Monday Forum: July 16, 2018

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1,568 Responses to Monday Forum: July 16, 2018

  1. Farmer Gez

    John Faine (ABC radio 774) told his audience today that he owns a camp dog he adopted from the Kimberly.
    Pathetic and funny at the same time. So ABC.

  2. DrBeauGan

    Do you agree though that taxation is theft?

    No. It’s extortion. Cough up or get banged up.

  3. Stimpson J. Cat

    Ask Lauren if she would ever consider cosplaying as a coal-fired power station for me.

  4. Old School Conservative

    Outsiders is currently interviewing Anne Marie Waters, from the UK “For Britain” movement.
    Lots of good ideas, arguments, and suggestions for a civilised Britain.
    (lots of my comment is withdrawn to get through 2 “in moderation” barriers.)

  5. Geriatric Mayfly

    Calli. Mars has now cleared Vulcan’s handiwork, which obscures the eastern aspect of my canopy above.
    Ablaze with lust, unrequited and unforgiving, but still in pursuit of the Venus and her paramour, who for the sake of modesty, have now faded behind the drapes on the western horizon.

  6. DrBeauGan

    No chance for me to see Luna, Venus or Mars tonight. It’s a sky full of cloud when it’s not actually raining.

    That’s naycha for you.

  7. Tom

    Great post at 9.15pm, Des Deskperson.

    Can you tell me from your vast experience: what is your best estimate of what it costs the public service to perform a service versus the private sector?

    My guestimate is that it costs the APS at least twice as much to do anything compared with the private sector. In other words, the real cost of the federal government is HALF or less what we pay in taxes and therefore the size of government could theoretically be halved without affecting serviced delivery if it were privatised.

  8. testpattern

    ‘Everyone here seems agreed ABC funding should be reduced by at least 90 per cent’

    What? In Cairns? And hand Pacific broadcasting over to China Radio International? Idiots/traitors.

    Tommy Jiang and China Radio International

    ‘Beijing’s chief Australian propagandist has backed Liberal candidate John Alexander in the Bennelong byelection while savaging the Turnbull government’s efforts to counter Beijing’s interference in Australia.’

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/chinese-media-mogul-tommy-jiang-wants-john-alexander-in-bennelong-20171215-h055ds.html

    ‘A group of eminent Australian journalists associated with Papua New Guinea and the Pacific have come together to persuade the Australian government to rebuild the ABC’s once great broadcasting services to the region. They include well-known names such as Sean Dorney, Jemima Garrett, Max Uechtritz, Tess Newton-Cain, Sue Ahearn, Peter Marks and Jioji Ravulo. They have the full support of me personally and PNG Attitude with its 5,000 followers.

    The Australian government is at present conducting a review of Australian broadcasting in the region. It is taking submissions until Friday 3 August (read about it here). This is a great opportunity to change Australian policy on this important issue. I strongly urge you to make a submission. And, if you need a helping hand, you’ve got three expert journalists to provide it: Sean Dorney ([email protected]), Jemima Garrett ([email protected]) and Sue Ahearn ([email protected]).’

    ‘The countries that do not receive ABC radio now include Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, French Polynesia, Kiribati, Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Palau, Marshall Islands and Tuvalu…While the ABC and the department of Foreign Affairs were looking the other way China’s state-owned media has taken hold of 10 former Radio Australia frequencies bringing the defence establishment behind proposals to revitalise Asia Pacific broadcasting..

    Ironically, considering the antipathy of some in the LNP to the ABC, the independence of ABC broadcasting is an asset in an environment in which offsetting the tightly-controlled message of China’s state-run media is a key aim.’

    http://asopa.typepad.com/asopa_people/2018/07/heres-how-you-can-help-revive-abc-services-to-png.html

  9. Steve trickler

    Oh come on
    #2765088, posted on July 16, 2018 at 9:10 pm
    You are giving it what it wants.

    They’ll always be here, OCO. Always.



  10. mh

    SBS headline:

    ‘Putin will have Trump for breakfast’: How summit may backfire

    * sigh *

  11. Makka

    Westie Woman is from Perth AFAIK. Why would she know anything about Cassie from Sydney?

    He’s updating his files including known associates.

  12. zyconoclast

    George Christiansen has joined the queue to ask a question.

    More likely he thinks its the free food queue

  13. .

    Actually Makka, Precious has been put to bed in his basket and Grigory has warmed up the Bedford Van.

    Some soothing music before Grigsie’s bedtime.

  14. zyconoclast

    Sounds like Southern’s throwing out the red meat to the hordes. Same as what Milo did. Don’t get too star-struck, Peter.

    Conservatives are really lame about this kind of thing. Ooh someone famous and/or attractive is saying stuff we agree with.

    An alternative opinion on LS on you tube.

    Video one

    Video two

  15. John Constantine

    Why not let Sky tender for the Pacific broadcasting?.

