimmy with few conditions but a vague promise of denuking is Trump signalling to Xi that he is willing to deal if Xi is. The deal is that Xi straightarms the Norks, especially the Nork deep staters, and Trump relents on tariffs. It is “Art of the Deal” again.

    This is in Xi’s interest because the Chinese had a terrible scare when the nuke mountain collapsed. So they are afraid that the Nork regime will do something stupid leading to a massive exodus of Nork peasants and collapse of the country. Xi wants the Norks as a buffer as part of his grand strategy, and is now accepting if that means no Nork nukes then so be it. Which is also in Chinese interests since the Nork nukes are mainly intended to deter Chinese aggression, not US actions (although they do that too).

    We’ll see if China carries through. If they don’t Trump will ramp up pressure on Norkville to signal to Xi that the US can indeed collapse the DPRK and cause China a world of hurt.

  98. Boambee John

    m0nty says that he is a conservative defending the ramparts won by the left in the culture war.

    Actually, m0nty is a reactionary lackey, defending the privileges of the fascist left against the mass of the Australian working and middle classes, who simply want such fripperies as reasonably priced electricity, the right not to have to dodge bollards whenever they go to a public event, and the rights to freedom of speech and worship. As a running dog lackey of the fascist left establishment, m0nty opposes these aspiratins (but he is willing to offer them fantasy football).

  99. What possible use might the US have with rods from God?

    The money shot.

  100. OldOzzie

    Hewett story reaction shows the left protect its own regardless of the obscenities – Gerard Henderson

    It’s the silence of the comrades and the mates.

    Rosemary Neill’s exclusive story in The Weekend Australianlast Saturday that writer Dor­othy Hewett (1923-2002) had ­encouraged her underage daughters to have sex with men was quite shocking. But according to my research, the ABC has not covered the story.

    It has been covered twice in The Sydney Morning Herald, including a piece by Broede Carmody. There was also a brief reference in The Saturday Paper along with a piece in Guardian Australia.

    Hewett, whose story is well told by Ann-Marie Priest in A Free Flame: Australian Women Writers and Vocation in the Twentieth Century, was a fine novelist, playwright, poet and memoirist. Brought up in a conservative family in Western Australia, she ­attended university in Perth and became a member of the Communist Party of Australia.

    Moving between Perth and Sydney, Hewett remained a loyal communist, including during the Soviet Union’s invasion of Hungary in 1956. However, she could not abide Moscow’s crushing of the Prague Spring when the Soviet Union invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968. But she remained on the left after dropping her love of Euro­pean communism.

    Hewett married a communist lawyer and later lived with a boiler­maker in Sydney with whom she had three sons. She married Merv Lilley (1919-2016) with whom she had two daughters, Kate and Rozanna. For most of her adult life, Hewett was a sexual libertarian and a feminist.

    Kate Lilley (born 1960), a poet and associate professor at the University of Sydney, recently has published a book of poetry titled Tilt. Roz­anna Lilley (born 1962), an academic researcher, recently has written Do Oysters Get Bored? A Curious Life. Both women spoke to Neill on the occasion of the ­release of their books.

    As girls, the Lilley sisters ­embraced the sexual liberation preached and practised by their mother. If this had occurred with boys of their own age, this would have been of little moment. But both women maintain that Hewett encouraged them to have sex with older men. Their father must share at least half the blame for this.

    Kate Lilley says she slept with six men before she reached the legal age of consent at 16. Rozanna puts her figure as “at least a dozen”. The former says “there were constantly men staying in the house” in the Sydney suburb of Woollahra and there were “hardly any (heterosexual) men who came to the house who didn’t try to have sex with one or more” of Kate, Rozanna or Dorothy.

    The Lilley sisters have named the deceased male predators, ­including left-wing hero Bob Ellis (1942-2016), who has had some of his miniseries shown on the ABC and wrote speeches for, among others, Labor politicians Bob Carr, Mike Rann and Bill Shorten. Also named is Martin Sharp (1942- 2013), who was a follower of the libertarian Sydney Push and was profiled in the documentary The Sharp Edge,which was shown on the public broadcaster. As Joyce Morgan documents in her biography, Martin Sharp: His Life and Times, Sharp became somewhat conservative in his later years.

    British photographer David Hamilton (1933-2016), who spent time in Australia in the 1970s, is another named. He took pornographic images of Rozanna Lilley when she was 14 or 15. Hamilton committed suicide in 2016 after being accused of sexual assault.

    On any analysis, this is a scandalous story involving one of Australia’s leading writers (Hewett), her husband (who also became a writer) and two leading figures among the Australian intelligentsia (Ellis and Sharp).

    Yet the ABC, where many people work who were friends of Ellis and Sharp and admirers of Hewett and Lilley, appears not inclined to mention the issue. This despite the fact Ellis and Sharp were twice the age of the Lilley sisters when they had sex with them.

    Yet ABC presenters, producers, editors and journalists have been extremely active in chasing down any allegations of historic child sexual abuse said to have been committed by present or former members of the Catholic or Anglican churches.

    Writing in The Sydney Morning Herald, Carmody says the revelations about Hewett and her daughters has “sent shockwaves through the Australian literary community” but does not comment about why there has been almost no public comment by the intelligentsia.

    Carmody quotes Kate Lilley as saying she and her sister “were brought up in a very bohemian ­environment” and that what ­occurred was “just part of the time”.

    She added: “In many ways it was a very ordinary story. A lot of women have reached out saying they grew up in a celebrity ­milieu and ‘we too’.”

    Carmody reported these views without comment. Yet Fairfax Media would hardly run a story saying that we should not be ­bothered about sex between men and boys in Catholic institutions since such behaviour was “just part of the time”.

    Among left-of-centre news­papers, Brigid Delaney in the Guardian Australia was the first to focus on the revelations.

