Wednesday Forum: June 20, 2018

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1,823 Responses to Wednesday Forum: June 20, 2018

  1. Empire 5:5

    Despite this:

    Over the last seven days (June 13 through June 19), the networks have unleashed a deluge of reports featuring over-the-top grandstanding and virtue signaling totaling 258 minutes, or more than four hours. [UPDATE: On June 20, the network morning shows generated an additional 61 minutes on this topic, bringing the total to a stunning 319 minutes of airtime.]

    https://truepundit.com/update-networks-dedicate-258-minutes-to-separated-kids-coverage/

    This:

    According to a new Rasmussen poll, a majority of Americans blame illegal immigrant parents for the child crisis on the border over the U.S. government.

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/06/21/rasmussen-parents-to-blame-border-crisis/

  2. OldOzzie

    More Winning by Trump and his Team – MAGA

    ‘Christmas Comes Early’ For Mulvaney? Federal Judge Rules CFPB’s Structure Is Unconstitutional

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has been a target of conservatives. It’s currently part of the larger war against Trump as some disgruntled staffers are reportedly using encrypted devices to communicate with one another. They’re known as “Dumbledore’s Army.” No, I’m not kidding.

    It all stems from the leadership battle between Office of Budget and Management Mick Mulvaney and Deputy Director Leandra English. English was set up to takeover upon the departure of former director Richard Cordray, who left to run for governor of Ohio. Yet, since this is an agency within the executive Trump was well within his authority to appoint Mulvaney as acting director. English filed a legal challenge to the appointment, but the courts finally ruled that Mulvaney is to be top dog at the agency. It should come to no one’s surprise that people were criticizing the Mulvaney regime, especially on the agency’s advisory board. Mulvaney recently decided to fire the whole board.

    So, does this mean the CFPB is on life support? I know a lot of people hope so. This whole issue is likely to be decided by the Supreme Court (via The Hill):

  3. OldOzzie

    This is a classic case of what Trump and others have noted about Obama holdouts. They’re like the last Japanese soldiers stationed on Pacific islands, totally unaware that they’ve lost the war. Okay—maybe they know Hillary lost, but they still have that fighting spirit. Like they’re the vanguard to the Obama legacy. That’s fine, but as government workers, aren’t you suppose to work to the best of your ability regardless of who is in the White House. And if that cannot be accomplished, you find a new job, right? Well, for these resistance fighters, that’s not the case. I’m sure she’ll keep her job. The problem is that it only adds fuel to the fire that there’s a plot to get Trump from within the halls of this department and from this recent inspector general’s report, that’s an allegation that’s not entirely out of left field.

  4. calli

    Apropos of my last comment, where’s the Stimp?

    He’s an expert on such things and can advise on music selection.

  5. John Constantine

    http://www.visualcapitalist.com/maps-population-distribution-visualized/

    Important, because as the population maps of Canada and Australia show, there are places that people want to live, and places they refuse to go.

    Some people look at the simple geographic map of Australia and claim it is so big it can never be filled up.

    What Big Australia has done is mass import people from cultures that Abhor the Frontier, and are culturally open to being stacked higher and tighter in clone cities modelled on the human stocking densities of Asia.

    Their Andrew broad [ Christopher pyne with pet sheep] is in the news again, virtue signalling that his safe tory electorate isn’t diverse enough and must import more diversity, like ummmm errrr doctors and ummmm errrrr abottoirs.

    Newsflash, Australia is churning out so many medical students already that they can be found stacked six deep at the tip, unless the tip is outside a capital city in which case they wouldn’t attend there at gunpoint.

    Import masses of people from non Big Sky cultures and they will pack into the cities as tightly as they pack in back home.

    Comrades.

  6. Geriatric Mayfly

    Calli. Paint yourself with woad, don a loincloth and dance in a drum circle under the crescent moon. Mayfly
    A swag of pics at the Daily Mail showing the invasion of Stonehenge by bloody pagans. Getafix is there carrying a plasticbottle of the magic potion. Others appear to have opted for substances other than his NHS approved pharmaceuticals.

  7. None

    Jo Smyth

    #2743827, posted on June 21, 2018 at 10:46 pm

    How things have changed in schools. Tomorrow, my granddaughter aged 11, is having a Stress Down Day.

    Your granddaughter is having is not having a stress down. Her teachers, the poor petals, believe teaching is so stressful that they prefer not to do it. Pupil free days, stress town days, are just bulldust excuses for teachers not to do the job which they’re paid to do. It’s disgraceful.

  8. Top Ender

    Interesting letter in the Oz:

    Schools are at fault in failing to teach students general knowledge regarding the balance sheet for capitalism and socialism. But I suspect it is more the extremism of capitalism that has ­allowed leftism to flourish in education. The dollar is everything.

    The CEOs of universities, still called vice-chancellors, now aspire to salaries 20 times the average wage, thanks to John Dawkins’ corporatisation of this sector.

    Chancellors, more often than not, are successful entrepreneurs. They set the tone for the V-C, who focuses on the bottom line. There is thus little room or demand for courses that are expensive to run or that don’t generate immediate income.

    Meanwhile, corporate CEOs can avail themselves of salaries 100 or even 200 times the average wage. And since so many of these have shown themselves to be crooks and sometimes not even competent, is it any wonder leftism has found fertile ground in a population girded with unfulfillable aspirations?

    Chek Ling, Corinda, Qld

  9. areff

    Last time one former Obama man, when asked if there as a smoking gun in all this said, these are just examples, who knows what other meetings they had.

    That was Clapper talking. He grows more garrulous as the noose tightens, now reduced to pitching his conspiracies and professed patriotism to the likes of Whoopi Goldberg and Australian taxpayers’ very own Sarah “Simpleton” Ferguson.

    When they are the only people you can pitch to without risk of hard questions, you’re stuffed.

    Oh, and ANU too, where Clapper gets a pretty penny as a irregularly visiting professor or somesuch. That’s a match made in heaven.

  10. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Hungary says immigration threatens its national security…

    And if not halted, that is true. The measures Hungary is taking are reasonable under the circumstances currently being seen in Europe and given the EU control there. Hungary is objecting to a fifth column of activists within. No society can stand by continually and see treasonous behavior uncontrolled.

  11. .

    BorisG
    #2743870, posted on June 22, 2018 at 1:14 am
    Haley is great but I don’t think trump will be succeeded by a republican. Americans like to change the party of the president at least every eight years. Haley can come back later.

    No smart Democrat will run in 2020. Only the chancers. Hillary might return!

  12. Geriatric Mayfly

    There is thus little room or demand for courses that are expensive to run or that don’t generate immediate income.

    Between thee two bookends, where lies Wimmin’s Studies, White Studies, Aboriginal Studies and all the other Angry Studies?

  13. .

    Clapper isn’t the biggest crook, but he is the boldest.

    He openly lied to the US Senate. He is brazen and thinks that his prior promotion gave him the right to be above the law. He forgets himself, his boss will rightly always be a civilian, and they are those he serves. Nor is he (in theory) above the law.

  14. Snoopy

    No smart Democrat will run in 2020.

    So we can expect a Melbourne Cup field led by Hillary and George Clooney.

  15. Top Ender

    Mother removes her two sons from school after they are put in isolation for their ‘normal’ hairstyles and refuses to get it cut because ‘it’s against their human rights’

    A read of the article is interesting.

    – Boys are called “Tyrone” and “TJ”
    – 801 kids out of 804 meet the school rules
    – Mum reckons she can’t do anything because they are 13 and 11
    – Works two jobs and isn’t available to do much with them

    Mum needs a mirror and a big sign to look at.

    Write “Choices?” on it in big letters.

    There you go.

  16. John Constantine

    The elite brainstrust of Australia has bet the farm on moving to a capital city property services economy, underpinned by mass importing vast herds of consumption machine peasants to demand capital city property services.

    Exponential growth in demand started by ramping up documented immigration, then got the next leg up by recruiting to the Ponzi consumption machines that were not documented for permanent residency, but still the ACTU claimed 1.2 million consumers on work visa and the 600,000 consumers on education visa and the undocumented consumers on fly-in and overstay all boost demand for the capital city property Ponzi.

    Where does the next leg up in demand growth come from?. We already have the cheapest interest rates now we will ever see in our working lifetimes.

    We had the lift in permanents, we had the exponential lift in visas, the Ponzi must grow or collapse, there is no middle ground. Where is the third leg coming from?.

    Their elite quisling orcs will never import South African stale pales, as they move bush and don’t support the capital city Ponzi, the imports of value are those rich enough to throw hot undocumented money at the top end capital city property, and those poor enough to be stacked tighter and deeper by the millions into the bottom end of capital city property as an underpinning.

    Comrades.

  17. Farmer Gez

    Their Andrew broad [ Christopher pyne with pet sheep] is in the news again, virtue signalling that his safe tory electorate isn’t diverse enough and must import more diversity, like ummmm errrr doctors and ummmm errrrr abottoirs.

    Their Andrew Broad is about to get Central Victorian town of Maryborough put into his Mallee electorate. It’s over 400kms from Mildura to Maryborough.

  18. struth

    The CEOs of universities, still called vice-chancellors, now aspire to salaries 20 times the average wage, thanks to John Dawkins’ corporatisation of this sector.

    It’s still taxpayer funded so big difference.

    This isn’t another slimy Chicom trying to blame capitalism for the brainwashing of da yoof in universities who could only exist by taking money by force from the taxpayers of the nation.

  19. OneWorldGovernment

    This is mildly amusing.

    The Kochtopus Crushes Nashville Transit
    By Kyle Smith June 20, 2018 5:17 PM

    The dots connect themselves!

    The half-awake citizen may be unaware just how dexterously the arms of the Kochtopus have reached into every precinct of American life. Not one mile from my home stands a particularly egregious example: the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, home to the New York City Ballet. Koch put up $100 million toward renovating the theater, but consider his ulterior motives. Theaters like this one use a lot of floor wax. At intermission they serve drinks in plastic cups. Their seats are covered with upholstery. These are all byproducts of petroleum. Get the picture?

    …………..

    In 2014, David and Charles Koch gave $25 million to the United Negro College Fund. Don’t see the connection? Educated black people read more. The Kochs own Flint Group, one of the world’s largest suppliers of printing ink.

    Wake up sheeple! I have all of these connections diagrammed out on the 80-foot-wide blackboard I keep in the bomb shelter. You go unprepared for the Kochpocalypse if you choose. I won’t.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/06/koch-family-vs-nashville-transit/

  20. Some History

    For anyone interested.

    Volume up.

    Still one of the best concert openings.

    Elvis Presley Live

    Aloha from Hawaii (1973)

    0:00 to 3 minutes 52 seconds

  21. .

    John Constantine

    There are a lot of seemingly sensible Coalition voters who also support never-ending capital city price appreciation.

    There is so much at stake; even questioning that this asset appreciation is genuine wealth creation or not makes you a pariah, at best, an outsider.

    The default inflation setting is supported across Parliament and even by otherwise sensible economists.

    There might be room to move after the next downturn. I think our level of debt is crippling and that will lead to a crisis. At present, you’d have to take on high prices, and;

    *Cutting immigration (not hard if we stop subsidising various resettlement programmes and so on, we’d still get enough quality migrants)
    *Redesigning immigration and refugee resettlement
    *Inflationary monetary policy which many even on the ‘right’ will defend to the last shilling and pence
    *Land zoning, building regulations and high taxes on property development
    *Possibly decentralising state government functions

    I am all for this but to do so now with a stated goal of “ending the property ponzi” likely wouldn’t make you popular.

    A core of baby boomers and Gen X with vast amounts of wealth tied up in artificial property prices will see such policies as a threat to their balance sheet and a personal affront.

  22. Leigh Lowe

    calli

    #2743966, posted on June 22, 2018 at 8:18 am

    Paint yourself with woad, don a loincloth and dance in a drum circle under the crescent moon, Mayfly.

    That won’t stand out in the Central Highlands, let me tell you.
    There are three shops in Sodom selling nothing but woad and loincloth.

  23. .

    Koch put up $100 million toward renovating the theater, but consider his ulterior motives. Theaters like this one use a lot of floor wax. At intermission they serve drinks in plastic cups. Their seats are covered with upholstery. These are all byproducts of petroleum. Get the picture?

    The Koch Brothers also share roughly 69% of their DNA with rats.

    They are parasites! We MUST have the Clinton foundation backing the US Presidency, for the common good!

  24. Mother Lode

    No smart Democrat will run in 2020. Only the chancers. Hillary might return!

    It will be interesting to see if Oprah is still in the running – or if she is nothing more than a little fantasy for progs to cling to while there appears no other hope.

    The situation of the Democrats is like that saying “The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” (Although I always preferred the looser translation “A fox knows many things, a hedgehog only one – but it knows it very well.”)

    They had campaigning down pat. It was their one big thing. They knew the topography so well that they could never to be ambushed but knew all the best places to ambush. They could never be cornered but knew all the best places to corner. They could never be caught on disadvantaged ground but knew how to entice the enemy there.

    The Democrats still don’t know what happened. They are still trying to chart out what happened on their old map.

    It would not surprise me to learn they believe Oprah’s being wealthy and self-made is the trick – and her being black and more stylish will be the telling advantage.