    What is the point of replacing the Australia disdaining chicoms with godless commo hippy revolutionary Australia loathing and despising ABC types?.

    Comrades.

  16. Neil

    here are now 152,095 of these fucking parasites. The sovereign wealth fund which has ~ $130 billion socked away was set up to deal with these parasitical whackos’ retirement.

    Close to the truth but it also includes Army, Navy, Airforce, Federal Police and anybody else who gets paid by the govt. Costello got rid of DB schemes but they still get a generous 15.4% Super

  17. JC

    Des:

    Let me repeat, I’ve read your opinions of the APS, so it’s kind of redundant to suggest that you’ve been clear. You have, but of course that’s not the point. It cannot and will never be improved because it structurally cannot. Bureaucracies with never ending supply of stolen loot cannot be.

    Having said that, I cannot see how a person who political ideology opposed to big government could ever work for such a monster – knowing the money coming his or her way is essentially stolen.

    This bias is, I’m afraid, seen at its worse in those public sector functions that you consider ‘essential ‘- defence and security, areas inevitably excused from proper oversight because they are ‘vital’.

    I’m sure, but at this stage we need a military and we need the cops, the judiciary etc. However if the bureaucracy was made much smaller, there would be more time to focus on the remaining bits. Essential services are different too, because there is or theoretically should be and understanding with those people they are placing their bodies/lives on the line in between those that want to harm us. That agreement alone changes things compared to say, the slug working as director of communakshions for some useless minister. The other day, your pal was telling us how hard she worked preparing information for a minister attempting to cover his backside. It was totally lost on the slob, how much worse it looked in regards to the need for her job. There was no understanding at all.

    Having said this, there are still plenty – perhaps even a majority – of APS employees – intelligent, professional and objective – who work hard to counter these biases in developing and implement in the policies of the Government of the day.

    It’s a soviet model. It can never work and can never be reformed. It becomes bigger and bigger until an economic crisis hits and the routine starts all over again from a smaller base.

    I am for them. Maybe some of them they are wasting their time, but in a corporatist society like Australia, there any number of other people who are at least also arguably leeches in various ways on the so called productive members of the community, whether they realise it and can help or not.

    Where do you think the corporatism begins if not from the state and the state apparatus? Corporatism is basically one giant suck up between the state and the large corporations. Regulations and the regulatory state is totally responsible for its creation. It’s pure evil.
    My point rests, the state would not be able to fucntion without so many willing executioners. So don’t work for it.
    There’s also one big difference being useles while for the state vs working for a corporation in the private sphere. Eventually the money runs out if there are too many useless slugs in a firm. They go broke or bought out. The money doesn’t run out for the state.

    Anyone employed under an enterprise agreement negotiated by unions and certified by the FWA, for example.

    Yep, they’re thieving slugs too, but I don’t see the point.

  18. Geriatric Mayfly

    No chance for me to see Luna, Venus or Mars tonight.

    An unforgivable omission and lack of observation on my part. I will have to blame the crook neck. Astride and in the middle, between the lovers and the lustful god of war, is Jupiter himself. If anyone is to get first pick of the heavenly beauties it will be him. But tonight he seems hobbled and still well behind in the nuptial chase.

  19. .

    You gotta be fair JC.

    The government sticks its nose in and swallows up entire industries. Where do people trained in X then work?

    The thing is too, Defence, Treasury, etc, the essential PS functions still require staff.

  20. JC

    I am being fair, Dot. I haven’t disagreed nor do now with anything you’ve said.

  21. Tom

    * sigh *

    mh, ninety nine per cent of the war being waged on the West from within is bullshit propaganda that doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. The left is down to the bottom of the barrel and is freaking out because, in the real world where real people live outside the mainstream news media, especially in America — the world’s biggest economy — it is firing blanks.

    In Australia, the ABC is indispensable to the left because it is a megaphone with zero real performance metrics that it is required to meet and is allowed to swamp the airwaves with green left propaganda without accountability.

    Defund the ABC and the Australian left would shrivel back into the tiny communist rabble it was in the 1970s, when Trotskyists and Maoists would argue among themselves about ideology and disrupt the Liars Party state and federal conferences, then wouldn’t be heard from for the rest of the year.

  22. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Whatever happened to Ms Dolittle?
    Not that I miss her, or she ever added anything positive to the blog.

    Troll, Ms. Doolittle is a treasure, tres witty, delightfully ascerbic.
    Don’t expect you’ve noticed.

    She pops in and out when it suits her. Always good to see her.

  23. Gab

    Jupiter himself. If anyone is to get first pick of the heavenly beauties it will be him. But tonight he seems hobbled and still well behind in the nuptial chase.

    Nah, he;s just playing hard to get.

