Monday Forum: July 2, 2018

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1,698 Responses to Monday Forum: July 2, 2018

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  1. his refusal to challenge”the science”

    Yeah its crap.

    Summary of “the science” –
    1 + 1 = 2 is false because of ebil CO2. And we must stop using such arithmetic or we are all gonna fry.

  2. calli

    They had Stabby McStabface on Seven telling us that everyone should be nicer to each other in Parliament.

    Almost as good as The Pieman telling us to be nice to women.

  3. cohenite

    Turdball getting pizzled in the comments:

    The Australian
    Turnbull repeating mistakes on energy, says Abbott
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/climate/turnbull-repeating-mistakes-on-energy-saysabbott/
    news-story/ecd0f5d4adca4c73b7c9ccbfd5c7596c
    Simon Benson, National Affairs Editor, Sydney – 3rd June 2018

    Tony Abbott has accused Malcolm Turnbull
    of trying to repeat his failed 2009 attempt to
    secure a deal with Labor on an emissions
    trading scheme & warned that the
    government is suffering an “ideological
    fixation” with reducing carbon emissions.
    Delivering his most strident attack to date on his
    government’s own energy policy, the former
    prime minister has warned Liberal colleagues
    they risk a repeat of a split that almost destroyed
    the party a decade ago.
    Less than four weeks before five critical byelections,
    Mr Abbott has sought to escalate the
    internal campaign against the national energy
    guarantee ahead of a pivotal August meeting of
    COAG in which the government will seek
    support from Labor states.
    Does the Liberal Party nine years on realise the
    wheel has turned full circle and we are back to
    where we were in late 2009, with Malcolm
    Turnbull trying to do a deal with the Labor Party
    on emissions reduction,”
    Mr Abbott told The
    Australian, ahead of a speech tonight to the
    climate sceptic-think tank, the Australian
    Environment Foundation.
    “It’s not a circle you can square with the Labor
    Party … it is a fight that has to be won. There
    can be no consensus on climate change … you
    either win or lose … and at the moment we are
    losing.”

    Mr Abbott, who lost the leadership to Mr
    Turnbull in September 2015, yesterday refused
    to rule out a second stint as leader, claiming that
    while it was unlikely he would ever be prime
    minister again, it was not beyond possibility. In
    his first set-piece address on energy, to be
    delivered tonight in Melbourne, Mr Abbott will
    prosecute a case against the NEG, describing it
    as the definition of “insanity” and an
    impenetrable document that would commit an
    act of “self-harm” on the country’s economy.
    “Now, I can understand why the government
    would like to crack the so-called trilemma of
    keeping the lights on, getting power prices down
    and reducing emissions in line with our Paris
    targets; it’s just that there’s no plausible
    evidence all three can be done at the same
    time,
    ” Mr Abbott says in his written speech.
    “If you read the national energy guarantee
    documentation, there’s a few lines about lower
    prices, a few pages about maintaining supply,
    and page after impenetrable page about
    reducing emissions. The government is kidding
    us when it says that it’s all about reducing price
    when there’s an emissions reduction target and
    a reliability target but not a price target.”
    Mr Abbott risks being accused of a naked
    attempt to destabilise the Prime Minister by
    invoking the events of 2009, when Mr Abbott
    rolled Mr Turnbull for the Liberal leadership, a
    move triggered by Mr Turnbull’s support for
    Labor’s ETS.
    Last week Mr Abbott’s call for a special
    partyroom meeting to discuss the NEG was shut
    down by Mr Turnbull and failed to get support
    from colleagues. The majority of Liberal MPs
    support the policy.

    Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg has signalled
    to conservative MPs beyond Mr Abbott and a
    ginger group that he was looking at an “add-on”
    policy to the NEG that would guarantee to put
    more gas and coal into the energy system.
    The political stakes are high for the government
    with a recent Newspoll conducted for The
    Australian revealing that Labor was now more
    trusted to deliver cheaper and more reliable
    power than the Coalition.
    Last week the Nationals issued a set of
    demands to Mr Turnbull including the
    establishment of a $4 billion-$5bn fund for
    coal-fired power.
    A majority of Coalition MPs believe the best
    course of action would be to deliver the NEG
    and move on from the energy debate, which
    could become an electoral liability for the
    government.
    Mr Frydenberg has consistently argued that the
    NEG is the best solution to a decade-long
    problem by providing certainty for investment
    through a technology-neutral policy that allowed
    for the continuation of coal-fired power, which
    still provides up to 80 per cent of the national
    grid’s baseload power in high-demand periods.
    Mr Abbott and colleagues including outspoken
    NSW federal Liberal MP Craig Kelly argue that
    the NEG is an energy-intensity scheme by
    another name and will lead to the death of coalfired
    power in Australia and what Mr Abbott
    claims will be “the de-industrialisation” of the
    country.
    “Sure, we can substantially reduce emissions,
    but if we do we can’t expect power prices not to
    rise and we can’t expect energy-intensive
    industries not to close,” Mr Abbott says in his
    speech.
    But this is our future — under the national
    energy guarantee — because the emissions reduction
    requirement means more wind and
    less coal; and the reliability requirement means
    more gas and more ‘demand management’.

  4. Tintarella di Luna

    Tintarella darling, just tell them to get fucked. That’ll stop the calls.

    Cassie, people think I don’t swear, I leave the telling of such to my dear Sunbather, unlike my garrulousness he is serene, measured but very forceful when it comes to dealing with pests.

    He has written to the CEO of AGL in his unreadable handwriting which none of the numpties of today can read so I guess that’s why we received a few phonecalls at home wanting to talk to him about that letter. I told them he is a very busy man who works long hours and will not entertain being disturbed at home and gave them his office number. Needless to say no call.

  5. Dave in Marybrook

    Peter Custard-
    No idea how much per person / per day for the A.Behemoth.C.
    But new page- any takers? It’s imperative Custard gets a letter in for Thursday, and also have a good one-two combo ready for the Weekend if anyone chips him in Friday’s paper. I squibbed this trick a week or two ago, on a pretty petty point, but it still irks med.

  6. feelthebern

    For NFL Cats (or Cats who hate soccer).
    OBJ insane catch.
    http://www.nfl.com/videos/new-york-giants/0ap3000000939420/OBJ-looks-like-he-hasn-t-missed-a-step-with-this-one-handed-catch

    Also, Kaepernick posted this overnight.
    https://twitter.com/Kaepernick7/status/1014221549291954177

    Dunno how he can keep up his muscle mass.
    JJ Watt eats a dozen eggs a day as part of his regime.

  7. Snoopy

    8c a day or whatever is total bullshit. The truth is most people pay nothing for the ABC. The major contribution is from company tax, followed by net tax payers who are predominantly men.

  8. Tel

    The basic cost of the ABC to taxpayers is a billion dollars per year in round figures. Divide that down by Australians on the basis of who you think might be paying tax.

    The benefit of the ABC depends very much on where you sit politically … if you enjoy liberty, free markets, anything related to Christian morality, or traditional values, then you are probably paying in more ways than just money.

  9. Geriatric Mayfly

    Why the F&ck is this turd still in the country?

    Never heard of the quisling. Amazing how well some of them do in the lands of the infidel and show not a scintilla of either graciousness or gratitude.

  10. stackja

    Appetite lacking for Labor Leader Bill Shorten’s formal lunch in Devonport
    Mercury
    7 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    BILL Shorten will be in Braddon today amid reports a formal lunch in Devonport was cancelled because of a lack of interest.

    The federal Labor Leader is coming to the state to help candidate Justine Keay in the lead up to the Super Saturday by-election on July 28.

    Mr Shorten was scheduled to deliver a keynote speech today at the luncheon for the Devonport Chamber of Commerce.

    But it has been reported less than 20 of the 80 tickets for the function were sold and the Opposition Leader will now hold an informal lunch at a Devonport hotel.

    The venue, the Quality Gateway Hotel, held a sold-out business lunch for Malcolm Turnbull during May.

    Mr Shorten is expected to campaign in Braddon today and tomorrow.

    Mr Turnbull is due in the North-West electorate next week to help boost the profile of Liberal candidate Brett Whiteley.

  11. Shy Ted

    Would someone please provide me with the names and numbers of all these sluts who are being shamed. Thanks.

  12. Geriatric Mayfly

    followed by net tax payers who are predominantly men.

    Dirty money then, given the inordinate number of man-despising wimminzes for whom the ABC offers safe harbour.

  13. Up The Workers!

    Today’s “Silly Moaning Hemorrhoid” has headlines condemning David Leyonhjelm for not being apologetic to a Parliamentary perpetually professionally-offended misandrist.

    As opposed to the “Silly Moaning Hemorrhoid” itself, which by any standards is an apology for a “news”paper.

    Fauxfacts – the only lavatory papers where all the crap comes pre-loaded!

  14. stackja

    William McBride paid the price of taking on pharmaceutical giants
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/…/william-mcbride…/0a871168a10c163caeed93db96e…
    2 days ago – But what is almost certain is that many more families would have been affected if it weren’t for the obstetrician William McBride, who died last …

    Dr William McBride: The flawed character credited with linking … – ABC
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2018-06-29/thalidomide-william-mcbride…/9920608

    5 days ago – Dr McBride is credited with sounding the alarm about the dangers of thalidomide, but he also conducted fraudulent research. The journalist .

  15. Geriatric Mayfly

    Would someone please provide me with the names and numbers of all these sluts who are being shamed. Thanks.

    It will be a the ultimate test of endurance for you Shy Ted, but I suggest you attend the next SLUT WALK with notepad and pencil.

  16. pete m

    13.15 cents per day

    if $1.2 bil
    divided by 25 mil
    divided by 365

    using the same way the 8 cents a day was worked out

  17. stackja

    Up The Workers!
    #2754301, posted on July 4, 2018 at 8:28 am

    SMH just pandering to its ‘readership’.

  18. struth

    Net taxpayers.
    In this fucked up country, somehow public servants paying tax is counted as revenue.

  19. min

    Abbott did say last night that he was not a scientist but given the complexity of climate there were many things in nature that could be contributing (paraphrased) . Craig Kelly has a better understanding claims what Paris Agreement does to Australia is not only make us have to cut emissions , the highest % per capita in world but when all added up we will have to cut nearly 50% .
    Interesting answer to question by Tony, you may win office but nowadays you do not have power.

  20. Old School Conservative

    132andBush
    #2754294, posted on July 4, 2018 at 8:15 am
    Why the F&ck is this turd still in the country?

    Worryingly, only a couple of journalists and some Jooish leaders have spoken out against him.
    I didn’t see any negative voices raised by the LNP in NSW against his inflammatory comments.

    I inferred from his speech that Islam was the preferred vehicle to expand Chinese propaganda, influence, and territory.