  25. Geriatric Mayfly

    That won’t stand out in the Central Highlands, let me tell you.
    There are three shops in Sodom selling nothing but woad and loincloth.

    Also scores of volcanic cones, but none active, alas. Imagine Gaia’s benevolence in hastening the arrival of spring, if we could throw a few virgins into the boiling magma. Oh! They’re extinct as well. A brace of local lezzos might have done the trick.

  26. Zyconoclast

    Looks like a list for SSM

    Heat turned up on NEG
    By late on Thursday, the pro-NEG forces were mobilised, with an assortment of backbench Liberals (Julia Banks, Trent Zimmerman, Trevor Evans, Tim Wilson) and Nationals (Mark Coulton, Andrew Broad) publicly rallying to its defence.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-06-22/government-celebrates-on-tax-fights-on-energy-michelle-grattan/9897580

  27. areff

    That was Mel Gibson’s alternate title for Braveheart: The Woad Warrior, but the studio nixed it.

  28. Leigh Lowe

    King of the Woad.

  29. Snoopy

    Modern Leftism explained!

    Going from being an occasional marijuana user to indulging every day increases the risk of psychosis by up to 159 percent, research revealed in July 2017.

    Marijuana is thought to cause psychosis-like experiences by increasing a user’s risk of depression, a study found. The two mental health conditions have previously been linked.

    Frequently abusing the substance also significantly reduces a user’s ability to resist socially unacceptable behavior when provoked, the research adds.

    Also marijuana use lowers pain threshold.

    A small study found people who use cannabis require higher doses of painkillers than non users after major traumatic event like a car crash.

  30. calli

    Fury Woad?

    Oops! Wrong movie.

  31. Dr Faustus

    Wong and Winding Woad

  32. struth

    You take da high woad, and “‘ll take da low woad

  33. .

    You’re better off having a marijuana problem than an opioid, tobacco or alcohol problem.

  34. struth

    You’re better off having a marijuana problem than an opioid, tobacco or alcohol problem.

    The Libertarian hippies defending their patch, we see.

    Our drug good, your drug bad.
    (no that’s not dot strangling a cat, that’s the sound of a sitar in the background)

  35. C.L.

    You’re better off having a marijuana problem than an opioid, tobacco or alcohol problem.

    You’d rather a neuro-surgeon with a marijuana problem operate on you ahead of a cigarette smoker, Dot?
    Don’t be silly.

  36. struth

    You smoke da high weed and I’ll smoke da bad weed, and I’ll get cancer before ye.
    For me and my true love are always getting cancer,
    because the greatest cause of cancer is…. breathing.

  37. calli

    Cheapskates.

    Woad and loincloths aren’t that expensive.

  38. Roger

    Just saw a figure of a 15% combined unemployment and underemployment rate in Australia.

    I’d wager it’s closer to 20%.

    Wages are stagnant and the infrastructure lag is affecting quality of life negatively.

    Where’s the prosperity dividend from record high immigration?

  39. C.L.

    Time magazine’s latest cover already being brilliantly ridiculed.

  40. .

    I’d rather have a robot do it, failing that, a straight edge autist with a perfect academic and professional record, no friends and no compassion, but a perfectionist nonetheless who’s only joy in life is the competent delivery of medical and surgical care. Zero bedside manner and no chit chat in post-op care either.

    That is beside the point though. All drug prohibition is misguided.

  41. .

    struth
    #2744033, posted on June 22, 2018 at 9:48 am
    You smoke da high weed and I’ll smoke da bad weed, and I’ll get cancer before ye.
    For me and my true love are always getting cancer,
    because the greatest cause of cancer is…. breathing.

    You’re not far off. Before longer lifespans were common, lung cancer was considered a disease of old age, not of smoking.

  42. struth

    Dot gets his drug advice from swarmi guru DL, as they sit around in the smoke filled room in the hinterland behind Byron Bay, with a bad case of the munchies and Pink Floyd’s the wall on high rotation.

  43. struth

    No, DL, chocolate is not poisonous.
    You’re a bloody vet, you tool.
    That’s dogs.

  44. C.L.

    The New York Times lies and the SMH repeats the lies:

    New York: A powerful cover of Time magazine has struck a chord in the US, capturing national anguish over immigration policy by placing a crying immigrant girl at the feet of US President Donald Trump.

    “Welcome to America,” the headline on the poignant cover says.

    The crying two-year-old girl is a cut out from a now-iconic photograph by Getty photographer John Moore that went viral in the US and became a symbol of the Trump administration’s new “zero tolerance” border policy.

    She was depicted screaming while a US Customs and Border Patrol agent patted down her mother at a border crossing in southern Texas’ Rio Grande Valley.

    But oopsa-daisy: the Daily Mail just got hold of the father and interviewed him:

    In an exclusive interview with DailyMail.com, Hernandez, who lives in Puerto Cortes, Honduras, says that he was told yesterday that his wife and child are being detained at a family residential center in Texas but are together and are doing ‘fine…’

    Denis said his wife and daughter were never separated by border control agents and remain together.

    He revealed that his wife had previously mentioned her wish to go to the United States for a ‘better future’ but did not tell him nor any of their family members that she was planning to make the trek.

    ‘I didn’t support it. I asked her, why? Why would she want to put our little girl through that? But it was her decision at the end of the day.’

    He said that Sandra had always wanted to experience ‘the American dream’ and hoped to find a good job in the States.

    Denis, who works as a captain at a port on the coast of Puerto Cortes, explained that things back home were fine but not great, and that his wife was seeking political asylum.

    He said that Sandra set out on the 1,800-mile journey with the baby girl on June 3, at 6am, and he has not heard from her since.

    ‘I never got the chance to say goodbye to my daughter and now all I can do is wait’, he said, adding that he hopes they are either granted political asylum or are sent back home…

    ‘I don’t have any resentment for my wife, but I do think it was irresponsible of her to take the baby with her in her arms because we don’t know what could happen…’

    He said he heard from friends that his wife paid $6,000 for a coyote – a term for someone who smuggles people across the border.

    So the mother is a greedy scumbag who kidnapped his daughter. Criminal trash.

  45. Roger

    with a bad case of the munchies and Pink Floyd’s the wall on high rotation.

    Dark Side of the Moon, surely?

    Piper at the Gates of Dawn, even.

    Mind you, you’d probably have to be high to sit through Roger Waters’ insufferably pretentious “rock opera”.

  46. struth

    Hey, shouts dot from the kitchen…..
    How old are these rice crackers D.L.?

    They’re not rice crackers dot, they’re coasters…………………..

  47. John Constantine

    Thanks Gez, I missed the redistribution confirmation.

    “The AEC has reshuffled various electoral boundaries across Victoria to create room for an extra federal seat, which has been added in Melbourne’s west to account for population growth.”

    https://www.bendigoadvertiser.com.au/story/5480354/maryborough-move-to-mallee-electorate-bitterly-disappointing/

    This how their voteherd warfare works, not just the new left leaning electorate created through the population increase of importing property service consuming voters into the city, but the redistributing a left voting welfare town like Maryborough into a previously safe tory seat,

    This redistribution won’t send Mallee left, but will demographically send it marginal in a decade or two.

  48. .

    If you wanted to make it stick, you’d say I was watching Heavy Metal and listening to BOC.

  49. Some History

    From Chris Snowdon

    Scotland’s new [anti] tobacco plan unveiled

    https://velvetgloveironfist.blogspot.com/2018/06/scotlands-new-tobacco-plan-unveiled.html

    Just more coercion/punishment for “non-conformers”, even tampering with the appearance of individual cigarettes.

  50. struth

    Mind you, you’d probably have to be high to sit through Roger Waters’ insufferably pretentious “rock opera”.

    As was Roger.

    The damage done to wider society by those that smoke drugs cannot be calculated.
    Dope ……..the lefties preferred choice to create a nation of stoners useless to society and indeed a great cost to it.
    Whereas, if we could only get the mussies pissed once in a while, they’d calm down.

  51. Some History

    Contrast

    WWI reverend dubbed ‘Woodbine Willie’ spent almost his entire salary on 865,000 cigarettes for sick and dying soldiers, says new research
    20 June 2018

    “Woodbines, which were strong and unfiltered, were not widely available on the Western Front and were considered as gold dust in the trenches.
    Historians have long known that Studdert Kennedy ‘administered’ his own cigarettes to men on the frontline to boost morale.
    Records also show that he regularly ventured – unarmed – into No Man’s Land, often under heavy machine gun and artillery fire, to give dying troops one final ‘gasper’.”
    “Clutching his Bible for protection, the ‘Battlefield Saint’ would whisper the Lord’s Prayer and hold their hands until the end.
    His selfless bravery, particularly at the Battle of Messines, earned him a Military Cross from King George V and the affectionate, lasting nickname, ‘Woodbine Willie’.”
    “In December 1915, he was stationed at a railway station in Rouen, France, where he held communion with the troops, penned letters for the illiterate, and prayed with and for young soldiers.
    When they left for the frontline, he gave them copies of the New Testament and, to the 96 per cent of soldiers who smoked, one or more Woodbine cigarettes.
    Troops were issued with two ounces of cheap rolling tobacco with their rations, but supply was irregular.
    While ready-rolled cigarettes like Woodbines were sometimes available from The Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes (NAAFI), they were expensive and highly prized among the working classes.”
    “He routinely prayed with dying soldiers on the frontline and was awarded the Military Cross after running through ‘murderous machine gun-fire’ at Messines Ridge to deliver morphine to men screaming in agony in No Man’s Land – a role he was not expected to do or paid for.”
    “His chief relaxations were tea drinking and cigarette smoking and it was his practice to offer the traditional smoke to any soldier he met.’
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5865655/WWI-chaplain-Woodbine-Willie-spent-entire-salary-865-000-cigarettes-sick-troops.html

  52. stackja

    Roger
    #2744046, posted on June 22, 2018 at 9:57 am

    Comfortably Numb?

  53. John Constantine

    CPH creso pharma greets the legalisation of recreational marijuana nationwide in Canada.

    https://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/20180621/pdf/43vxyh16hrd21b.pdf

    We do not have to guess or speculate, just watch Canada for results.

    My position is that there will be good and bad, but that taking wealth from organised crime and removing policing burdens, as well as increasing peoples personal responsibility for their own life choices will let us see in real time what Canada is really made of.

  54. Infidel Tiger

    Don Trumpeone appears to be as stupid on internet taxes as our Malcolm and ScoMo.

  55. OldOzzie

    JUDITH SLOAN
    New system won’t fix all flaws in school funding model

    Here’s something strange. Representatives from the non-government school sectors were briefed this week about the findings of the Chaney review of the socio-economic status measure that largely determines government funding of their schools and they were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement.

    And then there is a story in Fairfax Media previewing the findings of the Chaney review.

    Everyone knows where the story came from, but denials will be the order of the day. Hint: the leak didn’t come from anyone at the briefings. It makes the process look like a complete joke.

    The Chaney review is a means of attempting to get the Education Minister Simon Birmingham out of a hole. Mind you, he created this hole himself.

    In his haste to spend an additional $25.3 billion over 10 years on funding schools, he forgot to pay attention to the sensitive issue of how the additional money should be allocated between the different school systems.

    In particular, he failed to pay heed to one of the key recommendations of the first Gonski report that the SES model be reviewed and potentially replaced before any new funding arrangement was put in place.

    No one thinks the SES model is fit for purpose. Using out-of-date income, occupation and education census data — but not religion — for statistical areas, an index is created for every non-government school based on the addresses of parents. The higher the figure, the lower the government funding given to that school.

    The model throws off some truly bizarre results. Some elite independent schools that are charging more than $25,000 per year in fees (double for boarders) have relatively low SES scores.

    Geelong College has an SES of 108 whereas Holy Rosary School in Kensington (an inner Melbourne suburb) has an SES of 119. The Kings School at Parramatta has an SES of 116 whereas St Aloysius in North Caulfield (a mid-suburb in Melbourne) has an SES of 118.

    The word is that Chaney will recommend that the tax file numbers of the parents be used to assess their capacity to contribute and hence the extent of government funding, at least in part.

    This will be an improvement on the current system, but there will still be some holes. It is not uncommon for grandparents to pay for the education of their grandchildren at independent schools. In this case, the parents’ income is an irrelevant variable.

    And some parents, including farmers, operate complex trust and company arrangements that generate their incomes. Simple TFNs for employees do not cover these instances.

    And then there is the increasing proportion of students with overseas-born parents at some of these elite independent schools. Often the father works overseas so the TFN data will not be useful.

    The hope is that the new funding arrangement also takes into account the fees that these schools charge. Consideration could also be given to including an assessment of the resources of schools.

    It is neither fair nor efficient for schools that charge exorbitant fees and have lavish facilities to be subsidised more than small Catholic parish schools that charge low fees and have modest facilities.

  56. .

    Tobacco raises a nation’s intellectual and human capital.

    You likely would not have the cream of the crop as engineers, doctors or investment managers without.

    Tobacco is undoubtedly a nootropic, and not just from the nicotine.

    PS

    struth, Snoopy – I am reading “The Butler’s Guide to the making of Wines, Beers, Liquors in a Gentleman’s Cellar”, first printed 1808 right now. Nothing about DMT or CBD.