  24. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Defund the ABC and the Australian left would shrivel back into the tiny communist rabble it was in the 1970s, when Trotskyists and Maoists would argue among themselves about ideology and disrupt the Liars Party state and federal conferences, then wouldn’t be heard from for the rest of the year.

    True. Certain university departments and the ABC see it as their mission to set the tone for the Nation. Start defunding and save the furniture. There is a lot of ruin already, but it’s not too late to call halt.

  25. JC

    The government sticks its nose in and swallows up entire industries. Where do people trained in X then work?

    Dot, there are 152,095 APSers. knock out 10,000 tied to essential services. That leaves lets say 140,000. The savings alone would amount to ~$20 billion a year. That money going back into the private sphere and much lower tax rates would be more than adequate to help with new jobs. Sure, I accept that a large number wouldn’t be employable, so they aim low, such as washing dishes. We can find a way to live and prosper.

  26. .

    It’s a soviet model. It can never work and can never be reformed. It becomes bigger and bigger until an economic crisis hits and the routine starts all over again from a smaller base.

    I think we screwed up by having a Federal capital.

    We have Canberra turned into another London, Washington, dare I say it, King’s Landing.

    People working for the Feds in Sydney or Brisbane just tend to see it as a job.

    When families and young people move to Canberra and begin generational APS careers, we start to see the creation of an ersatz aristocracy, outside of the legal profession and Parliament.

    It would be fair to say that the Morrisons, the Streets, the Katters and APS dynasties are actually a sample of our ruling class.

    Uncontrolled aristocracy nearly always becomes an oligarchy. The degree of merit in the aforementioned who’s who varies considerably.

  27. JC

    In many ways we’re in a worse position than the US, because at least the US has someone who recognizes there’s a swamp – a huge dirty swamp called Canberra.

  28. Rae

    APS to be abolished?

    Never. Not even significantly diminished. What some here see as essential services is not what the general population sees as essential services.

  29. .

    Maybe it ought to be Stackja.

    We probably also screwed up at Federation, inevitably due to State rivalries and vested interests.

    Things would have been peachy if we:

    1. Split up into more States, maybe 20 from 6, and;
    2. Had a confederation with a rotating Presidency.

    The Federal executive could have rotated between Premiers/Governors and the Federal bench (High Court) could have been a pool of the most senior judges that had not sat on each case. Federal law could have been made by agreement.

    All we would have for Commonwealth APS would be Treasury, an Attorney General’s office of sorts, Defence and External Affairs.

  30. .

    Rae
    #2765151, posted on July 16, 2018 at 10:06 pm
    APS to be abolished?

    Never. Not even significantly diminished. What some here see as essential services is not what the general population sees as essential services.

    Sad but true. The DSP is an “essential service”. That’s why there are 760,000 DSP recipients (4.5% of the voting age populace).

  31. Geriatric Mayfly

    Like layers of undisturbed sedimentary rock, the social strata of Canberra were once described to me. There were not many and all of recent geological age. The top four accretions yielded no secrets and offered most resistance when struck with the pick, but I cannot recall their constituent parts. The lower layers, an odd assortment of conglomerates and mudstones which didn’t count for much in the grand scheme of things and were easily shovelled out of sight.

  32. Rae

    Things would have been peachy if we:

    1. Split up into more States, maybe 20 from 6, and;

    Maybe 14 states from splits as follows:

    VIC = 1 state ; TAS = 1 state ; ACT = 1 state
    NSW = 2 states ; QLD = 2 states ; SA = 2 states ; NT = 2 states
    WA = 3 states

    Each with only 2 Senators.

  33. Oh come on

    Lauren Southern is sound on many issues. She’s also better looking than most. I don’t think she’s anything particularly special on either count, though. But that’s just me – each to their own.

    When Jordan Peterson came out to Oz, I got to thinking about situations when I might pay a decent chunk of money to see a pundit or ‘opinion maker’ speak live. I’d want to be certain they were offering something new and interesting. So yes for one of Peterson’s biblical lectures perhaps, and no for a speaking tour engagement where he’s giving his stock speech.

    The lecture circuit in the US that has been such a fantastic source of income for past-it politicians seems rather bizarre.

  34. zyconoclast

    PhD Scholarship
    Innovations in qualitative methodologies:
    Exploring changes in gender equality related to
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    most likely in Nepal and/or Cambodia.
    This position is available to domestic students (i.e. students who do not require a visa). The successful
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    by Professor Juliet Willetts.

  35. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    We probably also screwed up at Federation, inevitably due to State rivalries and vested interests.

    For whatever reason, I’m remembering an academic argument, quite a few years ago, that the men who drew up the Australian Constitution, had the example before them, of a war fought over States rights, and the role of a Federal Government, and they were determined to avoid any recurrence.

  36. JC

    Well that’s great Rones, but what exactly is your opinion on federation without resorting to a book review.
    Have a shot at a first opinion without a book review.