    On Wednesday she commented that “finding out your literary hero is not only a grub … but had sexually abused underage girls, forces a major reconsideration of the man and his work”.

    For the most part, the left protect their own. Richard Neville (1941-2016), in his 1970 book Play Power,boasted about having sex with an underage schoolgirl in London. Soon after he returned to Australia, Neville was given a program on ABC radio in which he interviewed three pederasts in the ABC studio in Sydney in July 1975. No one reported the child sex abusers to the NSW police.

    Richard Downing, then ABC chairman, who was appointed by the Whitlam Labor government, rationalised the ABC’s decision to air Neville’s program.

    Downing told the Herald at the time that “in general, men will sleep with young boys”. Incumbent ABC chairman Justin Milne and his predecessor, Jim Spigelman, have refused to distance the contemporary ABC from Downing’s statement, which has never been ­renounced.

    Ellis, Sharp and Neville were all besties, in current terminology. Today their memory is protected by their admirers — particularly within the ABC.

    Gerard Henderson is executive director of the Sydney Institute. His Media Watch Dog blog can be found at theaustralian.com. au.

  101. Atoms for Peace

    The Norks must know that any screwup by them will see a one time deal off of the table. The Chinese can deal with the fallout.

  102. twostix

    Can we teach jealous fading over the hill crones to not deliberately give young girls bad advice that will hurt their future?

    All of human history days no.

  103. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I was sitting at a bar with some USAF personnel last night. Two most interesting points in wide ranging discussions. They knew quite a lot about what was being done to George Pell, this surprised me, they brought it up. They had no idea that Australia had been giving money to the Clinton Foundation. We raised our glasses to DJT, we concluded that the strangling to death of everything that is good about the USA and The Anglosphere had possibly turned a corner.

    I was sitting in a bar last night with a few Catallaxy denizens. A rollicking good time was had by a small group of us in highly animated conversation. Sadly, we didn’t think that any corner had been turned, although we did come up with some I-didn’t-say-that-I-was-drunk creative solutions to the problems. 🙂

    Cats and Kittehs were in attendance. Thanks guys.
    Get my email from Sinc if you are in Sydney for occasional Friday Catallaxy drinks in the CBD.
    There is $10 all-evening parking in Goulburn Street Parking Station after 5pm close to venue/s.
    I will pass your details on to the Drinks Master for The List.

  104. candy

    Dangerous advice to young girls walking home late at night.

    One would get the impression that Mrs FitzSimons and the Vic. Premier don’t give a toss about the welfare of their own young daughters. Really, that’s the only conclusion you can draw.

    Normal people are out of their mind with worry if their daughters don’t heed advice about walking home late, or their sons are driving too fast, kids thinking they are “bullet proof”, as kids have done throughout the ages.

  105. Nick

    Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    I await similar sentiments from a male commentator the next time a mother kills her children.

  106. Atoms for Peace

    Start allowing people to carry the means for self defence.

  107. None

    Daniel Andrews wouldnt have walked through that park.

    Let’s see his daughters walk through that park. Oh wait, they get to go to private Catholic colleges, not even safe schools.

  108. zyconoclast

    Can we teach jealous fading over the hill crones to not deliberately give young girls bad advice that will hurt their future?

    Apart from how to scam a $2M/year contract, why would a young woman pay any attention to a jealous fading over the hill crones?

  109. I’m also guessing Trump told Kim that his 13,000 artillery museum pieces are impotent junk.

    This is fun, Boris. Every second link is a goldmine.

  110. Death Giraffe

    Most of the Trump descriptors could apply to successful political leaders of the past. Trump encapsulates them in a particularly brazen and vulgar style.

    ..
    This, I have been saying for over two years is exactly what sets the bastards off.
    Trump’s style grates on them to the point most of them don’t even really hear the content of his message.
    Almost to a person, no one in the media has spent any extended period of time around people who work for a living. They just cannot parse for meaning colloquial english, in the context used by the common, working man.

  111. None

    Start allowing people to carry the means for self defence.

    The really horrid thing is the young woman was “Amazonian” in terms of stature (I am using one of the words used to describe her in press reports) but even she was no match for that fat thug who brutalised and murdered her. Take note, fat Marise Payne. So yes, people should be allowed to carry means for self defence. Even mace or similar is better than nothing.

  112. I’m guessing that Trump also told Kim that his 13,000 artillery museum pieces are impotent junk.

  113. Geriatric Mayfly

    Start allowing people to carry the means for self defence.

    A squirt of Mace might do for starters. But think of what such an affront might do to the perpetrator. Therefore, banned.

  114. candy

    I reckon there are more very well known men who turned up to the Hewett’s house to get at the girls. Because they would be very likely “left” orientated there will be no outrage.

    It seems the Hewett parents used their girls as lures to attract the elites to their home so they could have famous visitors and feel socially at the top. I think that’s the reason they prostituted them. No money changed hands, apparently.

  115. Oldozzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2738339, posted on June 16, 2018 at 9:15 am

    Cats and Kittehs were in attendance. Thanks guys.
    Get my email from Sinc if you are in Sydney for occasional Friday Catallaxy drinks in the CBD.
    There is $10 all-evening parking in Goulburn Street Parking Station after 5pm close to venue/s.
    I will pass your details on to the Drinks Master for The List.

    Lizzie,

    If Sinc can pass my email details onto you, I would be happy to include my Ugly Mug (13 Hour surgery enhanced -but unsuccessful, so “Hail Mary” Chemo – as Radiotherapy already on that side can’t do again, so Radiation Oncologist, after 20 years CLL, had to try something) onto Drinks Master List

    Regards

    OldOzzie

  116. Nick

    The Fitzsimmons household must be a very strange place.

    Ones a rag, the other wears one.

