When political correctness becomes dangerous

At the expense of igniting lefty outrage I’m going to admit to having climbed Uluru. Now while I’m not an athlete, I am in fairly good shape (almost round) for a man my age, and not that far off the wrong side of 50. I came prepared; hat, water, hiking boots. It was very hard – the first section has no support and is quite steep. It more or less serves as a barrier to entry, those people attempting the climb and who struggle on the section before the chain should give up. The climb is not for you. It gets harder after that point. Coming down is murder.

So today we have the news that a Japanese tourist has died climbing Uluru.

Northern Territory Police say the man, 76, was attempting to ascend one of the steepest parts of the climb when he collapsed and lost consciousness about 4:00pm yesterday.

Park rangers were the first on scene and performed CPR until SES crews arrived. The man was flown to the health clinic at nearby Yulara, but could not be revived.

Unfortunate to be sure. What was a 76 year old man doing climbing Uluru? Yes, I know; don’t blame the victim.

To my mind the problem is this: at Uluru they have signs discouraging a climb on cultural and religious grounds. They also have conditions under which the rock is closed for climbing – mostly associated with weather events. I’m open to correction but I don’t recall seeing signs that warned of health related reasons not to climb the rock. My impression is that there are more warnings at an amusement park than at Uluru.  Certainly there wasn’t anybody around to provide warnings or enforce any warnings.  Mind you, the tour guide should have provided detailed information and warnings about climbing the rock.

Of course, the counter-argument could be that cultural and religious grounds should be enough to deter would-be climbers. Clearly that isn’t the case.

On the topic of climbing Uluru – here is a story about the government and/or its agencies lying to us. Again.

Update: Photos from the rock.

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70 Responses to When political correctness becomes dangerous

  1. Roger

    No health warning signs?

    Good Lord!

    I’m familiar with a Japanese Garden that warns visitors not to negotiate its benign paths unless fit!

  2. Sinclair Davidson

    If they are there they are not prominent.

  3. H B Bear

    As an occasional viewer of Bondi Rescue may observe, it is tempting to post that Orientals and sub Continentals have no appreciation of risk but obviously that would be waacist. At least when Australians do stuff like this usually they are pissed and being egged on by their mates.

  4. Roger

    If they are there they are not prominent.

    Expect that to change.

    it is tempting to post that Orientals and sub Continentals have no appreciation of risk but obviously that would be waacist.

    Anyone who climbs Uluru must be either bored or have a loose grasp of the risk-reward calculus:

    “Oh look, a spinifex covered plain. Isn’t it grand?”

  5. Egor

    Ah memories. When Uluru was designated “dual management” by Aboriginals and Nat Parks the fear that access arrangements would be changed by Aboriginals was poo pooed in the media as racist scaremongering, Nat Parks assured us that would not happen.
    Now Aboriginals are attempting to close off climbing the Rock. Who would have guessed they lied.

    If a Japanese tourist wants to risk death from physical exertion walking up the Rock that’s his business.

  6. Up The Workers!

    Could we perhaps cut paths at each point of the compass for several escalators to be installed on the rock so that pear-shaped, fat-bottomed professional offence-taking Greenies can all get up there to see everything and everyone that they should be righteously outraged at?

    Can’t have the “luvvies” all huffing and puffing from unfitness, when they will need to be huffing and puffing from sheer outrage at all the tourists ‘defiling’ the rock.

  7. struth

    Japanese man would have been part of a tour group and all guides must be brainwashed, er I mean accredited before they can work in the park.
    He would have been made aware of the health risks.
    Many people die jogging because they think they are fitter than they are.
    You never here about that, unless it’s maybe on a fun run (which they never cancel because someone sticks a leg in the air)
    This is purely political.
    As a tour guide for many years, I have taken thousands of tourist to see the rock.
    I have taken thousands that climbed the rock.
    I have been beaten up the rock by an 84 year old man (although I dispute his claim) when I was a young cigarette smoking tour driver…………………..
    The rock was a fun and magical place to visit, and until the fun Nazis came in and decided to end it, was a very special place.
    The rock stood there proud as it had done for millennia before aboriginals past by it, and during it’s hey bay (the early nineties) at sunset, it was almost giving you a good old Aussie wink and a grin.