  57. stackja

    Infidel Tiger
    #2744060, posted on June 22, 2018 at 10:07 am

    Hyperbowl.

  58. struth

    Pink Floyd didn’t need no education.
    Two negatives make a what?

  59. littledozer

    How the hell is Tim Wilson pro NEG? He came to prominence by campaigning against global warming policies/consensus and mocking the inconsistencies.

  60. Baldrick

    State of Origin causes women bashing:

    On Sunday evening thousands will sit down to watch the second game in this year’s State of Origin rugby league series.
    New research shows there’s a massive spike of nearly 40 percent in the rate of family violence in NSW on State of Origin game days.
    The report from the Centre for Alcohol Policy research at La Trobe University reviewed data collected over six years by the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.
    Michael Thorne is Chief Executive of the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education, and he speaks to ABC’s Mandy Presland.
    “The issue I think here is the fact that alcohol is wrapped around these sporting events,” he says.
    “Alcohol is closely associated with the playing of it and the viewing of rugby league.”
    But it’s also other codes of sport, and research in the UK has shown similar results.
    “It’s entirely unacceptable that we see these results from research and do nothing about it because it’s women and children that are harmed by this alcohol fuelled violence.”

    Via TheirABC, who else.

  61. H B Bear

    How the hell is Tim Wilson pro NEG? He came to prominence by campaigning against global warming policies/consensus and mocking the inconsistencies.

    Add it to the list. Just another Lieboral.

  62. johanna

    As the Gadarene swine aka the Victorian government continue sending their State in a headlong rush to oblivion, the latest brainwave is to allow busybodies to launch prosecutions under environmental laws, and to grant the EPA a bunch of new powers:

    The new laws, tabled in Parliament on Wednesday, would empower lobby groups to go to the courts to force a company to comply with state environment laws.

    The laws would also give the EPA the power to prosecute companies if pollution is likely to occur – for example, if a company does not install shielding around toxic waste. At present, the authority can only prosecute companies after pollution has occurred.

    [ … ]

    Among other proposed changes:

    Maximum penalty for a general pollution offence to rise from $386,000 to $1.6 million.
    Maximum penalty for an intentional or reckless pollution offence rises to $3.2 million, and for individuals five years in jail. Courts will have the power to impose additional penalties on top of this.
    Maximum penalties for illegal dumping to double to $1.6 million. Repeat illegal dumpers face two years in prison.
    EPA inspectors will have the power to enter businesses and homes, obtain documents, question witnesses, obtain search warrants and use surveillance devices.

    Looks like EPA inspectors will have more powers than your average cop.

  63. .

    New research shows there’s a massive spike of nearly 40 percent in the rate of family violence in NSW on State of Origin game days.

    In what towns and communities? What is the ethnic background of these groups? Income and education profiles? Is it any different to any other night where a sporting event is on TV and there is an excuse to drink heavily?

    Because we need more ads when a little white boy closes the door in the face of a white girl in a well to do suburban home.

    That will stop the violence! It will enhance Respect for Women!

  64. OldOzzie

    CUT & PASTE
    Whipping women, r=ping children comes up Trumps in Hollywood

    Violence against women accepted in West! ABC news reader Juanita Phillips tweets, June 17:

    Perhaps any study of Western Civilisation could examine how and why ­violence against women is such an integral and accepted part of it …

    At least it’s not celebrated. Abigail Esman, The Algemeiner, June 19:

    “In the West, batterers and wife killers are not celebrated — they are shunned. If possible, they are also prosecuted.” Yet those who commit honour killings and honour violence, (feminist Phyllis Chesler) said, “are viewed as heroes who have saved their family’s honour. Thus, they feel no shame or remorse.”

    Except in Hollywood? Sasha Savitsky, news.com.au, yesterday:

    Actor Peter Fonda … (tweeted) “rip Barron Trump from his mother’s arms and put him in a cage with p–dophiles” … (and) “see if mother (Melania Trump) will will (sic) stand up against the giant a**hole she is married to …” His tweets were in response to a Trump administration policy which has reportedly separated nearly 2000 immigrant children from their parents at the US-Mexico border. (A rep for Fonda told Fox News … “My response is … same as the Pope.”) … The 78-year-old actor also went on a tirade against (White House press secretary Sarah) Sanders and Secretary of Homeland Security (Kirstjen) Nielsen … (tweeting: Kristjen (sic) Nielsen is a lying g*** that should be put in a cage and poked at by passers-by. The g*** should be pilloried in Lafayette Square naked and whipped by passers-by while being filmed for posterity.) Fonda called for violence against both … women saying Sanders’ … children should be taken away and given to Trump adviser Stephen Miller “for safe keeping”. He also compared Miller to N=zi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels. Fonda’s tweet where he called for Nielsen to be stripped naked and publicly whipped was applauded by Nancy Sinatra …

    Abuse of children unconscionable! UN News, June 18:


    “In the past six weeks, nearly two thousand children have been forcibly separated from their parents,” UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein said … to … the Human Rights Council … “The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable,” he said, calling on the US to immediately put a stop to the policy, and ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

    Except when it’s done by UN peacekeepers? Sreem oy Talukdar, Firstpost.com, June 18:

    What happens when a 71-year-old institution that faces obsolescence has as the head of its human rights arm a quasi-Islamist (High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein)? We get tendentious nonsense … Al Hussein has no moral authority to pass judgment on human rights … (after) his role in the suspension of whistleblower Anders Kompass — a senior UN aid worker (was exposed) … Kompass leaked to French prosecutors a UN internal report that had damning disclosures of r=pe and s-domy of boys as young as nine by French peacekeeping troops whose responsibility it was to protect the homeless children. Kompass was troubled that the UN had failed to take corrective action to stop sexual abuse of children. For his bravery, Kompass was suspended as director of field operations in … 2015 … and Al Hussein … requested his resignation. … (a report) exonerated Kompass of any wrongdoing, but he eventually resigned, protesting the UN’s failure to take action against senior officials involved in the cover-up.

  65. .

    EPA inspectors will have the power to enter businesses and homes, obtain documents, question witnesses, obtain search warrants and use surveillance devices.

    Utterly Orwellian and ridiculous. Not much else we can say other than the “lobby group” provisions creates a class of block wardens and citizen spies the actual Nazis would be proud of.

  66. .

    Does anyone here know what the (NSW) EPA for example, defines as pollution?

    Find out the definition is and you will see why giving the EPA police powers is a recipe for disaster.

  67. Zyconoclast

    How the hell is Tim Wilson pro NEG? He came to prominence by campaigning against global warming policies/consensus and mocking the inconsistencies.

    Now that SSM is legal Timmy doesn’t give a bugger about energy.

  68. C.L.

    Tobacco raises a nation’s intellectual and human capital.

    Houston mission control celebrates the safe splashdown of Apollo 13:

    https://airandspace.si.edu/multimedia-gallery/5125hjpg

  69. littledozer

    Now that SSM is legal Timmy doesn’t give a bugger about energy.

    A closet AGW believer it turns out.

  70. Baldrick

    In what towns and communities? What is the ethnic background of these groups? Income and education profiles? Is it any different to any other night where a sporting event is on TV and there is an excuse to drink heavily?

    You’ll just have to take their word for it, no statistics are supplied, even at the Centre for Alcohol Research.
    SJW’s in America tried the same with Super Bowl Sunday which was soon debunked.

  71. cohenite

    How the hell is Tim Wilson pro NEG? He came to prominence by campaigning against global warming policies/consensus and mocking the inconsistencies.

    Now that SSM is legal Timmy doesn’t give a bugger about energy.

    What an arsehole. He told me he thought alarmism was crap and renewables useless.

  72. struth

    EPA inspectors will have the power to enter businesses and homes, obtain documents, question witnesses, obtain search warrants and use surveillance devices.

    Armed?

  73. Mother Lode

    The Woad Warrior

    Just saw that, areff.

    Loved it.

  74. Snoopy

    Does anyone here know what the (NSW) EPA for example, defines as pollution?

    In the immortal words of Johnny Strabler, “Whadda you got?”

  75. C.L.

    John McCain encouraged bankrupting of conservative non-profits by IRS:

    Judicial Watch Obtains IRS Documents Revealing McCain’s Subcommittee Staff Director Urged IRS to Engage in “Financially Ruinous” Targeting.

    (Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch today released newly obtained internal IRS documents, including material revealing that Sen. John McCain’s former staff director and chief counsel on the Senate Homeland Security Permanent Subcommittee, Henry Kerner, urged top IRS officials, including then-director of exempt organizations Lois Lerner, to “audit so many that it becomes financially ruinous.” Kerner was appointed by President Trump as Special Counsel for the United States Office of Special Counsel.

    The explosive exchange was contained in notes taken by IRS employees at an April 30, 2013, meeting between Kerner, Lerner, and other high-ranking IRS officials. Just ten days following the meeting, former IRS director of exempt organizations Lois Lerner admitted that the IRS had a policy of improperly and deliberately delaying applications for tax-exempt status from conservative non-profit groups.

  76. areff

    This business about State of origin leading to battered women scattered all about the place, the alleged research is here for those interested:

    http://fare.org.au/wp-content/uploads/The-association-between-State-of-Origin-and-assaults-in-two-Australian-states-noEM.pdf

    Suspect it is our version of Epidemic Violence on Superbowl Sunday (horror!), which Christine Hoff Summers demonstrated was just more of the usual BS.

  77. stackja

    MARCH 28 2017 – 5:00PM
    Croppa Creek killer Ian Robert Turnbull, who murdered Tamworth-based environment officer Glen Turner, dies in Sydney hospital
    Breanna Chillingworth

    Mr Turner had been investigating Turnbull for illegal clearing of native vegetation, and was carrying out what should have been a routine departmental visit with a colleague, Robert Strange, when he was murdered.

  78. .

    Pretty much, Snoopy.

    You practically can’t do anything.

    http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/nsw/consol_act/poteoa1997455/sch99.html

    ———————–

    “air pollution” means the emission into the air of any air impurity.

    “water pollution” or
    “pollution of waters” means:
    (a) placing in or on, or otherwise introducing into or onto, waters (whether through an act or omission) any matter, whether solid, liquid or gaseous, so that the physical, chemical or biological condition of the waters is changed, or

    “land pollution” or
    “pollution of land” means placing in or on, or otherwise introducing into or onto, the land (whether through an act or omission) any matter, whether solid, liquid or gaseous:
    (a) that causes or is likely to cause degradation of the land, resulting in actual or potential harm to the health or safety of human beings, animals or other terrestrial life or ecosystems, or actual or potential loss or property damage, that is not trivial, or

    “noise pollution” means the emission of offensive noise.

    —————————-

  79. John Constantine

    No offence need take place for a successful prosecution to occur.

    The new EPA powers are along the lines of thoughtcrimes being the new cash raising prosecution of choice for their left.

    When fifty percent of inspectors at least are diversity, the range of soft targets needs to increase to employ them.

    Booking people over the internet from camera drone overflights is the new rent-a-cop State indulgence.

    Big corporates have compliance departments to deal with new regulatory burdens, small and self employed business just live in dread until prosecuted and hope the fine won’t break them.

  80. areff

    If Cats better versed in statistics than I care to analyse the report’s numbers and methods, it would be much appreciated.

    http://fare.org.au/wp-content/uploads/The-association-between-State-of-Origin-and-assaults-in-two-Australian-states-noEM.pdf

  81. Death Giraffe

    A core of baby boomers and Gen X with vast amounts of wealth tied up in artificial property prices will see such policies as a threat to their balance sheet and a personal affront.

    ..
    A lot of people are heavily invested in the idea “owning” multiple properties makes them secure.
    This is going to unwind horribly.
    The basic contridiction between the heavy government interferrence that maintains high property prices and these people’s assumption that the State will defend their property rights into the future is a knife edge proposition.

  82. Roger

    This business about State of origin leading to battered women scattered all about the place, the alleged research is here for those interested:

    Note the target is not masculinity as such but alcohol consumption.

    The biddies in academia are working towards prohibition.

  83. Roger

    A lot of people are heavily invested in the idea “owning” multiple properties makes them secure.
    This is going to unwind horribly.

    Leveraged to the hilt, often on the basis of credit assessments doctored by bankers; it’s our own sub-prime crisis waiting to happen.

  84. John Constantine

    The coming push is for artificial fertiliser to be considered a pollutant, if it drifts, leaches or washes away from the target crop.

    There are ‘cancer jockey’ operators, wedded to their self propelled boomsprays and fertiliser spreaders who do not care about movement of applied product and will ruin it for everybody.

    EPA can just point to the blue green algae blooms in lakes as evidence of fertiliser use without attention to detail.

  85. JC

    James Hansen, godfather to gerbil warming gets a beating in a WSJ op-ed.

    Thirty Years On, How Well Do Global Warming Predictions Stand Up?
    James Hansen issued dire warnings in the summer of 1988. Today earth is only modestly warmer.

    Hansen’s predictions were so wrong, you would place him in the Tim Flannery camp. In fact, wrongology should get a new word. To flannery…. as in, “Hansen flanneried those predictions”.

  86. stackja

    Stuck tree branch on truck damages more than a dozen cars in Queens

    Wednesday, June 20, 2018 05:48PM
    WHITESTONE, Queens (WABC) — More than a dozen cars were damaged in Queens after a truck driver drove down the street with a tree branch stuck under his tires.