  117. Okay, my posts are going to moderator or a black hole of some sort. Maybe if I word it differently.

    EMP weapons have been used in Syria. So much for the Norks’ artillery.

  118. None

    Here’s one of the money quotes Old Ozzie:

    There is much that most of us don’t like about Trump. He has been crude, sexist and xenophobic in some of his comments in the past. He has been inconsistent, brash and self-obsessed. He is divisive, confrontational and unorthodox. Above all he is driven by ego. We get this. Those who feel the need to point it out daily have become tiresome. They might as well be informing us that Vladimir Putin is macho or Justin Trudeau is shameless.

    “Most of us” is who? Most of us is journos and elite lefties. The average Jo Blow sees “crude” = honest and direct, “sexist” = making a pass, “xenophobic” = stating the obvious about some migrant elements.

  119. Nick

    Strange that calls regarding the safety of young women in Victoria never mention the judicial system. Too political.

  120. I await similar sentiments from a male commentator the next time a mother kills her children.

    Or a women burning her boyfriend to death in his granny flat.

  121. Des Deskperson

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.’

    Last night’s Ten News has a vox populi segment on the rape and murder of Dixon, with a couple of women nterviewees saying how much it reminded them of the rape and murder of Jill Meagher.

    It’s interesting that these people remember Jill Meagher – inner-city dwelling ABC employee – but seem to have forgotten, if they ever cared at all, about Sarah Cafferky, murdered two week later in the same city by a similar violent recidivist criminal. Cafferkey was just an outer-suburbn bogan.

    The rape and murder of Dixon is, of course, horrendous, but one wonders if Wilkinson would have given a sh*t if she had been some Broady single mum instead of a Fitzroy feminist artiste,

  122. Death Giraffe

    No money changed hands, apparently.

    ..
    Of course money changed hands.
    Do you think their literary works sold on merit?
    Do you think they earnt a cent off the value of what they produced?
    Why do you think art galleries pay “artists” for blank canvases or piles of trash?
    Exactly what do you think has been going on in academia and the art scene these last few decades?

  123. C.L.

    CL, awarding the Little Rocket man a meeting with a leader of the free world for nothing in return is the biggest flop in decades, of not a breakthrough.

    When Kim has dismantled his nukes then come back to us.

    And the best way to ensure denuclearisation is by not meeting or speaking with Pyongyang, is it?
    Leave commentary on this subject to the historically literate adults, hey.

  124. zyconoclast

    How Donald Trump eclipsed the ‘libertarian moment’

    Yesterday was another bad day for the “libertarian moment” and for Sen. Rand Paul in particular. The candidate Paul endorsed and campaigned for in Virginia’s Republican gubernatorial primary, state delegate Nick Freitas, lost to Corey Stewart, a pro-Trump candidate controversial for his defense of Confederate monuments, among other things. Further south, a Republican congressman of longstanding affinity to the Paul family and libertarianism, Mark Sanford, also lost his primary in South Carolina to an opponent who accused him of disloyalty to President Trump. A Paul-endorsed candidate, Eric Brakey, did win the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Maine, in an uncontested primary, but his odds of defeating Sen. Angus King in November are long.

  125. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    Reforming the unlucky lottery – The Australian 12:00AM June 16, 2018

    The $2.6 trillion superannuation industry will howl long and loud about state interference in the market when it learns the Turnbull government remains open to the idea of using the Future Fund to create a Canadian-style nationwide pension fund as a default retirement scheme. The industry already is fighting the government’s moves to cap fees and charges at almost three times their existing average. Reform is overdue to protect workers’ nest eggs from ruthless gouging that has left millions of retirees and savers tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars out of pocket. In an exclusive interview with Anthony Klan today, Financial Services Minister Kelly O’Dwyer shows she is prepared to put the public interest ahead of the funds’ narrow vested interests.

    Government-owned corporations are not the best answer, generally, to industry problems. In this case, however, a nationwide pension fund could improve the functioning of the market, in the interests of workers, by increasing competition and improving the reporting of fees and returns. Competing against such a player would force established industry and retail funds to lift their games to attract and retain members in order to survive.

    Three weeks ago, the Productivity Commission’s draft report on the failure of super trustees and regulators to safeguard members’ financial interests would have prompted many workers to take stock. Investors should look at their funds’ returns, ensure their super is centred in a single fund to cut fees and, if necessary, look at switching to a better performer. As commission deputy chairwoman Karen Chester, the report’s co-author, told The Australian, the review found many members’ interests were “missing in action”.

    Of 14.6 million accounts analysed by the commission, about a quarter were judged to be underperforming. A “typical full-time worker” investing in an underperforming fund, the report says, may retire with a balance 53 per cent lower (or $635,000 less) than what they would have accumulated in a top performing fund. Excessive insurance premiums and fees and holding multiple accounts — which many workers do as a result of changing jobs — also could leave a worker’s nest egg tens of thousands of dollars worse off.

    The Future Fund has runs on the board. It has delivered, on average, 11.6 per cent a year across the past five years, which would amount to 9.71 per cent after deducting super tax and administration fees. That performance compares well with the 10 biggest retail funds’ 7.63 per cent a year average return in the past five years and the 10 biggest industry funds, which returned 9.58 per cent on average.

    The prospect of a Canadian-style pension fund should prompt funds to review their investment performances, fees and the transparency with which they report to members. Ms O’Dwyer’s reform agenda is right. Millions of Australians have been dudded by a system they have no choice but to join. The stakes are high for them, their families and taxpayers. Bigger balances and higher returns for retirees would cut pressure on the Age Pension. As Klan writes, a 40-year-old with an average super balance of $84,000, earning $84,700 a year and paying $250 a year in life insurance from their super, could retire $227,000 better off with the Future Fund than with existing funds. Workers deserve no less in returns from hard-earned 9.5 per cent contributions. Managing super is beyond the financial literacy of many people and a default fund would help them. However the government proceeds, regulators must put an end to super being an “unlucky lottery” for too many.