    To be told it is not mine to be proud of , due to the colour of my skin, and that I must dribble politically (Marxist) bullshit to my punters regarding blackfellas (who I’ve seen climb it and swim in it’s waterholes, as have I) is absolutely disgusting.
    I remember only too well my very first tour to the rock and the awe experienced by my passengers as we moved closer to it.
    My young heart burst with pride.
    But alas our young whites are no longer allowed to feel as I did.
    It is not theirs.
    The rules climbing the rock, and the concern about deaths don’t seem to get applied to other activities, so why the concern here?
    They haven’t banned sky jumping or surfing at Margaret river
    Nowadays the rock is going to be closed for climbing, something they assured us they would never do.
    And already if someone farts in the nearby aboriginal community, the climb is closed because it’s too windy.
    They have a prison like fence around the base of the climb just to help with that welcoming, friendly approach that so helps tourism.

    The human ants around our glorious old rock, have ruined it, but they’ll soon be all gone, and the Rock will still be there.
    I’ve had my time there. and although I could see the writing on the wall, it was the best time to be a tour driver there.
    Nothing lasts forever, and I will not go back and pay a park fee to those parasites, ever, just to see my old mate……and be told lies.

  8. Genghis

    My experience of Ayres Roch (as it was in those days) was 1963. As a group of school kids we went up, little book for signing for those that were successful. No chains or railings on the Kangaroo Tail and then three of us ran down. A few weeks later a Carey Grammar boy went over the side in fog – that was a bit sobering. I was in brothel creepers and the scour marks on the soles were still there when they were thrown out two years later. Stupid really but that’s what 16 YO idiots did in those days or at least the more stupid ones. Have great photos from the Caves. The only place to stay was a run down Motel. Had a great time climbing all over the Olgas – not sure what their PC name is. One was called Bruce’s Bump – but probably not named that today.

  9. H B Bear

    I have been beaten up the rock by an 84 year old man (although I dispute his claim) when I was a young cigarette smoking tour driver…………………..

    Ha ha. Sounds like the time I went on a cycle tour through the New Forest and got left behind by a German couple in their 70s. Probably ex-SS I suspect.

  10. Sinclair Davidson

    I did see some Japanese boys (maybe early 20s at most) run up and then down.

  11. Some History

    If they are there they are not prominent.

    They’re there. The funeral parlour blocks their visibility.

  12. struth

    I’ve seen a drunk tour driver attempt to back a bus up the climb.
    He ended up getting a go with the South Australian Transport accrediting Road Train driving.
    Something he had never done, but for being a bullshit artist.

    People held records on the speed of the Climb and the amount of times climbed in one day.

    At the base of the climb in the mornings there were tour coaches everywhere, and people would go running past us out into the scrub to drop their strides….nowhere to go on the rock.

    Always something happening, but most of all fun.
    People would do our tours and cry like babies at the end, not wanting to go home to their stinking countries.
    Australia really had something special in those days.
    An easy laid back larrikinism that still had respect embedded in it.
    New Year’s Eves were great fun at the rock, etc etc.
    Now you may as well done a hooded cape and pray to the gods of Aboriginal activism, chanting and scared out of your wits in case somebody catches you smiling and not showing enough horror and disgust at the terrible white man.
    You must also be mindful to be full of praise when shown the amazing healing properties of milkweed and how this medically superior culture had all they needed to cure cancer and build space shuttles.
    All shown to you by some fat white chick from Sydney, who only arrived a week before you.

  13. Dr Fred Lenin

    All the controversy about Ayers Rock could be solved by quarrying it for crushing and using to build highways for the B triples that kill lots of people and wildlife. There are plenty of other rocks up north, the Bungle Bungles make Ayers Rock look very ordinary. It would stop all the whinging about” saykritsytes”. Leave the locals with their traditional bush tucker.Spam ,damper and sweet black tea and of course VB .