  37. Geriatric Mayfly

    PhD Scholarship
    Innovations in qualitative methodologies:
    Exploring changes in gender equality related to
    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

    Good time of year to start. The impact of snow-bunny piss on the fragile drainage basins in the Snowy Mountains.

  38. Bruce in WA

    We’d never get away with this now:

  39. Oh come on

    Poor old Anthony Bourdain. Gives a virtue-signalling interview for the benefit of his girlfriend, who promptly cucks him and he necks himself.

    Harvey Weinstein is probably pissing himself with laughter.

  40. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Scooby…i dont see ZK2A insulting every man & his dog (sorry) like you do.

    JC thinks he’s being terribly witty, and mocking, in deciding on cheesy, little schoolyard nicknames for other Cats, and wonders why they just can’t be ar$ed replying to his ravings. It’s something to do with the standard of wit on a traders desk, but, if that’s the standard of wit on a traders desk, it’s puerile, to say the least.

    I won’t go into the issue of how he was outed as a blatant liar on the Cat, perhaps next time…..

  41. John Constantine

    Sir Richard Hadlee’s bowel cancer was operated on, but now they have to go back and dig out the liver cancer.

  42. Makka

    Oz;

    Liberal senator Dean Smith is urging Malcolm Turnbull to sanction a wide-ranging Senate inquiry into Australia’s population policy, believing the recent reduction in immigration levels does not go far enough to ease community concerns about population growth.

    With the national population to hit 25 million next month, the West Australian senator has written to the Prime Minister, Treasurer Scott Morrison and Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, urging them to support a year-long inquiry into the issue.

    A special Newspoll today reveals that 72 per cent of voters support the Turnbull government’s cut of more than 10 per cent to the annual permanent migrant intake to 163,000 last financial year — ­revealed in The Australian on Friday — on the back of a crackdown on fraudulent claims and a sharp rise in visa refusals.

    Only 9 per cent of voters strongly oppose the cutback, revealing the depth of support in the community to put the brakes on immigration amid claims that the capital cities are not coping with population growth.

    The Newspoll of 1644 voters across the country reveals that 47 per cent “strongly approved” of the reduction in immigration levels and 25 per cent somewhat approved. Only 9 per cent strongly disapproved.

    Support was strongest among One Nation voters — 88 per cent in favour. Coalition voters were on the same page with 83 per cent in support.

    In a sign that Bill Shorten is out of touch with the Labor base, twice as many ALP voters supported the cut to immigration as opposed it — 64 to 32 per cent. Almost half of Greens voters also sided with the government: 49 per cent either strongly or somewhat in favour while 44 per cent disapproved.

  43. JC

    Ronery
    Lol
    You’re absolutely fucking useless. You treat this place like a lonely hearts club and spread bad karma by being a pack animal. Absolutely useless.

  44. Oh come on

    Hahahahahahahaha the left’s latest hero doesn’t know shit and is clearly not ready for primetime. Watch the video – she’s a real dummy!

    What we need is more clueless young Democrat candidates running for Congress.

    (Via Insty)

  45. Oh come on

    Almost half of Greens voters also sided with the government: 49 per cent either strongly or somewhat in favour while 44 per cent disapproved.

    I would not have predicted that.

  46. Makka

    So basically, nobody wants to see mass immigration into Australia. Watch Turdball fk it up.

  47. So basically, nobody wants to see mass immigration into Australia.

    That’s pretty-much been the case since the 1980’s.
    Hasn’t made a skerrick of difference.

  48. rickw

    Overnight flight to Singapore from Melbournistan.

  49. Infidel Tiger

    Poor old Anthony Bourdain. Gives a virtue-signalling interview for the benefit of his girlfriend, who promptly cucks him and he necks himself.

    Those metoo sheilas are all horrendous fright bats.

    They are crazy.

  50. Infidel Tiger

    Doesn’t matter what we think.

    The whole ponzi collapses when they turn of the third world spigot.

  51. rickw

    So basically, nobody wants to see mass immigration into Australia.

    That’s pretty-much been the case since the 1980’s.
    Hasn’t made a skerrick of difference.

    It could have started much earlier than that.

    Most weren’t that keen on the Greeks and Italians post WWII, even though there were relatively few issues arising.

    I wonder what the actual net benefit to Australia was apart from the introduction of souvlaki and pizza?

    Especially now that Australian taxpayers are funding a fair proportion of them to live out their twilight years in the village they originated from.

  52. Oh come on

    Some good vids on the Twitter tonight. Here’s one of a guy robbing a restaurant copping it sweet from the staff. Pretty funny. There’s one guy who’s like ‘is he subdued? Not sure? Better belt him another 15 times just in case’. The bald dude with the ‘tash doesn’t quite know what to do with himself.

  53. Makka

    JULIAN Assange is reportedly set to be evicted from Ecuador’s London embassy after six years of asylum, with Britain in high-level talks with the South American country.