  21. Tom

    One of little-known crises caused by the Obambi years is the insanity of changes to pilot training requirements — sextupled from 250 hours to 1500 hours of flying time before you can get a job as a co-pilot — which, of course, has caused a massive pilot shortage (unforseen consequences being one of the specialties of leftist politicians):

    The requirement came about in the aftermath of the 2009 Colgan Air Bombardier Q400 crash near Buffalo, New York, which killed all 49 passengers and crew on board as well as a person on the ground. The accident spurred Congress to mandate FAA increase the minimum amount of training hours for first officers to 1,500 hr. from 250 hr.

    US regional airlines say they have been the most affected by the change. Since the enactment of the 1,500-hr. requirement in 2013, over 100 regional airports in the US have seen a more than 33% reduction in flights and more than 60 airports have seen a 50% drop in flights, according to data provided by the Regional Airline Association (RAA), which noted that 20 airports have had airline service discontinued altogether.

    Critics of the 1,500-hr. rule argue that flight hours, taken alone, are not a sufficient metric to judge prospective airline pilots. They point out that pilots often accumulate their 1,500 hr. through activities like mapping, flight instruction or towing banners. “There’s been this side effect that pilots are now coming out of that experience with diminished skills compared to before the rule, and also compared to when they graduate” from flight school, RAA president Faye Malarkey Black said. “We’re failing out more pilots [in regional airline training classes] now than we did before the rule. By the time they qualify for hire, they’re rusty.”

    Another often-cited effect of the rule is the added costs to enter the profession. In addition to paying for college tuition and pilot training, hopefuls now must pay for the additional flight hours by renting aircraft or taking jobs with lower compensation than they could earn in the airline environment.

    “The pilot profession has now become the domain of the elite. If you don’t have access to your own wealth or good credit to get private loans, you have a very hard time accessing this career,” Black said.

    Speaking of the 1,500-hr. requirement, [Transportation Secretary Elaine] Chao said: “Our hearts go out to the families and the relatives of the people who [died in the Colgan crash]. But it was because of that that it was thought that not enough hours were accumulated by these commuter aircraft pilots. And so the requirement for the hours required to fly certain types of aircraft increased. But that has actually made it so much harder … to enter this field.”

    RTWT

  22. stackja

    min
    #2754310, posted on July 4, 2018 at 8:35 am

    Left/MSM have the power given them by gullible people.

  23. Dave in Marybrook

    SHY spent the last three years telling all and sundry that homosexual grown-ups bumping uglies together is the essential part of their humanity, so much so that schoolkids, Christians, governments and constitutions should bow down in reverence to their sex lives, and bend over backwards to accommodate them.
    And now, having copped a nifty one-liner, she’s clutching at her pearls.

  24. egg_

    13.15 cents per day

    Which works out as much as a Foxtel subscription per tax paying household, as some have crunched the numbers in the past.

  25. calli

    Why did SHY go ibto politics if she is so thin-skinned?

    To those of us who have copped far worse in the workplace and laughed it off and excelled as revenge, she looks incredibly silly.

  26. stackja

    Liberty Quote
    Any 20 year-old who isn’t a liberal doesn’t have a heart, and any 40 year-old who isn’t a conservative doesn’t have a brain.

    — Winston Churchill

    Millennials capitalism, socialism survey: Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong …
    https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/…millennials…/ab2d82e3d030a7ddb8eed3e9941105…
    Jun 20, 2018 – A NEW survey has found that Australian Millennials have lurched so far … the poll and co-authored the CIS paper “Millennials and Socialism”.

    Poll shows 58% of ‘Millennials’ in Australia favourable to socialism …
    https://www.greenleft.org.au/…/poll-shows-58-‘millennials’-australia-favourable-socia…
    Jun 22, 2018 – The poll found 58% were favourable to socialism and 59% thought that. … similarly to Australia, Millennials prefer socialism to capitalism, … the …

  27. 132andBush

    The benefit of the ABC depends very much on where you sit politically … if you enjoy liberty, free markets, anything related to Christian morality, or traditional values, then you are probably paying in more ways than just money.

    That’s a liberty quote.

  28. 132andBush

    I inferred from his speech that Islam was the preferred vehicle to expand Chinese propaganda, influence, and territory.

    Totalitarian/fascistic in nature, they’re a natural fit.

  29. egg_

    BorisG
    #2632799, posted on February 10, 2018 at 1:25 am
    On a like-for-like basis: ABC annual cost = $1.1 billion; ABC audience reach = 5.5 million*;
    cost per viewer/listener/consumer = $200

    actually per household it is around $500, so per tax paying household about $1000. That is a lot more expensive than any Foxtel.

    * annual report.

  30. Snoopy

    US airlines will end up importing pilots from countries where knives and forks are curiosities and the required flying hours for a rookie first officer are much fewer.

  31. John Constantine

    Their new Adelaide hospital, one of the southern hemisphere most expensive buildings weight for age.

    Has to halt operations halfway through, because the Diesel Gennie fails.

    South Australian Labor party demands an investigation of diesel engine.

    Being willing to halt operations halfway through to save the planet not the patient:

    This green willingness is Our Strength.

    Comrades.

  32. Peter Castieau

    I sent this letter Dave in Marybrook

    Carol Peters (letters 4/7) claims the ABC costs taxpayers just 4c per day. This is the result you get if you search either the ABC or other left wing media outlets like the Guardian or Fairfax.
    However a most basic calculation of the ABC budget of $1billion per year divided by our population of 25million results in the cost being 11 cents per day.
    But surely Ms Peters knows that almost 50% of the population pay no nett tax so the figure is likely to be closer to 20 cents per day or $73 per year.
    And to think people will still prefer to spend hundreds of dollars per year on pay TV when the ABC is such good value?

  33. Bruce of Newcastle

    Bringing a bundle of love.

    Roaming stork lands Polish charity with huge phone bill (via Drudge)

    In April 2017, Polish environmental group EkoLogiczna placed a GPS tracker on the back of Kajtek, a white stork, to collect data about the bird’s winter migration route as well as its feeding habits.

    In the year that followed, Kajtek travelled some 6,000 kilometres but was last recorded on 26 April in the Blue Nile Valley in eastern Sudan.

    Last month, EkoLogiczna was surprised with a phone bill linked to the SIM card installed in the Kajtek’s GPS tracker for a total amount of 10,000 PLN (€2,278).

    Yum! And how kind to include a free SIM card with lunch.

  34. Cactus

    On the Trilemma of power (you can only get 2/3 of affordability, low emissions & consistent supply).

    I think that Australia needs to have an honest debate about this. Lets be intellectually honest and say we cant have all 3. We have to choose 2. Get the debate/data out there and honestly.

    If as a democracy we choose 2&3 then so be it. But lets be honest about it. Tell the public how much bills are going to cost, build the Snowy 2.0, the gas peakers and the ruinables. Is an average families bill going to be lifting 30% or 50% or 100% as a result. Which industries and jobs will we be offshoring? Aluminium fairly obviously. Light manufacturing etc. What will our trade balance do when we import this. What countries will we import this stuff from and what are they doing with their emissions. Thats the costs. Then talk to benefits. How many degrees lower will temperatures be in 2100? At least in this way, the people of this country can make a somewhat educated choice. If they choose to bankrupt the country so that we delay the temperature of 1-Jan-2100 to 14-Jan-2100 – then at least they did so in a somewhat educated fashion.

    I am sick of this intellectually dishonest we can have lower emissions, same reliability and lower costs too via ruinables. I cannot respect anyone making that argument. I can respect an argument from someone who thinks lower emissions is worth the costs. I can disagree with that argument and do. But at least that is an intellectually honest position.

  35. Percy Popinjay

    Of the four biggest global emitters, China and India have made no Paris commitment to reduce their total emissions and America has now pulled out. When three of the four biggest emitters have no Paris reduction target at all, why should we?

    It is a very good question, however Abbott is incapable of answering it. Just give it away, you monumental fraud.

  36. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    STATE POLITICS
    Ambrose Mareng more needs to be done to tackle Sudanese youth crime

    The Australian
    12:00AM July 4, 2018
    Save

    Richard Ferguson
    Reporter
    Melbourne
    @RichAFerguson

    Melbourne’s South Sudanese community has “no idea” how to help young people caught in the spiral of violence, and criminals have misunderstood their freedoms, a community leader says.

    Police are still investigating how a party in an Airbnb property in Hawthorn last weekend resulted in significant damage to the $3.55 million home and two ­people being bashed.

    The chairman of the South ­Sudanese Community in Australia, Ambrose Mareng, said current strategies to deal with youth crime had failed to solve the issue.

    “Ideas. Everybody talks about ‘ideas’ on how to solve the problem, but nothing seems to be working,” Mr Mareng said.

    “Everyone condemns what these people are doing and we are working hard … but no one has any idea what the ultimate solution to the crime problem will be.

    “And you can’t start playing the blame game with leaders or the media. It is a problem (crime) and it ­affects our whole community.”

    South Sudanese youths have been linked to a series of wild parties in short-term rental properties over the past six months in Footscray and North Melbourne.

    The latest incident in Hawthorn East resulted in tens of thousands of dollars damage to a four-bedroom house in which holes were smashed through walls, a Mercedes-Benz car was damaged and gang-inspired graffiti tags, including that of the Apex gang, were painted over the property.

    No arrests were made but several properties were raided in Pakenham East on Monday.

    The house party follows a summer of bashings, home invasions and public brawls connected to South Sudanese teens. Victoria Police set up an African Australian Community Taskforce but that group is not helping in the Hawthorn investigation.

    A police spokeswoman said police did not initially identify the Hawthorn partygoers as African in appearance because they were not looking for specific individuals.

    It has been reported over the past months that young South ­Sudanese people in Melbourne often rent properties for parties because they do not feel welcome in pubs and clubs.

    From the Oz. “do not feel welcome in pubs and clubs.” Anybody even imagine why? WFM, they honestly do.

  37. OldOzzie

    Tony Abbott calls for Australia to pull out of Paris climate deal – Joe Kelly

    The Nationals are demanding the construction of “a minimum of three” baseload power stations as the price of their support for Malcolm Turnbull’s national energy guarantee, as Tony Abbott last night called on the government to abandon the Paris climate agreement.

    Delivering a lecture to the Australian Environment Foundation — a climate sceptic think tank — in Melbourne last night, the former prime minister argued that abandoning the Paris targets would help “save” the Liberal Party and protect its legacy over the next 10 years.

    He defended his criticism of the energy guarantee as well as his push to build new coal-fired power stations by advocating for a profound overhaul of climate policy that would see Australia follow the lead set by Donald Trump.

    “Withdrawing from the Paris Agreement that is driving the ­national energy guarantee would be the best way to keep prices down and employment up, and to save our party from a political ­legacy that could haunt us for the next decade at least,” Mr Abbott said.

    The comments add to pressure over the national energy guarantee as the Nationals push their own separate agenda.