  14. Fat Tony

    Dr Fred Lenin
    #2755408, posted on July 5, 2018 at 11:30 am
    All the controversy about Ayers Rock could be solved by quarrying it for crushing and using to build highways for the B triples that kill lots of people and wildlife.

    Dr Fred – do you remember back in the ’70s some Yank suggesting that Ayers Rock would be excellent for storing radioactive waste?

  15. flyingduk

    All the controversy about Ayers Rock could be solved by quarrying it for crushing and using to build highways for the B triples that kill lots of people and wildlife

    Gold sir, gold! I shall christen it the ‘Bamiyan’ solution and seek to implement it forthwith.

  16. I’d forgotten how dangerous it is, having climbed it at the age of 7, but yes, coming down the steep parts are a case of “you slip, you die”, yet, the inevitable death didn’t come from a fall.

    It just goes to show, you can still be an idiot at 76. Why would anyone in their right mind climb a mountain at that age without undertaking such a task in recent years?

  17. Oh, and I forgot. Take a shirt!

    It might be 30 degrees at the bottom, but it might be 15 degrees and blowing a strong wind at the top.

  18. Mitch M.

    Now Aboriginals are attempting to close off climbing the Rock. Who would have guessed they lied.

    What a racist attitude. Christian sacred places are open to everyone to enjoy. Go to Jerusalem, visit the magnificent cathedrals, all humanity is invited to enjoy these places. Aborigines want their sacred places for themselves. Imagine the outrage if we decided to ban aborigines from some of our sacred places.

  19. Bruce of Newcastle

    I have no problem with someone expiring on the way up a rock.
    So long as the costs incurred are paid by for his estate.

  20. Tom

    At the expense of igniting lefty outrage I’m going to admit to having climbed Uluru.

    Welcome to the club, Doomlord, that our betters have decided will soon be illegal.

    I suspect the white blackfellas who caused this may soon change their mind when they realise they’ve killed the golden egg (tourism) that’s now the cream on top of their Welfare.

  21. Rockdoctor

    Climbed that uptilted bed of arkose sandstone when I was 16 and signed the book at the top. Lots of people climbed back then from what I remember and the dangers were known, I seem to remember a bunch of plaques of the deaths or maybe something else. Memory after 4 decades is a bit fuzzy.

    Wife, children & I are going sometime before the climb is banned to do it again. The children never been & are keen.

  22. They also have conditions under which the rock is closed for climbing – mostly associated with weather events. I’m open to correction but I don’t recall seeing signs that warned of health related reasons not to climb the rock. My impression is that there are more warnings at an amusement park than at Uluru. Certainly there wasn’t anybody around to provide warnings or enforce any warnings. Mind you, the tour guide should have provided detailed information and warnings about climbing the rock.

    Nanny Sinclair doesn’t think that a man who has managed to reach the ripe old age of 76 would be able to figure out his own limitations, so signs, lots of signs, and tour guides should be available to “guide” naive 76 year olds.
    Hey why not put up signs on all footpaths across Australia warning naive Australians that jogging may be dangerous to their health.
    We could also reduce unemployment by adding millions of “lollipop” people holding up signs at intersections warning people not to jog unless they are fit enough and or young enough.
    We could arm them with those fat measuring devices, blood pressure monitoring devices etc etc.

    We just don’t do enough for naive, stupid citizens whom we care so much about. /Sarc

  23. Dr Fred Lenin

    New restrictions announced ,you may not desecrate the sacred rock on any day ending in “day” ,it is permissible at other times .

  24. Cynic of Ayr

    I’m not sure what Sinc is implying here. It seems that he’s saying it’s not the victims fault, because the victim wasn’t warned that he could be a victim.

    Let’s extend it. The bloke was 76. At 76, the risk factor can be higher than, say, 26.
    So, let’s say the bloke died as he was walking up the stairs into his hotel. Is it the hotel’s fault? Should there be a sign at the hotel that says, “Patron’s who are 76 years old, should be aware that climbing these stairs may cause injury or death.”

    FFS Sinc, get a grip! You’re supposed to be one of the intelligent people here. Or at least write more plainly.

