Open Forum: July 14, 2018

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1,414 Responses to Open Forum: July 14, 2018

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  1. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I claim this thread in the name of Captain Joseph Burnett, of HMAS Sydney, who died at his post, on the bridge of that cruiser, as the German gunners, on the raider “Kormoran” opened a hail of gunfire.

  2. Oh come on

    Trump fucking blew the bejeezus out of uber-xunt Jim Acosta. That is going straight to the pool room.

  3. Oh come on

    And instead of taking Jim Acosta’s question, he took one from Fox News!

  4. Infidel Tiger

    No one likes sport any more.

    So many spare seats at wimbeldon for a semi final.

    The world is changing man. No one care about shit we used to take for granted.

    Corporatism has destroyed our culture.

  5. Pedro the Ignorant

    First XI.
    We will bat first, thank you, Umpire.

  6. Baldrick

    Please keep retweeting Leftards. The more the better for Trump 2020.

    Mike Stuchbery 💀🍷 @MikeStuchbery_
    I see some wags are trying to get #FuckOffTrump to trend. How remarkably uncivil of them! What kind of message would it send if everybody were to start tweeting #FuckOffTrump? Appalling stuff. #FuckOffTrump

  7. Oh come on

    I see some wags are trying to get #FuckOffTrump to trend. How remarkably uncivil of them! What kind of message would it send if everybody were to start tweeting #FuckOffTrump? Appalling stuff. #FuckOffTrump

    Flaccid.

  8. Baldrick

    Hilarious …

    Fox News @FoxNews
    President @realDonaldTrump: “@CNN is fake news. I don’t take questions from CNN.”

    (20 second video)

  9. Oh come on

    Trying to get a hashtag to trend on Twitter is activism, hey? How embarrassing for his parents.

  10. Oh come on

    Leading at Drudge:

    DEPUTY ATTORNEY GENERAL ROSENSTEIN TO HOLD PRESS CONFERENCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENT… DEVELOPING…

    Hrm. Interesting. Maybe.

  11. BorisG

    So many spare seats at wimbeldon for a semi final.

    This one is a bit boring except for an occasional brilliance

  12. Just watched that press conference.
    DT is high as a kite. Something has happened back home. Expect revelations soon.
    And he wasn’t addressing or buttering up Lady MayMay, he was sending signals to her successor.

  13. Zatara

    Rosenstein speaks…. Russian GRU intelligence accused of phishing, hacking, stealing files, etc. from the weak ass IT of the Dem campaign “in an attempt to interfere with the election”.

    Not to influence the election for any specific party or candidate but to screw with the system. No changing of votes, electronic or otherwise.

    So, the Russians wanted to stir hate and discontent in the US.

    Mission accomplished. The Dems bit on it and went loud and stupid because it eased their butthurt over losing the election.

  14. Zatara

    “OMG, Trump encouraged that” say the MSM.

    Umm, no. Trump commented on the revelations of Dem criminal activity those leaks provided and encouraged that.

    Big difference.

  15. Zatara

    I’m still more than a little curious about how all this information was developed to the point of indictment by the FBI since the Dems never gave up their server to be examined.

    Screw the popcorn.

  16. Zatara

    The new MSM meme…. “How can he possibly talk to Putin after this?”

    Well, why don’t you STFU and watch him. You might learn something.

  17. Tom

    Hooray! Larry Pickering is drawing cartoons again after his battles with chemo. Today, Chris Bowen.

  18. Tom

    Nothing but Trump Derangement from Britain’s establishment lefty cartoonists like Gerard Scarfe (freelance) and Christian Adams (London Evening Standard). Predictable. Passé.

  19. mh

    MSM really talking up Trump protests in UK, but falling flat. Having to rely on ‘baby blimp’ . Sad.

    #Free Tommy march today will be attended by genuine people, not sheeple.

  20. Mark A

    Zatara
    #2762778, posted on July 14, 2018 at 3:58 am

    The new MSM meme…. “How can he possibly talk to Putin after this?”

    Well, why don’t you STFU and watch him. You might learn something.

    Putin can be very pragmatic, and so can be DT.

  21. mh

    Very cold around SE Qld right now. Oakey, for example, minus 5.4 degrees according to bureau, other places even colder.

  22. Ragu

    Any Taswegian Cats know how how to sail? Pipe Opener is coming up and we need to get a solid crew together beforehand to sort out those that know their sheets.

    Did I mention that it involves a serious three day piss-up?

  23. Ragu

    Whats wrong with the world #42705;

    Young people don’t have the mettle to head out in 40knts under sail.

  24. Ragu

    Mild winter in Slowbart so far, mh.

  25. Zatara

    Ooops. No need for the server. The GRU spear-phished Clinton campaign chairman Podesta, breaking his high-tech password of “password” and got access to everything they wanted.

    But, but, but….. why did they attack the Democrats? Gee I dunno. Why do criminal rob banks? How about because they got used to tapping Hillary ‘s bathroom server for years harvesting the top secret information she hung there? Or maybe because the Pakistani criminals the Dems hired to do their IT gave the GRU yet another route into the Dems secrets?

  26. Bruce of Newcastle

    Thanks Tom! Branco is my favourite this morning, smell that smelly Strzok.
    Lobbecke has a pretty good Trump one this morning. ‘Ware zeppelin!

  27. Elle

    8 degrees here in the eastern suburbs of Sydney. About to head out to do the coastal walk – Bronte to Bondi. Brrrrr

  28. Herodotus

    The BBC were out in Trafalgar Square indulging in some TDS cheering as the “tens of thousands” protested.
    They had some hand-picked protesters come on mike for candid comments then had to try and balance it by asking some pro Trump people to have a say. But as usual it was obvious which side they were on.

  29. Elle

    Thank you for the toons, Tom.

  30. Herodotus

    A balmy 8, Elle! Our west Sydney gravel is colder than that coastal stuff.

  31. Herodotus

    The outrage against Trump for saying May’s Brexit strategy is poor (fact check: true) tells us all we need to know about media hypocrisy.
    Is there any way a leader (take your pick – Macron, May, Merkel …) who criticised Trump’s policies on anything at all would be told they were insulting and out of line?

  32. Elle

    I know Herodotus. A bit lucky here on the coast.

  33. Herodotus

    Rosenstein now pointing to 11 Russian unicorns over there!

  34. Tintarella di Luna

    Just watch the last part of the pressure and saw the bit where he slapped out CNN. A voice off camera whimpeeing: but we *are* a network. Gold.

    That simpering voice was CNN’s Jim Acosta’s, you remember, Jim, the ignorant j’ismist who thinks the Emma Lazarus purple prose ‘poem’ nailed to the bottom of the Statue of Liberty is US Immigration policy

  35. stackja

    Johansson exits trans film amid backlash
    Alex Stedman, Reuters
    an hour ago

    Scarlett Johansson has exited the drama film Rub and Tug little more than a week after her casting sparked backlash among trans groups and activists.

    “In light of recent ethical questions raised surrounding my casting as Dante Tex Gill, I have decided to respectfully withdraw my participation in the project,” Johansson told Out Magazine, which first reported the news, in a statement.

    “Our cultural understanding of transgender people continues to advance, and I’ve learned a lot from the community since making my first statement about my casting and realise it was insensitive. I have great admiration and love for the trans community and am grateful that the conversation regarding inclusivity in Hollywood continues.”

  36. stackja

    Tintarella di Luna
    #2762814, posted on July 14, 2018 at 7:13 am

    CNN don’t get it.

  37. pete m

    Mc I have no doubt trump knows what a trade deficit means.

    He is using it as cover to discuss the trade rules saying they caused an imbalance that would not be there.

    Trump is the great hope for freer trade.

  38. Tintarella di Luna

    Tintarella di Luna
    #2762814, posted on July 14, 2018 at 7:13 am

    CNN don’t get it.

    Yeah, but they keep taking though, don’t they? Jim Acosta has been taking sucker punches for CNN and it certainly shows. He should sue.

  39. Tintarella di Luna

    Grace Collier gets it said:

    Mark Latham is a king rat with a bite that could cause serious harm
    Those sledging Mark Latham are foolish. The last person on earth that anyone should ever get in a fight with is someone who has absolutely nothing to lose.

    Someone with nothing to lose should always be considered an extremely dangerous person. Someone who has nothing to lose will not care what anyone thinks or says about them. They will not care about the harm they may suffer. Instead they will stand, their back to the wall, and fight with every ounce of their being, and consequently they will usually win.

    When Latham is called a “rat” or a “king rat” by his former Labor colleagues, it doesn’t hurt him in the least. The public don’t see why the term Labor rat is a pejorative one.

    This week our commentator Troy Bramston said a rat was “a term enveloped in Labor mythology” and “somebody who joins or supports Labor’s opponents, breaking solidarity”.

    A rat is more than this, though. The sordid reality is that a rat was a term originally coined by criminals. A rat was someone who put observance of the law over blind allegiance to their fellow crims and subsequently informed on them to the police.

    In the labour movement, a rat is someone who gives away dirty secrets and reveals damaging information about dodgy conduct. In the labour context, people who see and know things are expected to keep their heads down and their mouths shut, and in the end the rewards will come to those who wait.

    This is the contract that binds and this, too, is the reason for Labor’s shrillness. Latham doesn’t need their rewards, he knows where the skeletons are buried and he is quite happy to point them out.

    This week a spectacular ding-dong unfolded on Paul Murray Live on Sky News between Latham and our commentator Graham Richardson. In my opinion, the person who looked rattled was Richo, but you are encouraged to Google the clip and form your own conclusion.

    In the heat of the argument, Latham reeled off a long list of names and details, including a mention of a Swiss bank account. Richo’s mouth opened and closed like a gasping goldfish. It was spectacular television if nothing else. In the aftermath, on Twitter, journalists circulated titbits about Richo’s past, using pages from published books and detailing allegiances with known criminals, historical activities and financial transactions.

    None of Richo’s past activities or alliances has ever resulted in formal adverse findings or prosecution. Nevertheless, both the exchange and the fallout stress the point that those with something to lose should avoid fighting with those who don’t.

    In terms of media-pulling power, Latham is a perfect 10. Any airtime he offers will be greedily gobbled up.

    Latham could have a cap made with “Labor rat” embroidered on the front. He could cheerfully do the rounds of all the television stations, proudly wearing it, and reveal “why me being a Labor rat is a good thing for people like you”.

    Latham also could have some other caps made up with “Labor grub” across them. These could be waved at the cameras, with offers to post them around to key Labor people who he could nominate, elaborating on the reasons for the nomination.

    If there is going to be a war between the Labor grubs and the Labor rats, then let’s get on with it. It is not too hard to see who the public will side with, is it?

    Latham’s faults are well-documented, out in public, and he is the first to admit to them. He has nothing to hide. Unlike those he criticises, he isn’t regarded as shady, shifty, dodgy or untrustworthy. To the contrary, he appears honest, so honest that the main complaint about him is that his brutal honesty is just too brutal.

    I spoke with Latham for the first time this week, and he had a few comments to make about the present state of politics, which is his main concern. “The public is crying out for a third choice, and that would rapidly improve Australian democracy,” he says, adding: “A third party would shake up the system and produce a better policy debate — it is unfortunate our minor parties are so fragmented.”

    In Australia, the traditional Left-Right paradigm is increasingly irrelevant. Instead, the divide is between insiders and outsiders, and those for or against government control, and those with or without skin in the game. Insiders are those with power but no skin in the game. Their living is secure, derived from government funding or government control of human behaviour or markets. Their tendency is to prefer the control of government, or institutions, over the population.

    Outsiders are those with skin in the game and no power. Their living is derived from the free market or subject to the market. If they fail, they will suffer the consequences. They resist government control and take the view that any government we have should work for them, particularly since they create the wealth to fund it.

    “The Australian economy is not working for the people,” Latham says. He points to the US, and says that this was and is key to the difference between our nations.

    “My preferred choice is that the minor parties stop competing against each other and come together for the next election.”

    Perhaps a merger is out of the question, but some formalised alliance may be possible.

    In the US, Donald Trump was elected on a promise to make the government work for the people. In Australia, the feeling is the people work for the government. No one promising to reverse all that, and with the machinery to deliver it, has come along yet.