    A two-page list of demands aimed at combating the threat of sovereign risk for potential investors in new baseload power generators, including coal-fired stations, is being promoted by the Nationals as a “genuine and serious policy position” to supplement the Prime Minister’s signature energy policy.

    The confidential working document — obtained by The Australian — sets out the position of the minor Coalition party and advocates for the creation of a $5 billion fund to “ensure (a) reliable energy mix is delivered to Australian electricity users in the short, medium and long term”.

    Only coal, gas or traditional hydro projects capable of delivering electricity “24 hours a day, seven days a week, regardless of weather conditions” would be ­eligible for assistance under the proposal.

    Operating under a ­“government-owned company model”, the suggested fund would keep any new power stations off budget, like the approach taken with the western Sydney airport and ­inland rail projects.

    Recasting the already divisive energy debate as a struggle for the soul of the Liberal Party, Mr ­Abbott said that it took “character to do what’s right” as well as “courage to disagree with your peers”.

    “Far from ‘wrecking the government’, MPs worried about ­energy policy are trying to save it with a policy that would be different from Labor’s,” he said.

    Mr Abbott also canvassed ­unwinding Australia’s emissions targets or abandoning them to “whatever would actually be achieved in 2030 through normal business cost-cutting and efficiencies, plus whatever is delivered through the emissions reduction fund”.

    The Nationals are keen to ­ensure their push to supplement the energy guarantee is not linked to Mr Abbott’s alternative conservative agenda or the leadership as they seek to maximise their chances of Mr Turnbull and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg agreeing to their key demands.

    The Australian can reveal that the $5bn fund proposed by the ­Nationals would be broken into two key components: a “grant fund” as well as an “equity fund”. It would sit within the infrastructure portfolio held by Nationals leader Michael McCormack.

    The grant fund would be used to “extend the life of existing plants or increase capacity, ­including emission reduction improvements … and rapid capacity improvements such as installing new units at existing stations”.

    However, grants would not be awarded for standard or planned maintenance to existing stations.

    The equity fund is aimed at the delivery of at least three new baseload power stations with a minimum capacity of 1200 megawatts according to a set of strict criteria, including a cost-benefit analysis against other projects to be conducted by the Infrastructure and Project Financing Agency.

    Both funds would work in consultation with the Energy Security Board, which would provide guidance on how assistance from the two funds should be allocated.

    Factors that would need to be considered for the finance of projects would include emissions ­reduction, “completion time and delivery to market” as well as the “availability of transmission ­capacity or the potential to deliver capacity in the short term”.

    Projects would also need to be located in an “area of forecast need”.

    Queensland LNP MP George Christensen told The Australian he would not support the national ­energy guarantee unless it included measures to drive more investment into baseload power generators.

    “I can’t support anything that doesn’t have an incentive built into it for baseload power,” Mr Christensen said.

    “Whether that’s grants, whether it’s direct investment or government equity in projects — all of the above should be ­considered”.

    Queensland LNP senator Barry O’Sullivan said he would not comment on “any resolutions of the partyroom” but said he was a very strong advocate for new clean coal-fired power generators.

    “They provide security of supply. They will put downward pressure on the cost of energy in the marketplace and the modern technologies that are used in the development of these power stations will also make a great contribution to the reduction in carbon emissions,” Senator O’Sullivan said.

    Mr Frydenberg said almost 4.3 million households in Queensland, NSW and South Australia had benefited from lower retail electricity prices following the Turnbull government’s intervention in the gas market last year. “Further power price relief is on the way,” Mr Frydenberg said. “The ­national energy guarantee, in conjunction with existing policies, has been forecast to reduce household electricity bills by $400, according to the independent Energy Security Board.”

    The Turnbull government yesterday took full ownership of Snowy Hydro Limited at a cost of more than $6bn, which NSW and Victoria will spend on infrastructure projects.

    Mr Abbott yesterday linked his push to abandon the Paris Agreement to dissatisfaction with the ­national energy guarantee, arguing the policy would be greatly ­improved if it contained a “price target as well as an emissions-­reduction target”.

    The speech will embolden other Coalition MPs to speak out against the Paris targets, which commit Australia to reducing emissions by 26-28 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030.

  38. Death Giraffe

    Good onya Calli.
    No other bastard bothered to watch it.
    Four views!
    Stuff yiz all!


  39. OldOzzie

    Tony Abbott bells the cat: why are we still in global climate pact? – Graham Lloyd

    There is a core truth in Tony Abbott’s incendiary climate change speech that is sure to infuriate polite society.

    That truth is Australia would never have signed up to the Paris Agreement had the United States not been a party to it. A foundation stone of Australia’s commitment to climate action has always been to measure its response to that of other nations and to be mindful not to commit economic self-harm. With the US out, coal use back on the rise and major emitters China and India not constrained for decades, Abbott has asked the inconvenient question: What are we still doing there?

    Abbott’s latest intervention is an attempt to bell the cat — that we have lost sight of the real issue and lost perspective on the consequences. High electricity prices and the stress they pose to households and industry are cited as evidence of economic delusion.

    His summation of climate science will no doubt produce howls of derision but Abbott’s views are widely shared. In a direct attack on the key climate change narrative, Abbott says storms are not more severe, droughts are not more prolonged, floods are not greater, and fires are not more intense than a century ago. As a moral challenge, he says, climate change pales against man’s inhumanity to man. He rates degraded bushland and waterways, particulate pollution, water quality in the Third World, deforestation and urban overcrowding as higher-order priorities.

    The issue, however, is whether there is a cost benefit to acting on climate as it is currently framed. Abbott repeats the reality, acknowledged by Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg and Chief Scientist Alan Finkel, that nothing Australia does to reduce emissions will make any difference to climate on a global scale. He says that of the four biggest emitters, China and India have made no Paris commitment to reduce their total emissions and the US has now pulled out.

    The irony is that, even out of the global compact, the US is performing well in its shift to lower emissions thanks to the extraordinary boom in shale gas production. Europe is finding the going increasingly tough.

    Abbott’s speech comes at a key time both for the Paris Agreement and Australian policy. The federal government is bogged down in the details of a national energy guarantee that is supposed to marry electricity prices, energy security and climate concerns.

    This year in Poland the world must put some meat on the Paris Agreement bones. What once was considered the greater ambition target of 1.5C temperature rise is now routinely cited as the benchmark. Abbott argues the price of participation for Australia is too high and the potential global benefit marginal at best. It is political mischief but not beyond the pale.

  40. John Constantine

    A vicpol spokeswoman mouths the words that vicpol refused to report he offenders as Apex predator in appearance, because ” they weren’t looking for individuals”.

    Stalin’s power to put his words in vicpol media mouthpieces is our strength.

    For a certain value of “our”.

    Comrades.

  41. Roger

    “Everyone condemns what these people are doing and we are working hard … but no one has any idea what the ultimate solution to the crime problem will be.

    Try law enforcement and imprisonment followed by deportation whenever possible.

  42. egg_

    On the Trilemma of power (you can only get 2/3 of affordability, low emissions & consistent supply).

    “Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence” – where are the claimed sea level rises, etc.?
    The ABC states that “climate change” is now a toxic term with the public.
    Joe Public has had it with a decades long diet of junk Science, false claims and guilt/scaremongering.
    Abbott is obviously emboldened by all of the above.

  43. C.L

    Farce at the soccer cup, as usual.
    Penalty shoot-out saves England’s bacon.
    Why don’t they just hold a day-long series of shoot-outs and the nation with the luckiest goalie wins?

  44. C.L

    Actress Amber Heard (yeah, I dunno what she’s in either) Tweets that ICE is coming for the help:

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/wp-content/uploads/amanda-heard-twitter-racism-600×382.jpg

  45. Mother Lode

    I have no doubt this will raise a few hackles, but anyway…

    Regarding Abbott:
    1) He was a good opposition leader and he is doing quite well in opposition now – opposition to Labor and the Greens and to the dripping wets in his own party.

    2) He does have convictions – he did push back on Putin, and there is that story Beazley loves to tell where Abbott met Obama (who was the only POTUS available at the time) and told him that he wasn’t there to ask for stuff, but instead that he anticipated trouble in the Middle East (and he was right) and that Australia would be there for the US when the time came.

    3) He failed in his Prime Ministership (although he was pissing off all the right people). I don’t think it was because he was a wimp. It looked like it at the time, but I reckon it was a doomed strategy and he likely underestimated quite what he was up against in his own party. We talk about him surrendering on 18C but does anyone think it was going to get through? It would have been a matter of priorities, and certainly at the time it seemed to impact very few people.

    4) If he has learned his lessons he might make a passable leader. I won’t vote for him just because he wants it. He has to go to war against the wets and Labor. It would have to virtually be a revolution. And he has to do that before I will vote – in case I have been too charitable.

    He may have learned his lessons, or he might have been too damaged by his experience. He is a fighter though – since being dumped he has not retreated to sit and lick his wounds. He is still pissing off all the right people.

    I would give him the chance to audition for the job again.

  46. Tel

    A police spokeswoman said police did not initially identify the Hawthorn partygoers as African in appearance because they were not looking for specific individuals.

    It’s astounding how much you can not find… when you don’t look.

  47. Infidel Tiger

    There is the biggest double rainbow I have ever seen outside my house right now.

    Cue the double rainbow video please.

  48. egg_

    the hospital’s emergency generator failed to start to bridge the electricity supply, after the mechanism supplying diesel to the generator did not work.

    Witnessed similar in the military, where their favoured local installer omitted a fuel line non-return valve and over a month the fuel line to the underground reservoir would drain – the local maintenance contractors were smart enough to run only monthly Genset test routines, weekly ones wouldn’t have spotted it.
    “A $2 part…”
    Comrades.

  49. Turnip

    Have you looked at getting bottled GAS? I was paying huge $100 for access to use $8 worth of gas.
    My neighbor has 2 9kg bottles attached which cost $45 each and they changed them very rarely. Only used for cooking but worth investigating and you could get a 45kg commercial bottle and be done for a few years

  50. C.L

    Remnants of Obama being flushed around the s-bend of history:

    Trump administration is breaking from Obama-era affirmative action policies.

    Democrats slammed the news about doing away with the Obama-era policies.

    “The Trump administration isn’t just willfully blind to the reality of systemic racism — it’s coldly indifferent to its destructive consequences, and it’s absolutely committed to dismantling any efforts to address our nation’s original sin,” Democratic National Committe Chairman Tom Perez said in a statement. “Democrats believe that diversity and inclusion are profoundly American values. We believe that a quality education opens the doors of opportunity, and that everyone deserves a meaningful seat at the table.”

    The Justice investigation has also drawn a strong rebuke from numerous organizations representing minority groups, which argue that this is a step toward doing away with affirmative action altogether.

  51. OneWorldGovernment

    The Turnbull government yesterday took full ownership of Snowy Hydro Limited at a cost of more than $6bn

    That’s the end of irrigated farming in the Murray Darling Basin and the death knell of Australian Rice production.