  126. None

    Exactly what do you think has been going on in academia and the art scene these last few decades?

    🤔🤔🤔

  127. C.L.

    The FBI Hates Trump—and His Voters, Too

    James Woods has Tweeted that the IG report (proving FBI criminality against Trump and hatred of Republicans) may explain why the worst massacre in US history (Las Vegas; targeting conservatives) was quickly laughed off by the FBI.

  128. Death Giraffe

    Dire Straits.
    The Gallery:
    ..

    Harry made a bareback rider proud and free upon a horse
    And a fine coal miner for the NCB that was
    A fallen angel and Jesus on the cross
    A skating ballerina you should have seen her do the skater’s waltz
    Some people have got to paint and draw
    Harry had to work in clay and stone
    Like the waves coming to the shore
    It was in his blood and in his bones
    Ignored by all the trendy boys in London and in Leeds
    He might as well have been making toys or strings of beads
    He could not be in the gallery
    And then you get an artist says he doesn’t want to paint at all
    He takes an empty canvas and sticks it on the wall
    The birds of a feather all the phonies and all of the fakes
    While the dealers they get together
    And they decide who gets the breaks
    And who’s going to be in the gallery
    No lies he wouldn’t compromise
    No junk no bits of string
    And all the lies we subsidize
    That just don’t mean a thing
    I’ve got to say he passed away in obscurity
    And now all the vultures are coming down from the tree
    So he’s going to be in the gallery.
    Songwriters: Mark Knopfler

  129. Zatara

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    Do you support ‘our girls’ being infantry in the ADF Lisa?

    If so what do you suggest we tell the enemy boys?

  130. If Sinc can pass my email details onto you, I would be happy to include my Ugly Mug

    Oldozzie, would love to have you on board. We will celebrate what we have.

  131. C.L.

    Professional wrongologist Paul Kelly claims Trump has ended the US alliance.

    In a way, good.
    The US has been bankrolling mendicant Western European states and propping up phony, half-hearted War on Terror participants like Australia for too long.

    Speaking of phonies, I note that John Howard (who dispatched our special forces to Iraq and Afghanistan, many to their deaths) hasn’t come forward to defend them. Total weasel.

  132. rickw

    EMP weapons have been used in Syria. So much for the Norks’ artillery.

    How do EMP weapons impact low tech artillery shooting at a city?

  133. Roger

    Authorities have pushed risk management on to organisations and businesses to the degree where a paper cut requires a form to be submitted to OH&S.

    Now Daniel Andrews is advising women to disregard risk entirely and place themselves in situations where their very life may be at peril.

    Yet I’d wager his children are chauffeured to and from school on account of possible risks to their safety.

    If so, what a pathetic hypocrite he is.

  134. OldOzzie

    None
    #2738356, posted on June 16, 2018 at 9:26 am
    Here’s one of the money quotes Old Ozzie:

    There is much that most of us don’t like about Trump.

    “Most of us” is who? Most of us is journos and elite lefties. The average Jo Blow sees “crude” = honest and direct, “sexist” = making a pass, “xenophobic” = stating the obvious about some migrant elements.

    None,

    I agree with you that Chris Keeny identifies himself as one who agrees with – “There is much that most of us don’t like about Trump?

    but overall the rest of his Article was fairly balanced

  135. None

    Hey Louis FitzSimons, Jake FitzSimons: DON’T R-APE GIRLS, YOU TURDS.

  136. Tel

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    Duh! Rape is already against the law.

    It the age old question: beg the perpetrator, or arm the victim. There’s an age old answer too, begging the perpetrator never works.

  137. Boambee John

    The fascist left establishment fears the rightful aspirations of the Australian working and middle classes. The fascist left establishment clings desperately to its privilege and the unearned wealth it has obtained by working against the interests of the Australian working and middle classes.

  138. feelthebern

    I ran into John Howard yesterday.
    He gets his hair cut at the same barber shop I go to.
    I don’t know what I’ll do when my barber quits.
    He’s been cutting my hair for 15-16 years now.

  139. Tel

    How do EMP weapons impact low tech artillery shooting at a city?

    The blow up your radio so the order to fire never comes through.

    That said, nothing will stop the Norks extensive string network.

  140. Death Giraffe

    I don’t know what I’ll do when my barber quits.

    ..
    Shave it off.
    Hair is shit.

  141. H B Bear

    bern – tell him to get his eyebrows done. And then abuse him for what he did to the Lieborals in the lead up to electing R-G -R.

  142. Nick

    He gets his hair cut at the same barber shop I go to.

    He attends a barber? He looks like an ageing koala

  143. Zatara

    LISA WILKINSON: Now, given recent revelations, do you think there’s a misogynistic, sexist, bullying culture in our Defence Force?

    Dunno Lisa but I absolutely guarantee there’s a “misogynistic, sexist, bullying culture” in combat.

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    Just a reminder Lisa, Eurodyce Dixon was of conscription age.

  144. Woolfe

    The more rapes and murders of women the easier it will be to outlaw men.

  145. Roger

    The rape and murder of Dixon is, of course, horrendous, but one wonders if Wilkinson would have given a sh*t if she had been some Broady single mum instead of a Fitzroy feminist artiste,

    Similar lack of disquiet when an Afghan refugee from Victoria sexually assaulted several women on a Gold Coast beach last year and not only avoided jail but had no conviction recorded. He was convicted of nine charges of sexual assault and three charges of common assault after an initial two charges of attempted rape were dropped. Presumably he now walks the streets of Melbourne.

  146. OldOzzie

    Law & the Courts
    The IG’s Report May Be Half-Baked
    By Andrew C. McCarthy -June 15, 2018 2:08 PM

    But who knows?