  40. BrettW

    How many people will go and watch Rub and Tug if main role is played by a transgender rather than Scarlet ? The activists have just killed the commercial success of the movie.

  41. Tintarella di Luna

    The activists have just killed the commercial success of the movie.

    No, the gutless producers have and I hope the financial backers kill the project by pulling their dough.

  42. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Both of the Ben Garrison’s today, Tom. Skewers deftly the hypocrisy of Merkel sitting on the Russian gas line pally with Wussia and letting America do the heavy lifting; in the next one he draws perfectly and in detail the EU Ship of Doom heading over the rapids to a watery grave while Brexiteers row for their lives.

    Thank you for finding the toons for us every daybreak.

  43. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    How many people will go and watch Rub and Tug anyway?
    Trannies are boring these days. All politics and bleating.
    Most people have had enough and want to be entertained, not story-lectured.

  44. Tintarella di Luna

    Oh then there’s this – Turnbull’s Treason Team at work, gaol your critics – beaudiful, the DOGS are outs:

    Jail threat for leader of Catholic schools lobby
    The chief critic of Education Minister Simon Birmingham’s schools funding policy has been secretly threatened with jail by a commonwealth regulator warning it will cut his organisation’s charity status and tax concessions for campaigning against flawed government policy.

    The nation’s charity regulator has written to Catholic Education Melbourne executive director Stephen Elder advising of a sweeping investigation, explicitly warning him that he will be fined and jailed for up to a year if he does not comply fully and accurately with the probe.

    The extraordinary demand follows a national campaign led by Mr Elder against Senator Birmingham’s funding model for schools. Mr Elder’s campaign ­severely embarrassed Senator Birmingham and Malcolm Turnbull, and stretched to breaking point the Coalition’s relationship with the Catholic Church, with the government potentially forced to find billions of dollars for church schools.

    The Weekend Australian can reveal that the Australian Charities and Not-For Profits Commission has launched an investigation into Catholic Education Melbourne over robocalls and leaflets used during the March 17 Batman federal by-election. But the probe will extend well beyond the by-election ­period, with the ACNC demanding potentially thousands of pages of documents from July 1 last year to June 12 this year.

    The ACNC has demanded an audit of the innermost workings of CEM, sending Mr Elder a list of three penalties if he fails to comply. They are 12 months’ jail for providing false and misleading information, 12 months’ jail for false or misleading documents and a $3600 fine for failing to comply with his notice.

    READ MORE
    Schools‘Birmingham is getting smashed’JOHN FERGUSON
    “The ACNC is concerned that the actions of CEM may be placing the charity at risk of having a disqualifying purpose,’’ ACNC ­director of compliance Prue Monument wrote on June 12.

    “Should the ACNC find evidence of noncompliance with the requirements under the ACNC Act or ACNC Regulation, the ACNC may decide to use its enforcement powers or to revoke the charity’s registration.

    “If the outcome of the ACNC investigation results in revocation of the charity’s registration it will also result in the loss of tax concessions.’’

    The investigation comes just days before the Prime Minister is due to meet the heads of the Catholic Church in Australia to end the school funding war.

    Mr Elder yesterday hit back, declaring that the Catholic sector would push ahead with its demands for a fairer deal for its schools, estimated to be as much as $2.5 billion to $3bn over the next 10 years.

    “The Catholics didn’t pick this fight with the Turnbull government, but it’s my job to protect the interests of Australian families of modest financial means who want to send their kids to Catholic and low-fee independent schools,” he said.

    “To shrink from the fight would be to betray those families, and that’s something I could never in good conscience do.”

    Mr Elder was sent a notice of investigation by the ACNC on June 12, but the authority had been communicating for several months in the wake of the March 17 Batman by-election, in which CEM paid $4378.84, minus GST, for robocalls discussing education policy.

    The by-election was a battle between Labor and the Greens. There was no Coalition candidate and Labor won amid significant Greens infighting. Mr Elder’s involvement in the by-election escalated the feud ­between him and Senator Birmingham after Labor leader Bill Shorten pledged an extra $250 million to Catholic schools in the first two years of a Labor government. Senator Birmingham offered an apology to Mr Elder, a former state Liberal MP, after suggesting he could be bought for a few pieces of silver.

    Ms Monument said promoting or opposing a political party or candidate for political office could lead to disqualification.

    The groups were in a dispute over what needed to be provided to the ACNC, with CEM claiming its activities in the by-election were “in the pursuit of CEM’s charitable purposes to advance education and religion’’.

    Ms Monument said: “We consider the distinction between political purposes and charitable purposes is one of degree, we consider the expenditure of otherwise charitable funds on an activity is relevant to the question of whether this points to a disqualifying purpose.’’

    The investigation raises questions for all charitable organisations and could restrict the flow of information during campaigns.

    The CEM robocall was carefully worded on legal advice. It stated: “Malcolm Turnbull has slashed funds from low-fee local Catholic and independent schools and our state school system. The Greens seek to strip funds from Catholic schools, threatening your right to choose the best school for your children, putting pressure on the state system. In contrast, Labor believes that local Catholic schools are an essential element of our education system.

    “Labor will restore hundreds of millions in school funding cut by the Liberals to both Catholic and state schools. Education is vital for our future — and the ­future of our schools depends on who you support on Saturday.’’

    The Independent Schools Council of Australia, Independent Schools Victoria and elite campuses such as Melbourne Grammar School all have charity status, which provides a range of benefits. The ACNC was formed in 2012 under Labor to more closely examine the charities sector, with a side function of keeping checks on potential terror funding and money laundering. Its chairman is former federal Labor minister Gary Johns.

    An ACNC spokeswoman said: “Due to secrecy provisions in the ACNC Act, we are unable to comment on what action we may or may not take in relation to a specific charity. However, the ACNC does take all concerns from the public seriously, and where there is evidence of misconduct or mismanagement, we will investigate.’’ On its website, the ACNC states an organisation will not be a charity if it has “disqualifying political purposes’’.

    “A charity’s policy position on a matter of concern may be similar to, or align with, that of a particular political party,’’ it said.

    “In such a situation it is OK for the charity to continue to campaign on that issue, provided that this does not amount to the charity having a purpose of promoting or opposing a particular political party or candidate. In the lead up to an election there are increased risks that, in the minds of the public, charity advocacy or campaigning can be associated with a particular political party.’’

  45. stackja

    Bread prices set to surge as cost of Australian wheat spikes
    Jeff Whalley, Herald Sun
    July 13, 2018 8:02pm
    Subscriber only

    HOSTING a barbecue or taking the family out for a picnic this weekend? You might want to stock up on bread while the going is good.

    The cost of the humble loaf is likely soon to soar, markets are indicating, with Australian wheat prices poised to gallop ahead.

    And never mind whether you favour white, multigrain or sourdough — the pain will be spread widely.

  46. stackja

    Super-sized super funds are headed our way soon
    Karina Barrymore, Herald Sun
    July 13, 2018 8:25pm
    Subscriber only

    BIGGER, fatter and fewer superannuation funds are coming, like it or not, with the number of funds tipped to more than halve as mergers and takeovers create a new breed of mega-fund.

    The superannuation sector is also bracing for the next round of royal commission hearings with several problems expected to be flushed out, including the lack of mergers by underperforming funds and the strong focus on selling insurance products instead of concentrating on
    retirement savings.

    Overall, there are 224 managed super funds in Australia with analysts expecting the total to shrink to about 100, as underperforming and smaller funds amalgamate in search of higher investment returns and lower fees.

  47. rickw

    Bread prices set to surge

    You know you’re communist economy is in the shit when they start reporting on the price of bread.

  48. stackja

    Viva Energy: Shares in fuel supplier make low-octane debut on Aussie market
    John Dagge, Herald Sun
    July 13, 2018 8:12pm
    Subscriber only

    THE biggest company to join the Australian stockmarket since Medibank Private has failed to fire on debut, with shares in refiner and fuel retailer Viva Energy stumbling at the open.

    Shares in Viva, which supplies Coles Express petrol stations and owns the Geelong refinery, fell 4 per cent on its first day of trade to close at $2.40.

    The shares had been sold to investors during the initial public offering for $2.50 — the bottom end of a proposed price range that extended to $2.65.

    That price handed Viva, which supplies petrol, diesel and jet fuel, a market value of $4.86 billion, making it the biggest float on Australian shores since the Federal Government sold health insurer Medibank in 2014.

    Stag stagger.

  49. Leigh Lowe

    Herodotus

    #2762812, posted on July 14, 2018 at 7:07 am

    Rosenstein now pointing to 11 Russian unicorns over there!

    Makes me wonder why the Russians were so interested in wedding plans and yoga.

  50. Chris

    Makes me wonder why the Russians were so interested in wedding plans and yoga.

    Gold.

  51. Chris

    An hour later, the ABC reports that a man was bashed, robbed and bashed again (because he wouldn’t say where he parked his car) by a group of twelve described as being of African appearance. This took place in broad daylight on the corner of Spancer and Flinders Streets.
    Helen, you’re a champ!

    In a troubled world, its good to know that our betters are providing for us.

  52. stackja

    Wimbledon to resume tomorrow. Isner again!

  53. calli

    Poop! I’m babbling to myself on the dead thread!

    You can start the party now.

  54. stackja

    la Fête nationale – le 14 Juillet
    If La Perouse had been earlier?

  55. Tintarella di Luna

    You can start the party now.

    calli thank goodness you’re here, I hope you brought the party favours.

  56. stackja

    Landowners in stoush over massive Darling Downs solar farm
    Des Houghton, The Courier-Mail
    July 14, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    WHEN Tom Shew retired, he headed for the hills outside Warwick on the Darling Downs, choosing a home site overlooking the picturesque Freestone Valley.

    But his idyllic views of lush farmland and dairy cattle are about to be blotted out by 250,000 large solar panels.

    And it’s a story that’s about to be played out throughout regional Queensland.

    Shew, 71, a horticultural scientist and educator, says he will have virtually no other views except the panels once the $125 million Freestone Valley project is complete.

    “I will see solar panels from my living room, the bedroom, the rumpus room and the patio,” he says. “For me, and many others, it will be a disaster.”

    Shew and his neighbours in the Sladevale community fear they will suffer reflective glare, as each of the 2.6m solar panels have been designed to tilt up and down to follow the path of the sun. Each panel has a little motor.

  57. johanna

    Minus 6.5C a little earlier here in Queanbeyan. The Golf Course looks like it snowed overnight, rather lovely with sun glittering off the frost. Roos must be huddled together somewhere out of sight.

    Anyway, back in the real world it seems that Brad Pitt’s much publicised charity to build homes for the poor following the destruction if the Ninth Ward by Katrina has suffered the fate of many a rich do-gooder’s virtue-signalling:

    Among the first to lend a helping hand was Pitt, who – along with his then wife Angelina Jolie – owned a house in New Orleans and set up the charity Make It Right to help regenerate the area. Pitt was lauded as a humanitarian who willing to put his money where his heart was.

    But according to residents interviewed by DailyMail.com,, Pitt hasn’t been seen in the Lower Ninth Ward in years and the last Make It Right home was built in 2016, giving up on its promise to construct 150 new homes – as stated on its out-of-date website – with just over 100 being built.

    And many of those houses are falling apart, with roofs caving in, wood rotting and walls collapsing.

    The pictures show a bunch of uninhabitable slums, and the residents who bought them are worse off than before.

    Note also that they were designed and built with – you guessed it – ‘sustainability’ and ‘innovative design’ at the fore, with disastrous results. For example, in probably the wettest, most humid city in the US they refused to use treated wood because Da Environment, so ten years later it is the consistency of wet cardboard.

    I seem to recall Kevin ‘Grand Designs’ McCall getting involved with another such project in the UK, with similar lofty objectives and disastrous results for the unfortunate residents.

    The arrogance and ignorance and vanity of media luvvies is boundless.

  58. stackja

    Bingo barney at retirement home ends up in court
    Alexandria Utting, The Courier-Mail
    July 13, 2018 7:00pm
    Subscriber only

    A BINGO barney at a retirement village has sparked a ­bizarre court saga between two senior-citizen residents.

    The heated stoush began when 86-year-old Edward Mullins allegedly told 64-year-old Paul McGuire “Outside and I’ll knock your head off” after he tried to host a bingo game at Opal Gardens — aka Opal by Living Gems — retirement resort at Logan Village in July last year.