  25. Dr Fred Lenin

    They could quarry it for building the new Indigenius Peebles Decromatic Soshalist Republiks new assembly house in the middle of the Simpson desert ,get them really involved in the land ,bag humpies for their politicians ,no shops no grog or tobacco and living on lizards and spinifex stew ,give them back their “culcha “ they love so much.

  26. Hayden Bristow

    “what was a 76yo doing climbing Uluru”. Not the right question. Question should be did the man exercise regularly.

  27. A Lurker

    People get killed crossing the road too – and that activity doesn’t warrant warning signs.
    However, Ayres Rock will be a moot point because soon no-one will be allowed to climb it.

    p.s. I’ve climbed it too – while in my young, fit and agile early-20’s.

  28. Sinclair Davidson

    Question should be did the man exercise regularly.

    Good point. Displaying my ageist privilege there. I’m so ashamed.

    As to the nanny comments – I don’t think it is unreasonable for government, or indeed anyone else, to provide people with information, guidelines, or warnings.

    So I was taking my then young offspring into a holocaust museum in Germany and an official said that it wasn’t recommended that children go inside, and I asked if was forbidden, and he said no, and in they went. The official was being helpful.

  29. Entropy

    If they are there they are not prominent

    I believe there are signs with the requested warnings. Near the start, Right next to the series of plaques for each of those that died in an attempted climb. There is a stack of them.

  30. stackja

    Signs say jumping off bridges is dangerous.

  31. W Hogg

    I think it’s reasonable to warn of HIDDEN dangers. Icy road. Ocean rip.

    Ayers Rock is self evidently 348m high and steep. A sign to this effect in Japanese provides no additional info beyond what his eyes, and then his body would have told him. He assumed the risk, and died in strenuous activity. As opposed to fucking his mistress later that day.

  32. Up The Workers!

    Greenies shouldn’t get their frilly panties in a knot about Ayers Rock.

    Won’t be long now till it’s totally submerged beneath those killer “rising sea levels” that have drowned dozens of ex-Pacific nations, caused by gerbil worming, human breath, Donald Trump, Tony Abbott and Cardinal George Pell.

  33. BorisG

    struth

    #2755376, posted on July 5, 2018 at 10:46 am

    You can be very good, struth.

  34. Helen Davidson

    It was very hard – the first section has no support and is quite steep. It more or less serves as a barrier to entry, those people attempting the climb and who struggle on the section before the chain should give up. The climb is not for you.

    Yep, that was me. Hubby went all the way to the top, while I just managed to make it to the start of the chain, wrapped my arms around it and hung on like grim death for 20 minutes to get my breath back, then slowly padded back down on my arse.

    I’m pretty sure I remember signs at the bottom warning that the climb was strenuous and that you shouldn’t try it if you had heart or other health issues. That was about 20 years ago.

    The problem for the tourism industry with Ayers Rock is that its one of those things that you have on your bucket list to do once, but there is absolutely no reason to go back a second time.

  35. BorisG

    I have no problem with someone expiring on the way up a rock.

    An Israeli doctor told me a true story: an elderly Russian -Israeli woman asks him: you know I have all these conditions, do you think it is a big risk to fly to Rome for a sightseeing tour? his answer: what’s the risk? In the worst case it will be written: born in the village…, died in Rome…

  36. None

    What a racist attitude. Christian sacred places are open to everyone to enjoy. Go to Jerusalem, visit the magnificent cathedrals, all humanity is invited to enjoy these places. Aborigines want their sacred places for themselves. Imagine the outrage if we decided to ban aborigines from some of our sacred places.

    it has nothing to do about sacred places and everything to do about money in a place where it is very hard to make money much less easy money and lots of it. The 2006 census I think it was included questions on religious affiliation and showed that over 70% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders self identify as Christian – more than the average non-indigenous Aussi. It also showed that a pathetically small number just over 1000 or up to 1500 actually followed traditional religion. The stats for the 2013 census we’re not published online if I recall correctly. Anyway the overwhelming majority of Aboriginal people don’t believe any shtick about spirits inhabiting rocks. As always in these cases follow the money.