    You’ve got to hand it to Michael Horowitz: The Justice Department inspector general’s much-anticipated report on the Clinton-emails investigation may be half-baked, but if it is, it is the most comprehensive, meticulously detailed, carefully documented, thoughtfully reasoned epic in the history of half-bakery.

    Why say do I say the report “may be half-baked”? Why don’t I just come out and declare, “The report is half-baked”? Well, I figure if I write this column in the IG’s elusive style, we’ll have the Rosetta Stone we need to decipher the report.

    See, you probably sense that I believe the report is half-baked. But if I say it “may be” half-baked . . . well, technically that means it may not be, too. I mean, who really knows, right?

    If that annoys you, try wading through 568 pages of this stuff, particularly on the central issue of the investigators’ anti-Trump bias. The report acknowledges that contempt for Trump was pervasive among several of the top FBI and DOJ officials making decisions about the investigation. So this deep-seated bias must have affected the decision-making, right? Well, the report concludes, who really knows?

  147. None

    Meanwhile, Penny spends her time in London where she can concentrate on her new business, Penny Mountbatten London. Her career, she says, ‘became my lifeline’ in those first difficult years of her life apart for Lord Ivar.

    ‘I said to James this morning, ‘I don’t think I’ve ever felt as happy as I do right now.’ I’ve always loved Ivar wholeheartedly and he knows me better than anyone else on this planet, he often tells me how proud he is of what I’ve achieved.

    ‘I’m proud too. Finally I am able to love myself and the reason this marriage is acceptable to all of us, particularly our lovely daughters, is because of the character of James, the nature of the beast — the gorgeous beast.’

    Bit of battered wife syndrome there. The whole report alludes to the Lord being a right bastard until he could shove his dick up someone’s shithole. No wonder the woman is happy to give him away. She’s been brow beaten into accepting that as the enlightened thing to do. Fancy giving up most of your adult life for such a turd.

  148. feelthebern

    Last thing I’m going to do is harass a bald guy in a barber shop.

  149. thefrollickingmole

    “Separating babies from their mothers is not the answer and is immoral,” he added.

    And his call for the same sanction on people procuring abortions is…..???

  150. md

    Leftists in the bureaucracy working against the national interest and the interests of the people? Where have we heard of that before!
    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/byron-york-political-bias-infected-fbi-trump-clinton-investigations
    http://www.fitmisc.net/forum/showthread.php?162279-These-are-REAL-FBI-Texts
    FYI, the ACA they mention is the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).
    It is worth remembering that it was claimed that a ‘technical glitch’ at the FBI led to the ‘loss’ of text messages exchanged during a five month period, a period that happened to be crucial to investigating claims of bias. The DOJ Inspector General recovered many, if not all, of these texts.
    Trump’s hands are tied as long as the Russia Russia Russia thing is in play, because any sackings will be looked on negatively while it is in play. Maybe that’s why they’re dragging it out until after the mid-term elections. In any event, once the decks are clear, Trump has to purge the FBI and DOJ of leftists who treat the agencies as their own personal weapons in their war against America.

  151. EvilElvis

    How odd. I never felt the need to tell my son not to rape women. It was something he instinctively knew was wrong.

    The Fitzsimmons household must be a very strange place.

    I guess when you’re flat out dodgying up Aussie history, have the pressure of being a headwear fashion model, are busy telling your viewers how they should live and feel and generally hang out in the same artsy circles that would host paedo parties in the seventies some things slip through the cracks, Calli.

  152. Mater

    Daniel Andrews
    @DanielAndrewsMP
    So our message to Victorian women is this: Stay home. Or don’t. Go out with friends at night. Or don’t. Go about your day exactly as you intend, on your terms. Because women don’t need to change their behaviour. Men do.

    For next weeks road safety blitz:

    So our message to Victorian children is this: Look left and right. Or don’t. Check that the cars are stopping. Or don’t. Use pedestrian crossings exactly as you will, walk straight out there on your terms. Because you don’t need to stop. Cars do.

  153. stackja

    Donald J. Trump
    ‏Verified account
    @realDonaldTrump
    I have a great relationship with Angela Merkel of Germany, but the Fake News Media only shows the bad photos (implying anger) of negotiating an agreement – where I am asking for things that no other American President would ask for!

  154. .

    There is actually nothing wrong with a White Australia Policy

    Well no, there certainly is.

  155. stackja

    Adrian Bayley given many chances by legal system.

  156. .

    I’ve heard Trevor Fosdyke also never paid his ARU fees and kept on playing unregistered whenever there were uni holidays, particularly when there was an influx of unregistered players filling in…he also played in a few 3rd-grade grand finals, despite being the best fullback in country rugby (no wait, the best fullback in country rugby owns his own sheep station now..).

    It’s basically this guy’s fault that Trump won (racism) and the ARU don’t have enough in junior development funds.

  157. Snoopy

    There is actually nothing wrong with a White Australia Policy

    I wondered how I missed that statement. So I did a search. And now I know.

  158. .

    The implementation of a White Australia Policy would mean no Jason Soon or Bruce of Newcastle.

  159. Baldrick

    If only we had politicians of the same calibre:

    US expected to withdraw from UN Human Rights Council: report
    The U.S. is reportedly planning to pull out of the United Nations Human Rights Council after clashes over key issues such as Israel.
    A source told Reuters that the move could be “imminent.” The council will begin a three-week session in Geneva on Monday.
    Other diplomatic sources told Reuters that the withdrawal was “not a question of if but of when.”
    The U.S. rejoined the council under former President Obama after boycotting for three years under former President George W. Bush.

  160. .

    It’s a good start Baldrick, they should go all the way, but remember that John Bolton is a “bufoon”, as sfdc reminded us.