    Police say the truck hit a tree on 14th Avenue in Whitestone Tuesday night and then continued down the street, with the massive branch sticking out from the truck.

    The cars were damaged with broken windows and windshields. Now, several people are picking up the pieces.

    “I have to take care of this instead of going to work tomorrow,” one owner said. “I’m going to have to get a loaner car.”

  87. JC

    No shit.

    After traveling thousands of miles to New York from the U.S.-Mexico border, some of the migrant children put in foster care have suffered from anxiety and depression, doctors said.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-york-struggles-to-deal-with-migrant-children-1529624303

  88. Death Giraffe

    Take the following bypothetical, yet common example:
    A lifelong public servant invests in multiple properties over a thirty year worklife.
    The on paper value of these properties has increased many times over, on the back of goverment restrictions on new builds, green belts and immigration.
    The public servant will retire on a generous government super scheme.
    The properties will be let out mainly to people on welfare.
    Has this person earned a single dollar not funneled through the state?
    Why would they feel confident that the rule of law will remain to protect something built through such unworthy means?
    This country contains a million + people who’s wealth is aquired in exactly this manner.

  89. .

    Initial comment: that modelling by FARE and CAPR kind of sucks!

  90. OldOzzie

    REVIEW
    Bullshit Jobs: A Theory; Blue Collar Frayed: work in tomorrow’s economy – Richard King

    In 2013 the essay On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs appeared in the radical ­London-based magazine Strike!. Its author, anthropologist and political activist David Graeber, sought an answer to a simple question: how is it that developed economies in thrall to ideals of efficiency and high ­productivity generate so many jobs that even the people who do them regard as pointless?

    In 1930 John Maynard Keynes predicted that by the year 2000 workers in developed economies would be working a 15-hour week. How could the great economist have got it so spectacularly wrong, and might these ‘‘bullshit jobs’’ have something to do with it?

    To say the essay hit a nerve would be to put it mildly. Translated into numerous languages, its premise became the subject of a YouGov poll. The finding: 37 per cent of British workers ­regarded their jobs as meaningless.

    Meanwhile, Graeber was inundated with ­testimonies from exasperated workers eager to confirm his thesis, or at least the assumption underlying it: that for a certain stratum of knowledge workers, pointless busywork was the rule, not the exception.

    Convinced he was on to something, Graeber began to solicit further testimonies, and to think more deeply on the problem.

    The result is Bullshit Jobs: A Theory, which combines the abovementioned testimonies with passages of philosophical and political theory.

    Though not as impressive as Graeber’s ­previous book, Debt: The First 5000 Years, it is a highly original take on a subject that is fast ­becoming an inescapable modern theme: the nature and availability of work in a rapidly ­automating economy.

    To the prophecies of ‘‘jobocalypse’’ on the one hand and Silicon Valley-style Pollyannaism on the other, Graeber adds a tantalising ­question: will the price of surviving the coming changes be a job so pointless it wouldn’t be worth doing if there wasn’t a pay cheque at the end of it?

    Graeber defines a bullshit job as:

    a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence, even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case.

    In other words, a bullshit job is precisely the kind of job capitalism is supposed, over time, to eliminate. Big business and its political proxies are forever spruiking the efficiency of markets, and even their left-wing opponents would agree that capitalism operates by squeezing workers. And yet bullshit jobs proliferate. Why?

    One answer — the right-libertarian one — is that it’s all the fault of government bureaucracy. This is an unsatisfactory explanation.

    Another is that whole areas of life that were once beyond the purview of the market (leisure activities in particular) have been seized on by a capitalism hungry for new things to monetise and marketise. Yet as Graeber suggests it isn’t primarily ­service jobs that are proliferating but rather managerial and administrative ones. Moreover, it is precisely those jobs — HR ­consultant, ­communications co-ordinator and so on — that people appear to regard as bullshit. Bullshit jobs, in the majority of cases, are to be found in the knowledge economy.

    For Graeber, it follows that the reason for their existence cannot be purely economic. It must also be moral and political.

    Part of it has to do with what he calls ‘‘manag­erial feudalism’’, the process whereby self-­important executives surround themselves with minions in much the same way that a feudal­ lord might keep adding to his retinue.

    This fuels an infatuation with hierarchy, which is further fuelled by the fact that certain organisations can soak up more of the available loot by becoming less efficient, not more.

    As Graeber puts it: ‘‘In any political-­economic system based on appropriation and distribution of goods, rather than on actually making, moving, or maintaining them, and therefore, where a substantial portion of the population is engaged in funnelling resources up and down the system, that portion of the population will tend to organise itself into an elaborately ranked hierarchy of multiple tiers.’’

    Other factors are important, too. For ­example, Graeber cites the political ­consensus that ­regards more jobs as necessarily A Good Thing and the fact that economics (and hence work) is imbued with quasi-religious meaning, having emerged from moral philosophy, which itself emerged from theology. There is also an interesting disquisition on time, and the way a moral attitude to it came to replace a more practical­ one derived from ­natural or seasonal rhythms. To be paid for one’s time, rather than what one produces, is for Graeber a perverse ­arrangement, and liable to generate busywork of the bullshit job variety.

    Some reviews of Bullshit Jobs take Graeber to be saying that there is an elite ‘‘out there’’ creat­ing work for all us drudges to do.

    But while there is an element of that in the book, and ­certainly in the original essay, this is to oversimplify Graeber’s argument, which ­attempts to combine (not always convincingly) psychological, historical and political factors.

    If the book has a failing, it’s that Graeber’s ‘‘sources’’ are obviously self-selecting.

    The many accounts of pointless work that Graeber takes as his raw material are often highly politicised, which leads one to wonder if these correspondents are really representative. The first third of the book especially has the quality of an echo chamber.

    The qualitative research in Blue Collar Frayed, by Australian academic and writer ­Jennifer Rayner, is less consciously political, though its political implications are clear.

    For whereas Graeber is interested in the kind of jobs that arose from the transition to a post-industrial economy, Rayner is concerned with the jobs that have gone, or are going, as a result of the same process.

    Her book is an intervention on behalf of those who, far from doing the bullshit jobs, would once have been regarded, and regarded themselves, as the heart and soul of the ­material economy.

    Rayner has focused exclusively on men and their prospects in the new economy.

    The figures are stark: Australia’s manufacturing industry shed 33,000 jobs in the past five years, while agriculture has lost 15,000 and mining 18,000, with another 30,000-50,000 ­predicted to go by 2020.

    Moreover, it’s likely that the real rate of ­unemployment among this cohort is higher than official estimates.

    Since unemployed blue-collar workers tend to lack ‘‘transferable skills’’ they often stop looking for new work altogether, and as a result cease to be included in the statistics.

    There is a tendency on the part of power elites to stress the ‘‘inevitable’’ aspects of this process, and it is here that Rayner’s analysis bites. For while she accepts that automation and globalisation are partly responsible for the high rates of retrenchment among blue-collar males, she regards the failure to plan for this outcome as one of policy and political will.

    For her there is plenty that could have been done, not only to soften the blow to the ­communities affected by these processes, but also to make Australia’s economy more ­resilient in the future.

    Prefabricated housing, medical prostheses, water infrastructure and green technologies are all areas that could benefit blue-collar workers and Australia as a whole.

    The failure to invest in these areas is, for Rayner, the crowning disgrace.

    Though not as intellectually ambitious as Graeber’s mightier, messier tome, Blue Collar Frayed is an excellent essay on the plight of a crucial section of the workforce.

    Politicians will sometimes talk as if men who’ve spent their working lives assembling cars or turning lathes will be frictionlessly ­assimilated into the knowledge and service economy. Rayner calls bullshit on that idea, and does it in style.

    Richard King is a writer and critic. His most recent book is On Offence: The Politics of Indignation.

  91. struth

    A core of baby boomers and Gen X with vast amounts of wealth tied up in artificial property prices will see such policies as a threat to their balance sheet and a personal affront.

    Fuck ’em.
    Greedy pricks made the wrong choices in life.
    Maybe they should get a little more interested in what’s going on around them, especially politically.

    No sympathy at all.
    But that really is irrelevant.

    The best outcome to this government caused problem is to get the government out of it, and every other area it is distorting prices and restricting wealth creation.
    Cheaper power, land development and a complete reversal of socialist stranglehold of our economy won’t see every over investing gambler with borrowed money come out on top, but many will be able to get through.
    Real private sector jobs will ease their pain somewhat.

  92. stackja

    Sydney nurse who shot dead and decapitated former lover granted parole
    AAP
    42 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    A SYDNEY nurse convicted of shooting and decapitating her former lover has been granted parole, nearly two decades after she was jailed.

    NSW’s State Parole Authority on Thursday said Keng Hwee (Kathy) Yeo will be released no later than July 13.

    The 47-year-old was sentenced in 2000 to a maximum 24 years in prison with an 18-year non-parole period, which expires on July 6.

    Yeo had been found guilty of murdering Christopher Mark Dorrian, 31, who was shot three times in the head and dismembered after he ended his relationship with her.

    She had been a nurse at the drug and alcohol unit of Rozelle Hospital in Sydney’s inner west where he was a patient.

  93. .

    In 1930 John Maynard Keynes predicted that by the year 2000 workers in developed economies would be working a 15-hour week. How could the great economist have got it so spectacularly wrong, and might these ‘‘bullshit jobs’’ have something to do with it?

    Tax and spend is why he got it wrong.

    Carefully calculate how much of your entire wage cost all the way to final consumption is spent on regulatory compliance or taxation. So for some calculations, you’d need to account for taxes on dwelling construction and identify them as part of your after income tax salary as part of your mortgage payment; your pre-income tax income probably has payroll taxes on it as well as taxes on your superannuation contributions by your employer. Then what is left over is ravaged by tariffs, excise and GST.

  94. So the mother is a greedy scumbag who kidnapped his daughter. Criminal trash.

    What a terrible mother. Gobsmacking.

  95. Jeez a lot of crap gets written here about weed, mostly, I suspect, by people who have never smoked a joint or a bong. Humans have been smoking Cannabis for at least the last 5,000 years.

    It only became a “problem” when American interests wanted to use timber offcuts to make paper and couldn’t compete against Cannabis with its lower lignin content. Then it got banned.

    Eventually (about ten years ago here in Brisbane) commercial interests started adding unpleasant stuff to their crop, with adverse results on hapless users.

    The moral of the story being grow your own.

  96. OldOzzie

    JC Good Article – Thanks

    Thirty Years On, How Well Do Global Warming Predictions Stand Up?
    James Hansen issued dire warnings in the summer of 1988. Today earth is only modestly warmer.

    James E. Hansen wiped sweat from his brow. Outside it was a record-high 98 degrees on June 23, 1988, as the NASA scientist testified before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources during a prolonged heat wave, which he decided to cast as a climate event of cosmic significance. He expressed to the senators his “high degree of confidence” in “a cause-and-effect relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed warming.”

    With that testimony and an accompanying paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research, Mr. Hansen lit the bonfire of the greenhouse vanities, igniting a world-wide debate that continues today about the energy structure of the entire planet. President Obama’s environmental policies were predicated on similar models of rapid, high-cost warming. But the 30th anniversary of Mr. Hansen’s predictions affords an opportunity to see how well his forecasts have done—and to reconsider environmental policy accordingly.

    Mr. Hansen’s testimony described three possible scenarios for the future of carbon dioxide emissions. He called Scenario A “business as usual,” as it maintained the accelerating emissions growth typical of the 1970s and ’80s. This scenario predicted the earth would warm 1 degree Celsius by 2018. Scenario B set emissions lower, rising at the same rate today as in 1988. Mr. Hansen called this outcome the “most plausible,” and predicted it would lead to about 0.7 degree of warming by this year. He added a final projection, Scenario C, which he deemed highly unlikely: constant emissions beginning in 2000. In that forecast, temperatures would rise a few tenths of a degree before flatlining after 2000.

    Thirty years of data have been collected since Mr. Hansen outlined his scenarios—enough to determine which was closest to reality. And the winner is Scenario C. Global surface temperature has not increased significantly since 2000, discounting the larger-than-usual El Niño of 2015-16. Assessed by Mr. Hansen’s model, surface temperatures are behaving as if we had capped 18 years ago the carbon-dioxide emissions responsible for the enhanced greenhouse effect. But we didn’t. And it isn’t just Mr. Hansen who got it wrong. Models devised by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have, on average, predicted about twice as much warming as has been observed since global satellite temperature monitoring began 40 years ago.

    What about Mr. Hansen’s other claims? Outside the warming models, his only explicit claim in the testimony was that the late ’80s and ’90s would see “greater than average warming in the southeast U.S. and the Midwest.” No such spike has been measured in these regions.

    As observed temperatures diverged over the years from his predictions, Mr. Hansen doubled down. In a 2007 case on auto emissions, he stated in his deposition that most of Greenland’s ice would soon melt, raising sea levels 23 feet over the course of 100 years. Subsequent research published in Nature magazine on the history of Greenland’s ice cap demonstrated this to be impossible. Much of Greenland’s surface melts every summer, meaning rapid melting might reasonably be expected to occur in a dramatically warming world. But not in the one we live in. The Nature study found only modest ice loss after 6,000 years of much warmer temperatures than human activity could ever sustain.