    Mr McGuire has launched legal action in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal, calling on them to evict fellow resident Mullins — and they’ve continued the war in the magistrates court.

    Mr McGuire told the court that he relied on a witness, a former neighbour of Mullins, who claimed he had been assaulted by the 86-year-old, including being coward-punched.

    “That evidence will show Mr Mullins is capable of the act and that’s what I’m in fear of … He’s done it before,” he said.

    Magistrate Kilmartin said that was a legitimate concern.

    QCAT found Opal Gardens conducted a proper investigation into the matter and could not be “expected to monitor every movement of every homeowner and the ­relationship between each and every resident”.

    A Living Gems spokeswoman said the matter between the men was “of a sensitive nature and should be treated with care and compassion”.

    “ (QCAT) has already decided in favour of the Resort owner in relation to its actions in the matter between Mr McGuire and Mr Mullins. Living Gems is satisfied with the Tribunal’s decision in its totality,” she said.

    “We at Living Gems are proud of the harmonious and friendly communities that are established within our Resorts and are committed to preserving our fundamental principles of belonging and acceptance.”

    The pair will return to court in November. Both men declined to comment.

  59. stackja

    Bingo barney at retirement home ends up in court
    Alexandria Utting, The Courier-Mail
    July 13, 2018 7:00pm
    Subscriber only

    A BINGO barney at a retirement village has sparked a ­bizarre court saga between two senior-citizen residents.

    The heated stoush began when 86-year-old Edward Mullins allegedly told 64-year-old Paul McGuire “Outside and I’ll knock your head off” after he tried to host a bingo game at Opal Gardens — aka Opal by Living Gems — retirement resort at Logan Village in July last year.

    Mr McGuire has launched legal action in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal, calling on them to evict fellow resident Mullins — and they’ve continued the war in the magistrates court.

    The Courier-Mail understands Mr McGuire had taken over the running of the bingo tournament shortly before the stoush began and not all residents supported the change.

    “What I’m trying to understand, sir, is how a man of 86 … he doesn’t look like he is a prize fighter at a stadium on a Friday night … how is he going to put into practice any idea of seriously assaulting you, how is that likely to ­happen?” Magistrate Brian Kilmartin asked Mr McGuire during a mention of the ­matter.

    Mr McGuire told the court that he relied on a witness, a former neighbour of Mullins, who claimed he had been assaulted by the 86-year-old, including being coward-punched.

    “That evidence will show Mr Mullins is capable of the act and that’s what I’m in fear of … He’s done it before,” he said.

    Magistrate Kilmartin said that was a legitimate concern.

    QCAT found Opal Gardens conducted a proper investigation into the matter and could not be “expected to monitor every movement of every homeowner and the ­relationship between each and every resident”.

    A Living Gems spokeswoman said the matter between the men was “of a sensitive nature and should be treated with care and compassion”.

    “ (QCAT) has already decided in favour of the Resort owner in relation to its actions in the matter between Mr McGuire and Mr Mullins. Living Gems is satisfied with the Tribunal’s decision in its totality,” she said.

    “We at Living Gems are proud of the harmonious and friendly communities that are established within our Resorts and are committed to preserving our fundamental principles of belonging and acceptance.”

    The pair will return to court in November. Both men declined to comment.

  60. stackja

    Bingo barney at retirement home ends up in court
    Alexandria Utting, The Courier-Mail
    July 13, 2018 7:00pm
    Subscriber only

    A BINGO barney at a retirement village has sparked a ­bizarre court saga between two senior-citizen residents.

    The heated stoush began when 86-year-old Edward Mullins allegedly told 64-year-old Paul McGuire “Outside and I’ll knock your head off” after he tried to host a bingo game at Opal Gardens — aka Opal by Living Gems — retirement resort at Logan Village in July last year.

    Mr McGuire has launched legal action in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal, calling on them to evict fellow resident Mullins — and they’ve continued the war in the magistrates court.

    The Courier-Mail understands Mr McGuire had taken over the running of the bingo tournament shortly before the stoush began and not all residents supported the change.

    “What I’m trying to understand, sir, is how a man of 86 … he doesn’t look like he is a prize fighter at a stadium on a Friday night … how is he going to put into practice any idea of seriously assaulting you, how is that likely to ­happen?” Magistrate Brian Kilmartin asked Mr McGuire during a mention of the ­matter.

    Mr McGuire told the court that he relied on a witness, a former neighbour of Mullins, who claimed he had been assaulted by the 86-year-old, including being coward-punched.

    “That evidence will show Mr Mullins is capable of the act and that’s what I’m in fear of … He’s done it before,” he said.

    Magistrate Kilmartin said that was a legitimate concern.

    QCAT found Opal Gardens conducted a proper investigation into the matter and could not be “expected to monitor every movement of every homeowner and the ­relationship between each and every resident”.

    A Living Gems spokeswoman said the matter between the men was “of a sensitive nature and should be treated with care and compassion”.

    “ (QCAT) has already decided in favour of the Resort owner in relation to its actions in the matter between Mr McGuire and Mr Mullins. Living Gems is satisfied with the Tribunal’s decision in its totality,” she said.

    “We at Living Gems are proud of the harmonious and friendly communities that are established within our Resorts and are committed to preserving our fundamental principles of belonging and acceptance.”

    The pair will return to court in November. Both men declined to comment.

  61. stackja

    Bingo barney at retirement home ends up in court
    Alexandria Utting, The Courier-Mail
    July 13, 2018 7:00pm
    Subscriber only

    A BINGO barney at a retirement village has sparked a ­bizarre court saga between two senior-citizen residents.

    The heated stoush began when 86-year-old Edward Mullins allegedly told 64-year-old Paul McGuire “Outside and I’ll knock your head off” after he tried to host a bingo game at Opal Gardens — aka Opal by Living Gems — retirement resort at Logan Village in July last year.

    Mr McGuire has launched legal action in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal, calling on them to evict fellow resident Mullins — and they’ve continued the war in the magistrates court.

  62. stackja

    Bingo barney at retirement home ends up in court
    Alexandria Utting, The Courier-Mail
    July 13, 2018 7:00pm
    Subscriber only

  63. stackja

    A BINGO barney at a retirement village has sparked a ­bizarre court saga between two senior-citizen residents.

    The heated stoush began when 86-year-old Edward Mullins allegedly told 64-year-old Paul McGuire “Outside and I’ll knock your head off” after he tried to host a bingo game at Opal Gardens — aka Opal by Living Gems — retirement resort at Logan Village in July last year.

    Mr McGuire has launched legal action in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal, calling on them to evict fellow resident Mullins — and they’ve continued the war in the magistrates court.

  64. stackja

    I can’t tell anymore here about Bingo barney. Must be some words, that spam.

  65. stackja

    QLD union organisers face fines of up to $121,000 under new laws
    Matthew Killoran, The Courier-Mail
    July 14, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    TEN CFMMEU organisers from Queensland face having to personally pay $121,000 in fines under new laws, but there are fears loopholes could provide a way to get around the crackdown.

    Workplace Relations Minister Craig Laundy has warned that the Federal Government is investigating ways to close potential loopholes.

    Experts warned there could be ways around the orders, such as holding fundraisers, offering end-of-year bonuses or third parties donating the cash.

    Mr Laundy said attempts to circumvent orders would be contempt of court. Opposition workplace relations spokesman Brendan O’Connor said the orders were draconian.

  66. stackja

    Country so dangerous tourists aren’t going there anymore
    Natalie Wolfe, news.com.au
    July 14, 2018 1:38am

    SIX months ago, tourists flocked to the Central American paradise of Nicaragua to race down volcanoes on thin, wooden boards, explore its Caribbean coast and watch turtles heave themselves onto black sand beaches under cover of moonlight.

    But three months ago, all of that changed.

    On April 18, the government announced it would reform its pension system and reduce benefits by five per cent. The changes were approved by Nicaragua’s President Daniel Ortega and a pro-democracy protest immediately kicked off on the streets.

    Despite starting out as a peaceful demonstration, it quickly dissolved into a deadly and bloody protest, ending with the deaths of more than a dozen people.

    Since then, almost 300 people have died in the government’s brutal crackdown.

    People living in Managua, Nicaragua’s capital city, have witnessed police officers force protesters to their knees and execute them. Gangs patrol the streets after dark, forcing locals into house arrest for much of the night.

  67. stackja

    Lord Mayor Ron Christie wants Hobart to become an ‘RV friendly capital city’
    JIM ALOUAT, Mercury
    July 13, 2018 10:46pm
    Subscriber only

    PART of Macquarie Point would be turned into a caravan park under a bold bid by the Hobart Lord Mayor to capture the growing grey nomad market and create an “RV friendly capital city”.

    Alderman Ron Christie, who has come under criticism recently for his comments on mass tourism, has expanded on an idea listed in the Hobart City Council’s Draft Transport Strategy.

  68. stackja

    Multicultural community’s backlash for Greens over Chinese visas comments
    LORETTA LOHBERGER, Mercury
    July 13, 2018 9:49pm
    Subscriber only

    GREENS leader Cassy O’Connor’s comments about the increasing numbers of state-sponsored visa applications by Chinese businesses and skilled migrants has left members of Tasmania’s Chinese community feeling angry and hurt, a community leader says.

    Yongbei Tang, Multicultural Council of Tasmania treasurer, said she felt “very hurt” when she read the comments.

    It was reported on Friday that Ms O’Connor said the State Government was “dangerously close” to the Chinese communist regime, citing an almost 900 per cent rise in the number of Tasmanian Government-sponsored visas in five years.

  69. stackja

    AB-DUCK-TED: ‘I’m not quackers, but aliens stole my feathered friends’
    LAUREN ROBERTS, NT News
    July 14, 2018 12:00am

    “ALIEN FORCES” are behind a series of strange duckling disappearances in Humpty Doo, fears NT nurse Desi Friend.

    About two months ago, one of Ms Friend’s ducks went missing – then another, and a third – until a total of eight ducks went missing from her locked yard.

    “Mysteriously over the course of two weeks, one by one they disappeared into thin air,” she said.

    “There’s no sign of any forced entry, there’s no feathers, there’s no big fat snakes, there’s no dogs, there’s no evidence at all.

    “A wild dog couldn’t have got past my dog and would have left feathers or a mess – and a snake couldn’t have eaten eight ducks in three weeks.”

  70. Snoopy

    ABC Online Just In header:

    Julie Bishop can pull a beer but can she pull votes for Liberal Mayo candidate Georgina Downer?

    Now there’s an open invitation!

  71. P

    Melania. Fashion. I can’t remember seeing better. All worn with grace and style.

    First that caught my eye was the Calvin Klein she wore at NATO, then came that magnificent gown by J. Mendel. Now the Victoria Beckham (WOW) and the Christian Dior suit. Link to pics.
    Then off to Scotland in brown snakeskin stilettos.

  72. lotocoti

    I’m trying to get my head around the objections to a woman playing a woman pretending to be a man.
    What do they want?
    A man pretending to be a woman playing a woman pretending to be a man or a woman pretending to be a man playing a woman pretending to be a man?

  73. Farmer Gez

    -2.5 the low for Horsham Vic.
    -4.5 for Kingaroy QLD.
    You don’t often see that.

  74. stackja

    lotocoti
    #2762872, posted on July 14, 2018 at 9:06 am

    The usual confused conflicted.

  75. Rae

    Quatre-vingt-six. Bonjour.

  76. TheSemiMentalBloke

    I had a terrible thought this morning.
    I’m 66 and was born in March.
    This means that in November I’ll be 66.666 yrs old.
    Oh no! I’ll be the anti christ!

  77. C.L.

    That number Melania wore to Blenheim made me think of what high class Roman ladies must have looked like back in the days of old Britannia. She gets none of the attention and credit a Democrat FL would get, of course. That goes without saying. She’s the most glamorous FL in American history but hatey hate. They gushed about Michelle, a horse-gobbed, wig-wearing monster.

  78. stackja

    TheSemiMentalBloke
    #2762879, posted on July 14, 2018 at 9:19 am
    I had a terrible thought this morning.
    I’m 66 and was born in March.
    This means that in November I’ll be 66.666 yrs old.
    Oh no! I’ll be the anti christ!