    I bet they are. The Brits know Assange has the goods on GCHQ spying on the Trump campaign. They have to know what he knows and where the data is stored.

  54. rickw

    The bald dude with the ‘tash doesn’t quite know what to do with himself.

    To be fair to him, it would have been hard to thread a punch between his co-workers shoulders, they were packed in tight!

  55. John Constantine

    Unfortunately, their Ponzi collapses as soon as the feeling vanishes that exponential growth in importation of consumption machines for capital city property services is State guaranteed.

    The last exponential leg in the Ponzi was the two million visas issued to consumption machines, these allowed the property Ponzi in dog box vertical slums ‘student 9 square meter bedpods’.

    Where is the next leg up coming from?.

    Bet they will throw super money at it, or let dodgy councils sign off on crap developments, or let developers openly link citizenship rights to Australian taxfunded troughs to buying into the Ponzi.

    Ponzi must feel like it will always double, or it will halve.

    The mansion of the Australia Post head honcho going on the market for 44 million in the wasteland that is yarragrad is a sign. How does that expect to double to 88 million?.

  56. John Constantine

    Even when the Ponzi lets go, that doesn’t mean we will fail to meet our signed obligations to obey fashionable decolonialisation theory.

    We will never waver from our abject and craven self loathing.

    Our elites will claim that all those human battery cages must be filled, now they are built.

    Stack them higher and tighter and train them the correct way to vote.

    Comrades.

  57. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    https://www.google.com/search?q=sarah+blasko+flame+trees&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-ab

    Poor, silly stupid old J.C. – had for breakfast on this blog by far better men then he will ever be. He may have been on a trading desk, but I doubt it.

  58. BorisG

    JC, taxation is either theft or it is not. If 10% not theft then it is not theft at any rate. I think the current taxation and spending levels are way too high, but it is not theft.

    Taxation is absolutely essential to a functioning society, starting not even with the army but with a court system, which admisters the laws.

    I completely agree that the self perpetuating government bureaucracy is deeply flawed. We shall see if trump succeeds to slash it to any substantial extent. So far he has not done anything noticeable in this direction but I have learned to be patient as experience shows when he gets around doing something he promised, it may be radical.

  59. JC

    The one economic test for immigration is to watch the capital to labor ratio. If it’s going up then it’s been net positive. If it’s falling it’s a negative.

    No other bullshit, such as Ponzi schemes answers the question. If you want to make a case on sociological grounds, well that’s different.

    Makka

    I have a question for you. How do you really square your views on immigration when you’re an economic immigrant yourself at the moment. If you argue they are paying you a lot of money, then why shouldn’t that same arguement apply to 457s?

    Curious.

  60. Makka

    So far he has not done anything noticeable in this direction but I have learned to be patient as experience shows when he gets around doing something he promised, it may be radical.

    Trump has a plan. Gotta start somewhere.

    Trump seeks to reorganize the federal government

    Trump seeks to reorganize the federal government
    A soon-to-be released report will recommend combining safety-net programs under HHS while also recommending big changes at other agencies.

    By HELENA BOTTEMILLER EVICH and ANDREW RESTUCCIA 06/06/2018 03:26 PM EDT
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
    The Trump administration is preparing to release a sweeping plan for reorganizing the federal government that includes a major consolidation of welfare programs — and a renaming of the Health and Human Services Department.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/06/06/trump-reorganize-federal-government-629133

  61. JC

    Boris

    Sure, but there are degrees of theft. A person stealing a dollar is not going receive the same punishment as someone cleaning out your home and bank account.

    Also, I believe I made the case for just funding the bare basics which includes those items you mentioned.

    Taxation is necessary for the proper functioning of society is the big lie.

  62. BorisG

    Most weren’t that keen on the Greeks and Italians post WWII, e

    How about before 1770? Most Australians weren’t keen either but this made little difference.

  63. Makka

    Curious.

    Easy. Africa is skills deficient in my area where Australia is not.

    I’m not a citizen of the country I work in and never want to be. I abide by their laws as a guest. I’m here to transfer knowledge and get things done. It’s a completely different landscape in Australia which is far more developed. These guys here get a great deal!

  64. BorisG

    Taxation is necessary for the proper functioning of society is the big lie.

    Sorry i think JC you contradict yourself. if you agree taxation is necessary for basic esstisl services and minimal welfare then it is neither a lie nor a small theft, because it is not theft at all.

  65. Makka

    then why shouldn’t that same arguement apply to 457s?

    Completely different levels of national development, education, skills and experience. Developing countries are desperate to develop their own while earning from exports. In this case minerals

    I can’t think of any area where 457’s are necessary in Australia if the tax , immigration and economic settings were sensible.

  66. BorisG

    Trump has a plan. Gotta start somewhere.

    Totally agree and support. Consolidation is one important step. Not just to reduce bureaucracy and paperwork but also to understand how much of this exists.