  161. Geriatric Mayfly

    Battle scars of mystery outbreak
    In a scenic pocket of Victoria, a medical mystery: how did a flesh-eating bug take hold and why is it spreading?

    Behind the paywall, but I recall similar references years ago to a pocket in Victoria of one of those “panic” diseases. I think it might have been mad-cow. All hush, hush of course. No idea what this new one might be, but I hope it does not provoke tabloid headlines like the one in Britain: “I watched my mum’s face rot.”

  162. stackja

    ALP says Gough ended White Australia Policy.

  163. Percy Popinjay

    ALP says Gough ended White Australia Policy.

    As well as giving wymmynses the vote.

  164. Snoopy

    US expected to withdraw from UN Human Rights Council: report

    Stabby would rather die.

  165. .

    History says the WAP was primarily pushed by the ALP, unions and “The Bulletin”!

    “Fucking Vietnamese balts…” etc.

  166. stackja

    Geriatric Mayfly
    #2738411, posted on June 16, 2018 at 10:50 am

    Same story?

    Medical journal demands ‘urgent’ response to epidemic of flesh-eating ulcerRohan [email protected]_smith news.com.au APRIL 16, 2018 7:43PM
    A FLESH-eating bacteria common in Africa is rapidly increasing in number in parts of Australia. WARNING: Graphic images.

    THE most frightening thing about a flesh-eating bacteria multiplying at a rapid rate in parts of Australia is that doctors don’t know how to prevent it.

    A startling report in the Medical Journal Of Australia on Monday declared the need for an “urgent scientific response” to an infection disease known by many names but most commonly the Bainsdale ulcer. It’s also often referred to as the Buruli ulcer or the Daintree ulcer because it occurs in parts of north Queensland.

    The report includes graphic images of the ulcer eating away at the flesh of an 11-year-old boy from the Mornington Peninsula, the Victorian bayside region where confirmed infections are up 400 per cent in the last four years.

    The bacteria that causes the ulcers attaches to its host and causes “severe destructive lesions of skin and soft tissue, resulting in significant morbidity”, the report states.

    “All age groups, including young children, are affected, and the emotional and psychological impact on patients and their carers is substantial.”

  167. None

    There is actually nothing wrong with a White Australia Policy

    And there would be no me either because I am not white. The “White Australia Policy” was not about picking whites but about migrants only from selected countries which shared Australian values (Remember Chinese, Afghani, Indian, god knows how many others were here since European settlement). When that was ‘dismantled’ it was replaced by migrants from countries which also shared the same values. And there is nothing wrong with either of it. No one has a right to enter your home just as no one has a right to enter other people’s countries. So do try and keep up, R-A-A-A-A-A-A-C-I-S-Ts. For the record in the early days of this blog I defended Jason Soon against charges of racism by pathetic lefties including not a few pathetic lefty libertarians.

  168. Percy Popinjay

    Wonderful to see the greenfilth recycling rubbish (again).

  169. .

    Question about Medicare.

    Are doctors just rorting taxpayers? Sure, medicine is a valued service.

    What would happen if the Treasury said “charge anymore more than the Medicare rebate and we won’t subsidise your patients”?

    I don’t know if this has been tried before.

    Would prices come down or would we just face shortages? I’ve seen some older friends and family of mine see non-invasive specialists for initial consultations of $500 or more.

    That’s not to say I want to see poor doctors or have them treated like serfs as they are in the UK NHS.

    This is not about envy. Are high prices caused by shortages or subsidies?

    People older than me can probably remember how medicine worked as consumers in the 1960s and 1970s pre-Whitlam/Fraser.

    I’d be very interested to know.

  170. Baldrick

    … but remember that John Bolton is a “bufoon”, as sfdc reminded us.

    Hmmm, sfdc. No wonder I scroll past him.

  171. calli

    “Because I don’t want to see you and your family destroyed by a nuclear war.” @realDonaldTrump what a great answer! MAGA

    I’m warming to this orange fella.

  172. calli

    ALP says Gough ended White Australia Policy.

    As well as giving wymmynses the vote.

    And ending the Vietnam war.

  173. OldOzzie

    Bill Clinton cornered Loretta Lynch at Sky Harbor and it wasn’t just to say hello
    Laurie Roberts, Arizona Republic

    At long last, we have the inside story on what happened that June evening two years ago at Sky Harbor International Airport, when Bill Clinton met Loretta Lynch.

    Or put another way, the evening Clinton essentially ambushed the then-attorney general on the Phoenix tarmac, setting off a series of seismic events that left a number people looking like Wile E. Coyote – after the Acme Corp. bomb blows up in his face.

    For the first time, we hear Bill Clinton’s version of events, on why he delayed his flight out of Phoenix and waited for Lynch’s plane to land then talked himself aboard to meet with the nation’s top law enforcement official – the woman whose agency was at the time investigating whether his wife Hillary should face criminal charges.

    “I just wanted to say ‘hello’ to her and I thought it would look really crazy if we were living in [a] world [where] I couldn’t shake hands with the Attorney General, you know, when she was right there,” Clinton is quoted as saying, in a report released Thursday by the Office of the Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Justice.

    Yeah, sure.
    ‘He was literally there’

  174. Geriatric Mayfly

    THE most frightening thing about a flesh-eating bacteria multiplying at a rapid rate in parts of Australia is that doctors don’t know how to prevent it.

    Thanks stackja. Sounds like a real humdinger, as opposed to hurt feelings, being offended and crippled by all those inappropriate, unacceptable and problematic hazards that send so many to an early grave.

  175. .

    “There is nothing wrong with the WAP, it would exclude me too…”

    Okay, so would you vote for it next election or ever?

    I’m going to suggest that if you would not vote for it, there is at least something wrong with it even if you like it overall.