  52. OldOzzie

    Ambrose Mareng more needs to be done to tackle Sudanese youth crime – Richard Ferguson

    Melbourne’s South Sudanese community has “no idea” how to help young people caught in the spiral of violence, and criminals have misunderstood their freedoms, a community leader says.

    Police are still investigating how a party in an Airbnb property in Hawthorn last weekend resulted in significant damage to the $3.55 million home and two ­people being bashed.

    The chairman of the South ­Sudanese Community in Australia, Ambrose Mareng, said current strategies to deal with youth crime had failed to solve the issue.

    “Ideas. Everybody talks about ‘ideas’ on how to solve the problem, but nothing seems to be working,” Mr Mareng said.

    “Everyone condemns what these people are doing and we are working hard … but no one has any idea what the ultimate solution to the crime problem will be.

    “And you can’t start playing the blame game with leaders or the media. It is a problem (crime) and it ­affects our whole community.”

    South Sudanese youths have been linked to a series of wild parties in short-term rental properties over the past six months in Footscray and North Melbourne.

    The latest incident in Hawthorn East resulted in tens of thousands of dollars damage to a four-bedroom house in which holes were smashed through walls, a Mercedes-Benz car was damaged and gang-inspired graffiti tags, including that of the Apex gang, were painted over the property.

    No arrests were made but several properties were raided in Pakenham East on Monday.

    The house party follows a summer of bashings, home invasions and public brawls connected to South Sudanese teens. Victoria Police set up an African Australian Community Taskforce but that group is not helping in the Hawthorn investigation.

    A police spokeswoman said police did not initially identify the Hawthorn partygoers as African in appearance because they were not looking for specific individuals.

    It has been reported over the past months that young South ­Sudanese people in Melbourne often rent properties for parties because they do not feel welcome in pubs and clubs.

    Mr Mareng runs homework groups, counselling sessions, and job training for young South ­Sudanese people through his charity Mamada. He said “not feeling welcome” was not an ­excuse for damaging rental properties.

    “Feeling welcome is not the issue here. We have been made welcome ever since we landed in this country,” he said, “but we do have a problem with integration. And there is a misunderstanding of freedom. Freedom to damage yourself and others and others’ property? This is not freedom.”

    Mr Mareng’s charity receives little government support, though he is applying for a grant from the state government and recently ­received a grant from Google.

    He said more money would help get young people off the streets but that groups like his also needed to help themselves.

    “Of course we need help from the police and the government … but we must also help ourselves,’’ Mr Mareng said. “Through commercial activities, we can fund our community programs like counselling and job training, and give South Sudanese kids jobs.’’

    From the Comments

    – Take them back to their own country Mr Mareng and let them show their gratitude for having a chance and ruining it.

    – We should do a Trump & send them all to the ACT then build a fence around it so the persons who thought it was a good idea to bring African migrants into Australia can enjoy them instead.

    – Easy – arrest, convict, deport! Which part of that is complicated. If you cant appreciate the liberty of living in Australia, go back to wherevere you came from.

    – How about more group hugs, that’s Dan Andrews best answer.

    – No ideas? How about reducing intake and exporting the bad eggs.

  53. egg_

    The Turnbull government yesterday took full ownership of Snowy Hydro Limited at a cost of more than $6bn

    That’s the end of irrigated farming in the Murray Darling Basin and the death knell of Australian Rice production.

    “I’m from the Govt and I’m here to help…”

  54. Farmer Gez

    More indigenous knowledge given a reverent run on 774 ABC Jon Faine.
    A member of the Djadjerwurung conservation committee (or something like that) reckons it would be a beaut idea to introduce dingoes back into high conservation areas of Victoria.
    They control foxes, rabbits and cats, is the theory. Jon Faine reckons he’s heard they don’t interbreed with dogs, according to some Professor.
    Plenty of city types texting and calling it a super idea.
    I dub this ABC effort, The Silence of the Lambs.

  55. egg_

    The Nationals are demanding the construction of “a minimum of three” baseload power stations as the price of their support for Malcolm Turnbull’s national energy guarantee, as Tony Abbott last night called on the government to abandon the Paris climate agreement.

    Or one Nuke plant on SHY’s doorstep, as James Lovelock is a big fan.

  56. EvilElvis

    Peter Castieau
    #2754325, posted on July 4, 2018 at 8:56 am

    Should also throw in that continued, unrestrained immigration flatters this figure and dilutes the population factor even more in the equation.

  57. egg_

    Catherine King (who thinks the appropriate response to alleged misogyny is misandry)

    Snic from teh current Air Bair Cair fred.
    Something that DL was trying to get into SHY’s thick skull.

  58. Tom

    Yes, Mother Lode, Abbott has convictions. But, in the white hot heat of government, he did not have the courage of his convictions. This is what we call a leadership test. He failed. And he would fail again. Those who think he wouldn’t are deluding themselves.

    Meanwhile, he’s a useful irritant as the country’s de facto opposition leader. He’s good at that. But he is not a prime minister.

    Nor is the current interloper. But that’s a separate 1000-word essay about this country’s leadership crisis.

  59. EvilElvis

    Good onya Calli.
    No other bastard bothered to watch it.
    Four views!
    Stuff yiz all!

    I had a look, DG, I had to refresh the browser a few times though…

  60. Or one Nuke plant on SHY’s doorstep …

    In the interests of improving housing affordability , how about a large Russian built nuke in Wentworth?

  61. Mother Lode

    They control foxes, rabbits and cats, is the theory.

    Why would ‘Indigenes’ have better knowledge of dingos interactions with rabbits and cats etc than whitey?

    Were there many rabbit plagues before whitey showed up?

    Ah, but he is Aboriginal, so there is some pure luminous currency in what he says.

    Next…the wheel.

  62. Leigh Lowe

    Just read the new high watermark in peak stupid in the Oz (no link) …
    Jet engines could give a jumbo boost to wind farms.
    In a nutshell it goes like this.
    A jet engine is mounted in front of one or more wind generators.
    The jet engine burns renewball fuel.
    The exhaust blast is directed at the wind generator blades which then spin and drive a … a … turbine.
    No wait.
    Couldn’t we just … ? Surely not.
    No doubt Trumble junior will invest in this and Trumble senior and Lucy will legislate for it.

  63. OldOzzie

    Knowing what we do now, the Paris climate deal is passe – Tony Abbott
    The Australian
    12:00AM July 4, 2018

    My government set the Paris 2030 emissions reduction target on the basis that this was more or less what could be achieved without new government programs and without new costs on the economy. There was no advice then to the effect that it would take a clean energy target or a national energy guarantee to get there.

    Our intention then was to monitor developments; and, in the meantime, to rely on market ­forces to make energy use efficient, and on the emissions reduction fund to keep overall emis­sions heading down at the lowest possible cost. My government never put emissions reduction ahead of the wellbeing of families and the prosperity of industries. As I’ve said all along, you don’t improve the environment by damaging the economy.

    I have never thought that reducing emissions should be a fundamental goal of policy, just something that’s worth doing if the cost is modest. I have never thought that climate change was, to quote Kevin Rudd, the “great moral challenge of our generation”. It was an issue, that’s all, and — at least on the actual changes we’ve so far seen — not a very significant one compared with man’s inhumanity to man; maintaining and improving living standards; and even with many other environmental issues such as degraded bush and waterways, particulate pollution, water quality in the Third World, deforestation and urban overcrowding.

    After all, the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide from roughly 300 to 400 parts per million during the past century has not had dramatic consequences.

    Storms are not more severe, droughts are not more prolonged, floods are not greater, and fires are not more intense than a century ago, despite hyperventilating reportage and over-the-top claims from Greens politicians.

    Sea levels have hardly risen and temperatures are still below those of the medieval warm period. Across time, temperature change seems to correlate rather more with sun spot activity than with carbon dioxide levels. And even if carbon dioxide, a naturally occurring trace gas that’s necessary for life, really is the main climate change villain, Australia’s contribution to mankind’s emissions is scarcely more than 1 per cent. Of course, we should treat the planet with respect. But it would be the height of folly to suppress living standards, shrink industries and drive jobs offshore for a moral gesture.

    Much has changed since I was prime minister. Post the carbon tax repeal, power prices have quickly resumed their inexorable rise, doubling in a decade. Selective blackouts have become relatively common: most of South Australia went dark for 24 hours because the wind blew too hard and the interconnector went down. And, the big one, the US has withdrawn from the Paris Agreement. When the world’s leading country withdraws, it can hardly be business as usual.

    Our 2015 target, after all, was set on the basis that the agreement would be “applicable to all … parties”. Absent the US, my government would not have signed up to the Paris treaty, certainly not with the present target.

    Yet as long as we remain in the Paris Agreement — which is about reducing emissions, not building prosperity — all policy touching on emissions will be about their reduction, not our wellbeing. It’s the emissions ­obsession that’s at the heart of our power crisis and it’s this that has to end.

    When they visited Parliament House the other day, business leaders described Labor’s 45 per cent emissions reduction target as “economy-wrecking”. Even meeting the government’s 26 per cent target, they said, would be “challenging”. They supported the ­NEG, but what they expect of it is 24/7 availability of dispatchable baseload power and internationally competitive prices, while still trying to achieve the Paris targets. Their concern was the economic dislocation already being caused by our climate policy and, to the extent that they supported the new one, it was as the least bad way to deliver even more emissions reduction while minimising the impact on jobs and growth.

    Yet nothing that Australia does to reduce emissions will make the slightest difference to climate, as the Chief Scientist said last year. Of global emissions, China is responsible for 28 per cent, the US 15 per cent, Europe 11 per cent, India 7 per cent and Australia 1.3 per cent. A 26 per cent cut to 1.3 per cent is a statistical blip, so why not scale back our cut to 20 per cent, or to 15 per cent, or to zero; or to whatever would actually be achieved in 2030 through normal business cost-cutting and efficiencies plus whatever is delivered through the emissions ­reduction fund?

    Of the four biggest emitters, China and India have made no Paris commitment to reduce their total emissions and the US has now pulled out.

    So when three of the four biggest emitters have no Paris target at all, why should we, especially now that we can start to count the cost — in more expensive cars and in culled herds as well as through more expensive and less reliable power? Knowing what we know now, we would not have made the Paris Agreement. Now that we do know, we should get out of it.

    Withdrawing from the Paris Agreement that is driving the NEG would be the best way to keep prices down and employment up; and to save our party from a political legacy that could haunt us for the next decade at least.

    Far from “wrecking the government”, MPs worried about energy policy are trying to save it, with a policy that would be different from Labor’s and would give voters the affordable and reliable power they want.

  64. Stimpson J. Cat

    Poll shows 58% of ‘Millennials’ in Australia favourable to socialism …

    In the Poll did they actually ask how many Millenials actually know what Socialism is?