  37. JohnJJJ

    What’s the issue, the guy was 76 for heaven’s sake. What language will the sign be in? So let’s say you do Chinese, Arabic, Japanese and Korean signs and a Zulu decides to climb and drops dead. How about people who don’t read, have no written language and the blind. So let’s go for 30 languages, with voice and braille. How many signs and where? What about the person who doesn’t pass the sign and dies?
    Try this: guides who speak many languages, then you’ll need backup for holidays, a manager, an accountant, shift managers, risk manager… and back up for when they go on holidays. So now they’ll need a building, car park, maintenance staff ( with backups), accommodation for the 200 people – so far – and their families. Then shops, supermarket, community centre, bus service, schools, social workers….
    We could name the new city after the 76 year old.

  38. JohnA

    Up The Workers! #2755375, posted on July 5, 2018, at 10:46 am

    Could we perhaps cut paths at each point of the compass for several escalators to be installed on the rock so that pear-shaped, fat-bottomed professional offence-taking Greenies can all get up there to see everything and everyone that they should be righteously outraged at?

    Can’t have the “luvvies” all huffing and puffing from unfitness, when they will need to be huffing and puffing from sheer outrage at all the tourists ‘defiling’ the rock.

    Nah, do it with technology.

    Get a professionally-made HD video of the climb and the view.

    Run it on continuous loop at the gym in front of those walking machines.

    Don’t let those pollies anywhere near the place…

  39. johanna

    As to the nanny comments – I don’t think it is unreasonable for government, or indeed anyone else, to provide people with information, guidelines, or warnings.

    Seems to have gone over to the Dark Side.

    We have no information about this man, except that he died in a certain place at a certain time doing a certain activity.

    It’s a bit previous to be positing public policy on this absence of facts.

  40. struth

    As to the nanny comments – I don’t think it is unreasonable for government, or indeed anyone else, to provide people with information, guidelines, or warnings.

    They do more than warn them Sinclair, they try to shame them into not climbing.
    But either way I can guarantee you they are warned as you were told above.
    Funny how you expect others to listen to you on things you believe yourself to be an expert on, but when others who know the subject better than you give you answers to your questions, it is brushed away as if it was never said.

    Monty’s like that.

    Hmmmmmm,

  41. struth

    People die in their sleep.
    We don’t ban sleep.

    And the Ambulance still turns up anyway.

  42. Welcome to the Brotherhood of the Rock! As part of research for the upcoming book Climbers Handbook: a guide to climbing Ayers Rock I spoke with a bloke who was on the 1952 NSW Schoolboys excursion. he climbed up from Maggie Springs (Mutitjulu) and then down the traditional way. I look forward to one day repeating his effort an exploring more routes.

    I have compiled a page showing the development of warning signs since the first was put up in the late 1950s. It may be viewed here…
    http://righttoclimb.blogspot.com/2018/03/pictorial-history-of-warning-signs-at.html

    Some questions about the actual numbers of deaths ON the rock as opposed to at the bar in the resort outlined in this post…
    http://righttoclimb.blogspot.com/2018/07/17th-death-on-rock.html

  43. PS if you have any good photos of the rock or signs, plaques etc get in touch through the blog.
    I’m looking for copyright free images of:
    -the warning sign at the base in the 1980s,
    -the sign commemorating the first Ranger Bill Harney that was stood near the base of the climb, above -the other memorial plaques but has since disappeared (probably removed for some reason in the 1970s?).
    -Images of the summit plaque in place complete with the map of Tasmania (this would be late 1970-1977?) The complete map was lost in the early 1980s and the Australian coat of Arms in the early 2000s. To see how it looked when first constructed see http://righttoclimb.blogspot.com/2018/06/ayers-rock-geodetic-station.html

  44. struth

    -the sign commemorating the first Ranger Bill Harney that was stood near the base of the climb, above -the other memorial plaques but has since disappeared (probably removed for some reason in the 1970s?).

    That was removed because the new owners believed the first ranger at the rock was not correct and not a friend to the aboriginal people.
    His books were banned from Yulara.
    History has been rewritten and it has gone on for years.