    I survived. I am sure you will.

  79. Outsiders are those with skin in the game and no power.

    Because they can’t afford it.

  80. calli

    Nice to see someone being truthful about their age. So silly to pretend to be younger. People can always tell. 🙃

    Oh, and here’s some 🎉🎉🎉s for Tinta.

  81. stackja

    calli
    #2762884, posted on July 14, 2018 at 9:24 am

    I know several ninety plus ladies who don’t worry about age.

  82. Tom

    Laughed out loud, Calli at 9.24am.

  83. calli

    Melania always looks good. She seems to favour well tailored stuff rather than thrown together. And she has nice arms so she can do sleeveless. She has a slightly short waist, but who cares with those legs?

    Sadly I am reduced to ballet flats and 1.5” max heels – 👠 envy.

  84. Confused Old Misfit

    heSemiMentalBloke
    #2762879, posted on July 14, 2018 at 9:19 am
    I had a terrible thought this morning.
    I’m 66 and was born in March.
    This means that in November I’ll be 66.666 yrs old.

    Ah! To be so young again!

  85. cohenite

    Just watched the big T and little T interview: Trump is masterful. He doesn’t give a damn about the msm, his mission is US first UK second and the EU third; but the thing is with a stronger US the UK and EU improve as well.

  86. John Constantine

    Has the Trumpnado blown winds of change up Stormy Bishop’s skirts?.

    Australia reported as interfering with chicom build and control plans for Solomon Islands internet.

    Under Hussein Obama, all we had to do was fly to Paris and sign another swathe of capitulation conventions.

    Blocking chicom control of national internet sounds like work, and annoying to chicom donors.

    No wonder Australia’s quisling Class donated to corruption as usual Clinton crime cartel campaigns.

    Comrades.

  87. Crossie

    “Trannies are boring these days. All politics and bleating.
    Most people have had enough and want to be entertained, not story-lectured.”

    ———–

    They were boring twenty five years ago. When I worked in the city I used to change trains in Strathfield and regularly saw this old transvestite on the platform, stringy long grey hair, unstylish dress, comical high heels, five o’clock shadow and smoking a cigarette. It all looked just incongruous.

    It may only have been a transvestite rather than a transgender though I believe one precedes the other.

    Les Girls were the only interesting or entertaining trans.

  88. Percy Popinjay

    One for the ages. Betty looks genuinely chuffed.

  89. Des Deskperson

    According to Fairfax:

    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/politics/federal/pm-and-c-staff-sanctioned-for-cabinet-files-leak-20180713-p4zra8.html

    The Prime Minister’s Department has sanctioned staff and will overhaul its security as a federal police inquiry found “human errors” were to blame for the ‘Cabinet documents in the filing cabinet found by the bushy’; debacle in January.

    It’s reported that ‘Dr Parkinson said he had “personally dealt with” and sanctioned officials for their roles in the breach.’

    There is no information on what the sanctions may have been. Agencies are not obliged to revel the outcomes of disciplinary procedures, but it is generally regarded as good practice to report what sanctions were imposed, both to reassure the taxpayer that the matter has been appropriately dealt with and to let staff know what might happen to them if they committed a similar breach.

    Failure to do so inevitably leads to speculation that the sanctions were inadequate. In this particular case, it also adds to and strengthens the sense of weirdness and unreality surrounding the whole affair.

    filing caits embarrassing leak of cabinet documents that ended up in a second-hand shop.’

  90. Crossie

    Betty looks genuinely chuffed.

    And Trump doesn’t care that his suit is creased.

  91. Geriatric Mayfly

    Melania. Fashion. I can’t remember seeing better. All worn with grace and style.

    And who again were those losers, who said they would refuse to design for the best walking advertisement
    currently on the world stage?

  92. chrisl

    Visiting a water temple on the Inca trail in Peru which was built around a permanent spring over a thousand years ago . The Incas are long gone the temple is in ruins but the water just keeps on flowing. Climate change not so much

  93. Frank

    They gushed about Michelle, a horse-gobbed, wig-wearing monster.

    But the toned arms, or rather she looks like she has a mean right hook. Coupled with the low centre of gravity it would make her a worthy opponent.

  94. Crossie

    Jail threat for leader of Catholic schools lobby
    The chief critic of Education Minister Simon Birmingham’s schools funding policy has been secretly threatened with jail by a commonwealth regulator warning it will cut his organisation’s charity status and tax concessions for campaigning against flawed government policy.

    The grubs are not only on the Labor side, they are also well established in Malcolm’s government. They’ve lost my vote and are not getting it back until Lucien Eye are gone from the political scene along with all their enablers.

  95. calli

    From Cohenite’s link:

    In London, the security barrier erected around the Ambassador’s home also aimed to foil the first protest group — ‘Together Against Trump’ — who launched a “wall of sound” demonstration using megaphones, recording of crying children, whistles and pots and pans to disrupt the Presidential couple’s first overnight stay in the capital.
    An array of protesters — ranging from drag queens in full feather and sequin regalia to a contingent dressed as chickens to highlight the practice of chlorine washing in the US food industry — will take up to three hours to march through central London.
    The final rally will coincide with Mr Trump’s visit to meet the Queen at Windsor Castle.

    The usual suspects. Low energy and lame. The chicken suits are a nice touch of madness though.

  96. Frank

    With regards to Jim Acosta, I think Mark Steyn used to refer to him as the George Clooney of the Washington press pack. Pretty much nails it.

  97. calli

    Zatara linked to them yesterday, Mayfly. Marc Jacobs was one. I hope he’s enjoying the view from his high horse.

  98. Anthony

    Would not surprise me if Putin makes these ‘GRU agents’ available to the US court system, their lawyers appear for discovery, and Mueller has done it again. It would appear that all Dem running dogs are fucking liars. Would you buy a used car from any one of them?

  99. zyconoclast

    ‘There are Nazis in our neighborhood:’ New billboard in Washington state draws attention

    Neighbors in the group, “Tacoma Against Nazis” said they’re fighting back against what they feel is white supremacy invading their community.

  100. cohenite

    FMD, I know this was covered on the past thread but Trump: other people have tried to have a relationship with Putin and failed but he will succeed because the other people were not him.

    And refused to take questions from fake news cnn.

    And May loves him.

  101. Percy Popinjay

    The chicken suits are a nice touch of madness though.

    Headless chicken suits would have been more apt.

  102. 132andBush


    And refused to take questions from fake news cnn.

    And May loves him.

    And they let his wife wear stilettos on a bowling green!!!

  103. Crossie

    P
    #2762910, posted on July 14, 2018 at 9:53 am
    Here’s the Growing List of Designers Who Refuse to Dress Melania Trump

    Courtesy of Zatara – Open Forum July 13, 11:32 am.

    And she still manages to look spectacular even without their rags.

  104. zyconoclast

    ‘Fake Refugees Get Out’: How South Koreans Are Channeling Trump

    Lee, who leads a local group demanding the Yemeni nationals be deported, believes outsiders compete for jobs and pose a threat to local safety. The refugees she saw at the immigration center looked “really scary,” she said. She praised the U.S. president, who won a victory this week when the Supreme Court upheld his ban on visitors from seven countries, including Yemen.

  105. Baldrick

    Melania in some daggy traveling clothes. Ooh la-la.

    Even the Secret Service agent was taking a good look.

  106. Tom

    “Stormy Bishop”.

    Splendid, John Constantine!

  107. johanna

    Crossie
    #2762900, posted on July 14, 2018 at 9:43 am

    Betty looks genuinely chuffed.

    And Trump doesn’t care that his suit is creased.

    Yeah, I find that odd. Guy has all the money in the world, best dressed wife on the planet and yet you often see him wearing crumpled suits. I sometimes wonder if it is deliberate, to be a bit more Everyman. After all, there is no necessity for it – non crease suit fabrics have been around for a long time now.

  108. 132andBush

    Nice to see someone being truthful about their age. So silly to pretend to be younger. People can always tell. 🙃

    LOL

  109. Bruce of Newcastle

    Would not surprise me if Putin makes these ‘GRU agents’ available to the US court system, their lawyers appear for discovery, and Mueller has done it again.

    I was thinking the same thing.
    Some Russian oligarch just has to stump up a couple hundred k for a lawyer and discovery will embarrass Mueller hugely.
    The agents don’t even have to turn up.
    Good value for money.

  110. Roger

    Jail threat for leader of Catholic schools lobby

    I note he’s doubling down. Good.

  111. zyconoclast

    Is Hungary Experiencing a Policy-Induced Baby Boom?

    By providing a grant for married couples with children, CSOK incentivizes childbearing, sure, but it also gives couples the financing they need to get a new home and live together, provided they are willing to get hitched. Hungary’s tax benefits favor families with children, and favor married filers with children the most. Beyond the direct natality incentive, these policies may induce more marriages, and with more marriages, you get more births of all kinds, including first and second kids, despite the much smaller CSOK subsidies than what is offered for a third child.

    Hungary’s fertility rates are still extremely low: only about 1.5 children per woman. The government is spending huge amounts of money and will probably never reach replacement-rate with this strategy. However, Hungary is experiencing some fertility gains, probably at least partly as a result of a basket of policy changes including tax preferences, cash grants, loan subsidies, constitutional protections, and costly political signaling. But to the extent these policies are working, they are effective because they are not being used in isolation, but rather together as a whole concert of pro-natal policies and cultural nudges. And they are working because they induce marriage, not simply childbearing, and marriage helps boost long-run fertility, not just birth-timing.

  112. 132andBush

    P
    #2762910, posted on July 14, 2018 at 9:53 am
    Here’s the Growing List of Designers Who Refuse to Dress Melania Trump

    Courtesy of Zatara – Open Forum July 13, 11:32 am.

    What’s your point, P?

  113. Baldrick

    Nice to see someone being truthful about their age. So silly to pretend to be younger. People can always tell.

    I see what you did there calli 😸

  114. zyconoclast

    Muslim party leader in the Netherlands tells Dutch to leave their country if they don’t like diversity

    “If they don’t like a changing Netherlands in which people with different cultures live… like in the city of Zaandam or the neighbourhood of Poelenburg, they should get lost,” Kuzu says in an interview.

  115. Crossie

    Yeah, I find that odd. Guy has all the money in the world, best dressed wife on the planet and yet you often see him wearing crumpled suits. I sometimes wonder if it is deliberate, to be a bit more Everyman. After all, there is no necessity for it – non crease suit fabrics have been around for a long time now.

    My theory is that he hates the fuss. On the other hand it could be his way of saying to Brits who love to receive foreigners in flowing robes “This is the national costume of American businessmen, live with it”.

  116. Percy Popinjay

    Here’s the Growing List of Designers Who Refuse to Dress Melania Trump

    Victoria Beckham not being one of them. Good for her.

  117. P

    In my heyday it was Jacqueline Kennedy’s clothes we loved. Also clothes worn by Audrey Hepburn in films.
    Jacky in France. Jacky with the Queen and Prince Philip. How we doted.
    Newspapers were only black and white. The Women’s Weekly came to the rescue with colour.

  118. Crossie

    zyconoclast
    #2762931, posted on July 14, 2018 at 10:09 am
    Muslim party leader in the Netherlands tells Dutch to leave their country if they don’t like diversity

    “If they don’t like a changing Netherlands in which people with different cultures live… like in the city of Zaandam or the neighbourhood of Poelenburg, they should get lost,” Kuzu says in an interview.

    That’s what you call chutzpah.

  119. Roger

    Migrant boys abuse and [email protected] 5 young girls in Denmark – Migrant mother thinks racism is behind their arrest

    And I note the father is using the Whoopi Goldberg defence.

  120. Viva

    Trannies are boring these days.

    Certainly lost the shock value I remember in The Crying Game.

  121. Bruce of Newcastle

    The other really juicy thing about the 12 wussians Mueller has indicted is that the indictment is about Hillary’s server.

    The GOP has tried to get the MSM to cover Hillary’s server for years and years.

    A bit of publicity about just how wide open she was would be gloriously embarrassing to the Dems. The submariner got a year in the slammer for some photos inside a sub, Hillary laid open SecState secrets to at least five foreign intelligence services.

    Wouldn’t it be fun if Mueller’s latest Trump gotcha ends up putting Hillary away for the rest of her life?