    I’m guessing around 54.631% would have answered “Don’t Know”.

  65. egg_

    a large Russian built nuke in Wentworth

    Never mind the fluorescent green runoff.

  66. egg_

    Jet engines could give a jumbo boost to wind farms.

    Could amplify the infrasound, too – bonus!

  67. Fisky

    “Knowing what we do now” – Abbott

    Right, because there was never any inkling that an EU backed Paris agreement would ever evolve into a binding treaty to drive down emissions. Abbott must have been the most naive PM ever!

  68. John Constantine

    Video has emerged showing dozens of wallabies violently launching themselves into a fence at Trinity Beach. Warning: Distressing content

    https://au.news.yahoo.com/bizarre-scenes-wallabies-hurl-themselves-102127612.html

    Once dingos are reintroduced, graziers will be required to protect their animals by erecting biosecurity fences capable of excluding predators.

    Looming in the near future will be the foxproof fence campaign, where lambing paddocks will only have the social licence to operate if they are predator secure.

    If current prices hold, then lambing barns like they have in Europe become viable, for intensive operations.

    Fencing the wallabies into the parks along with the dingos will be confronting for the activists.

  69. Tel

    a large Russian built nuke in Wentworth

    I would buy Indian for political reasons (although some of the Indian plants are indeed Russian), and put it in South Australia somewhere North of Port Augusta. Not that I have any problem with the Russians, it’s just that overall probably India is slightly better aligned with Australia.

  70. Mother Lode

    But, in the white hot heat of government, he did not have the courage of his convictions.

    Possibly.

    But I am not sure what he could pragmatically have done differently.

    It is easy an explanation to say he reprioritised according to what was practical.

    People here often cite the backing down on s18C, but it probably still is for most people a remote ‘theoretical’ issue. We often argue theory here so in its way it is more concrete to us.

    Similarly his budgets were nothing to write home about, but we now see the wets, who had the numbers, were none to keen to make budget cuts. Take what you can get or get nothing.

    And his opposition within the party were not motivated by other principles – it was the untrammeled venality of that fathead Turnbull who was happy to be courted by the ABC and Fauxfacts, and who orchestrated more leaks than his silly Snow Hydro v2.0.

    Look, he may have just wussed out. Or he got lost in over-compromising. Or maybe, given what he was working with, the meagre results were all that could be done.

    I am not sure.

    Which is why, as I said, I would not just dogmatically write him off. If he can show he has gas in the tank, and is ready to take on the disreputable claque of retards in power now, I would give serious consideration.

  71. Dr Faustus

    To those of us who have copped far worse in the workplace and laughed it off and excelled as revenge, she looks incredibly silly.

    Sounds a bit normative. First you have to explain exactly how a Greens Senator could ever reasonably be expected to excel at anything.

    Excel at outrageous moral outrage?
    Excel at developing entirely impractical policy?
    Excel at clogging up the mechanism of government?

    Otherwise you are just being harsh and judgmental. Very harsh, actually.

  72. Geriatric Mayfly

    Jon Faine reckons he’s heard they don’t interbreed with dogs, according to some Professor.

    An alpine farmer, very well versed in Snowy Mountains’ lore, one told me that the worst wild cross breeds were Labrador and Dingo. The old Lab increases the IQ by eleventy.

  73. cohenite

    John laws, the punters’ friend is one FB’s side.

  74. Fisky

    Too Late Tony needs to stop wasting everyone’s time. He has no hope of being PM again and even if he had, we know what he will do – cave to the Left.

  75. Fisky

    Similarly his budgets were nothing to write home about, but we now see the wets, who had the numbers, were none to keen to make budget cuts. Take what you can get or get nothing.

    I have no brief for Lord Wentworth, but at least he passed tax CUTS. Too Late Tony hiked taxes to their highest rate in over 20 years!

  76. Infidel Tiger

    Right, because there was never any inkling that an EU backed Paris agreement would ever evolve into a binding treaty to drive down emissions. Abbott must have been the most naive PM ever!

    There’s a reason we hated this guy so much as PM.

    He gave all his loyalty to snakes and morons like Credlin and Hockey and turned his back on his base every chance he had.

    Possibly a good person, but he’s a shithouse politician who must never ever be anything but a crotchety Rick throwing backbencher again.

  77. Mater

    Jet engines could give a jumbo boost to wind farms.

    It’s the first time the Northern Territory can claim to be ahead of the curve. Though it doesn’t take much to outpace greenies, in technological terms.

    Rolls-Royce technology boosts electricity generation in Australia’s Northern Territory

    Capitalism at work. Cut out the middleman (that being the wind turbines).

  78. egg_

    Otherwise you are just being harsh and judgmental. Very harsh, actually.

    “Nasty!”

  79. stackja

    Fisky
    #2754374, posted on July 4, 2018 at 10:18 am
    Too Late Tony needs to stop wasting everyone’s time. He has no hope of being PM again and even if he had, we know what he will do – cave to the Left.

    Don’t worry, DL is on hand.

  80. calli

    Poll shows 58% of ‘Millennials’ in Australia favourable to socialism …

    In the Poll did they actually ask how many Millenials actually know what Socialism is?

    New social media platform. Of course they’ll 👍 it.

  81. Fisky

    Remember when Abbott effectively said we needed to keep 18C otherwise it would raise the risk of terrorism! Incredible.

  82. calli

    Arky, watching that video was workshop porn. Like TFM’s lathes.

    The only thing that could top it would be a time machine to watch the production line in action.

  83. egg_

    The Industrial Trent 60 AGT generates up to 66 MW of electric power in simple-cycle operation and runs at 42-percent efficiency

    Fvcked.

  84. Dr Faustus

    He gave all his loyalty to snakes and morons like Credlin and Hockey and turned his back on his base every chance he had.

    I may have mentioned this before, but Hockey’s comprehensive failure as Treasurer was a huge factor in Abbott’s own failure as PM.

    Leave 18c aside with the onions and Imperial Honours – the Dim Bulb Duo lost it by pretending that the Budget Emergency of Doom was over 12 months after fucking up the politics of the first budget.

  85. OneWorldGovernment

    The former Liberal Party of Australia actually did an excellent job of conning the electorate.

    They presented as Conservative when in fact they were and are nothing of the kind at all.

    At least with the Turnbull Treason Team we can actually see them without the mask they used to wear.

  86. Geriatric Mayfly

    Pity Mr Jones. Miss Orr QC at the Banking RC is asking him some very pointed questions. She barely pauses for breath. “Swallow me up now,” says Mr Jones to the crack in the floor.

  87. calli

    Otherwise you are just being harsh and judgmental. Very harsh, actually.

    Another area of excellence. I’ve been honing my skills for years.

    🙂

  88. Infidel Tiger

    Abbott’s first budget was a suicide note.

    Wealth taxes.
    Punishing pensioners with the retirement age change.
    Idiotic co-payments for Medicare.

    He was obviously duped by Treasury but the moron should have been aware that was the plan.

  89. Myrddin Seren

    Mark A

    The longer I spend working overseas the more convinced I am that OZ has had it.

    The longer I spend talking to middleclass Australians, the more depressed I get that they will lead us over a cliff in a rush of virtue signalling.

    The high-fives about plastic bag bans on TV – ‘we are saving the oceans !’ Relevance to someone in Broken Hill ? Zero. Maybe – ‘Stop throwing your rubbish away then ? /sarc’

    ‘Oh – we recycle. It’s the uncaring Proles who can’t be trusted to do the right thing !’

    Yesterday – ‘I am partial to renewables like wind and solar, because we all want clean air !’
    Moi: ‘Show me where we don’t have clean air ? Those power stations in Singleton you drive past on the way to the horse stud in Scone – which you oppose mining because of – are only emitting steam. Where is the dirty air ?’

    Not that Australia has a lock on this. Here are a bunch of middle-class cosmopolitan Brits protesting against governance in their country and in favour of rule by an unelected, unaccountable and demonstrably corrupt elite in Brussels. Warning – this mob of diversity enthusiasts is a uniformly white and Anglo as an ABC on-air staffers room.

    Years ago, the late Peter Cook made a brilliant move called The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer.

    It ends with:

    Rimmer then gains ultimate control by requiring the populace to engage in endless postal voting on trivial matters. At last, exhausted, they acquiesce in one final vote which passes dictatorial power to him.

    I reckon if you dressed it up as an environmental issue – all those wasted polling booths, ballot papers, HTVs, travel, advertising etc – the Australian middleclass would do a Michael Rimmer and sign their democracy away in a heartbeat.

    Prediction – we are only a few years away from this, as the Protected Classes tighten the 2030 Save the Planet screws.

  90. Mater

    The Industrial Trent 60 AGT generates up to 66 MW of electric power in simple-cycle operation and runs at 42-percent efficiency

    Egg, what does that figure drop to when you inject a wind turbine into the system? It doesn’t bare thinking about.
    The idea must have been published as a joke.

  91. struth

    If we have become used to seeing Malcom Turnbull roll over and never fight, of being the whipping boy of femarxism, of kneeling down begging the left for love, and avoiding all confrontation, giving in and rolling over for his tummy rub, watch what happens when you threaten his master’s U.N. agenda.
    He will bring Australia crashing to it’s knees before he will give up the Paris agreement.

    What will show Australians.
    Well, as many comment here, he’s stupid.

    Stupid, my arse.
    You don’t get to be in politics in a democracy and not know that you need to give the voters what they want, sometimes.
    Be Dammed what the voters want on this issue (and any other U.N. directive), as Friedeggburger told us, it’s happening DESPITE the will of the people.

    Where about to see a dirty fight.
    A behind the scenes dirty fight to rid Abbort once and for all.
    He vill not stand in ze vay of ze master plan!

    It’s the only time we’ve ever seen him fight.
    The U.N. agenda is THE ONLY THING on Malcom’s mind and agenda.
    He. and his cronies are traitors working against Australia, and I believe they should be brought to trial, and when found guilty, executed.
    No one voted for the Paris agreement.
    No one voted for mass immigration by shithouse cultures.
    No one voted for multiculturalism and no one voted to give our taxes in the millions, secretly to the Clinton Crime Cartel.
    No one voted to be giving millions to Palestine.

    You know that list could be longer.
    Enough with criminals pillaging and killing our country.

    Let’s fight this scum with all we’ve got.
    Some of us have kids.

  92. Dr Faustus

    The Industrial Trent 60 AGT generates up to 66 MW of electric power in simple-cycle operation and runs at 42-percent efficiency

    Using gas, that costs $8.00/GJ versus coal that costs $1.50 – $2.50/GJ.
    For the same (or slightly worse) thermal efficiency and emissions as modern coal-fired.

    Very fucked.

  93. JC

    Abbott’s first budget was a suicide note.

    Wealth taxes.
    Punishing pensioners with the retirement age change.
    Idiotic co-payments for Medicare.