    However slashing actual programs and firing people en masses may be much much harder.

  67. JC

    Sorry Makka, I’m not buying that. You’re making sweeping assumptions about skills shortages here while excusing yourself.

    What you’re arguing – and you have argued zero immigration- is that a firm should be precluded from hiring a foreigner as CEO, CFO or the chief tech officer. That’s such a retarded comment that you’re having a lend.

    Remember, you’ve argued zero immigration which means no foreigner could compete for say the CEO job at BHP or Rio for instance.

    Your argument is self serving and very hypocritical.

  68. JC

    Boris

    I’m not contradicting myself. I argued that 10% of GDP is still stealing but nowhere near the magnitude we see now where the demand for taxation and spending is limitless.

    Von Mises argued consumer wants are unlimited. The demand for welfare is also unlimited. People have to understand that taxation is theft, which incidentally is a very core belief in libertarian thinking. There are degrees of theft, which is the point I was making.

    I don’t quite understand how there’s really no difference in the severity of the crime when someone steals $10 or $100.

  69. Mitch M.

    PhD Scholarship
    Innovations in qualitative methodologies:
    Exploring changes in gender equality related to
    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

    That is either a joke or someone in the department has been licking cane toads. So incredulous was I that I had to check with Google. Damn you Zyconoclast you have shredded my last remaining hopes for this country.

  70. JC

    And Rones, last as usual

    Stop the hallucinating, you whack job. You’ve had such an arse here at the Cat that you now eat and shit out the same hole.

    Even your famous 2015 open forum, you received a well deserved arse kicking.

    Just accept the fact that you’re the Cats arse kicking pinata go to bed as you’re no doubt drunk again.

  71. BorisG

    Makka you may be right about minerals, because in this area Australia is one of World leaders. But in oil and gas Australia is a very small player and has very limited supply of professionals, most of whom are expats. Without them (and educators in this area, who also mostly expats), most of the majors would have to locate their regional hubs elsewhere.

    And while we have some educational programs in this field, Australia simply does not have economy of scale to build viable educational programs in many specialized engineering and technology areas.

  72. BorisG

    JC, are you now arguing that taxation for the sake of essential services (courts, police, army etc) is still theft ? Police and soldiers are thieves ?

  73. JC

    More on the capital/Labor ratio.

    Australia’s Capital to labor ratio had a reasonably strong growth rate of 3.7% 1974 to 2014. That’s quite high and suggests despite the headwind stuff like legislated wages etc and inflexible labor markets, this ratio has been healthy. Consequently, calling economic immigration a Ponzi scheme is simply wrong. Living standards have been rising primarily due to higher population levels as a result of economic scaling. Bigger population means better economies of scale. In this decade we’ve seen an even higher ratio registered.
    This is the point. If you want to argue against economic immigration then do so on sociological grounds and not ridiculous comments like the quality of pizza has improved. Incidentally, I think it has with the latest batch coming here and improving it. 🙂
    Look, it’s okay to argue that you don’t like females wearing towels over their heads or someone’s head shape is different and you don’t like it. Personally, I prefer french being spoken if I’m going to hear a foreign language, rather than say, Chinese or Russian (sorry Boris). I think it’s also okay to argue that cities are becoming more crowded. But there’s no argument from the economic side as there’s no Ponzi scheme and those using it should stop.

    Here’s the link to the stats I used.

    https://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/productivity-update/2015-/2014-australian-productivity

  74. JC

    JC, are you now arguing that taxation for the sake of essential services (courts, police, army etc) is still theft ? Police and soldiers are thieves ?

    Tolerable theft, if we have to split hairs. But yes, taxation is theft and there’s really no argument against this. It’s expropriation of one’s labors.

    Now you could make an argument to suggest …

    yes I know it’s wrong to expropriate someone’s money but we need it to support the very basic facets of the state such as the judiciary, military, cops etc. It will be a very light touch form of expropriation and we’re very sorry

    Most sensible libertarians could live with this while the extreme wing would still oppose it. But the very honest position to hold is recognizing it is still expropriation of one’s labors. There’s no movement in this first argument.

  75. JC

    Boris.
    Here’s an idea for possibly helping change the minds of the population through persuasion. Stop calling taxation , taxation. Begin calling it expropriation, because that’s what it really is. The ATO should now be the AEO , the Australian Expropriation Office. A person working at the AEO should be an Expropriation Officer. Call it what it really is!

  76. Mark A

    JC
    So your solution would be what?

    Tariffs like the GST or user pays?

  77. Snoopy

    Get that strangulated testicle seen to, stat.

  78. Tom

    Bonus Ben Garrison Crooked Hillary GIF animation.

  79. RobK

    Thanks Tom. Garrison at 4.32 is quite a powerful image.