  45. Sinclair Davidson

    struth – tone down the aggro. I’m not having a go at you or anyone else.

  46. Other Rock books banned…
    Mountford: Brown men and red sand (1948)
    Mountford: Ayers Rock : its people, their beliefs and their art (1965)
    Mountford: Nomads of the Australian desert (1976)

    perhaps the most ridiculous though: Bromley Climbs Uluru (1993)
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/australasia/aborigines-try-to-ban-tale-of-the-teddy-bear-on-ayers-rock-113858.html

  47. squawkbox

    I have been beaten up the rock by an 84 year old man (although I dispute his claim) when I was a young cigarette smoking tour driver…………………..

    Could have been on the tour I was on in the 80s. An octogenarian Italian comfortably beat everyone else up the Rock without raising a sweat. Turned out he had been a general of mountain troops in the war and largely ignored the set route, simply heading to the top in a straight line.

    Incidentally, even then as tourists we were exposed to a huge amount of stuff on the spiritual significance and folklore of the rock to the aboriginals, but nothing even hinting it was taboo for climbing. My own suspicion is that this sacred ground stuff was invented by the local park rangers who were sick of people needing to be helped off the rock, people defecating on it, and of course as the post says, people dying on it.

  48. Delta A

    I climbed the rock 48 years ago early in the morning on a January day. I was young and fit then, but I still recall standing at the base and looking up, up, up. No signs necessary to tell that it would be an arduous, taxing climb.

  49. jupes

    Unless the bloke was blind, he did not need a sign. When he stood at the base he would have looked up and seen a fucking great rock that is 863 m high.

    If the old bastard couldn’t work out that his heart needed to pump pretty hard to get up to the top, then he would have been so dumb that he should have been extremely grateful to have made it that far in life.

    The last thing this world needs is more signs.

  50. jupes

    Incidentally I attended an OHS course a few years back. A total waste of time run by zealots.

    In the accommodation block near the classroom, there was a sign next to the washing machine power point:

    Danger Electricity.

    I kid you not.

  51. BorisG

    If the old bastard couldn’t work out that his heart needed to pump pretty hard to get up to the top, then he would have been so dumb that he should have been extremely grateful to have made it that far in life.

    Or maybe he wasn’t dumb at all, maybe he was an experienced climber but on this day his heart refused to work or whatever.

    Or maybe he wanted to die climbing (his passion) rather than by being run over by a passing car on his way to a grocery store.

    I won’t judge this person but I agree with others that we do not need more signs where common sense is more than sufficient.

  52. BorisG

    A distant relative of mine in his fifties died when his heart failed during a morning swim which he did regularly for many years. Do we need signs in the beach?

  53. squawkbox

    A distant relative of mine in his fifties died when his heart failed during a morning swim which he did regularly for many years. Do we need signs in the beach?

    Of course. Death is simply a sign that we have been drinking or smoking too much, or indulging in hazardous activities. I am confident that Clive Hamilton and Michael Daube will live forever.

  54. Clint

    So I was taking my then young offspring into a holocaust museum in Germany and an official said that it wasn’t recommended that children go inside, and I asked if was forbidden, and he said no, and in they went. 

    Holocaust museums are a great reminder that the Jews have an eternal debt to the Anglos for sending millions of their sons to die to save them. I hope the guide thanked you for your people’s
    sacrifice

  55. Clint

    Does anyone know the penalty for climbing Ayres rock when it is banned?

  56. Clint

    So I was taking my then young offspring into a holocaust museum in Germany and an official said that it wasn’t recommended that children go inside, and I asked if was forbidden, and he said no, and in they went. 

    Holocaust museums are a great reminder that the J ews have an eternal debt to the Anglos for sending millions of their sons to die to save them. I hope the guide thanked you for your people’s sacrifice

  57. Re penalties…see Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2000

    Under Part 12—Activities in Commonwealth Reserves, there are a wide range of offences Rangers could fine you for depending how they see your action. A number of possibles below. My understanding is that the current value of one penalty unit is $210. 50 units would amount to $10525, 30 units would be $6315. If you claim you were undertaking scientific research you may cop 20 units -see below. God forbid whatever you do, don’t enjoy yourself or have fun.