  122. OldOzzie

    Tom

    Thanks as always – nearly Branco ,but Ben Garrison #2 the Winner Today

  123. stackja

    Tintarella di Luna
    #2762828, posted on July 14, 2018 at 7:46 am

    Yes! DOGS! Goulburn just sent all the kids to state school. Do State schools really want Catholic parents turning up and demanding proper schooling?

  124. OldOzzie

    Perhaps some Power Expert Cats could answer a question I posed on Jo Nova’s Mid Week Unthreaded

    OldOzzie
    July 14, 2018 at 9:24 am · Reply

    Jo or any other Electrical Power Experts.

    Is there any way you can turn off Mains Baseload Power and make Green Electorates only able to have Renewable Energy to their Districts?

    Starting with the ACT then all other Green Electorates around Australia?

    Would be a good bill to put before the Federal House and Senate if doable

  125. Mark M

    China Has Been Preparing For A Trade War For Over A Decade

    “China has been a very vocal proponent of the SDR basket system, and it becomes clear why if you understand what the globalists intend for the future of the world’s monetary framework.
    This plan was first outlined in the globalist controlled Economist magazine in 1988 in an article calling for the beginnings of a global currency in 2018.

    In 2015, China’s central bank suggested that the SDR system should “go digital,” creating a digital version of the reserve so that it could spread quickly.

    It should come as no surprise that the IMF is in full agreement with this plan and has even suggested in recent articles on its website that cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology are the future evolution of the monetary system.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07-12/china-has-been-preparing-trade-war-over-decade

  126. stackja

    Mark M
    #2762943, posted on July 14, 2018 at 10:22 am

    Would Red China technology always follow the party line?

  127. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    Anti-church standover not on – The Australian -12:00AM July 14, 2018

    Even before the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission launched its attack on Catholic Education Melbourne, the Turnbull government achieved a minor miracle. Education Minister Simon Birmingham’s blatant disdain for the Catholic sector’s robust defence of its schools’ funding united the church’s disparate tribes like little else. Next week’s meeting between Malcolm Turnbull and the archbishops of Brisbane and Sydney, Mark Coleridge and Anthony Fisher — with Senator Birmingham standing by in an anteroom — is shaping as a showstopper. When religious freedom is a frontline issue, bigger principles than school funding are at stake. The conflict is now about free speech, with a federal agency seeking to crush the church’s efforts to defend its schools’ funding in the public square. These schools educate 760,000 Australian children, about one in five. The political stakes are vast. Such tactics would be folly under any government; under the Coalition, supposedly committed to principle of choice, they are unconscionable.

    Today, associate editor John Ferguson reveals that the ACNC has threatened to axe the charity status and tax exemptions of Catholic Education Melbourne and twice, in writing, threatened its executive director, Stephen Elder, with up to 12 months’ jail if he failed to comply with an ACNC investigation.

    The ACNC investigation centres on $4378.84 spent by Mr Elder in the lead-up to the March 17 by-election in the federal seat of Batman in Melbourne’s west. In that campaign, in which Labor was challenged by the Greens, with no Liberal standing, Mr Elder and Catholic Education Melbourne backed a computer-generated phone call to voters. It did not pull any punches: “Malcolm Turnbull has slashed funds from low-fee local Catholic and independent schools … The Greens seek to strip funds from Catholic schools … In contrast, Labor believes that local Catholic schools are an essential element of our education system. Labor will restore hundreds of millions in school funding cut by the Liberals … the future of our schools depends on who you support.”

    The Commonwealth Electoral Act, amended in 2016, refers charities to ACNC rules. These allow them to campaign or advocate for a charitable purpose but not to “to promote or oppose a political party or a candidate for political office”. Mr Elder, 61, a former Victorian Liberal MP and the nephew of former Victorian premier Sir Henry Bolte, is clear about his responsibilities: “It’s my job to protect the interests of Australian families of modest financial means who want to send their kids to Catholic and low-fee independent schools … we will continue the fight until fair funding to the Catholic sector is restored.”

    Church-state battles over school funding and much else, such as conscription during World War I, are not new. But the state threatening a church leader with fines or jail for campaigning against government policy breaks dangerous ground. It raises questions whether other church bodies might face similar treatment for campaigning over asylum-seekers, for example, or future legislation on contentious issues such as voluntary euthanasia, abortion or marriage.

    Legislation designed to prevent activist political groups benefiting from charitable status is legitimate. At the same time, as we said in response to Social Services Minister Dan Tehan’s St Thomas More lecture on religious freedom, churches have a vital role in the public square. The long running war on school funding has intensified into something more serious.

  128. “China has been a very vocal proponent of the SDR basket system, and it becomes clear why if you understand what the globalists intend for the future of the world’s monetary framework.
    This plan was first outlined in the globalist controlled Economist magazine in 1988 in an article calling for the beginnings of a global currency in 2018.

    Pretty sure that SDRs have been around longer than that (even before Bretton Woods ended), but floating rates make them pointless.

    “Globalists” were fine with the gold standard and what exists now because they work. Bretton Woods and SDRs, along with the interwar mess did not.

    The SDR might be useful in international disputes where currencies literally go bust or you have large fluctuations over a negligent act committed at sea, etc.

  129. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2762946, posted on July 14, 2018 at 10:26 am

    BO IRS Tea Party comes to mind.

  130. Rae

    Larry Pickering is drawing cartoons again after his battles with chemo.

    Interesting. He previously, back in February 2017, said he’d “knocked back that chemo crap”. Tried high dose vitamin C, fruit and vegetables, and hemp oil instead.

  131. Confused Old Misfit

    “There is no allegation in the indictment that any American was a knowing participant in the alleged unlawful activity…There is no allegation in the indictment that the charged conduct altered the vote count or changed the outcome of the 2016 election.” Rosenstein.

    Probably late to the party with this but has anybody checked to see if mUnty is OK?
    I suppose he will have a stunning rebuttal.

  132. zyconoclast

    No to sub Saharan Africans, yes to Portuguese.

    Ronaldo’s Taxing Exit
    The world’s most famous athlete is leaving Spain for many reasons, including los impuestos.

    It would be an exaggeration to say that Portuguese soccer superstar Cristiano Ronaldo is leaving his team, Real Madrid, for Italian club Juventus strictly because of the Spanish taxman. Ronaldo had other reasons for making one of the biggest moves by a star athlete in recent memory, including the fact that he was paid less than rival Lionel Messi at Barcelona—even though Ronaldo led Real Madrid to three consecutive European Champion’s League titles. Still, Ronaldo didn’t start talking about exiting Spain until local tax authorities began hounding him in spring 2017, and he has continually complained about his treatment by authorities since then.

    The enormously rich striker was infuriated not only by the tax demands but also by the government’s accusations that he was hiding his income. “I am an open book,” Ronaldo told a Spanish judge. “You don’t need to do anything but type my name into Google and everything about Cristiano comes up.” Now he’s going to Italy, which has recently passed tax reforms designed to welcome foreign wealth.

  133. OldOzzie

    Abbott is right: Paris climate treaty fails to fight global warming – Bjorn Lomborg – he Australian – 12:00AM July 14, 2018

    Political language on climate change often amounts to empty puffery: bold promises that are not going to be delivered and aspirational rhetoric that proves impossible to achieve.

    It is therefore remarkable that Tony Abbott has acknowledged Australia would not have signed the Paris Agreement if he had known in 2015 that the US would withdraw, and that trying to reach national targets would damage the Australian economy.

    Internationally, very few politicians have admitted the inherent failings of the Paris treaty, but the truth is that it was always oversold.

    This begins with the treaty itself, which includes the fiction that pledges under the agreement will somehow keep the planet’s temperature rises to 2C or even 1.5C.

    The 1.5C target is a fantasy. Studies show that achieving it would require nothing less than the entire planet abandoning the use of every fossil fuel by February 7, 2021. Given our reliance on fossil fuels, that would mean we stop cooling and heating our homes, stop all air travel, and the world’s farmers stop making half the world’s food, produced with fertiliser almost exclusively made from fossil fuels. The list goes on.

    As for the less stringent 2C target, keeping the global temperature rise below that requires a reduction in emissions during this century of almost 6000 billion tonnes. The UN body that oversees the Paris Agreement has estimated that even if every single country (including the US) were to achieve every national promise by 2030, the total greenhouse gas cut would be equivalent to just 60 billion tonnes of CO2.

    This means that even if completely successful, with the US rejoining tomorrow and every nation doing every single thing promised, the Paris treaty makes 1 per cent of progress towards the “easier” target of 2C.

    Not only is the treaty not binding, but even binding agreements such as the Kyoto Protocol did not hinder countries such as Canada from promising to cut emissions by 6 per cent and instead increasing them by 24 per cent.

    In Paris, many governments made vows they have not lived up to because they are finding — like Australia — that there are costs to doing so. In fact, research last year in Nature found that “no major advanced industrialised country is on track to meet its pledges”.

    Few nations are forthcoming about their failures, but we know the EU vowed to cut emissions to 40 per cent below its 1990 level by 2030, but as of last year had enacted policies that would reduce them by 19 per cent. Even including “pledged” policies, the EU will make it to less than 30 per cent. And the Nature study says, “Japan promised cuts in emissions to match those of its peers, but meeting the goals will cost more than the country is willing to pay.”

    It would be wrong to imagine that the US was on track before Donald Trump quit the Paris Agreement. Barack Obama promised to cut US emissions to 18 per cent below 1990 levels by 2025 but never backed this with sufficient legislation, introducing policies that were set to achieve at most a 7 per cent reduction. And poorer nations remain on target only because they promised so little.

    While politicians enjoy rhetoric about saving the planet, very few are willing to implement policies that will achieve meaningful temperature cuts. Why? Because the costs of doing so through carbon cuts are high and the benefits quite small.

    That doesn’t fit with what many people believe: we often are told global warming is catastrophically costly and that solutions are cheap or beneficial. It pays to look at the evidence. The best estimates show global warming has roughly a zero net cost to humanity.

    The most pessimistic study finds a cost of 0.3 per cent of gross domestic product, while the most optimistic suggests a net benefit of 2.3 per cent.

    We usually hear only about the (real) problems of global warming, such as increased heatwaves, cooling costs and heat deaths. But we rarely hear that global warming will reduce extreme cold, heating costs, and the number of deaths caused by the cold (which right now outweigh heat deaths by seven to one).

    As global warming progresses, the adverse effects generally will increase while the positive effects will diminish, making a net negative for humanity. But the outcome is not the doomsday suggested by Hollywood. The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has found that without any climate policy, the impacts in about a half-century will be equivalent to a loss of 0.2 per cent to 2 per cent of global GDP. That is similar to one recession across the next five decades: a problem but by no means the end of the world.

    If we don’t act, the damage will reach 3 per cent to 4 per cent early next century — a significant impact, but still nowhere near catastrophic in a world where climate models expect the average inhabitant to be 500 per cent richer.

    This means climate policy can create, at most, benefits worth 3 per cent to 4 per cent of global GDP in 100 years. Any realistic policy will achieve only a fraction of this.

    The Paris treaty, fully implemented, would achieve one-hundredth of the reduction to 2C (a level at which there are still significant impacts), and hence achieve benefits worth perhaps only one-tenth of 1 per cent of global GDP 100 years from now.

    The policy costs, often downplayed, can be vast. The EU is widely lauded by environmentalists for its bold carbon cut promises. Taking into account the total cost to the economy, the EU’s bill for cutting 20 per cent by 2020 runs to about €209 billion ($328.5bn). Its much more ambitious policy of cutting emissions by 40 per cent by 2030 will likely cost €574bn a year.

    Yet the benefit will be vanishingly small: my peer-reviewed, published analysis shows the EU’s Paris promises for 2030, in the most optimistic circumstances, fully achieved and adhered to throughout this entire century, would reduce global temperatures by 0.053C by 2100.

    A peer-reviewed study has shown each dollar spent on EU climate policies will generate a total long-term climate benefit of 3c. Looking further ahead, the EU has promised an 80 per cent reduction by 2050.

    The biggest study from Stanford University’s Energy Modelling Forum has used the world’s top models to show that the average expected cost to the EU if all policies were perfectly co-ordinated and perfectly efficiently implemented would be €2.9 trillion a year — or 11.9 per cent of the EU’s total GDP by 2050.