    He was obviously duped by Treasury but the moron should have been aware that was the plan.

    He signed up to every single liar party big spending policy. He didn’t miss one, so wonder he tried taxes.

  94. Rae

    13.15 cents per day

    if $1.2 bil
    divided by 25 mil
    divided by 365

    using the same way the 8 cents a day was worked out

    Cheaper still, 13.14¢ per day, if divided by 365.25 to allow for the Leap Year day.

    That’s less than one Coles or Woolies reusable bag per day.

  95. egg_

    Mater
    #2754392, posted on July 4, 2018 at 10:40 am

    High speed turbines are great in a small package, but hardly efficient.

  96. jupes

    Abbott’s first budget was a suicide note.

    Indeed. He had destroyed TLS with her own words: “There will be no carbon tax under a government I lead”. He had then campaigned on no increased taxes. So what was the first thing he did on taxes … ?

    Now that was stupid.

    So was his belief that governing for all Australians meant he had to kowtow to the left. Remember he appointed the loathsome Natasha Stott Despoja to the totally unnecessary virtue-signalling position of “ambassador” for women and girls.

    That shit is unforgivable.

  97. egg_

    less than one Coles or Woolies reusable bag per day.

    365 days per year per person.

  98. C.L

    Jet engines could give a jumbo boost to wind farms.

    In a nutshell it goes like this.
    A jet engine is mounted in front of one or more wind generators.
    The jet engine burns renewball fuel.
    The exhaust blast is directed at the wind generator blades which then spin and drive a … a … turbine.

    It sounds like a Dr Seuss book.
    Turnbull’s premiership is actually a lot like The Cat in the Hat Comes Back.
    One hare-brained policy after another, all of them making matters more pink than before.

  99. stackja

    Never satisfied crowd on the Cat. Pie in sky.

  100. egg_

    Is Trumble going to cloud seed the Snowy Hydro (again)?

  101. struth

    We’re about to see a dirty fight.
    Never type while there is steam coming out of your ears.

  102. Confused Old Misfit

    Jon Faine reckons he’s heard they don’t interbreed with dogs, according to some Professor.

    Somewhere I recall reading that the Australian Cattle Dog, both blue and red heeler variants, had dingo in their lineage; along with kelpie, dalmatian, scottish sheep dog and these days, god only knows what else.

  103. stackja

    C.L
    #2754401, posted on July 4, 2018 at 10:51 am
    Jet engines could give a jumbo boost to wind farms.

    And street lights provide ‘solar energy’ 24/7.

  104. H B Bear

    Jon Faine reckons he’s heard they don’t interbreed with dogs, according to some Professor.

    Jon Paine could only have heard that in a Fitzroy cafe, the ALPBC water-cooler or one of Moose Knuckle’s dinner parties.

  105. Confused Old Misfit

    A droving dog was needed, but the colonial working dogs are understood to have been of the Old English Sheepdog type, commonly referred to as Smithfields. Descendants of these dogs still exist, but are useful only over short distances and for yard work with domesticated cattle. Thomas Hall addressed the problem by importing several of the dogs used by drovers in Northumberland, his parents’ home county. At that time dogs were generally described by their job, regardless of whether they constituted a breed as it is currently understood. In the manner of the time, the Hall family historian, A. J. Howard, gave these blue mottled dogs a name: Northumberland Blue Merle Drovers Dog.[45]

    Thomas Hall crossed his Drovers Dogs with dingoes he had tamed, and by 1840 was satisfied with his resulting progeny. During the next thirty years, the Halls Heelers, as they became known, were used only by the Halls. Given that they were dependent on the dogs, which gave them an advantage over other cattle breeders, it is understandable that the dogs were not distributed beyond the Hall’s properties. It was not until after Thomas Hall’s death in 1870, when the properties went to auction with the stock on them, that Halls Heelers became freely available.[46]

    John Faine and his “professor” friend can go pound sand!

  106. Rafe Champion

    Jets in the windfarms is like shining lights on the solar panels in the night in Spain.

  107. Geriatric Mayfly

    egg_
    #2754404, posted on July 4, 2018 at 10:53 am
    Is Trumble going to cloud seed the Snowy Hydro (again)?

    Very risky at the moment. Some Iranian military nutter claims that the Chews are stealing water bearing clouds which by rights should be floating over Iran. Cloud stealing, another matter to keep the UN Human Rights mob exhaling halitosis for years to come.

  108. Gab

    Buy 2 lottery tickets today, infidel Tiger.

  109. struth

    Anyone who believes that Dingos don’t breed with dogs is a completely insulated F..wit.

    Jon, you silly white public servant.
    For diversity, you should have already handed over your job to a female Querty black dwarf.
    What are you doing there?
    There is a big world outside your little city studio.
    Scary as it may be to you.

  110. Confused Old Misfit

    Full disclosure: I’ve had a Blue ANd now have a Red ACD. Best dogs in the world.

  111. struth

    We could power the wind turbines from a coal powered station next door.

  112. egg_

    Dingoes originated in China 18,000 years ago

    Aren’t they just a typical South Asian dog?
    I’ve seen a few dingo-like dogs running around Bangkok.

  113. Stimpson J. Cat

    Stimpys Interesting Tweets

    Pasta e fagioli🇮🇹
    @CrownOrDeath
    Every black person swimming over the mediterranean is readily admitting that ending colonialism was a disaster and they’re incapable of self rule
    4:40 PM · Jul 2, 2018

  114. struth

    Could we get the greenies to line up at the solar farms at night with dolphin torches to shine at them.
    Rechargeable batteries of course.

  115. Stimpson J. Cat

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    After having written many best selling books, and somewhat priding myself on my ability to write, it should be noted that the Fake News constantly likes to pore over my tweets looking for a mistake. I capitalize certain words only for emphasis, not b/c they should be capitalized!
    7:13 AM · Jul 4, 2018

  116. struth

    Yes, they are just an Asian wild dog.
    They don’t bark, but howl.
    Neither do wolves apparently.
    The ancestor of the domestic dog.

  117. cohenite

    Dennis Jensen sums up Abbott:

    One of Abbott’s flaws is that he takes friends and supporters for granted, and thus thinks he needs to cozy up to his enemies (I am talking within the Liberal Party here). Also, despite his “conviction politician” reputation, he is. Apart from his Catholicism and how politics impacts on those views (where he will fight strongly), the only real issue he has really shown personal conviction with is his paid parental leave scheme. Even with climate change, he has been all over the place.
    If you factor in that he had Bob Santamaria, and all he stood for, as his mentor, you will have a stronger idea of where Abbott’s fundamentals lie.

    Leyonhjelm and Pauline it is then.

  118. struth

    constantly likes to pore over my tweets looking for a mistake

    Yes, that’s exactly what I’m doing with their, there where wear etc.
    I’m “pore-ing out ” my inner Trump.

  119. egg_

    Cloud stealing

    One of Baldrick’s cunning plans?

  120. Snoopy

    Yes, they are just an Asian wild dog.
    They don’t bark, but howl.
    Neither do wolves apparently.
    The ancestor of the domestic dog.

    I wonder if the domestication of dogs selected for barking.

  121. Snoopy

    Jets in the windfarms is like shining lights on the solar panels in the night in Spain.

    Enriching.

  122. stackja

    stackja
    #2754408, posted on July 4, 2018 at 10:57 am
    C.L
    #2754401, posted on July 4, 2018 at 10:51 am
    Jet engines could give a jumbo boost to wind farms.

    And street lights provide ‘solar energy’ 24/7.

    Yes!

    Rafe Champion
    #2754412, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:01 am
    Jets in the windfarms is like shining lights on the solar panels in the night in Spain.

  123. yeh bring Spanish Inquisition NOW!

    BorisG, given your response here and your silence re my question, I think we can safely conclude that you accepted the JPost hit-piece without reading Condon’s article in the NR and were simply trolling in the manner of a disgruntled liberal.

  124. Leigh Lowe

    Mater
    #2754392, posted on July 4, 2018 at 10:40 am

    High speed turbines are great in a small package, but hardly efficient.

    No-one is talking about the relative efficiency of gas turbines, egg.
    It is indisputable that any gas turbine will be more efficient as a direct generator of power as distinct from using that same gas turbine to blow air through wind farm blades.

  125. Geriatric Mayfly

    They don’t bark, but howl.

    There is no suitable word for the Dingo vocals in English. Fishing alone, in a corner of the Snowy totally scarfed in the black of night, one started the repertoire, with neither a tune-up nor overture. One of only two occasions, when the hair on the back of my neck and head became raised hackles.

  126. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    There is no suitable word for the Dingo vocals in English

    Fair comment – there were a couple still, in the mid Sixties,where the family farm was, and, yes the hairs on the back of the neck do rise.

  127. Snoopy

    It is indisputable that any gas turbine will be more efficient as a direct generator of power as distinct from using that same gas turbine to blow air through wind farm blades.

    We’re talking profitability, not efficiency.

  128. egg_

    It is indisputable that any gas turbine will be more efficient as a direct generator of power as distinct from using that same gas turbine to blow air through wind farm blades.

    My years in the power industry were wasted.

  129. Mother Lode

    While it is easy to just say everything that happened under Abbott’s PM-ship was doing, and all he needed to do was do differently.

    I can’t distinguish with certainty how much of what his government did was him and how much the rest of his party.

    I don’t especially credit Trumble’s tax cuts as I do not believe for a minute it has anything to do with benefiting the country. I will as happily accept the cuts as I have had to endure all the bans, imposts, and SJW stuff he has foisted on us – and I do think I can point at him for this because he leads a snivelling band of sycophants.

    I can’t say either way, which is why I personally keep the option open to re-consider if he can convince me he is worth it.

    I am just not saying ‘no’ dogmatically.

  130. Death Giraffe

    Dingos are pretty much the same thing as those asian wild dogs.
    We had a part dingo for 18 years.
    Wonderful dog. Very gentle. But would sneak off down to the local supermarket if given any chance at all.
    I still miss him.
    Dated a girl way back who’s mum had a full dingo.
    Also a very gentle dog. That guy near Castlemaine who had a whole farm full of them. It was his life’s work.
    Quite something to hear them all on the howl.

  131. OldOzzie

    <a href="https://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/editorials/reliable-and-affordable-power-must-be-the-priority/news-story/2e1c2e55a3f60b8a72b3dff5144e54a4&quot;EDITORIALS
    Reliable and affordable power must be the priority

    Less than a month from the “Super Saturday” by-elections and with the opposition in disarray over tax, the last thing Malcolm Turnbull needs is agitation within the Coalition, whipped up by Tony Abbott. That said, and more important for the nation, the last thing the economy needs is for soaring power prices and unreliable supply to undermine productivity, confidence and investment. The Prime Minister will be peeved over Mr Abbott’s feisty address to climate-sceptic think tank the Australian Environment Foundation, in which the former prime minister called for Australia to follow the US in exiting the Paris Agreement and abandon emissions targets to “save” the Liberal Party. It is true, as Mr Abbott said, that Australia would never have signed the Paris Agreement had the US not been a party to it.