    Several more of Mr. Hansen’s predictions can now be judged by history. Have hurricanes gotten stronger, as Mr. Hansen predicted in a 2016 study? No. Satellite data from 1970 onward shows no evidence of this in relation to global surface temperature. Have storms caused increasing amounts of damage in the U.S.? Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show no such increase in damage, measured as a percentage of gross domestic product. How about stronger tornadoes? The opposite may be true, as NOAA data offers some evidence of a decline. The list of what didn’t happen is long and tedious.

    The problem with Mr. Hansen’s models—and the U.N.’s—is that they don’t consider more-precise measures of how aerosol emissions counter warming caused by greenhouse gases. Several newer climate models account for this trend and routinely project about half the warming predicted by U.N. models, placing their numbers much closer to observed temperatures. The most recent of these was published in April by Nic Lewis and Judith Curry in the Journal of Climate, a reliably mainstream journal.

    These corrected climate predictions raise a crucial question: Why should people world-wide pay drastic costs to cut emissions when the global temperature is acting as if those cuts have already been made?

    On the 30th anniversary of Mr. Hansen’s galvanizing testimony, it’s time to acknowledge that the rapid warming he predicted isn’t happening. Climate researchers and policy makers should adopt the more modest forecasts that are consistent with observed temperatures.

    That would be a lukewarm policy, consistent with a lukewarming planet.

    Mr. Michaels is director and Mr. Maue an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute’s Center for the Study of Science.

  97. stackja

    Jury struggles in trial fitness deliberation of Bourke St Mall rampage accused killer Dimitrious Gargasoulas
    Padraic Murphy, Shannon Deery, Herald Sun
    10 minutes ago
    Subscriber only
    THE jury has been unable to reach a decision on whether alleged Bourke St killer Dimitrious Gargasoulas is fit to stand trial.

    The 12-person jury has been discharged and the case will be reheard by a different jury.

    Earlier this week the jury asked Justice Lex Lasry for guidance, telling him they could not come to a unanimous decision.

    The jury has been trying to reach a decision since Monday.

    Justice Lasry told the jury members to persevere before sending them home for the night.

    The jury, eight men and four women, must unanimously decide whether Gargasoulas is fit to stand trial on six counts of murder and 28 counts of attempted murder over the January 2017 incident.

    Gargasoulas is accused of running people down in Bourke St Mall, killing six and injuring dozens of others.

  98. Tom

    The truth about “Henry Greenberg”, the convicted criminal sent by the FBI to spy on the Trump campaign and to attempt to entrap Trump in a WussiaWussiaWussia payment scandal.

  99. stackja

    Supreme Court judge Lex Lasry yesterday directed the jury to ignore all “feelings of sympathy or prejudice you might have for anybody in this case”.

    “You shouldn’t be influenced by what happened on that day,” Justice Lasry said.

    Under Victorian law accused persons are presumed fit to stand trial unless a jury is convinced they are unable to:

    UNDERSTAND the nature of the charge,

    ENTER a plea,

    EXERCISE their right to veto a jury member,

    UNDERSTAND the nature of the trial, including the roles played by the judge, jury and counsel,

    FOLLOW the course of the trial,

    UNDERSTAND the substantial effect of evidence in the case or

    INSTRUCT counsel and make their version of events known to the court.

    To find him unfit for trial the jury must be convinced on the balance of probabilities that Gargasoulas is unable to meet one or more of those minimum standards.

    Justice Lasry said the standard of proof was less than that required in a criminal proceeding where a jury must be convinced beyond reasonable doubt.

    In this case they must only find that it is “more likely than not” that Gargasoulas is unable to meet one of the standards.

    “Your task is to determine whether he is fit or unfit to stand trial. This is the only question you will be asked to answer,” Justice Lasry said.

    Whether or not Gargasoulas committed the offences is not something the jury need consider.

    Medical experts are divided in their opinion about Gargasoulas’ mental state.

    The jury has been told that Gargasoulas suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and delusions but understood the legal process.

  100. stackja

    But there has also been evidence that Gargasoulas was fit to stand trial, and had been making been making rational decisions about pleading not guilty by reason of mental impairment to receive the benefit of being held in a hospital rather than prison.

    Prosecutor Andrew Tinney, SC, told the jury that under the law the onus fell on Gargasoulas’s lawyers to establish that he was unfit to face trial.

    “The prosecution challenge the defence contention that the accused is unfit … The fact that he suffers an illness does not mean he is not fit to stand trial,” he said.

    Dr Theo Alexander, for Gargasoulas, said he should be declared unfit.

    Dr Alexander said though “mental illness was not in its self sufficient” to avoid a trial, Gargasoulas was unfit because he was unable to enter a plea or understand the evidence against him and could not properly instruct his lawyers.

    “Mr Gargasoulas is, mentally speaking, not a well man,” he said.

  101. struth

    Carefully calculate how much of your entire wage cost all the way to final consumption is spent on regulatory compliance or taxation. So for some calculations, you’d need to account for taxes on dwelling construction and identify them as part of your after income tax salary as part of your mortgage payment; your pre-income tax income probably has payroll taxes on it as well as taxes on your superannuation contributions by your employer. Then what is left over is ravaged by tariffs, excise and GST.

    Totally agree.
    Even with the extra burden of tariffs as a tax, which somehow you think I don’t get.

    I am here today, with more time on my hands than I could have because I refuse to be away from home and working all the time to take less than half of the wealth I create for myself and my family.

    If I go away for two weeks work, I work one week at least , for the government.
    Sorry government……go fuck yourself.

  102. .

    Leveraged to the hilt, often on the basis of credit assessments doctored by bankers; it’s our own sub-prime crisis waiting to happen.

    Combined Federal, State and Local government debt in Australia is near 1 trillion AUD or roughly 60% of GDP now.

    Given the bond rate is roughly 3%, per capita real GDP growth needs to exceed about 1.8% for there to be labour demand growth.

    So ask yourself what happens if there is a prolonged period of lower growth, or what happens to growth as the debt burden soars higher?

  103. johanna

    Judging from stuff coming out of the Banking Royal Commission about how people’s loan applications were bodgied up by various parties, there must be a lot of people on a knife edge as far as servicing their loans is concerned.

    Hell, when I bought my first house my loan application was honest, and I borrowed a good bit less than the bank was prepared to lend to buy an old shack in an unfashionable suburb. It was still a very Spartan first few years, with only necessary expenditures allowed. No fancy holidays, new toys or anything of that nature, and big cutbacks in going out for entertainment.

    I just don’t know how people with massive or multiple mortgages do it these days. For example, if Telstra lays off 8,000 people, surely at least some of them will be in strife with their mortgages?

  104. Leigh Lowe

    Speaking of statistical bias and non-disclosure thereof, there’s this little gem from MSN.

    Presented with a host of major news outlets, respondents found that PBS News and the Associated Press were the least biased outlets, while Fox News and Breitbart News tied for having the most perceived bias.

    OK.
    Look at the charts in the article.
    The breakdown charts showing perceptions by political leaning (Democrap and Republican) show that:-
    – Fox News scores -87 among Democrap voters, and +3 among Republican voters
    – CNN scores exactly the same (-87) among Republican voters, and + 29 among Democrap voters
    You would expect that, if the survey sample was split 50:50 between Demcraps and Republicans, that the merged table would show an equal score for CNN and Fox News.
    But no.
    The merged table shows Fox News scoring -51 and CNN scoring – 27.
    This tells us that the sample was skewed heavily towards Dems or that there were lots of “independents” who coincidentally all broke one way in the survey (Q&A style).

  105. jupes

    This business about State of origin leading to battered women scattered all about the place, the alleged research is here for those interested:

    Dunno about Australia but every SoO game produces violence in PNG.

    More often than not several people end up dead.

  106. struth

    Why should people world-wide pay drastic costs to cut emissions when the global temperature is acting as if those cuts have already been made?

    World wide?

    BUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUURRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

    fail.

    Only the western bit.

  107. Mother Lode

    In what towns and communities? What is the ethnic background of these groups?

    I notice from the posters on the sides of buses and those scattered around on signboards that domestic violence is almost purely the preserve of a) men and b) white people.

    I say almost because I recently saw one which had an Asian guy.

  108. stackja

    johanna
    #2744133, posted on June 22, 2018 at 11:10 am

    How many today, prepare for the worst?

  109. .

    Russian real GDP per capita is lower than what it was in 2008 – which is only marginally higher than what it was in 1989.

    https://tradingeconomics.com/russia/gdp-per-capita

    Calling them a basket case is a legitimate call.

  110. areff

    Welcome back, Dot. The women battered maroon and blue report cites NSW stats (6pm until 6am) and says they come from the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research. Of course, being a dill, I can’t find them. Have written to the BCSR for guidance, so there’s another field of inquiry for the statistically minded.

    Sorry, while I know my tables and am good at sums, further mathematical competence stops at Venn diagrams.

    Olfactory senses are OK, however, and this report smells very fishy.

  111. jupes

    Hey CL do you have Spotify?

    I found a great playlist: The Birth of Rythm and Blues (in the Decades group).

    No doubt what Mick and Keith were listening to back in the day.

  112. stackja

    Animal rights protesters accidentally kill chickens in illegal demonstration
    2 HOURS AGO
    MACQUARIE NATIONAL NEWS

    A group of animal rights protesters have injured and killed several hens in an illegal break-in at a chicken farm south-west of Sydney.

    Just before midday, a large group of protesters allegedly forced entry to a farm shed on Mowbray Road at Lakesland, near Camden, and threatened the owner with bolt cutters.

    As the group burst into the shed the commotion scared the animals who crushed each other, with several suffocating.

    The group ignored directions from RSPCA inspectors, who were inspecting the property at the time, to leave and tried to place the chickens in cages.

    Several suffered broken wings in the attempt to save them.

    Police arrived as the protesters were attempting to flee and stopped a Toyota Hilux full of chicken cages nearby.

    13 people – eight women, four men and a 17-year-old girl­ – have been arrested and charged with:

    – Enter prescribed premises without lawful excuse;

    – Commit an act of cruelty upon an animal;

    – Malicious damage;

    – Steal or kill with intent to steal domestic animal or bird; and

    – Enter inclosed lands/interfere conduct of business.

    One of the men, aged 46, has also been charged with assaulting police, common assault and use offensive weapon with intent to commit indictable offence.

    All have been bailed to face court in August.

    The group has been posting ‘call to action’ videos on social media for several days and has continued to do so since the illegal demonstration.

  113. struth

    So ask yourself what happens if there is a prolonged period of lower growth

    If….?

    Looking at actual growth and not government manipulated GDP as a measure, where is there any REAL growth.
    It’s not if, it’s when.
    Right now I am looking to move but will not buy a house in the area I need to move to, because I believe they are still way over priced and have a long way to fall yet.
    And when they do…………..Australia has nothing else.

  114. Boambee John

    Just did the shopping at Woolies, with non-Woolies bags.

    Saw several other shoppers with Coles, IGA or Aldi bags, or bags from clothing or shoe shops.

    The 15c Woolies bags some were using are noticeably bigger than the old bags, as are many of the other bags being used. Hence heavier loads for the checkout chicks to move. I wonder how many compo claims it will take for sense to prevail?

  115. areff

    Johanna: my former neighbours at the old address make your point. Young couple, they bought their place with the great assistance of Rudd’s GFC package. He works, she is working on baby #2 and won’t be earning for a few years. Hubby told me just before I left the street that it was only her folks’ help that was keeping it all together. When interest rates go up, as in the US, and as closure rates keep dropping, all it will take is hubby being laid off.

    Sad to report, as he’s a nice kid, he works for Telstra. Or perhaps that should be “worked”.

  116. OldOzzie

    “It’s Been A Difficult Few Days” – Musk Shutters ‘SolarCity Facilities’ Across 9 States

    The shuttering of these new facilities (and potentially further layoffs across call centers) raises new doubts about the viability of cash-strapped Tesla’s solar business and Musk’s rationale for a merger he once called a “no brainer” which many have blasted as a bailout of an affiliated firm at the expense of Tesla shareholders.

    All of which, we are sure encourages the class-action lawsuit against SolarCity, as the following epic tweetstorm from @TeslaCharts so conclusively exposes.

  117. JC

    When interest rates go up, as in the US, and as closure rates keep dropping, all it will take is hubby being laid off.

    All the large US banks passed the annual stress tests announced today. It means the Fed believes the major US banks would succeed in getting through a major credit event.

  118. Eyrie

    Boambee John, The STUPID FUCKING LNP voted with Palletofshit to ban the “single use” plastic bags in Qld.

  119. Eyrie

    The Tesla collapse is going to be spectacular. Solar doesn’t make sense and neither do battery cars.
    The pity is, this guy has managed to give the human race a future in space which may be snatched away in the collapse.

  120. .

    Our situation is more complicated though as the RBA can and probably will go lower.

    We can use the external adjustment (import and export adjustments) and get a lower nominal cash rate; what that will do to the market rate for bonds is difficult to say though. If our (Aussie) whole of government debt goes from 60% to 65% or 70%, I cannot see them going lower as the risk obviously increases.

    The unfortunate thing, however, is the only policy tool left more or less just delays a recession and can cause a classic credit cycle as identified by von Mises.