    That is more than all the 28 EU states spend on education, recreation, health, housing, environment, police and defence. Moreover, climate policies are rarely perfectly designed and effectively implemented.

    Typically, in real life that means doubling their cost, meaning the EU’s plan of cutting 80 per cent could reach a fantastical one-quarter of the entire EU GDP.

    Unsurprisingly, it is not a good idea to pay 12 per cent to 25 per cent of GDP in the decades ahead to avoid a fraction of a 3 per cent to 4 per cent GDP loss in 100 years.

    Carbon cuts pledged in the Paris Agreement put the cart before the horse. Green energy is not yet ready to compete with fossil fuels, so forcing economies to switch means slowing them down.

    More than $100bn will be spent this year alone on subsidies for solar and wind energy, yet this technology will meet less than 1 per cent of the globe’s energy needs.

    Even by 2040, and even with carbon being taxed, the International Energy Agency estimates that average coal still will be cheaper than average solar and wind energy.

    The Australian Competition & Consumer Commission’s recent report outlines with refreshing clarity how well-intentioned climate change policies have hurt energy customers.

    The ACCC finds that state governments’ “excessively generous” subsidies for solar photovoltaic systems have pushed up prices for “all electricity users”. The subsidies “outweighed, by many multiples, the value” of the PV energy.

    The Paris Agreement is not the right answer but a solution is needed. The US’s decision to leave the treaty without implementing an alternative climate policy is a poor one. On the sidelines of the Paris treaty came the real opportunity: philanthropist Bill Gates announced the creation of a green energy innovation fund backed by private individuals and about 20 governments, including Australia, that will double global green energy research and development.

    This should be only the beginning. Nobel laureates for the project Copenhagen Consensus on Climate found we shouldn’t just double R&D but make a sixfold increase, to reach at least $100bn a year. This would still be far cheaper than the proposed Paris cuts and it would actually have the prospect of making a significant impact on temperature rises. It would do so without choking economic growth, which continues to lift hundreds of millions out of poverty.

    Australia should put the ambition to innovate green energy sources at the heart of its climate policy. This should not be about subsidising existing inefficient solar panels and wind turbines but, rather, about investing in feasible technological breakthroughs that could help solar, wind, fusion, fission, artificial biomass and other promising technologies to achieve required breakthroughs.

    We don’t need all of them to work; just a few would solve the ­climate problem, while making low-cost, plentiful energy for the entire world.

    The knowledge that the Paris Agreement should not have been signed is perhaps startling, but it’s time to learn from the treaty’s failings and to ensure future policy decisions are grounded in economic reality.

    Fixing climate change requires boosting innovation so green energy eventually will become so cheap it will outcompete fossil fuels — not making fossil fuels so expensive that everyone suffers.

    Bjorn Lomborg is director of the Copenhagen Consensus Centre and a visiting professor at the Copenhagen Business School.

  134. Can someone give me a bit of direction on “non-denominational churches”.

    I saw this “three hearts church” after listening to Prince on YT. Apparently, he was satanic along with Elvis.

    These dudes see satan everywhere. Vampire stories are satanic, along with monster high dolls for little girls. They talk about satan, satan and more satan. Dolls that are kawaii and have stuff from the Mexican day of the dead stuff are satanic of course.

    They label everything fun as satanic; they are fairly good at making satan seem like a good deal. They don’t really talk about “be nice man”, but rather a lot of whacky stuff about nanotechnology being a way for satan’s forces to control us.

    Then I found a “three hearts church exposed!” site that reckoned they were “freemasons!” and then one commenter reckoned that the entire Christian community/church has been apostate since 1453 when Mehmet “started telling Christians what they could believe”?

    If you’re claiming there has been no true Christians for over 500 years…well that’s a rather ambit claim!

    So are these fringe cults dominated by a lack of education? It is like a person whose only education was basic literacy met with puritanism and Pentecostalism and some of the worst internet conspiracy theories.

  135. zyconoclast

    Australian States beat them too it.

    Hydrocarbon Hypocrisy
    Governor Andrew Cuomo and his primary opponent, Cynthia Nixon, are blowing hot air when it comes to energy exploration.

    Governor Andrew Cuomo and activist/actress Cynthia Nixon, opponents in September’s New York gubernatorial primary, don’t agree on much—but they are hell on hydrocarbons. Cuomo has outlawed natural-gas hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the Empire State, while Nixon wants to ban fracked gas from even entering the state. Never mind that the revolutionary energy-extraction method has over the past decade transformed America from a net hydrocarbon importer to the world’s leading energy producer. Both candidates promise to block new gas pipelines in New York, too.

  136. while Nixon wants to ban fracked gas from even entering the state

    So they want a Kimberly system for their fuel supply? What about after refinement?

    Both candidates promise to block new gas pipelines in New York, too.

    I see a winter of discontent in the future.

  137. zyconoclast

    Making the Right Move on Racial Preferences
    The Trump administration revokes Obama’s admissions guidance to colleges, to the fury of activists and the press—who won’t acknowledge why preferences are necessary.

    Press outlets extensively covered the rescission of the guidances. None of the stories, however, even hinted at why racial preferences are needed to engineer racial diversity in the first place. The abyss between the academic qualifications of black and Hispanic students, on the one hand, and whites and Asians, on the other, was kept assiduously offstage, pursuant to longstanding journalistic taboos. Instead, it was as if a mysterious force was preventing blacks and Hispanics from entering college.

  138. Roger

    Can someone give me a bit of direction on “non-denominational churches”.

    Yes. Don’t waste your time on them.

    They are often power trippers seeking to bind consciences on matters of the third or fourth order.

  139. stackja

    Man and pets dead after Sydney house fire
    Sarah McPhee, Australian Associated Press
    July 14, 2018 9:22am

    A 50-year-old man has died in hospital after a fire at his home in Sydney’s inner west, with firefighters battling barbed wire fences and hoards of household items to gain access to the property.

    Emergency services, including 30 firefighters, were called to the blaze at the two-storey duplex on Stanley Street in Putney, near Ryde, shortly before 4am on Saturday, police said.

    “The main body of fire appeared to be in the basement and the resident was found unconscious on the upper levels,” a Fire & Rescue NSW spokesman told AAP on Saturday morning.

    “The unusually high levels of household materials being stored definitely inhibited the ability of the resident to escape from the building, and inhibited firefighters from being able to find the resident.”

    FRNSW were faced with “a whole range of security measures” including barbed wire fencing at the home, which could be described as a hoarder’s residence given it was filled with piles of various items, he said.

    The man, believed to be the only person who lived in the building, was taken to nearby Concord Hospital in a critical condition but later died, police said.

    He is yet to be formally identified.

    A number of pets were found dead inside the home including snakes, kept in various terrariums, and a dog.

    Some snakes were found alive, the FRNSW spokesman said.

    One firefighter was treated for exhaustion while three neighbours, forced to evacuate their properties, were taken to hospital for observation suffering smoke inhalation.

    The cause of the fire is not yet known but a crime scene has been established ahead of a forensic examination.

  140. Infidel Tiger

    It is Bastille Day. The day the French celebrate the disgraceful and appalling behaviour of their ancestors and the unsoundnessn of their Republic.

    We can only hope they repent.

  141. stackja

    Why interviewing online troll Lauren Southern was a waste of my time
    ANNABEL HENNESSY, The Daily Telegraph
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    JUST like there are some people who can’t be argued with, there are some who can’t be interviewed.

    Alt-right Canadian “activist” Lauren Southern falls into both of these categories.

    The 23-year-old has made a Youtube career for herself through stunts which have included pretending to be a transgender person at a university rally and handing out flyers which stated “Allah is gay” in the UK.

    I spent 13 minutes interviewing Southern on the phone yesterday after she arrived in Brisbane for her Australian speaking tour wearing a T-shirt which stated “it’s OK to be white”.

    Southern claimed to be wearing the shirt because she wanted to show she has “no shame” in being white.

    This is what makes interviewing Southern a fruitless task, because her whole rhetoric is designed to create a reaction rather than examining individual issues.

  142. Look what’s happened to the Mayor of London!

    🙂

  143. stackja

    Infidel Tiger
    #2762974, posted on July 14, 2018 at 11:06 am
    It is Bastille Day. The day the French celebrate the disgraceful and appalling behaviour of their ancestors and the unsoundnessn of their Republic.

    We can only hope they repent.

    La Comité de salut public will investigate such comments.

  144. Gab

    So what happened to Mayor Khan’s balloon? Haven’t seen or heard anymore about it.

  145. stackja

    Absurd day of men’s tennis has repercussions for the women at Wimbledon

    OUTRAGE and surprise has erupted after Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic inadvertently sparked a sexist furore in London.

    Wimbledon officials have decided the match will recommence at 1pm local time (10pm Saturday night AEST), just an hour before the scheduled start of the women’s final between Serena Williams and Angelique Kerber. That means, should the remainder of Nadal and Djokovic’s match last longer than an hour — which, judging by what they dished up today, is a very real possibility — then the women’s final will be delayed.

    Furthermore, the women’s doubles final may not even be played on Centre Court because as of Saturday morning, the schedule reshuffle had left it without an assigned court. It has been scheduled as TBA — to be arranged — and will not start before 5pm local time on Saturday.

    That has sparked backlash among the tennis community, especially considering the All England Club insists the men’s final would not move from 2pm local time — even for the football World Cup final.

    WTA insider Courtney Nguyen was furious the women’s showpiece could be affected. “It’s bulls***,” she tweeted, while Aussie tennis great Rennae Stubbs said the men should play after the women.

  146. stackja

    Gab
    #2762980, posted on July 14, 2018 at 11:19 am
    So what happened to Mayor Khan’s balloon? Haven’t seen or heard anymore about it.

    Now it’s a pig balloon. Khan not amused.

  147. cuckoo

    Just wanted to say that there is an Acting Senior Detective Sergeant in Vic Pol whose actual name is Pixie Fuhrmeister. We now return you to your scheduled viewing…

  148. Gab

    Really? I haven’t seen any pics of it. Clearly not trending anywhere. Such a shame.

  149. nemkat

    … she tweeted, while Aussie tennis great Rennae Stubbs said the men should play after the women.

    LOL, not one Aussie in a thousand has ever heard of this Aussie tennis great.

  150. Rossini

    Baldrick
    #2762921, posted on July 14, 2018 at 10:02 am

    For sh1t sake Baldick as if you wouldn’t.
    Don’t give me the sh1ts!

  151. stackja

    cuckoo
    #2762985, posted on July 14, 2018 at 11:25 am

    And PF is a mean hockey player.

  152. stackja

    Gab
    #2762986, posted on July 14, 2018 at 11:27 am
    Really? I haven’t seen any pics of it. Clearly not trending anywhere. Such a shame.

    Google: Michael Fabricant.

  153. Oh come on

    The baby Trump baby balloon was really embarrassing. All of those angsty Euros eagerly wanting to poke a finger in Trump’s eye, and the result was that. Ultra-low energy, like South Australia.

  154. None

    But the state threatening a church leader with fines or jail for campaigning against government policy breaks dangerous ground. 

    I’m not too sure what sets you want to call Mr Elder a church leader he has a Catholic education organisation – in fact is no different to other people who had independent schools bodies were they be religious schools or otherwise. He is not doing anything different to what any other head of independent schools will do under the circumstances. It seems to me that he or the organisation He represents is being targeted simply because of its association with the Catholic Church and this virulent anti-catholic hate that has reset the liberal party is actually quite frightening full stop but when I look at all the fifth columners in the Liberal Party- consider the gaystapo membership, and their attendant fetishes like Birmo – what can hardly expect much better.

  155. cuckoo

    American lefties are finding Trumps’ Supreme Court pick Kavanaugh even harder to smear than Mitt Romney was. In desperation they’ve resorted to the fact that he has occasionally run up a bank overdraft. I remember reading an article about Sonia Sotomayor, the self-described ‘wise latina’ picked by Obama, and was amazed by how little she had in the bank at the time of her appointment.

  156. stackja

    ALP was the Catholic political party until Menzies.

  157. Myrddin Seren

    In desperation they’ve resorted to the fact that he has occasionally run up a bank overdraft.

    hint, hint – meaning they are dog whistling he will be susceptible to credit card payments being made from Moscow.