    Closer to home, the Nationals, in a two-page list of demands agreed in their partyroom last week and obtained by Joe Kelly, are demanding the building of three new baseload power stations in which the commonwealth or the states would hold equity. A “government-owned company model”, used to deliver other vital infrastructure including the western Sydney airport, would keep any new power stations off budget. The Coalition partner also wants part of a $5 billion fund available to coal, gas or traditional hydro projects capable of delivering “electricity 24 hours a day, seven days a week, regardless of weather conditions” to deliver shorter-term improvements to the energy market. The fund would help extend the life of power plants, boost their capacity and cut emissions.

    Regardless of the former prime minister’s personal motivation, it is alarming but true, as Mr Abbott said on Monday, that the Turnbull government will be relying on the support of Labor states to back its ­national energy guarantee at next month’s crucial COAG meeting. Should the states, some of which are committed to renewable energy targets of 50 per cent, withhold their support, or offer it with unacceptable conditions, or if Mr Turnbull and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg fail to secure Coalition support for the NEG, the government could be left scrambling without an energy policy to meet one of its main responsibilities — ensuring the provision of reliable and affordable power. The fact Australia faces such a possibility reflects woeful planning at state and federal level.

    The Nationals’ pragmatic stance is well timed
    . It comes as coal is set to regain its position as our biggest export earner due to rising prices and surging demand from Asia. China, Japan, India and Indonesia are among nations that have turned to cleaner coal technology to meet their expanding energy needs. Decision-makers here should not be blind to what is happening in other parts of the world. As we noted a fortnight ago, “this is a lesson Australia appears doomed to learn the hard way”. And despite the determination of some states to lock up their gas resources, LNG exports also are booming.

    While much of the national debate has been anchored in the politics of climate change and the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to less than 2C, the needs of business and households for reliable baseload power at competitive prices have been overlooked in some quarters. This should not be the case in a nation rich in energy resources. Nothing that Australia does, as Mr Abbott writes today, will make the slightest difference to climate. It is also true that China, responsible for 28 per cent of global emissions, and India (7 per cent) have made no Paris commitment and the US (15 per cent) has pulled out. Australia is on track to meet its Paris target; but it is time to regain perspective. Emissions abatement should not jeopardise living standards.

  132. Mater

    Rafe Champion
    #2754412, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:01 am
    Jets in the windfarms is like shining lights on the solar panels in the night in Spain.

    Don’t laugh Rafe. It was happening in NSW when they had a 60 cent gross feed in tariff.
    If you leave the door open, enterprising people will walk through it.

  133. Armadillo

    Death [Shudder],

    That video was more boring than reading a post from Rae. FMD.

    What happened after the 1 minute mark? I saw some checkered tiles or something whilst I was fumbling for the volume button. That or a blunt kitchen knife to slit my wrists with.

    Calli said something nice about some metal wankery above. Lathe or something? Probably just made it up to you make you feel good. I doubt she actually watched it. Educated guess I reckon.

    Go back to harassing our youth. Someone needed to kick them up the arse.

    You deserted your post. Shame on you.

  134. struth

    As long as you didn’t feel the need to lick your balls at the same time.
    Was it a full moon?

  135. Snoopy

    Leyohjelm, Hanson and Bernardi. How many states are you people enrolled in?

  136. Habib

    Most of them are simply following in their convict footsteps.
    What’s worse, that mentality has poisoned the minds of the free settlers as well.
    And boy, don’t the politicians know it!
    They have nothing to fear.

    Too right, the only aberration was the minor ruckus at Ballarat in 1854, and that was kicked off and mostly manned by blow-ins, especially yanks who won’t take this sort of shit.

  137. jupes

    Jets in the windfarms is like shining lights on the solar panels in the night in Spain.

    Or you could just pump water back up hill.

  138. EvilElvis

    Leyohjelm, Hanson and Bernardi.

    One of these things is not like the others…

    Hopefully.

  139. stackja

    Leyohjelm, Hanson and Bernardi.

    Leyohjelm, Hanson and Bernardi, getting publicity. Votes?

  140. Mother Lode

    Anyone who believes that Dingos don’t breed with dogs is a completely insulated F..wit.

    I am sure Faine believes that if a dog has any dingo ancestry, even if it is a single great great great grandparent, then it is a dingo.

    There should also be particular roles preserved for dingos, typically guarding the fire place with a big bowl of food.

    And there is no need to prove dingo ancestry – just stories your grandmother dog told you.

  141. struth

    Am I sensing a little , tiny bit of grumpiness on the way Australia has been getting screwed by the U.N?

    Could it be possible that the AFLGBT sports codes have disgusted enough that some Aussies switched channels, or worse, couldn’t afford to power the tele?
    House Reno shows from a bygone era now that nobody can afford a house let alone renovate it, or power a bloody drill, giving some Aussies the shits.

    Pick those noses Aussies.
    Scratch those fat tattooed arses.
    Then try to put two plus two together…………………………………………

    You can do it…………….

    C’mon

    Slowly, slowly………………that’s right, now off the couch………………

  142. Dr Faustus

    the government could be left scrambling without an energy policy to meet one of its main responsibilities — ensuring the provision of reliable and affordable power

    Is this in the Constitution somewhere?

    Sensible people might think, now the national voltage and frequency issue is pretty much settled, the Commonwealth Government’s main responsibility is not fucking up the provision of reliable and affordable power by brain dead regulation.

  143. egg_

    If you leave the door open, enterprising people will walk through it.

    That’s the Economic Science.
    The point is that even as a direct power source, single-cycle gas is inefficient, let alone the losses involved in blowing wind turbines.

  144. stackja

    Habib
    #2754448, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:30 am

    Lalor, Joseph Peter (Joe) (1884–1915)
    from Argus (Melbourne)
    Captain Lalor, who has been killed, was a son of the late Dr. Lalor, and a grandson of Mr. Peter Lalor, of Eureka Stockade fame. He had an extremely varied experience of life, having served in the Royal Navy in the Foreign Legion of France, after which he fought through a South American revolution. Wherever trouble and fighting were to be found Captain Lalor was to be found until he came to Australia and gained an appointment in the administrative and instructional staff, rising to the rank of captain before the war broke out. He went to the front as a company commander in the 12th Infantry Battalion. Captain Lalor recently married a niece of Dr. B. Loughrey, a well-known physician in Lower Hawthorn. His wife is now in England with her only child.

  145. Farmer Gez

    The line up for Jon Faine’s conversation hour.
    Fair, balanced and independent ABC speaking truth to power. Ha ha ha!

    Wednesday 4th July

    Lyn Allison … co-host. former Democrats Senator for Victoria and leader.

    Today marks the 50th Anniversary of a large demonstration against the Vietnam War outside the U.S. Consulate in Melbourne

    Des Files … was an anti-Vietnam war and anti-conscription protestor. Convened the group which formed the Draft Resistance Movement

    Michael Hyde … was a Monash University student radical

    Elly Varrenti … writer, columnist, broadcaster, actor and teacher. CrazyBrave, a play by her good mate, the late Michael Gurr, is on at La Mama Theatre, 4th to 15th July

  146. stackja

    Faine and dingoes, could make an interesting story. But Sinc’s rules must be obeyed.

  147. Armadillo

    If you leave the door open, enterprising people will walk through it.

    More likely a scoundrel.

  148. Confused Old Misfit

    struth
    #2754422, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:09 am
    Yes, they are just an Asian wild dog.
    They don’t bark, but howl.
    Neither do wolves apparently.
    The ancestor of the domestic dog.

    Yes, wolves howl. I’ve heard the North American gray wolf howl.

  149. Geriatric Mayfly

    And there is no need to prove dingo ancestry – just stories your grandmother dog told you.

    Did Faine mention Canislink for unwaged dingoes?

  150. zyconoclast

    Leyohjelm, Hanson and Bernardi.

    One of these things is not like the others…

    Hopefully.

    One is from NSW

  151. Habib

    The general idea is less plastic ending up in the natural environment.
    Not a bad idea, i’m sure you’ll agree.

    No, it’s an cretinous idea, like every other one coughed up by idiot wastrel governments desperate to appear to be “doon sumpin”. Rather than the inevitable trip to a landfill for the surplus stock of previously perfectly alright bags, they’d be better put to use encasing the empty heads of every fucknob that’s had a part in this imbecilic intrusion and pathetic virtue-signalling.

  152. stackja

    Farmer Gez
    #2754471, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:43 am

    Yes! ‘Fair, balanced and independent ABC speaking truth to power’.
    Melbourne radio, Faine got 12.3% rating. Fox FM 12.4% 3AW 13.9%

  153. struth

    That is what I was saying.
    Wolves don’t bark apparently, but like dingos, only howl.

  154. OneWorldGovernment

    Confused Old Misfit
    #2754479, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:47 am

    Yes, wolves howl. I’ve heard the North American gray wolf howl.

    I’d reckon Struth, Armadillo and I could howl better than that.

  155. We don’t need any of the current landfill or solid waste regulations we currently have.

    The technology exists which makes landfill and pearl-clutching about dead turtles obsolete:

    http://plascotechnologies.com/our-solution/

    I am sure there will be more competitors offering similar or better options in the years to come. If recycling is profitable, it will happen, otherwise, we ought to zap the trash, or create mulch or syngas.

    In the context of the new technology options, municipal landfills are really just make-work projects for Council workers.

  156. Rossini

    hey fred what’ s new

  157. Geriatric Mayfly

    When the phone rings my Jack Russell lets forth a piercing primal howl. It always goes up a pitch when she detects that the caller wants to sell me solar panels.

  158. Mater

    The point is that even as a direct power source, single-cycle gas is inefficient, let alone the losses involved in blowing wind turbines.

    We agree, egg. I wasn’t selling it, just pointing out the ridiculousness of the initial proposal.
    The NT use it only for quick start peaking load and frequency control (which is traditionally a major problem for the NT).

  159. Confused Old Misfit

    I’d reckon Struth, Armadillo and I could howl better than that.

    Is that not what the three of you have been doing for the last decade?
    Cut the wolves some slack. They don’t have your evolutionary advantages. Bloody privileged humanoids!

  160. struth

    I’d reckon Struth, Armadillo and I could howl better than that.

    Not ready.
    For some reason, sniff, sniff, I’m attracted to this fat bitch from channel ten

  161. Old School Conservative

    An opinion piece in The Oz supporting Mr Abbott’s call to leave the Paris Agreement is accompanied by a picture.
    It shows clouds of steam rising from one chimney and is captioned “Emissions from a stack at the coal-fired Morgantown Generating Station in Newburg, Maryland.”
    A few comments have raised the error but no changes have been made.
    Ignorance or deliberate falsification?