  80. None

    See, this is the genius of Australian political cartoonists- well at least the good ones like Johannes Leak who is looking like he’ll become legendary status like his dad. They can draw, and they can caricature. Their subjects are instantly recognisable. Compare that to Ameeican cartoonisys. Like Garrison’s Trump. Trump doesn’t look anything like that. His Putin is shocking as well. And most American political cartoons are not funny. Johannes Leak is lightning years ahead of the old pros.

  81. Up The Workers!

    With the Democrats running the Ku Klux Klintons for the highest office in the land in the U.S.A., and the Labor(sic) Party running the likes of Juliar, Krudd, Bull Shitten and either Alwaysleazy or Pillberserk-Coutts-Trotter in Australia, I don’t know what disease has gotten into the Left, but it is both virulent and terminal.

    Let’s all hope that the Left will be put out of our misery before they do any more damage.

    We need to drain our swamp.

  82. Ragu

    Gotta love politicians.

    Two people die of meningococcal and the Pardy of Layba promise to make everything free to treat that particularly nasty form of death.

    Never miss an opportunity to fund a ‘crisis’.

    Comrades

  83. Top Ender

    Hmmm…

    Malcolm Turnbull’s chances of winning back the marginal Queensland Labor seat of Longman have been dealt a blow with revelations his candidate wrongly claimed to have won a military medal for distinguished service.

    Liberal National Party can­didate Trevor Ruthenberg ­ad­mitted he may have “screwed up’’. A former state MP, his ­biography on the Queensland parliament website has for six years stated the former air force corporal won the Australian Service Medal. Mr Ruthenberg, who was tipped to win the federal seat at the July 28 by-election, was yesterday confronted about his claim by The Courier-Mail newspaper.

    “If I screwed up then I screwed up and all I can do is apologise,” he said. “It was certainly not intentional and I respect the uniform way too much to claim I earned something I didn’t.”

    Mr Ruthenberg had hoped to deliver a historic win for Mr Turnbull in Longman: no government in almost a century has won a seat off an opposition. The Queensland parliament website has stated since 2012 — when he was elected for a single term under the Newman government — that he was awarded an Australian Service Medal. The medal is awarded for distinguished service in peacekeeping zones and non-war operations.

    The Courier-Mail reported that Mr Ruthenberg, who served in the RAAF 38 Squadron as an aeronautical ground engineer, did not ­receive the distinction and ­instead received the Australian Defence Medal, given to all ­military personal after serving four years. Mr Ruthenberg said he had no idea how the mistake ­occurred. “I have got absolutely no clue,” he told The Courier-Mail. “I don’t have the source documents. If the source documents are wrong then I apologise for that. Dead set, you are the first person to have ever asked me about it. If I made the mistake, I made the mistake.”

    The by-election is one of five being contested on July 28 and follows the resignation of one-term Labor incumbent and now-candidate Susan Lamb because she held dual citizenship.

    Ms Lamb defeated Turnbull government frontbencher Wyatt Roy, on the back of One Nation preferences, at the 2016 federal election.

    Polling has shown Mr ­Ruthenberg, who lost his seat state seat of Kallangur after one term, was ahead of Ms Lamb on a two-party-preferred basis.

    His preselection was delayed amid questions over his own citizenship status. Born in Papua New Guinea, he eventually presented paperwork to the LNP’s legal advisers showing he did not hold dual citizenship.

    The ASM is NOT awarded for distinguished “service in peacekeeping zones and non-war operations” but rather just for service there. If these are direct quotes sounds like someone has confused the two medals and also inserted the word “distinguished.”

    Oz article link

  84. Tel

    Tolerable theft, if we have to split hairs. But yes, taxation is theft and there’s really no argument against this. It’s expropriation of one’s labors.

    The word “theft” implies there’s some stealth to it, but taxation is more normally like armed robbery, basically “Your money or your life!”

    Not like they sneak around and take the money when you aren’t looking, they just march up and demand it with threats of violence if you don’t comply. Point is that you could refuse to pay the tax, but then you just have to put up with the violent retribution. It’s a choice like any other really.

  85. Snoopy

    but taxation is more normally like armed robbery, basically “Your money or your life!”

    That’s the trouble with representative government. The representatives make laws not to everyone’s liking. What’s the better alternative?

  86. Mater

    A former state MP, his ­biography on the Queensland parliament website has for six years stated the former air force corporal won the Australian Service Medal.

    And you are ‘awarded’ a Medal, you don’t ‘win’ it. It’s not a raffle (although sometimes I do wonder).

  87. Eyrie

    Top Ender, they spun up Ceres to give 1/3 g at the surface near the equator. So you are upside down in the tunnels, head towards center of Ceres. Ceres would simply fly apart. BIG science error.