    There is not a dichotomy between WAP and not having dodgy immigrants and refugees.

    Do you see how you have to assassinate your own character to continue advancing the argument?

  176. Leigh Lowe

    Baldrick

    #2738422, posted on June 16, 2018 at 11:04 am

    … but remember that John Bolton is a “bufoon”, as sfdc reminded us.

    Hmmm, sfdc. No wonder I scroll past him.

    No.
    Bolton is a crazed lunatic warmonger.
    Trump is a buffoon.
    Apparently.

  177. None

    I’m warming to this orange fella.

    it pays to check photos of the same event from different press organisations. You will find his actually not orange. I suggest that the colour saturation in some photos has been deliberately altered to make him look orange. It’s not the first time the media would have doctored photos.

  178. Baldrick

    Are doctors just rorting taxpayers?

    The system is designed to benefit ‘business model’ doctors who churn through patients quicker than a Big Sister fruit cake process line.
    A patient co-payment of $5 per visit would soon weed out the hypochondriacs and old biddies who just want someone to talk to and cut back the tax-mooching doctors pay packets.
    An over supply of available appointments should lead to a drop in prices as competition for patients increases.

  179. Baldrick

    Orange is the new black calli.

  180. Death Giraffe

    Face facts.
    It all went to shit after you let the Irish in.

  181. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    And ending the Vietnam war.

    He’s usually given credit, totally in error, for withdrawing Australian troops from the “fun factory.”

  182. Death Giraffe

    Also those melancholic Scots.

  183. calli

    Of course, none.

    Orange is my favourite colour. Van Gogh called it the colour of madness. Much better than the colour of envy.

  184. RobertS

    ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’: Lisa Wilkinson breaks down in tears.

    If she really cared she’d use her celebrity to lobby for the death penalty for such crimes.

  185. Death Giraffe

    Just basically gingers in general.

  186. Death Giraffe

    Dot, are you a ginger?
    Be honest.

  187. .

    No I am not the master troll coppercab.

  188. Bruce of Newcastle:

    We’ll see if China carries through. If they don’t Trump will ramp up pressure on Norkville to signal to Xi that the US can indeed collapse the DPRK and cause China a world of hurt.

    Have a look on Google Earth and see what an invidious position China is in if the two Koreas metamorphose into Korea backed by the US and Japan.

  189. stackja

    Geriatric Mayfly
    #2738426, posted on June 16, 2018 at 11:08 am
    THE most frightening thing about a flesh-eating bacteria multiplying at a rapid rate in parts of Australia is that doctors don’t know how to prevent it.

    Thanks stackja. Sounds like a real humdinger, as opposed to hurt feelings, being offended and crippled by all those inappropriate, unacceptable and problematic hazards that send so many to an early grave.

    Reminds of a past immune syndrome that was a mystery. Required a lifestyle change. Yet some today still living as before.

  190. Death Giraffe

    .
    #2738440, posted on June 16, 2018 at 11:22 am
    No I am not…

    ..
    Lying ginger bastard.

  191. None

    Face facts.
    It all went to shit after you let the Irish in.

    I dunno. Life became rather fun when the Irishman arrived here.

  192. dot, good to see you walk in the Cat front bar.

  193. None

    Orange is my favourite colour. Van Gogh called it the colour of madness. Much better than the colour of envy.

    Well said, Calli.

  194. calli

    Two of my kids are gingers. They even scare me sometimes. 🙂

  195. ‘Instead of telling our girls not to walk through parks, we should be telling our boys not to rape them’:

    Consider the sheer moral calumny leveled here at fathers across Australia. This is the statement of not merely a moral nimcompoop, but of a dishonest cow.

  196. OldOzzie

    IG Report: FBI Lawyer #1 Tashina Gauhar and The Huma/Weiner Laptop Issues

    One of the information issues with the IG report is that it’s written entirely from an insiders perspective. Therefore without an understanding of how divisions within Main Justice related to the discussed activity within FBI main DC offices it can be very confusing to understand.

    The ‘insider narration’ makes it difficult to see what happened with the Huma Abedin and Anthony Weiner laptop; and how the Clinton emails were discovered. However, because the issue is so important the IG report spends three chapters on this time-frame between September 28th and October 29th, 2016; and ultimately the next day, Oct. 30th, when a search warrant was executed for the laptop content.

    IG Horowitz takes this aspect of the investigation into granularity and nuance (Chapters 8, 9 and 10).

    At the heart of the activity during this critical period is FBI lawyer #1 Tashina “Tash” Gauhar who was on a video conference call with the FBI New York Field Office (NYFO) as the discoveries of hundreds of thousands of Clinton emails were relayed internally to the Mid-Year-Event (MYE) team in DC on September 29th, 2016.

    Almost a full month went by until October 27th, 2016, when the MYE team all gathered with James Comey to talk about the laptop issues and the emails. Within the IG review of this period, there is a bunch of ass-covering documentation that takes place in hindsight to the events. The IG is careful to point out each time his investigation is presented with documentary evidence that was clearly written long-after the events being questioned.

    The central IG question is: why didn’t the FBI take immediate action to review 725,000 Clinton-centric emails on the Huma/Weiner laptop? Why did they wait a month before seeking a search warrant? Why were they doing nothing?…

  197. C.L.

    Breaking new corruption scandal:

    Prosecutor Who Put Paul Manafort in Prison Today Attended Hillary Clinton’s Election Night Party

  198. Death Giraffe

    calli
    #2738450, posted on June 16, 2018 at 11:29 am
    Two of my kids are gingers. They even scare me sometimes. 🙂

    ..
    It is heart- rending when you hear the tragedy in some cats lives.
    We are here for you Calli.
    Chin up. There is no definitive proof they are completely souless.