  162. stackja

    A JAPANESE tourist has died while climbing Uluru yesterday afternoon.
    The 76-year-old man collapsed on the Northern Territory monolith at around 4pm while halfway up the monolith.
    Bystanders performed CPR but were unable to revive him.

  163. Habib

    Cue Nelson Muntz yet again-

    STUDIO 10 host Angela Bishop confronted David Leyonhjelm on live television over a sexist slur he tweeted at her last week.

    When the Liberal Democratic Party Senator appeared on the program this morning, she said: “Senator, you said that you made those remarks because (Sarah Hanson-Young) was guilty of misandry. I am not a misandrist. Why did you call me a bitch?” she asked.

    “Because you were being bigoted,” he responded. “Joe was trying to explain to you the context in which I made that statement, and you cut him off. The definition of bigotry is not listening to any other view. That is what I was trying to say.”

    Fellow host Hugh Riminton jumped in, arguing: “But if you think she’s a bigot, why not call her a bigot? Why call her a bitch? Real men don’t call women bitches.”

    “Oh. You’ve had a sheltered life,” the Senator replied. “Women call each other bitches.

    “I mix with normal Australians all the time, and don’t think there is anything wrong with … calling somebody a bitch or a bastard. Calling somebody a pussy, I don’t see anything wrong with it.”

    Ms Bishop went on to ask if he was using his “moment in the limelight” as a way of getting re-elected.

    “It wasn’t part of a plan. Remember it was Sarah who stood up in the Senate, making it public what was an interchange between us.

    “I don’t want to shut Sarah down. In fact in many ways it’s the gift that keeps on giving. I’m not resiling from the principles I’m raising. Free speech is important. But so is calling out sexism, so is misandry.”

    “I wasn’t guilty of misandry!” she fired back. “I defended your right to prosecute your argument. I just took issue with the language you used. So why call me a b**ch?”

    “Oh OK, alright,” he responded. “So if you took offence at that, I’m sorry you took offence at that.”

    When fellow host Sarah Harris asked him to clarify if that was an apology, he said: “Well, to the extent that Angela has said to me she was deliberately not being a misandrist. She was being bigoted — I’m saying that, you were being a bigot, you were cutting off Joe from explaining to you the context in which I made those comments in the Senate.”

    “Do you admit that calling her a bitch was wrong?”

    “Oh no, no no,” he said, to gasps from the audience.

    “So you’re not apologising?”

    “No. What I am saying is I’m sorry she’s taken offence.”

    “Not quite an apology,” Harris said, before they moved on.

    Snowflake asterisks removed. Is Hugh Rimjobington a great raving radish?

  164. stackja

    Chidren committing serious crimes just to find something to eat, MPs told
    KIDS as young as 10 are learning how to drive cars purely so they can smash them into shopfronts and find something to eat.

  165. stackja

    Boys severely burned in camp fire incident
    TWO children have been rushed to hospital with severe burns after one of them threw a tiny gas canister on a camp fire, causing an explosion.

  166. Armadillo

    For some reason, sniff, sniff, I’m attracted to this fat bitch from channel ten

    No use to me, won’t fit in the burrow. Howl all you like.

  167. stackja

    Richard Swift, a singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer who worked with TheBlack Keys, The Shins and many others, died Tuesday in Tacoma, Washington, at the age of 41, according to a post on his Facebook page; a rep confirmed the news to Pitchfork and other outlets.

    The cause of death has not been announced; in June a GoFundMe effort was launched for him to help cover medical bills for an unspecified “life-threatening condition.”

  168. egg_

    Mater
    #2754498, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:58 am

    I think we’re all on the same page.
    Our firm made good money renting Gensets out in the NT on a permanent basis e.g. driving water pumps to maintain water levels at remote sites whilst others have run fan mist sprayers to control dust at e.g. mine sites.

  169. Geriatric Mayfly

    Although they are not dogs, hyena in full throat can send a shiver up the spine. The distance traversed on the still African night seems limitless. Quite musical in fact if you are in a ‘safe space.’ Lullabies, should you be tucked up in bed.

  170. stackja

    Old School Conservative
    #2754501, posted on July 4, 2018 at 12:00 pm
    An opinion piece in The Oz supporting Mr Abbott’s call to leave the Paris Agreement is accompanied by a picture.
    It shows clouds of steam rising from one chimney and is captioned “Emissions from a stack at the coal-fired Morgantown Generating Station in Newburg, Maryland.”
    A few comments have raised the error but no changes have been made.
    Ignorance or deliberate falsification?

    People getting steamed up?

  171. egg_

    medical bills for an unspecified “life-threatening condition.”

    Low on drugs, m’kay?

  172. C.L

    Bill Shorten calls for the bombing of Nauru …

    Press Gallery threatens boycott of Turnbull’s trip to Nauru if ABC ban isn’t overturned.

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten encouraged the Press Gallery’s stance, saying Malcolm Turnbull should “join the team”.

    “I get that Nauru is a sovereign government and is entitled to decide who comes into their country,” he said.

    “But it’s our Prime Minister going there, it’s our independent public broadcaster who should report what an Australian Prime Minister is doing overseas.

    “I get it’s not an easy issue — don’t get me wrong, I don’t think that there is a simple solution here — but it shouldn’t be left to the Opposition or to the press gallery to fight for the coverage of prime ministers overseas.”

  173. Shy Ted

    Death Giraffe
    #2754441, posted on July 4, 2018 at 11:24 am
    Dingos are pretty much the same thing as those asian wild dogs.
    We had a part dingo for 18 years.
    Wonderful dog. Very gentle. But would sneak off down to the local supermarket if given any chance at all.
    I still miss him.

    Me too DG, only mine was a girl. Lived way, way out bush and she came alive in her country. Only ever ate roadkill or similar and led me into so many near-death situations just following scents. Lasted til 10, battered and bruised from living a genuine doggy life, just lay down. Called her a bloody bitch more times than I can remember and she took it as a compliment to do it all over again.

  174. stackja

    C.L
    #2754542, posted on July 4, 2018 at 12:21 pm

    Open borders Bill.

  175. Shy Ted

    There has never been an easier time to be Aussie PM. Just do what POTUSDJT does, word for word, tweet for tweet, policy for policy. Listening, Tony?

  176. stackja

    This incident was closed on 04/07/2018 at 8:45am:
    IncidentYARRAMUNDI Springwood Rd at Mahons Creek Rd
    HAZARD Kangaroo carcass
    Started today 8:03am, last checked today 8:45am
    Impact: Impact Northbound traffic affected.
    Attending: RMS
    Advice: Exercise caution
    Reduce speed

    Where Greens?

  177. H B Bear

    Jon Paine personifies Melbournibad.

  178. stackja

    Shy Ted
    #2754554, posted on July 4, 2018 at 12:26 pm
    There has never been an easier time to be Aussie PM. Just do what POTUSDJT does, word for word, tweet for tweet, policy for policy. Listening, Tony?

    BO left an odour.

  179. stackja

    H B Bear
    #2754561, posted on July 4, 2018 at 12:33 pm
    Jon Paine personifies Melbournibad.

    Interesting!

  180. calli

    “I wasn’t guilty of misandry!” she fired back. “I defended your right to prosecute your argument. I just took issue with the language you used. So why call me a b**ch?”

    I suppose Bishop and that other dim bulb speculating and giggling on the size of DL’s penis on FTA wasn’t misandry.

    It must have been some other thing belonging in the Third Form.*

    * which is traditionally inhabited by juvenile b*tches.

  181. egg_

    hey fred what’ s new —>

  182. Mark from Melbourne

    There should also be particular roles preserved for dingos, typically guarding the fire place with a big bowl of food.

    My Miniature Schnauzer wishes it to be known that, if this is the case, he identifies as a dingo.

  183. Habib

    “I get it’s not an easy issue — don’t get me wrong, I don’t think that there is a simple solution here — but it shouldn’t be left to the Opposition or to the press gallery to fight for the coverage of prime ministers overseas.”

    Yes there is you lightbulb-headed dolt, croak the ABC. Those guano-bagging, reffo-torturing natives are more savvy to the venality and pointlessness of that archaic monolith than any of you walking suppositories.

  184. Entropy

    stackja
    #2754502, posted on July 4, 2018 at 12:00 pm
    A JAPANESE tourist has died while climbing Uluru yesterday afternoon.
    The 76-year-old man collapsed on the Northern Territory monolith at around 4pm while halfway up the monolith.
    Bystanders performed CPR but were unable to revive him.

    Initially I thought what an idiot trying to climb the rock when he was that old.
    On second thoughts, what a cool way to go out!

  185. Confused Old Misfit

    what a cool way to go out!

    Having almost gone, once, I can tell you No, it’s not!

  186. Confused Old Misfit

    Habib
    #2754578, posted on July 4, 2018 at 1:06 pm

    That was well put!

  187. max

    Magistrate Robert Stone was overly swayed in his decision in the Archbishop Wilson case by the need to publicly signal outrage at the Catholic church’s mere existence.

    In that decision he opined that the accused showed no sign of remorse or contrition. Bullshit. The Archbishop is in the early stages of dementia. Why no mention of that as an explanation for his demeanour while under questioning in court ?

    In effect, the magistrate accused the Archbishop of lying under oath when he (the Archbish) averred he had no recollection of the conversation in which he was told of the abusive priest. Again, is that so surprising, given the Archbishop’s mental impairment ?

    The magistrate had obviously gone into this hearing with his mind made up. He should have excused himself.

    Last night the Drum spent a good twenty minutes lambasting the church. Nobody mentioned the problems in Katherine or Tennant Creek.

  188. Rae

    The Archbishop is in the early stages of dementia. Why no mention of that as an explanation for his demeanour while under questioning in court ?

    Why no mention of his “early stages of dementia” being no bar to him being Adelaide Archbishop until his conviction a few weeks ago?

  189. Stimpson J. Cat

    The world has gone mad.

    Elon Musk
    @elonmusk
    Replying to @nevona
    Yeah I like ICP
    9:18 AM · Jul 4, 2018

  190. C.L

    The Archbishop is in the early stages of dementia. Why no mention of that as an explanation for his demeanour while under questioning in court ?

    For the same reason Euridice Dixon’s killer is never described as a handicapped teenager – which is what he is. Doesn’t suit the media’s narrative (which is that poor Miss Dixon was killed by All Men).

    On the other hand, when a Muslim kills (as happens with monotonous predictability), the leftist commentariat publishes every supposedly exculpatory medical factoid as quickly and as ubiquitously as possible – not excluding acne, lumbago, male pattern baldness and the common cold.

  191. Stimpson J. Cat

    male pattern baldness

    It’s a f$cking heavy burden to carry C. L.

  192. notafan

    Why no mention that sad sack Rae’s comments continue to dusgust their unfortunate readers?

    Either the Archbishop has dementia, or he doesn’t.

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