    Paying off debt is still the easiest and most important policy objective right now and for the medium term.

  121. OldOzzie

    Did the FBI Frame Flynn? – by John Hinderaker


    The criminal case against Gen. Michael Flynn for lying to FBI agents was incredibly weak. At the time, I assumed that the charges against him were based on an audio tape or court reporter’s transcript of his interview. I wrote that the transcript should be made public so that we can all judge whether anything he said was actually untrue. While Flynn ultimately pled guilty to a single count of lying to a federal investigator, he has also said publicly that he pled to that single charge because the criminal investigation was rapidly bankrupting him.

    In fact, there is no verbatim record of what Flynn said to the agents who interviewed him. Consistent with normal FBI practice, as I understand it, there is no recording or transcript. Rather, the agents who conducted the interrogation summarized what Flynn said in a form FD-302. Is this summary of what Flynn (or any other witness) said accurate? Who knows? Are nuances lost? Undoubtedly. Is much of what the witness said, that may have mitigated the claim that something he said was false, omitted? Of course.

    In my opinion, the likelihood of getting a criminal conviction of General Flynn on the basis of a Form 302 was vanishingly small. If the government can’t prove what Flynn said–exactly–there is no way they can convict him of what amounts to perjury. So I find Flynn’s statement that he didn’t do anything wrong, but pled guilty to a single count to preserve what little net worth he has left, to be credible</em>

  122. calli

    stackja
    #2744145, posted on June 22, 2018 at 11:19 am
    Animal rights protesters accidentally kill chickens in illegal demonstration

    Hungry vegans in need of meat. They saw those chooks and their instincts overwhelmed them.

  123. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    So I find Flynn’s statement that he didn’t do anything wrong, but pled guilty to a single count to preserve what little net worth he has left, to be credible

    leftoids are all crooks, deviants and perverts and are the ones who should be in jail

  124. H B Bear

    I just don’t know how people with massive or multiple mortgages do it these days. For example, if Telstra lays off 8,000 people, surely at least some of them will be in strife with their mortgages?

    The relatively low level of “unemployment”, under-employment or whatever you want to call it has allowed the property Ponzi to go as long as it has. As soon as you get forced sales – either soft or hard with price falls, then the whole thing starts to unwind. Buyers are happy to sit on the sidelines knowing they are no longer chasing a moving target. Perth has been like this for years now.

  125. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Boambee John, The STUPID FUCKING LNP voted with Palletofshit to ban the “single use” plastic bags in Qld.

    The uniparty, vote for tweedledum or tweedledee.

  126. struth

    Buyers are happy to sit on the sidelines knowing they are no longer chasing a moving target. Perth has been like this for years now.

    I’m not that happy about it.

    I won’t live forever and have only one shot at life.
    Same with everybody in my family.
    We are putting our lives on hold because of the effects of socialist government policies and are therefore too scared to invest in the Australian housing market at this point.
    And I don’t mind admitting it.

  127. JC

    Look Dot, the RBA decides and decides alone where it wants nominal prices in the economy. That means that if it wants to see growth in nominal wages it can target for a higher inflation rate. No rises in nominal wages means the RBA either doesn’t want it or doesn’t even know it has this power. Nominal wages are the purview of the RBA. Real wages movement materialize through increases in productivity.

  128. Snoopy

    Paying off debt is still the easiest and most important policy objective right now and for the medium term.

    Howard and Costello paid off the Commonwealth debt. Where did that get us? Tax cuts are the better option.

  129. Entropy

    stackja
    #2744089, posted on June 22, 2018 at 10:42 am
    MARCH 28 2017 – 5:00PM
    Croppa Creek killer Ian Robert Turnbull, who murdered Tamworth-based environment officer Glen Turner, dies in Sydney hospital
    Breanna Chillingworth

    Mr Turner had been investigating Turnbull for illegal clearing of native vegetation, and was carrying out what should have been a routine departmental visit with a colleague, Robert Strange, when he was murdered.

    The old prick would buy a forested property on the cheap because of the NsW veg laws and then clear it anyway. That sort of shit gives good producers a bad name and results in ever more onerous laws as greenies point to his example.

  130. Leigh Lowe

    areff

    #2744141, posted on June 22, 2018 at 11:16 am

    Welcome back, Dot. The women battered maroon and blue report cites NSW stats (6pm until 6am) and says they come from the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.

    I confess to having murdered a bottle of Cab-Merlot during the Essendon Eagles game last night.

  131. Mother Lode

    Speaking of statistical bias and non-disclosure thereof, there’s this little gem from MSN.

    MSN, of course, also has a bias.

    Anyway, they can print these things as much as they like. Do they really think any person who watches FOX is going to read their report and suddenly decide “Hey! I didn’t realise they were biased – but it is written right here that they are. Fuck Fox!”

    I remember reading a few years ago that. among the movers and shakers in Washington, that Fox had a surprisingly large viewership even among the Democrats. Even they knew that, if you want the full picture, CNN, MSNBC etc could not be entirely relied upon.

  132. calli

    mh

    Amusing. They want us to shut up and we want them to keep talking.

    Out of the fullness (or emptiness, in this case) of the heart, the mouth speaks.

  133. mh

    Unions and workplace managers need to ensure pathogen-loaded ‘Green’ supermarket bags are not being brought into workplaces. An immediate ban on these types of bags is necessary in the interests of public health and safety.

  134. struth

    Howard and Costello paid off the Commonwealth debt. Where did that get us? Tax cuts are the better option.

    Tax cuts will raise revenue, which will help pay off debts.
    So tax cuts FIRST.

  135. .

    Productivity growth?

    What is private sector CAPEX like?

  136. zyconoclast

    Perth has been like this for years now

    Speaking of Perth, has anyone tried the Ching Chong burger?
    Please post a review if you have. Thanks

  137. Entropy

    areff
    #2744150, posted on June 22, 2018 at 11:24 am
    Johanna: my former neighbours at the old address make your point. Young couple, they bought their place with the great assistance of Rudd’s GFC package. He works, she is working on baby #2 and won’t be earning for a few years. Hubby told me just before I left the street that it was only her folks’ help that was keeping it all together. When interest rates go up, as in the US, and as closure rates keep dropping, all it will take is hubby being laid off.

    I fully expect to be helping my kids into housing when the time comes. A lot of Chinese families seem to doing it around here: buy a four-six bedroom house and then you find a youngle single or couple move in. No way they could do it on their own.

  138. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Melania now trolling the fake news industry like a boss.

  139. Leigh Lowe

    mh

    #2744169, posted on June 22, 2018 at 11:49 am

    TV Writer Threatens Four-Year-Old Daughter of Trump Jr.

    Roseanne lost her TV series forever for making an insulting remark (but not threatening violence or inciting violence).
    Lefties threaten or encourage actual violence and just fire out a glib apology and move on.
    Although I am enjoying the tactic of reporting these to the Secret Service.
    Suddenly the Canadian writer thinks “Uh-oh. I could be charged and/or barred from entering the US. That would put a crimp in my career/travel plans. Better back off.”

  140. struth

    Speaking of Perth, has anyone tried the Ching Chong burger?

    Not bad

  141. Snoopy

    I fully expect to be helping my kids into housing when the time comes. A lot of Chinese families seem to doing it around here:

    Hook your kids up with Ching Chongs? Smart move.

  142. cohenite

    OldOzzie

    #2744158, posted on June 22, 2018 at 11:39 am

    Did the FBI Frame Flynn? – by John Hinderaker

    The criminal case against Gen. Michael Flynn for lying to FBI agents was incredibly weak. At the time, I assumed that the charges against him were based on an audio tape or court reporter’s transcript of his interview. I wrote that the transcript should be made public so that we can all judge whether anything he said was actually untrue. While Flynn ultimately pled guilty to a single count of lying to a federal investigator, he has also said publicly that he pled to that single charge because the criminal investigation was rapidly bankrupting him.

    Strzok did the interview; case closed.

  143. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    #2744184, posted on June 22, 2018 at 11:58 am

    Melania now trolling the fake news industry like a boss.

    I love the jacket as bait, wait for the MSM to go off their trolley, then explain that it was all about exactly that … the MSM going off their trolley.

  144. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    The relatively low level of “unemployment”, under-employment or whatever you want to call it has allowed the property Ponzi to go as long as it has. As soon as you get forced sales – either soft or hard with price falls, then the whole thing starts to unwind. Buyers are happy to sit on the sidelines knowing they are no longer chasing a moving target. Perth has been like this for years now.

    House prices in Perth haven’t moved for almost a decade and sales volumes are now half what they they were 10 years ago. Apartments have been slaughtered.

    Sydney & Melbourne can only pray this is what happens to them.

    Personally I think a bit of real estate Armageddon on the east coast would a good thing for this country.

  145. egg_

    The problem with Mr. Hansen’s models—and the U.N.’s—is that they don’t consider more-precise measures of how aerosol emissions counter warming caused by greenhouse gases.

    What if both are wrong and there is no net change, which is most likely?
    GHG is a hypothesis.

  146. zyconoclast

    Not bad

    Looks delicious.
    Something you could love for long time.

  147. egg_

    GIGO: Garbage In – Garbage Out.

  148. johanna

    We are putting our lives on hold because of the effects of socialist government policies and are therefore too scared to invest in the Australian housing market at this point.

    struth, I think there are still relatively safe housing purchases to be made. I’m quite comfortable with mine, but I don’t have a mortgage – so if I sell in a depressed market, I will be buying into one, too. But this place won’t drop much, because it wasn’t that expensive to begin with. Being in Queanbeyan, it only cost about 2/3 of the equivalent property in Canberra, which is 10 minutes drive away.

    We have been hearing about the forthcoming apocalypse in the housing market for decades, but I doubt that it will happen. For one thing, because the country is so vast and lightly populated, it doesn’t have a single market, but lots of small ones. Perth is in the doldrums, but Hobart is booming. At other times, not long ago, Perth was booming and Hobart was in the doldrums.

    As you are no spring chicken from what I gather, I suggest that you just be very cautious and conservative, and spend as little as you can to get an acceptable roof over your head. Go for location rather than flashness, make sure you can survive for at least six months without an income, and you won’t go wrong.

    Unless you are quite well off, long term renting is the pits. Take the plunge, my man, just don’t get in too deep! You’ll be much happier, I promise you. 🙂

  149. zyconoclast

    Hook your kids up with Ching Chongs? Smart move.

    The Rudds and Turnbulls can’t be wrong.

  150. mh

    One from the HARDtalk archives: Tim Sebastian interviews Donald Trump on location at the Trump Tower, of course, in 1998.

  151. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    If this Presidency thing doesn’t work out, Trump has a bright future ahead in viral marketing.

  152. Tel

    The Tesla collapse is going to be spectacular. Solar doesn’t make sense and neither do battery cars. The pity is, this guy has managed to give the human race a future in space which may be snatched away in the collapse.

    Solar does make sense if you are out in a remote area, with occasional maintenance, far away from any cities and grid connection and your consumption requirements are not large enough to make it worth installing a major generator. It just doesn’t make sense for use in the middle of a large city where a coal plant is cheaper and easier. Eventually the coal will run out, and by that time we will surely have better solar technology, but allowing people to transition at a natural pace is much better than trying to force the answer with the heavy hand of central planning.

    Battery cars make sense for small cars that are lightweight, cheap, and make short commuter trips around town. All the available technology already exists for this, but right now Lithium batteries are a bit expensive and will catch fire if you thrash them too hard. We are simply waiting for costs to go down and technology to improve which absolutely will happen, but it isn’t quite ready yet.

    Trouble is councils are making suburban roads worse by filling them up with speed humps and other junk, then the mums who can’t drive just buy a 4wd and stop worrying about what goes under their wheels. Then there’s no place for any small vehicle because the roads are too shit and the other road users drive like turds. Then to make matters worse, there are all sorts of pointless restrictions on the use of small vehicles like battery powered bikes or scooters. Most people are forced into buying a mid-sized five seat car which has only one person in it 90% of the time.

  153. Cactus

    A few things I never really got about property. But I seem to be the outlier vs the public.
    Your house is not an asset. It is a consumption item in the mix with food/clothing/water. It is best for the economy well being that houses are as affordable as possible. You ask anyone if the price of food/essentials going up is a good thing – of course not, don’t be silly. You ask the same question is it good that house prices are going up, you get a very different answer.
    A rental property can be an asset, that is a business, but your own house is not an asset. That is also why it is rational to overcapitalise on your own home. You are living there, make it as nice as you like.

    The other thing I don’t get is people’s thought process when borrowing to buy property. It seems many people go [x] is the amount the bank is willing to lend me so I will go shopping for a house worth [x]. I instead did the math where I went my salary is (a), the maximum I want to spend on my house is 30% of (a) which is (b). Take (b) divided by 7% – a feasible interest rate and there is the maximum I want to borrow. I don’t borrow that amount, that is the absolute upper constraint. When applying for a loan, the loan manager asked about not just salary but bonuses. I said I don’t want any bonus income on the application form as they can not be relied up. The loan manager was surprised to say the least.

  154. .

    We have been hearing about the forthcoming apocalypse in the housing market for decades, but I doubt that it will happen

    It already happened at least once, SW Sydney dropped 40% at the end of 2007.