    #WascallyWussians

    Conversely, they are studiously disinterested in how #PornLawyer Michael Avenetti mysteriously came up with $8 million to settle some of his numerous outstanding debts.

  158. None:

    At one time Junker walking along pretending to talk animatedly the man at his side and then he kind of staggered back into the two guys walking behind him who basically pushed him forward so they didn’t think he was in pain. Just watching the astonishing beat it looked like he was drunk in the others were either trying to cover it up by holding him up or else quite annoyed at him and avoiding him. I hope he was drunk I want him to have been drunk because I reckon that could start to spell the end of the EU.

    “The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.”

    ― George Orwell, Animal Farm

    Perhaps it will be the eye opening moment for millions. Revolutions have started from less…

  159. stackja

    cuckoo
    #2762997, posted on July 14, 2018 at 11:48 am

    SS bank account balance not seen as an issue? GOP asleep?

  160. stackja

    Myrddin Seren
    #2762999, posted on July 14, 2018 at 11:53 am

    Dems are allowed different rules.

  161. Elle

    Apologies if this has been posted already. 

    I know this has been overdone, but I found this great comment on FB. The poster didn’t link to the newspaper. I assume it wasn’t a Fairfax rag. The commenter is Bernie Magner of Croydon. Summed it all up very well.

    “Can you imagine if the Thailand soccer team had been lost in Victoria? The rescue would have been put on hold until the LGBTQI community could have a representative on the rescue team, the children would have been chastised for not welcoming the rescuers to the country with a smoking ceremony, the coach would have been interviewed for not having a Working With Children police check, members of the Greens Party would be complaining about the water being pumped out of the cave endangering the habitat of a local frog, and there would be an outcry as to why there were no girls on the soccer team.”

  162. Elle

    *The poster didn’t link to the newspaper the comment was published in.

  163. Elle

    My guess is it was the Herald Sun as I can’t imagine a Fairfax publication letting this through the Pravda Editorialist!

  164. None

    I hope so too, Winston but watch the media try to bury the video. We can only hope it goes absolutely viral on other channels online and sparks a people’s revolution.

  165. This is what makes interviewing Southern a fruitless task, because her whole rhetoric is designed to create a reaction rather than examining individual issues.

    Or, it could be that you simply have no interviewing skills.

  166. None

    Excellent comment by Bernie, Elle. Ain’t that the truth.

  167. Bruce of Newcastle

    So what happened to Mayor Khan’s balloon? Haven’t seen or heard anymore about it.

    It’s the small orange thing in the centre of the second photo…

    About That “Giant Trump Baby Balloon”

    Just above the, er, enormous crowd.

  168. calli

    The ABC informs me that 100’s of thousands marched in London to protest Trump.

    Any figures from other sources? Having been in London many times, it’s easy to make a crowd appear larger because narrow spaces, especially around Westminster and up at TS.

  169. I see Mueller has set the table with indictments of named GRU agents. Main course to follow, it will be delicious. If he knows this much about Russian involvement in the hacking, imagine how much he knows about the American side.

  170. Myrddin Seren

    “Can you imagine if the Thailand soccer team had been lost in Victoria? The rescue would have been put on hold until….

    Christine Nixon was appointed head of the rescue effort.

    As she, Dan the Man and the Aardvark of Beaconsfield would expect to be chauffeured in to the cave in electric golf carts to personally save the wee lads, operations would have to await the arrival of Musk’s tunnelling machine to create a wide enough road for the convoy of VIP golf carts and an expanded press gallery inside where the assembled world’s media could report live as the VIP rescue party arrives.

    Unfortunately, the CFMMEU would ban the operation until Musk’s tunnellers were all fully accredited members of the union, with ten years’ back dues paid – in cash.

    And the UFU would launch state-wide industrial action until their members are tasked to drive the VIP golf carts – with huge cave rescue allowances.

    By the time all the industrial disputes were settled, Musk’s tunnelling machine would have been stripped of vital parts of Yoof-of-no-particular-description, and operations would be further delayed until replacement parts could be sourced.

    Unfortunately, by then there was insufficient base load power left in the East Coast grid to run the tunnelling machine until a new, government-subsidised AGL gas power station could be constructed on the site using imported gas from a specially built government-subsidised terminal.

    The soccer team eventually emerged blinking in to the light on their fifteenth year in the cave.

  171. Oh come on

    I see Mueller has set the table with indictments of named GRU agents. Main course to follow, it will be delicious

    You do need to lose some weight so this no food diet will suit you perfectly.

  172. Gab

    Guys, I’m asking about the Khan balloon not the Trump balloon. Ta.

  173. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2763015, posted on July 14, 2018 at 12:23 pm
    I see Mueller has set the table with indictments of named GRU agents. Main course to follow, it will be delicious. If he knows this much about Russian involvement in the hacking, imagine how much he knows about the American side.

    Dream on reactionary lackey of the fascist left establishment. If they turn up in court, will he plead that he is not yet ready to prosecute, as with the last set of Wussia indictments?

  174. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    REVIEW
    Siege: Inside the Lindt Cafe, by Deborah Snow

    Claire Corbett
    The Australian
    12:00AM July 14, 2018

    On the morning of December 15, 2014, a man walked into the Lindt cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place. Most Sydney residents will probably have memories and emotions about what happened next. Just after 9.40am Man Haron Monis took 18 staff and customers hostage, claiming he was committing an act of terrorism in support of the group known as Islamic State.

    Deborah Snow’s compelling book Siege: ­Inside the Lindt Cafe sets out its thesis in the subtitle: it’s the powerful and uncompromising story of what happened and why the police ­response went so tragically wrong.

    Snow, a senior journalist in print and on television, interviewed many key participants and pored over the mountains of evidence submitted during the subsequent inquest. She is in no doubt about where blame for the failure lies: with the NSW Police Force, especially its senior leadership.

    Snow offers an almost hour-by-hour account of the near 17-hour ordeal of the hostages. Two of them, cafe manager Tori Johnson and barrister Katrina Dawson, would not survive.

    Monis was killed too, though it seems clear as the story unfolds that he had no exit strategy and did not expect to walk out of the cafe.

    This question, of Monis’s intentions and ­expectations, goes to one of the most critical failure points in the handling of the siege.

    The high-stakes drama tested the policies, training, capabilities, experience, co-ordination and technical resources of the NSW police and, according to evidence presented to the inquest, exposed serious flaws along almost every seam.

    As hostage Louisa Hope comments: ‘‘I’m sure you’re as shocked and bewildered by what you’ve learnt as I was.’’

    Hindsight is notoriously 20/20 but reading Snow’s clear-eyed and meticulous account is upsetting: time and again there seems to be no explanation for failures of procedure and even competence.

    Why was Monis, charged with being an ­accessory to the murder of his ex-wife as well as 40 counts of sexual assault, free on bail? No ­answer. Why did authorities ignore the 18 calls to the National Security Hotline about Monis’s Facebook page? No answer.

    From the Oz.

  175. The ABC informs me that 100’s of thousands marched in London to protest Trump.

    The footage I say showed way less than that.

  176. Boambee John

    The “American side” is the Demorat machine, that gave up its passwords to a blatant phishing operation! LOL!

  177. Bruce of Newcastle

    If he knows this much about Russian involvement in the hacking, imagine how much he knows about the American side.

    Yes. Hillary’s server is a part of the indictment. How strange that five intelligence agencies hacked it. As I said upthread, all it takes is a cheap lawyer pushing for discovery and Hillary will be in a pantsuit with little arrows all over it.

  178. Oh come on

    Maybe they weren’t able to organise the Khan balloon in time, Gab? Still, if it flies this summer, it’ll be great! I hope they depict him holding a bunch of confiscated kitchen knives.

  179. Gab

    OCO, you might have a point. Bit of a shame though it wasn’t flown when Don was there.

  180. Oh come on

    The “American side” is the Demorat machine, that gave up its passwords to a blatant phishing operation! LOL!

    Didn’t Podesta have a password that was ridiculously vulnerable to a brute force attack? Like John1234?

  181. Elle

    Myrddin Seren, that is Gold!

  182. Confused Old Misfit

    If he knows this much about Russian involvement in the hacking, imagine how much he knows about the American side.

    “There is no allegation in the indictment that any American was a knowing participant in the alleged unlawful activity…There is no allegation in the indictment that the charged conduct altered the vote count or changed the outcome of the 2016 election.” Rosenstein.

    Of course there could well be ANOTHER indictment!
    Wait for it!
    Any day now!

  183. C.L.

    I’m not sure I’m uncomplicatedly on the side of the Catholic education mandarin.
    If he’s spending five large in an election campaign and that’s forbidden given his organisation has charity and tax-free status, the Commonwealth has a case.
    The Catholic schools politburo in this country is rusted-on Labor/Greens.

  184. Oh come on

    How long did it take to get Skywhale off the ground? Mind you that was a government arts grant project, so years and millions of dollars would have been a minimum.

    Yeah I don’t know – it is a pity that someone couldn’t lash something together for the day. It only needed to fly once.

  185. Baldrick

    So what happened to Mayor Khan’s balloon? Haven’t seen or heard anymore about it.

    They’re saving it for a Keep London Safe rally in August, Gab.

  186. C.L.

    Would not surprise me if Putin makes these ‘GRU agents’ available to the US court system, their lawyers appear for discovery, and Mueller has done it again. It would appear that all Dem running dogs are fucking liars. Would you buy a used car from any one of them?

    Indeed.
    This is another fake indictment from troubled Vietnam veteran Bob Mueller.
    There will be no court case. It’s a total sham.
    Unless, of course, the GRU 12 rock up to court like the Wussian 13.
    I hope they do; it would be hilarious.

  187. Oh come on

    Poor m0nty. He’s like a gambling addict sensing his luck might be about to change. Just one more play…

  188. JC

    How convenient. Dog face Mueller presents charges a few hours before Trump meets Putin.

    I’m beginning to think the deep state is more of an enemy than the Russians.

  189. Geriatric Mayfly

    The Jenny Macklin Mark I dirigible at least created a shadow, and it was a work of art. That fizzer in London looks like something a kid would tow around at a birthday party.

  190. Confused Old Misfit

    On its website, the ACNC states an organisation will not be a charity if it has “disqualifying political purposes’’.

    “A charity’s policy position on a matter of concern may be similar to, or align with, that of a particular political party,’’ it said.

    In such a situation it is OK for the charity to continue to campaign on that issue, provided that this does not amount to the charity having a purpose of promoting or opposing a particular political party or candidate. In the lead up to an election there are increased risks that, in the minds of the public, charity advocacy or campaigning can be associated with a particular political party.’’
    A question of intent.

  191. Oh come on

    Yes you routinely see more impressive balloons at sideshow alley.

  192. Baldrick

    Sorry, that should be a ‘Make London Safe Again’ rally.

  193. C.L.

    Also recollect that “Catholic” schools have more or less stopped teaching Catholic doctrine.
    The Australian makes no reference to that in its editorial. It’s not enough to say the sector educates 760,000 children and takes some strain from state schools. So what? That isn’t the raison d’etre of Catholic schools.
    So yeah. Screw them.

  194. Oh come on

    LOL it looks like a tiny yellow rubber ducky.

  195. Rae

    I hope he was drunk I want him to have been drunk because I reckon that could start to spell the end of the EU.

    More wishin’ and hopin’ by the anti EU cadre. Junckers was seriously injured in a car crash years ago which left him with permanent sciatic nerve problems that affect his lower back and legs.

  196. Gab

    LOL I had sciatic and yeah, I stumbled around and slapped people in the face too.

    You’re such an idiot Rae/SFB.

  197. Poor m0nty. He’s like a gambling addict sensing his luck might be about to change. Just one more play…

    He’s down to his underpants. I think I want him to win this one but Trump is telling me we have to keep winning. We have win more. But I think this may be too much winning. Just this once.

  198. C.L.

    Junckers was seriously injured in a car crash years ago which left him with permanent sciatic nerve problems that affect his lower back and legs.

    And it also causes him to randomly slap people in the face.

  199. Oh come on

    I guess it’s hard to organise anything when your crew gets up at midday and is incapacitated by 4pm.

  200. Infidel Tiger

    Juncker is well known to be a drunkard.