  199. struth

    Every Australian rape or violent criminal act for that matter should be a statistical consideration when weighing up our wonderous anti firearms “safety”.
    Those like Lisa Wilkinson, who are gun control zealots, make insane, inane, thick as two short planks, sexist comments about teaching men not to rape, while making sure that young women have no way of defending themselves, but more importantly, letting the rapist know that he is very unlikely to have a gun pointed at him, while plying his trade in Australia, emboldening him to attack.
    Every violent crime that may have been avoided by being able to defend one’s self should be counted when quoting safe gun free Australia.
    It really is only safer for the criminals.

  200. Bruce in WA

    223 …. nice calibre

  201. Boambee John

    Has the reactionary lackey of the fascist left Deep State, m0nty, been in this morning to defend the actions of the Democrat Party’s secret police force?

    Don’t just ignore the aspirations of the working and middle classes, comrades, oppress them.

  202. C.L.

    Seems the 2018 Perth Festival’s Dorothy Hewett Award is still a go.

  203. .

    So, the FBI hunting for communist infiltrators was just a recruiting programme?

  204. struth

    Every Australian ra pe or violent criminal act for that matter should be a statistical consideration when weighing up our wonderous anti firearms “safety”.
    Those like Lisa Wilkinson, who are gun control zealots, make insane, inane, thick as two short planks, sexist comments about teaching men not to ra pe, while making sure that young women have no way of defending themselves, but more importantly, letting the ra pist know that he is very unlikely to have a gun pointed at him, while plying his trade in Australia, emboldening him to attack.
    Every violent crime that may have been avoided by being able to defend one’s self should be counted when quoting safe gun free Australia.
    It really is only safer for the criminals.

  205. .

    But how does one teach not to rape?

    Surely you don’t do it through role-playing and experiential learning?

    I mean, then how would we teach people not to murder?

    “Back in ten honey. Gonna show the kids what not to do with a can of petrol and a lighter…”

    I get it. You tell your kids how much you respect women.

  206. Snoopy

    JC, don’t miss this.

    OldOzzie
    #2738452, posted on June 16, 2018 at 11:30 am
    IG Report: FBI Lawyer #1 Tashina Gauhar and The Huma/Weiner Laptop Issues

  207. C.L.

    Gerard Henderson has a column in The Weekend Australian condemning the ABC for its nationwide ban on reporting the Dorothy Hewett child r-ape scandal. He explains that Hewett and the r-pists are all admired by senior ABC figures.

    He also reminds readers that, historically, the ABC endorsed child molestation:

    Richard Neville (1941-2016), in his 1970 book Play Power,boasted about having sex with an underage schoolgirl in London. Soon after he returned to Australia, Neville was given a program on ABC radio in which he interviewed three pederasts in the ABC studio in Sydney in July 1975. No one reported the child sex abusers to the NSW police.

    Richard Downing, then ABC chairman, who was appointed by the Whitlam Labor government, rationalised the ABC’s decision to air Neville’s program.

    Downing told the Herald at the time that “in general, men will sleep with young boys”. Incumbent ABC chairman Justin Milne and his predecessor, Jim Spigelman, have refused to distance the contemporary ABC from Downing’s statement, which has never been renounced.

  208. struth

    But how does one teach not to rape?

    All men know not to rape.
    Except the ones that are taught that it’s ok with the infidels.
    You know about those ones dot.
    You are the libertarian, why are you asking about a problem the people that think like you on immigration have helped increase?
    Maybe you should have thought about that before.
    By the way, good to see you back.

  209. Snoopy

    It’s a pity Chas Lickadick will never bother to read this.

    IG Report: FBI Lawyer #1 Tashina Gauhar and The Huma/Weiner Laptop Issues

  210. Bruce of Newcastle

    But how does one teach not to rape?

    By turning the perps into eunuchs.

  211. Snoopy

    I don’t know what it’s like now, but Hyde Park in Sydney was a no-go zone at night unless you were in a group.

  212. Roger

    People older than me can probably remember how medicine worked as consumers in the 1960s and 1970s pre-Whitlam/Fraser. I’d be very interested to know.

    People made private health insurance a priority, even in QLD where Joh provided free hospital treatment but some preferred the choice of specialist and hospital.

    Iirc there was some public subsidy to the insurance schemes from the 1950s, but the poorest remained uninsured. This was the rationale for Medibank and then Medicare.

    As to how doctors set fees I don’t know, but affordability would have certainly been a factor, I would think, as families with children and a mortgage – the majority in the baby boom years – had less discretionary income than now.

    Doctors were more comfortably off than most, but they didn’t become millionaires on the basis of their practice alone.

  213. Snoopy

    The central IG question is: why didn’t the FBI take immediate action to review 725,000 Clinton-centric emails on the Huma/Weiner laptop? Why did they wait a month before seeking a search warrant? Why were they doing nothing?…

    Comey thought he could keep it under wraps. Missed it by that much.

  214. None

    Wilkinson has two sons and one daughter. The sun Zara on Twitter and Instagram so I believe all of you who use the same platform to get on there and tell the two boys they should not rape girls, not even there mum or the sister and you should tell them because I’m pretty sure Lisa Wilkinson has never told them not to rape girls.

  215. .

    I get the feeling that cutting the Medicare rebate to zero if the price charged is more than the rebate would not cause a shortage of care but a surplus of Maseratis.

    Any doctors out there? Am I completely wrong or just a bastard?

    $500 initial consult after a referral from ANOTHER specialist just feels scammy.

    Medicare to me just screams Edelstein and malpractice (lack of proper primary care, you’re treating patients, not banging out widgets).

  216. calli

    The Beloved a big, tough old guy, informed me this morning that even he wouldn’t walk the streets alone at 2am. He reckons it’s asking for trouble.

    I can’t fathom why these idiot feminists are encouraging young women to do so.

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