    The issue is, planning restrictions are so tight and the disproportionate taxation on dwelling construction constrict supply very strongly, hence the price recovery.

    In nominal terms the 1990 recession saw price falls of around 35%, see here: https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2015/sep/pdf/bu-0915-3.pdf at graph 1.

  155. Cactus

    Tel – if I can just interject on the coal running out comment. When in your mind do you think coal will run out at present consumption patterns?

  156. Death Giraffe

    too scared to invest in the Australian housing market at this point.
    And I don’t mind admitting it.

    ..
    It isn’t an investment.
    Invest your money in something that actually produces good in the world:
    A nuclear power plant. A mine. A manufacturer. A drug company.
    Just not in Australia.

  157. .

    tel

    What about LiFePO4 batteries?

  158. candy

    TV Writer Threatens Four-Year-Old Daughter of Trump Jr.

    I’m not sure if these things by the anti Trump journalists are “accidents” or impulsive, but some kind of push to get a nutter to do something to D. Trump.

    They may delete their tweet within hours, but the idea is put out there, screenshots saved, and crazy people reading it absorb it and dwell on it.

  159. Boambee John

    So I find Flynn’s statement that he didn’t do anything wrong, but pled guilty to a single count to preserve what little net worth he has left, to be credible

    I look forwrad to the screams of outrage from the left fascists and their loyal lackeys (hello m0nty!) when this process is applied to Comey, Brennan, Mc Cabe and all the other dregs of the Deep State.

  160. by that time we will surely have better solar technology

    By that time we will have fusion and small portable nukes.

  161. stackja

    I exchanged a house for a strata unit. Invested the difference.

  162. .

    BREAKING: GEN. FLYNN PLEADS GUILTY TO ELEVEN INDICTMENTS OF GENOCIDE

  163. When in your mind do you think coal will run out at present consumption patterns?

    About 2000 years from now.

  164. Entropy

    Hook your kids up with Ching Chongs? Smart move.

    My nephew is going out with an Australian girl of Chinese ethnicity. Very tall for a Chinese girl, very attractive, stylish, and her Australian accent makes the whole package hot as hell. She must be attracted to my nephew’s looks or his motorbike, because she is otherwise one hell of a lot smarter than him.
    Actually a lot of the kids at my kid’s Lutheran school are Chinese.

  165. H B Bear

    House prices in Perth haven’t moved for almost a decade and sales volumes are now half what they they were 10 years ago. Apartments have been slaughtered.

    I remember reading the losses that off the plan buyers were taking on apartments sold at the height of the boom in Mandurah, Coogee and those sort of places along the coast. They were astronomical. A lot of Multiplex employees lost their shirts on the Claremont Quarter development which was a win-win for ruining Claremont for a few generations.

  166. Tel

    I’d like an electric version of the Polaris Slingshot as a runabout but I wouldn’t drive it on Sydney roads because it would be beat up in no time flat. The regulators hate cars like that, which is why it’s officially classified as a motorcycle, and then you get a-hole cops who bust you for loosening your helmet so you can talk to them when they pull you over. Conclusion: don’t even bother with anything good, just use the beat up Corolla because that’s basically what Sydney streets deserve. Stop worrying and step right over the fuckit horizon, because everyone else already has done.

  167. egg_

    By that time we will have fusion and small portable nukes.

    Ruinables is Luddite technology.

  168. egg_

    Luddite technology.

    Worshipped by Neopagans.

  169. Death Giraffe

    And Struth, don’t streess about not being able to buy house.
    Let someone else:
    -Deal with stupid councils.
    -Pay rates.
    -Pay a mortgage (“untill death”)
    -Have a heap of capital tied up in something it can take months to offload, and bits of which, under normal circumstances, depreciate like fuck.

  170. mh

    candy
    #2744211, posted on June 22, 2018 at 12:11 pm

    TV Writer Threatens Four-Year-Old Daughter of Trump Jr.

    I’m not sure if these things by the anti Trump journalists are “accidents” or impulsive, but some kind of push to get a nutter to do something to D. Trump.

    Hollywood, the US entertainment industry along with the MSM are quite happy to put at risk the lives of young children like Junior’s 4 year old daughter. Yet look at the latest cover of the pathetic Time magazine – it shows Trump standing over a crying child. The media are sickos and should not be supported in any way. Please do not buy their filth.

  171. C.L.

    State of Origin does indeed traditionally lead to the battering of women: the NSW Blues.

  172. egg_

    When in your mind do you think coal will run out at present consumption patterns?

    They’ve already simulated non-biological manufacture of hydrocarbons like in deep sea vents in the lab, but fuel cells will likely be more efficient.

  173. Shy Ted

    The State of Origin made me do it.
    New research shows there’s a massive spike of nearly 40 percent in the rate of family violence in NSW on State of Origin game days.
    And right on cue, Channel 92Gem tonight State of Origin. Are they trying to incite violence? How many more people have to die? Oh, it’s Women’ State of Origin. Only lesbians will be getting bashed tonight. So that’s OK.

  174. Cactus

    incoherent rambler – (on subject of coal running out). I would have guesstimated 1-5k years as well. But most people use public numbers incorrectly. Many people take public resources/reserves and divide by consumption. Those numbers are not meant to be used for that purpose but they do. People end up with this conclusion that we only have 20-40 years of coal or oil left so we have to change anyway, so we may as well do it now.

    I have surprised a few people on this matter. I explain that proving reserves and resources are a costly thing for a business and so while it is very valuable at a particular deposit that has 5 years of life to go and find the 6th, there is diminishing returns and so if you have proved 50 years of life ahead, there is very little value in proving you have a 51st. Why not wait and do that in a few years time? Based on where coal is found and how much there is I would roughly say there is multiple thousand years of it. But what mining CEO would still have a job if they presented a plan to spend all cashflow on trying to extend mine life from 20 years to 500 years? The markets tend to find a value sweet spot at 10-20 years for mines in my experience.

  175. struth

    Johanna, I have a lovely big Queenslander on a decent block and very well renovated with two reverse cycle units, parking for a Kenworth and trailers and other cars, polished floor boards, outdoor entertainment area, fire pit, back lane entry, and huge old Queenslander rooms etc.
    It’s a beautiful old place and a real home.
    The price they want for the shit in the area we are contemplating moving to (in the country as well) is just ridiculous.
    It just so happens that it suits my, and Mrs Struth’s type of work, but there is no more work there, than here (as far as employment for other people) which means no real reason for the high prices.
    What should be no more than $200 ooo is $400 00, and in this depressed economy, $200 000 is pushing it.
    I am doing alright because like you I did not get sucked in by the artificially priced housing market and bought well within my means, with a home I only needed to take out a small mortgage, paying mostly saved cash.
    My prudence in this area (after missing the initial boom) is what is now starting to pay off for me and dammed if I’ll make a mistake now at the spritely old age of 51.
    I don’t trust this shithole of a country at all.
    Many that did are split up, suicided, or in very deep shit at the moment, and I bet we all know examples.

  176. Tel

    Tel – if I can just interject on the coal running out comment. When in your mind do you think coal will run out at present consumption patterns?

    I dunno exactly, in Australia we should last a fair while, not personally worried about it. The “present consumption pattern” is meaningless because of course the world consumption is growing.

    Gradually all the easy stuff gets scooped up (e.g. open cut mines in the Hunter Valley where you just tip it straight into the power station) and then you have to get under the mountains to dig the deeper stuff. Queensland still has plenty, it’s under Sydney as well but digging under a city runs into other problems. So over time the price must go up as we get pushed out of the comfort zone… but at the same time the mining equipment gets better, with robots and cameras on drones and whatever else people think of.

    Also depends on exports, China and India are really cranking up their industrialization and that’s going to keep consuming energy, has to come from somewhere. If exports go full tilt and technology keeps improving and China, India and SE Asia don’t do anything to deliberately throttle their own industrial growth I would say clearing out most of the Queensland coal in 200 years is possible. Then again, lots of things could happen: major war, big restructuring of government, population controls, shift to nuclear. All total speculation. Australian government might decide not to export energy, or perhaps tax it, then it depends on how many people we import.

  177. C.L.

    Strange …
    The SAS moral panic has suddenly gone silent.
    Has somebody worked out what Bob Mueller didn’t work out re the Wussian 13?
    To wit: keep going down this path and commandos and their commanders will have full legal rights to reveal all to defend themselves – under oath. ADF top brass and ministers could be subpoenaed.

  178. H B Bear

    Your house is not an asset. It is a consumption item in the mix with food/clothing/water.

    Cactus – housing in Australia is dramatically affected by the tax/welfare system. It is a CGT exempt store of wealth and exempt from the pension assets test. For most Australians it is a savings plan that keeps the rain off their heads. Sure economists will argue it provides a supply of “housing services” but that doesn’t fully explain it in Australia.

    It still doesn’t fully explain price movements in this country. Sydney house prices were over-valued by world standards five years ago and then proceeded to practically double. This makes no sense by any standard. Australian housing has outperformed Australian shares as a asset class for decades despite being significantly lower risk. Again that shouldn’t happen over the longer term.

  179. Death Giraffe

    I don’t trust this shithole of a country at all.

    ..
    +1000

  180. Leigh Lowe

    Actually a lot of the kids at my kid’s Lutheran school are Chinese.

    As soon as a school gets a couple of Chinese kids they have to employ a maths tutor … for the teachers.

  181. Tel

    By that time we will have fusion and small portable nukes.

    Small nuclear would be a game changer, could happen, like artificial intelligence it’s one of those things that’s always just about to go nuts, but so far never does.

  182. johanna

    .
    #2744206, posted on June 22, 2018 at 12:09 pm

    We have been hearing about the forthcoming apocalypse in the housing market for decades, but I doubt that it will happen

    It already happened at least once, SW Sydney dropped 40% at the end of 2007.

    That’s not an apocalypse, it’s a blip. It didn’t affect anyone else, and didn’t affect most people who lived there, because they weren’t planning on moving. BTW, how long did it last? A source would be good.

    Cyclical variations in metropolitan housing prices are only a problem if you are already overstretched or suddenly have to sell due to unforseen circumstances. The first is self-inflicted, and the second is beyond anyone’s control, but typically only affects a tiny minority of people.

    I have been reading about the impending real estate apocalypse for almost as long as I have been reading about the impending destruction of the Great Barrier Reef. As with the Reef, bits of it get smashed up now and then, but overall it is doing just fine.

    Does James Cook offer a degree in real estate projections?

  183. Leigh Lowe

    BREAKING: GEN. FLYNN PLEADS GUILTY TO ELEVEN INDICTMENTS OF GENOCIDE

    Correction … our earlier report should have read “Gen. Flynn goes to 7-11 and buys some pesticide”.

  184. Entropy

    So true, Leigh, so true. Two of my kids get separate maths tutoring as well.

  185. C.L.

    I really don’t get what Mrs Trump was trying to prove with that jacket.

  186. struth

    Half the time I’m on the internet, I am looking at realestate .com etc and just shaking my head and “venting” at the cat.

  187. jupes

    The SAS moral panic has suddenly gone silent.

    It’s just been put back in the cupboard until the Inspector General releases his report at the end of the year.

    Unless of course he has to interview a few more Taliban who were late to answer his ad.

  188. Leigh Lowe

    Personally I think a bit of real estate Armageddon on the east coast would a good thing for this country.

    Now is the perfect time.
    The banks will be so gun-shy of putting the pregnant mum with the two toddlers on the street and will allow those who want to trade their way out of it.
    If a few recent entrants to the market or over-extended investors have to hand the keys back, no biggy really, remembering that most will have had s.f.a. equity in the property even at peak market values.
    Of course, what will happen in reality won’t be a lot of home-owners sucking up losses, but a slew of legal claims that the mortgage brokers/banks didn’t explain the risk of a property crash fully.

  189. calli

    I really don’t get what Mrs Trump was trying to prove with that jacket.

    I do.

    Cheese. Mouse. Snap.

    I wonder what The Orange One is up to today as the MSM obsess and prove her right.

  190. Entropy

    All total speculation. Australian government might decide not to export energy, or perhaps tax it, then it depends on how many people we import.

    Molicit in governments’ future plans is to “decarbonise” Australia’s economy to ensure we aren’t cut off from our major trading partners while they “decarbonise” their economies and impose import bans from countries that don’t, while our betters still expect to be exporting Qld coal full tilt.
    The zealots haven’t spotted the inconsistencies and flaws in their plan.

  191. Entropy

    Struth, you could not build a small Queenslander with $200k these days.

  192. Baldrick

    I really don’t get what Mrs Trump was trying to prove with that jacket.

    It was a message for the lame stream media.
    Fatty Trump can explain it better:

    Donald J. Trump ✔ @realDonaldTrump
    “I REALLY DON’T CARE, DO U?” written on the back of Melania’s jacket, refers to the Fake News Media. Melania has learned how dishonest they are, and she truly no longer cares

  193. Tom

    Anyone who calls herself “A.B.” instead of her given names, Alexandra Brandon, is a wanker using a literary device to confer on herself respect that otherwise eludes her. Nevertheless, A.B. Stoddard, of Real Clear Politics, has written a heartfelt remembrance of public intellectual Charles Krauthammer, who died of cancer today, aged 68. Top read.