  201. None

    Also recollect that “Catholic” schools have more or less stopped teaching Catholic doctrine.

    if that is the case then you need to shut down Australian Catholic University which is the only University offering the mandatory postgraduate qualification we took teachers in the Catholic sector must hold. Also you should remove every child from Catholic parents because it is their job to catch HIV their children supported by their priest. Thirdly you need to ban every priest, brother or nun who breaks their vows from ever working in the Catholic Education sector. No way it’s that’s the perfect place for them.

  202. Oh come on

    None, you’re drunk again.

  203. Zatara

    Rovenstein bullet points apparently not appearing in the leftist meme o’ the day sheets:

    – “There is no allegation in this indictment that any American was a knowing participant in this illegal activity,”

    – “There is no allegation in the indictment that the charged conduct altered the outcome of the 2016 election,”

    – Some Defendants, posing as US persons and without revealing their Russian association, communicated with unwitting individuals associated with the Trump Campaign and with other political activists to seek to coordinate political activities.

  204. Rae

    The ABC informs me that 100’s of thousands marched in London to protest Trump.

    The footage I say showed way less than that.

    Lol.

    Looks like 1 or 2 hundred thousand, at least. More than Trumps inauguration.

  205. None

    *their job to catechize their children

    Stupid spell check. Mind you so many Catholics these days are so promiscuous they are great candidates for catching HIV

  206. Oh come on

    None of that made any sense, None.

  207. None

    Sorry Oh come on. It’s freezing here and my software has frozen.

  208. Farmer Gez

    I’m not sure I’m uncomplicatedly on the side of the Catholic education mandarin.
    If he’s spending five large in an election campaign and that’s forbidden given his organisation has charity and tax-free status, the Commonwealth has a case.
    The Catholic schools politburo in this country is rusted-on Labor/Greens.

    True, the Catholic Church is very left of centre (as are all the churches).
    Stephen Elder is an ex Lib MP for Ripon in Vic.

  209. Infidel Tiger

    Beautiful summers day in london.

    Maybe ten to twenty thousand ratbags at best out on the street.

    Most carrying Palestinian and Venezuelan flags. The usual suspects and a complete non event.

  210. None

    if that is the case then you need to shut down Australian Catholic University which is the only University offering the mandatory postgraduate qualification which teachers in the Catholic sector must hold to work in Catholic schools. Also you should remove every child from Catholic parents because it is their job to catechize their children supported by their priest. Thirdly you need to ban every priest, brother or nun who breaks their vows from ever working in the Catholic Education sector. No wait, that’s the perfect place for them….

  211. Zatara

    Didn’t Podesta have a password that was ridiculously vulnerable to a brute force attack? Like John1234?

    According the wikileaks it was “Password”.

    No, I’m not kidding.

  212. None

    No way is that behaviour by Juncker caused by sciatica problems.

  213. John Constantine

    https://www.theland.com.au/story/3956459/wild-dog-pack-dynamics-best-left-to-nature/

    Rewilding australias parks system with hunting packs.

    It is almost like their left are deploying topline killing machines as area denial devices like mobile landmines.

    Clearances of the prole racist settlers from a region is aided by rewilding with predators, and once you have 100,000 saltwater crocodiles and breeding up in the top end rivers, that lessens the risk of human reinfestation of the system.

    Hunting packs to rewild the murray darling basin, you just know they will do it.

  214. None

    The Catholic Education guy spent less than $5,000 on robo calls that were vetted by lawyers. How different is that to say unions and employers groups which also have tax free status but which in the case of the former, spend millions?

  215. Rae

    SFB?

    ROFL.

    You’re such an idiot Gab. It’s amazing how well you type with both feet in your mouth.

  216. Top Ender

    Interesting review of a book that looks like it might have asked the hard questions

    Hostage drama haunted by unanswered questions
    Claire Corbett

    Siege: Inside the Lindt Cafe
    By Deborah Snow

    Allen & Unwin, 320pp, $32.99

    On the morning of December 15, 2014, a man walked into the Lindt cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place. Most Sydney residents will probably have memories and emotions about what happened next. Just after 9.40am Man Haron Monis took 18 staff and customers hostage, claiming he was committing an act of terrorism in support of the group known as Islamic State.

    Deborah Snow’s compelling book Siege: Inside the Lindt Cafe sets out its thesis in the subtitle: it’s the powerful and uncompromising story of what happened and why the police response went so tragically wrong.

    Snow, a senior journalist in print and on television, interviewed many key participants and pored over the mountains of evidence submitted during the subsequent inquest. She is in no doubt about where blame for the failure lies: with the NSW Police Force, especially its senior leadership.

    Snow offers an almost hour-by-hour account of the near 17-hour ordeal of the hostages. Two of them, cafe manager Tori Johnson and barrister Katrina Dawson, would not survive.

    Monis was killed too, though it seems clear as the story unfolds that he had no exit strategy and did not expect to walk out of the cafe.

    This question, of Monis’s intentions and expectations, goes to one of the most critical failure points in the handling of the siege.

    The high-stakes drama tested the policies, training, capabilities, experience, co-ordination and technical resources of the NSW police and, according to evidence presented to the inquest, exposed serious flaws along almost every seam.

    As hostage Louisa Hope comments: ‘‘I’m sure you’re as shocked and bewildered by what you’ve learnt as I was.’’

    Hindsight is notoriously 20/20 but reading Snow’s clear-eyed and meticulous account is upsetting: time and again there seems to be no explanation for failures of procedure and even competence.

    Why was Monis, charged with being an accessory to the murder of his ex-wife as well as 40 counts of sexual assault, free on bail? No answer. Why did authorities ignore the 18 calls to the National Security Hotline about Monis’s Facebook page? No answer.

    Why did it take 45 minutes to inform the then police commissioner Andrew Scipione that a terrorist incident was under way in Sydney’s CBD, by when the Australian Defence Force’s Tactical Assault Group East was already preparing a response? No answer.

    Why did negotiators not even keep a list of demands made by Monis? Holed up in the nearby NSW Leagues Club, which served as a forward command post, the negotiating team did not have a computer, an iPad or even a smartphone to could keep track of various information feeds in real time. Why? And given the negotiators did not have enough phone lines, why was this not fixed? This failure meant many calls from the hostages went unanswered.

    Why was ASIO, with its far superior surveillance capability, not asked to provide ‘‘eyes’’ inside the cafe? Why were the observations of snipers stationed around Martin Place that Johnson was forced to his knees at gunpoint for seven agonising minutes — a prelude to execution — not relayed to the senior officer in charge of the forward command post?

    This officer had the responsibility to give the order for the tactical teams to storm the cafe. Yet at this most critical moment, when the situation was deteriorating rapidly and the first shots had been fired, officers in the forward command post believed the situation was ‘‘deescalating’’. How could they have been so wrong in reading the situation?

    Over the course of the book it becomes clear that the repeated assurances of police leadership to their political masters that their team was ‘‘the best in the world’’ were not only untrue but were impeding an effective response.

    Overconfidence, rigid thinking and adherence to the sole strategy of ‘‘contain and negotiate’’ long past the time it became clear this was never going to work meant critical chances to engage Monis and to use the capacities of other agencies were missed.

    Worse, this overconfidence meant that opportunities to correct the misreading of the situation were dismissed, especially in debriefing escaped hostages, the only people with inside knowledge of the siege.

    A key figure in this failure was police consultant psychiatrist ‘‘Brian’’ (pseudonyms have been used for legal reasons), who was embedded with the negotiating team during the siege. Snow comments that Brian was ‘‘a forceful character with a formidable intellect and great confidence in his own opinions’’.

    One hostage who escaped, cafe food supervisor Paolo Vassallo, said to the tactical team members waiting next door as he ran out of the fire exit: “Please, what are you guys doing? He’s going to shoot someone. You’ve got to go in, what are you waiting for? If you wait, people are going to die!”

    But Brian dismissed Vassallo’s words, describing his fears as ‘‘babbling’’. Brian had decided early on that ‘‘Monis was unlikely to commit a direct act of violence’’ and at no point changed his opinion. Not even during the inquest, apparently.

    Snow rightly focuses on the hostages as much as possible, rather than Monis, emphasising their ingenuity, selflessness and courage. Far from being passive victims, they did more than anyone to resolve the situation, by managing the volatile Monis’s moods, surreptitiously communicating with each other, trying to communicate with police and accomplishing their own escapes.

    It’s shocking to realise that of the 16 hostages who survived, the vast majority — 12 — freed themselves with no help whatsoever from the police.

    The courage of the tactical operations unit officers who were standing by, facing what they feared might be a bomb, is never in doubt. By the time they stormed the cafe, however, Johnson had been murdered and, of the remaining five hostages, Dawson was later to die in hospital from wounds sustained from fragments of a police bullet.

    The most distressing aspect of Snow’s account is that, as the siege wears on, some hostages realise no one is coming for them, that the police are going to wait until someone is injured or killed before they act, and that they are leaving all the initiative in the hands of the gunman.

    This perception was correct, as Snow proves when she lays out the details of how a plan for a rescue attempt drawn up by one of the most experienced operatives on the tactical teams was never approved by the assistant commissioners. No plan of action was approved during the siege — something that was sharply criticised by one of Britain’s leading experts on armed policing. The hostages were alone.

    It is this realisation that seemed to power the fury and pain expressed at the inquest, with Hope concluding: ‘‘I can’t fully express how shocking that news was to me. Knowing now that one of us had to die or be seriously injured before the police would initiate a rescue of any kind was utterly gut-wrenching.’’

    For the families of Johnson and Dawson, grief is a life sentence. The impact of Monis’s end, however, is deservedly brief, summarised by judge Peter Johnson’s terse epitaph: ‘‘No one mourns his passing.’’ Snow deserves praise for her thorough and empathetic account, which serves as a tribute to the courage and compassion of all the hostages.

    Claire Corbett is a writer and critic.

    More hard questions need to be asked though: who has been fired or imprisoned for what went on?

  217. Crossie

    The ACNC investigation centres on $4378.84 spent by Mr Elder in the lead-up to the March 17 by-election in the federal seat of Batman in Melbourne’s west. In that campaign, in which Labor was challenged by the Greens, with no Liberal standing, Mr Elder and Catholic Education Melbourne backed a computer-generated phone call to voters. It did not pull any punches: “Malcolm Turnbull has slashed funds from low-fee local Catholic and independent schools … The Greens seek to strip funds from Catholic schools … In contrast, Labor believes that local Catholic schools are an essential element of our education system. Labor will restore hundreds of millions in school funding cut by the Liberals … the future of our schools depends on who you support.”

    When you are to the left of Labor you can no longer even pretend to be a Liberal government, you are the Greens.

    Social conservatism is the only thing Liberals had to offer Catholics so cutting funding to their schools will only lead to further alienation.

  218. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Interesting review of a book that looks like it might have asked the hard questions

    I’ve got a copy on order – should make interesting reading.

  219. Yes. Hillary’s server is a part of the indictment. How strange that five intelligence agencies hacked it.

    No it’s not, Bruce. And that link was from 2016, and was a pack of lies.

  220. It’s Remarkable

    The very early post suggesting that bread prices will rise extraodinarily due to an increase in the price of wheat needs some thinking about:
    1. Most of the wheat used to make bread in Aussie has been purchased well in advance of it being needed, mostly some months ago, at the prices at the time.
    2. The value of wheat in a loaf of ‘normal’ bread is about 15 cents, you could therefore double the price of wheat and make not much difference to the price of bread. Most of the cost is in labour, other ingredients and (nowadays) the cost of power for the ovens. Plus a profit margin of course.
    3. The (now) popular ‘craft’ style breads – sourdough, various boutique mixes, Italian, Turkish and flat-style variants are even less related to the price of wheat, since they are all greatly higher in price (per gram) than standard loaves.

    Increased price of wheat is a seriously good thing, mainly for the growers who depend on the stuff for an income, but one effect will not be (much) on the price of Australian bread, even though it will be blamed for any increase that does occur.

  221. candy

    That Junckers guy is high on something, maybe opioids if he’s had seroius pain issues, more likely he’s just plain drunk as a skunk. The way he was holding his tie up to the other guy’s tie because the same colour and giving slurpy kisses looked like he’s just a drunk idiot.

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