    The group of three that wandered off the marked trail in September 2016 and required assistance were each fined $4,877.49. they pleaded guilty to walking on a Commonwealth reserve.
    If you get caught and you are indigenous it seems most of the fines will not necessarily apply see section 12.08.

    12.23 Entering prohibited or restricted area
    (1) A person commits an offence if the person enters or remains in a Commonwealth reserve, or a part of a Commonwealth reserve, in contravention of a prohibition or restriction imposed by the Director under subregulation (3). Penalty: 50 penalty units.

    12.23A Prohibited or restricted activity in a Commonwealth reserve
    (1) A person commits an offence if the person engages in an activity, or an activity in a class of activities, in a Commonwealth reserve, or a part of a Commonwealth reserve, in contravention of a prohibition or restriction imposed by the Director under subregulation (3). Penalty: 50 penalty units.

    12.25 Failing to comply with safety directions
    (1) If the Director, a ranger or a warden believes that the safety of a person in a Commonwealth reserve is, or is likely to be, endangered, the Director, ranger or warden may give to the person or another person directions necessary to ensure the safety of the person.
    (2) A person must comply with a reasonable direction given under subregulation (1) to the person.
    Penalty: 30 penalty units.

    12.26 Adventurous activity
    (1) In this regulation, adventurous activity means:
    (a) climbing, abseiling on, or jumping from, a rock face; or
    (b) bungee jumping or BASE‑jumping; or
    (c) hang gliding or paragliding; or
    (d) an activity determined by the Director under subregulation (4) to be an adventurous activity.
    (2) A person commits an offence if:
    (a) the person carries out an adventurous activity in an area of a Commonwealth reserve; and
    (b) the area is not provided for the activity in a determination made by the Director under subregulation (5). Penalty: 30 penalty units.

    Another unusual offences…
    12.10 Scientific research
    (1) A person must not carry out scientific research in a Commonwealth reserve. Penalty: 20 penalty units.

  58. md

    Why would you bother visiting the place, or anywhere else in Australia, for that matter?

  59. Link to those regulations.. https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2016C00914

    I listed Climb for Science as an event on Facebook and was given the following reminder…
    12.31 Public gatherings
    (1) A person must not organise or attend a public gathering of more than 15 persons in a Commonwealth reserve.
    Penalty: 10 penalty units.

    Oh and God forbid don’t raise the flag…
    12.40 Erecting signs
    (1) A person must not display or erect in a Commonwealth reserve:
    (a) a sign that is likely to be mistaken for a sign erected under these Regulations; or
    (b) a flag, banner, promotional device or image.
    Penalty: 5 penalty units.

  60. Our National Parks have become National no go zones

  61. Habib

    Ayers Rock shouldn’t have any of this PC/OH&S crap on it. And it should have a boozer ay the top, and 4WD access.

  62. Faine’s ABC running hard in support of a safe injecting facility next door to a primary school. Any suggestion that this may be imprudent or immoral is being rubbished.

  63. steve

    I climbed the rock at 50 years old I will never forget being passed on the way up in the steepest section by a 70+ Japanese man moving at twice my speed.

  64. Re penalties…see Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2000

    JOHN HOWARD, Liberal Party, NSW.

    Another unusual offences…
    12.10 Scientific research
    (1) A person must not carry out scientific research in a Commonwealth reserve. Penalty: 20 penalty units.

    So I can’t even plot an astronomical chart or I will get fined $4200?

    Utterly bizarre.

  65. Danger Electricity.

    I kid you not.

    Black permanent marker: “No worries, has RCD protection”.

  66. Speedbox

    Whenever the rock is actually closed to climbers, I wonder whether the tourists will bother to come or perhaps more accurately, at what rate they will come.

    There will always be those who want to see it, but if you remove any possibility of climbing, I wonder whether it will completely retain its allure.

  67. Pedro the Ignorant

    I saw Ayers Rock from a Piper light aircraft at about 1000 feet.
    We circled the rock, flew back to Alice Springs, landed, went to the pub and got maggoted.

    Great day out.

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