  194. struth

    Struth, you could not build a small Queenslander with $200k these days.

    True, but I’m not looking to move interstate, to a country area down in the cold country, where power is scarce and men are too.

  195. struth

    But I AM looking to move interstate….sheesh.

  196. C.L.

    No commando will be charged.
    You heard it here first.
    The report will make generalised, headline-able criticisms which will be “acted upon” by “concerned” ADF leaders but nobody will be charged with anything.
    A charged man has legal rights; any resultant trial would, by definition, adversarially look into chains of command, orders and ministerial knowledge.
    It is a totally phony investigation that any judge worthy of the name would be too embarrassed to conduct.

  197. johanna

    struth, I misunderstood your post – sorry. I thought you said you were afraid to buy (presumably because you were currently renting.)

    From what you describe, why sell at all? Sounds like you have hit the sweet spot where you are now.

    I agree there is plenty of overpriced property around everywhere. OTOH, sometimes it is just a matter of taking your time if you are looking in a particular area. My first joint took me 18 months to find, but it was well worth the wait.

    If you think something is ridiculously overpriced but for sale in your desired area, you can always go in with what you consider to be a realistic offer. You just never know how desperate the vendors may be to unload quickly.

    Investment properties are a whole other ball game, as well as being a lot of work and a PITA. A couple of friends and rellies have them, but they are in it for the long haul, not as get rich quick schemes. They look at owning them for at least ten years and do the sums accordingly, including worst case scenarios.

  198. Diogenes

    . I instead did the math where I went my salary is (a), the maximum I want to spend on my house is 30% of (a) which is (b). Take (b) divided by 7% – a feasible interest rate and there is the maximum I want to borrow.

    That almost the thought process we went through when borrowing for our current home (our logic was 30% of salary = x,x = repayments at 7% on a loan of y . Thus we were prepared to borrow up to 300k,( you could still buy a decent 3 bedder on the Central Coast for under that then, and that is what we asked for preapproval for ) the bank was willing to lend a few k shy of a million. The loans officer was surprised with our reasoning but after explaining having had my mortgage go from 10.5% when the loan was approved, to 18% before we moved into the house (it was being built – thanks for nothing Laurie Brereton who tied up all the brickworks with orders for Darling Harbour Mk1 ) he understood … to this day I cannot stand any combination of tuna and pasta or ‘savoury’ mince

  199. struth

    From what you describe, why sell at all?

    Basically a career move for Mrs Struth.

  200. Entropy

    That’s sounds like you have to move into a different market. That can be painful, Struth.

  201. Diogenes

    it’s under Sydney as well but digging under a city runs into other problems.

    There even used to be a colliery at Balmain and CSG was extracted until 1945. Finding a seam 880m down will not impact too much above

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balmain_Colliery

  202. calli

    As you do

    I tried mouth to mouth once. Nup. Still a 🐸.

  203. Entropy

    I hope you were drunk.

  204. calli

    Sober as a judge, entropy.😄

  205. Entropy

    Green tree frog or cane toad? Or only discovered he was a toad afterwards?

  206. Cactus

    Diogenes – It all seems so sensible. I am much younger and so was a child during those interest rates. So I didn’t experience them, but I listen to elders and try to learn from history. Dad liked having a few beers after a game of golf and I was his caddy quite often. $5 for an afternoon and a Sarsparilla after was a good deal for me. Dad got 2-3 pots then we went home. The golf club at 6pm on a Saturday is a great place to listen. All walks of life are there. Lots of small business types, labourers, the local copper, the retirees. Over a Sarsparilla a kid can learn a lotta things if they listen. I recall every now and then people would talk about interest rates being 10-20% and how tough that was. Heard a bunch of others saying those days weren’t all that bad – you can make a fortune when inflation is high. A few of them even did.

  207. struth

    That’s sounds like you have to move into a different market. That can be painful, Struth.

    The reason to give my story here is to highlight the stupidity of house prices in Australia and the stupidity of people not seeing the cause, and now complaining about their plight.
    It won’t be too painful for me Entropy, as the move will only be made when I get a decent deal, and am in a winning position. (or at least be able to walk away from).

    Both Mrs Struth and myself will not move and pay too much for what is likely to depreciate substantially soon.
    She would rather let the career move go, if that’s the case.
    I don’t think anything’s going to appreciate enough to even get back the tax the government apply to moving house.
    Stamp duty.
    Owning property in Australia is as much about the top end of town keeping you working and creating wealth that they’ll take, and giving you no option to get out of your enforced slavery, tied to the slave chains of a mortgage.

  208. Tintarella di Luna

    These days of being economical in all manner of things, in the interest of accuracy and economy, would it be amiss to refer to university chancellors as university chancers?

  209. cohenite

    egg_

    #2744192, posted on June 22, 2018 at 12:03 pm

    The problem with Mr. Hansen’s models—and the U.N.’s—is that they don’t consider more-precise measures of how aerosol emissions counter warming caused by greenhouse gases.

    What if both are wrong and there is no net change, which is most likely?
    GHG is a hypothesis.

    It’s a totally wrecked brain fart generated by misanthropes, commies and 3rd rate ‘scientists’. Remember:
    1 CO2 emitted radiation cannot heat water
    2 Sensitivity of CO2 is very small
    3 The atmosphere is saturated at current levels of CO2
    4 It’s a water world; water phase changes and clouds along with ocean currents do the heavy climate work
    5 Sun and orbital variations set the conditions.

  210. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    THE NATION
    Bourke St case: Jury unable to determine if James Gargasoulas mentally fit to stand trial

    AAP
    11:17AM June 22, 2018
    Save

    Tessa Akerman
    Reporter
    Melbourne
    @TessaAkerman

    A Melbourne jury has been discharged after being unable to determine whether accused Bourke Street killer James Gargasoulas is mentally fit to stand trial.

    Mr Gargasoulas, 28, is charged with six counts of murder and 28 counts of attempted murder relating to the January 2017 incident in Melbourne’s CBD.

    A special hearing in the Victorian Supreme Court last week heard Mr Gargasoulas suffers from paranoid schizophrenia and believes he is the messiah and will save the world from “cataclysmic destruction”.

    The jury of eight men and four women were sent out on Monday afternoon for deliberations and returned this morning after informing Justice Lex Lasry they were unable to reach a unanimous decision.

    Justice Lasry told the jury today they should be proud of their efforts.

    “You have been deliberating since Monday and that’s a heroic effort in my opinion,” he said.

    He said jurors were right not to compromise their strong views.

    “This is a difficult case, this is a significant case… this is a tragic case,” he said.

    The court had earlier heard that Mr Gargasoulas may respond to treatment that was available at Thomas Embling hospital but not in prison.

    Barrister Theo Alexander, for Mr Gargasoulas, said today it “logically, rationally, economically” made sense for his client to be transferred to the hospital.

    From the Oz. Any of the bush lawyers help out? I thought that, if you weren’t fit to stand trial, you spent a long time in the looney bin?

  211. Tintarella di Luna

    A charged man has legal rights; any resultant trial would, by definition, adversarially look into chains of command, orders and ministerial knowledge.
    It is a totally phony investigation that any judge worthy of the name would be too embarrassed to conduct.

    That is pretty much what our own Riccardo Bosi said on the Outsiders a couple of Sundays ago – excellent points made by Riccardo.

  212. Leo G

    it’s under Sydney as well but digging under a city runs into other problems.

    The entire Sydney Basin also conceals a massive stratum of oil shale. It has in the past been mined on its western fringe along a line from the northern Wollemi to the Illawarra. The deposit has higher oil yield than the US Green River deposits.

  213. Tel

    Donald J. Trump ✔ @realDonaldTrump
    “I REALLY DON’T CARE, DO U?” written on the back of Melania’s jacket, refers to the Fake News Media. Melania has learned how dishonest they are, and she truly no longer cares

    Every single day my clothing tells the world I really don’t care.

    If I was good looking like Melania I would care even less about clothes.

  214. .

    The GFC itself was started by a “blip” in US output in March 2007. Don’t discount blips, what they flow through to down the chain can be very significant. Of course, such a short-term downturn is/was evidence of something else happening. The structure of what is downstream is just as significant as to what causes the blip.

  215. Leigh Lowe

    calli

    #2744252, posted on June 22, 2018 at 12:40 pm

    I really don’t get what Mrs Trump was trying to prove with that jacket.

    I do.

    Cheese. Mouse. Snap.

    I wonder what The Orange One is up to today as the MSM obsess and prove her right.

    Correct.
    Whether pre-meditated or not, the point was proven.
    No-one asked what the slogan meant or who it was directed at.
    They merely decided to insinuate their own framed interpretation on it without asking for input.
    After all, they know exactly what she was thinking.

  216. C.L.

    That one of the most famous names in Hollywood called for Melania Trump’s son to be kidnapped and gang-raped by p-doph1les will – of course – not be mentioned by any of the news outlets in Australia which will tonight report on the First Lady’s jacket.

    Incidentally, Twitter has not closed Peter Fonda’s account – because it endorses his statement.

  217. jupes

    No commando will be charged.
    You heard it here first.
    The report will make generalised, headline-able criticisms which will be “acted upon” by “concerned” ADF leaders but nobody will be charged with anything.
    A charged man has legal rights; any resultant trial would, by definition, adversarially look into chains of command, orders and ministerial knowledge.
    It is a totally phony investigation that any judge worthy of the name would be too embarrassed to conduct.

    I hope you’re right but don’t share your confidence.

    Remember the people you are dealing with here: Deep state fuckwits of the ocean-going class. If you recall a few years ago, they already have charged a couple of commandos with murder. A jihadi was firing at them from a room with some kids in it. The commandos threw grenades that killed the gunmen and the kiddies.

    In any war last century, the investigation would have lasted precisely the 5 seconds that the platoon commander took to assess what had happened. But that’s not how things roll in the 21st century. After the inevitable legal investigation, the ADF Director of Prosecutions – a female Brigadier who had recently been promoted two ranks into the position and had previously defended David Hicks in print – charged them with murder.

    Two years later the judge threw the case out of court. The Brigadier kept her job of course and this was seen as the ‘process’ working.

  218. cohenite

    In Victoriastan, custodial supervision orders for those shits found unfit/muslim are for an indefinite period, although the Crimes (Mental Impairment and Unfitness to Tried) Act 1997 (Vic) also requires the court to set a ‘nominal term’ for the purposes of review.

    What do folks think should be nominal for this muslim?

  219. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    What do folks think should be nominal for this muslim?

    Life plus twenty years.

  220. jupes

    The court had earlier heard that Mr Gargasoulas may respond to treatment that was available at Thomas Embling hospital but not in prison.

    Barrister Theo Alexander, for Mr Gargasoulas, said today it “logically, rationally, economically” made sense for his client to be transferred to the hospital.

    Fuck. Me. Dead.

    They’re going to release the prick.

  221. OneWorldGovernment

    C.L.
    #2744262, posted on June 22, 2018 at 12:46 pm

    No commando will be charged.

    As it should be.

  222. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Fuck. Me. Dead.

    They’re going to release the prick.

    It’s for the best.

    Victoria deserves this.

  223. Tel

    The court had earlier heard that Mr Gargasoulas may respond to treatment that was available at Thomas Embling hospital but not in prison.

    That’s got to be crank yanking. How difficult is it for a psych doctor to visit the prison once in a while?!? Shit, try using this wonderful NBN “tele-medicine” technology, that’s what they sold it to us as being able to deliver.

  224. notafan

    Owning property in Australia is as much about the top end of town keeping you working and creating wealth that they’ll take, and giving you no option to get out of your enforced slavery, tied to the slave chains of a mortgage.

    oh ooh the global elite has you like a puppet on a string

  225. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The court had earlier heard that Mr Gargasoulas may respond to treatment that was available at Thomas Embling hospital but not in prison.

    The only treatment this turd needs is the Roman Short Sword.

  226. H B Bear

    Victoria deserves this.

    Let’s hope he doesn’t murder any ALPBC employees when he is released. That created a real kerfuffle last time.

  227. Roger

    They’re going to release the prick.

    No, he’ll be remanded in custody until Lasry’s successor takes over.

    Another jury will likely be empanelled to reconsider the evidence re his mental health.

  228. egg_

    3 The atmosphere is saturated at current levels of CO2

    Unsurprising, which roots the climageddonists models.

  229. zyconoclast

    The Extinction Invention
    A genetic technology that can kill off mosquito species could eradicate malaria. But is it too risky to ever use?

    Can we insert a gene drive into socialist?

  230. Tintarella di Luna

    Two years later the judge threw the case out of court. The Brigadier kept her job of course and this was seen as the ‘process’ working.

    Would that Brigadier happen to be the same shape and size and have the same theatre of war experience as our current unmissable but invisible Minister of Defence?

  231. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    They’re going to release the prick.

    No, he’ll be remanded in custody until Lasry’s successor takes over.

    Another jury will likely be empanelled to reconsider the evidence re his mental health.

    Seems he’ll be popped into the looney bin until Lasry’s successor takes over, next month.

  232. candy

    I really don’t get what Mrs Trump was trying to prove with that jacket.

    Might be nothing more than say it was bought for her by a family member in fun, or her son liked it and said wear it, it’s funny. With no particular meaning at all, just a jacket with something amusing as a slogan on it.

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