  88. Mater

    JC,
    I don’t mind paying reasonable taxation for services that benefit all and I don’t consider it theft. What I do think borders on theft is progressive taxation.
    Remove that, ensure everyone has equal skin in the expenditure game, and I think we’d see a different attitude throughout the electorate.
    The fact that 40% of income earners don’t pay net tax is utterly wrong (and this doesn’t include welfare recipients, pensioners, etc).
    There is a remarkably small segment of the community who are holding this rock show together.

  89. Top Ender

    I must pay more attention Eyrie…

    The other one that annoyed me was the glossing over of the time it would need for the distances to be travelled. IIRR the Sun is 9 light minutes away and Jupiter from Earth is 40. Their spaceships are way too fast for the narratives to hang together in reality.

    Still, I liked the general chaos of the Belter worlds, and the crime and filth (in places, gotta have more though). Disliked the manbuns and the whole new Belter language thing.

  90. Entropy

    The belter language thing is a fictional device to emphasise a diverging culture from the mother planet.

    Truth is any “belter” tongue would end up astronaut English.

  91. amortiser

    The “taxation is theft” is worth some discussion.

    In the legal sense taxation is not theft as it is collected in accordance with legislation within the powers provided for in the constitution. Morally it is quite another matter.

    If the government collects a tax outside its powers it is acting no different than a bushranger.

    This indeed has happened and quite recently and the amounts collected were very substantial.

    In the eighties and nineties state governments imposed taxes on alcohol and fuel. Eventually this was challenged in the High Court and the taxes were found to be “excises”, a tax reserved to the federal government. As a consequence all the amounts raised were collected illegally.

    Immediately, publicans lodged writs against the Queensland government for the return of all the taxes illegally collected as was their right.

    What was the result? Enter the bushranger!! Peter Costello told the litigants to withdraw their writs otherwise he would introduce retrospective legislation into the federal parliament to legitimise those taxes.

    The constitution to these people is an administrative inconvenience not the bulwark protecting the people from the government. The saddest thing about this disgraceful event was that hardly a whimper was raised against this action.

    Taxation is legally raised but we must remember that those raising the taxes really don’t have any respect for the rules under which those taxes are raised.

  92. Farmer Gez

    Listening to ABC AM.
    It’s August 23rd 1939 all over again.
    Watch out Poland!

  93. Mater

    BorisG
    #2765202, posted on July 17, 2018 at 12:18 am

    Most weren’t that keen on the Greeks and Italians post WWII, e

    How about before 1770? Most Australians weren’t keen either but this made little difference.

    Boris,
    Not arguing the validity (or otherwise) of the original post, but your response is false equivalence.
    Those arriving in the 1700’s & 1800’s did not wish to avail themselves of the indigenous infrastructure, legal system or state protections…because there wasn’t any. They built this country from scratch.
    Go and stand in the middle of the Mallee and have a look at roughly the equivalent of what the first settlers found when they arrived. Then compare that to what immigrants, post-1945, found when they arrived. Somewhat different.
    Some recent immigrants have contributed massively to this country, but to compare them to the first settlers is a little rich.

  94. C.L.

    It’s like Hillary Clinton never went crawling like a ravenous dog to Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in 2009 with her famous re-set button.

    Never happened.

  95. calli

    Yes it did. And wasn’t she happy about it.

    But Brennan now calls Trump at traitor. He thinks he’s safe.

  96. Cactus

    re Topender and Trevor Ruthenberg

    What is wrong with these people. Seriously. Anyone who lies about something like that is not fit for office. Your CV is not something you should make mistakes with. Its your credentials. You should know it back to front. Trying to pad it out. Jeez….

  97. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Read the Durack story: Mary Durack, ‘Kings in Grass Castles’, then ‘Sons in the Saddle’.
    It’s not just about the Kimberley region either. In ‘Kings’ NSW and Qld feature a lot.
    You will gain a new appreciation of how this vast country of ours was opened up.
    And you will know the trials and courage of the stalwart men and women who did it.

  98. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I love it that Trump sat in Churchill’s chair and looked stern.
    There is a message there somewhere.
    I think it is ‘don’t mess with me’. 🙂

    The MSM is going bananas about it all.

  99. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Garrison’s Trump. Trump doesn’t look anything like that

    Agree 4.32 is a powerful image. Garrison’s Trump in that one is deliberately in American heroic form; he’s not trying to present a send-up here. He’s drawn a variety of Superman, the honest and believable and somewhat ‘youthful’ face of change. Not unlike Jack Kennedy. 🙂

  100. Elle

    Top Ender! What a hideous prank!

    Great toons, Tom. Johannes Leaks being my fav. He’s certainly following in his father’s footsteps.

  101. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Thanks for the great start to the day again, Tom.

    It’s good to open up the laptop, start at the top of page, and when you hit the toons you know it’s daybreak!
    Tom has marked off the end of the stoushing and nite battles and once more we enter into the light.

  102. Some History

    For anyone interested.

    Volume up.

    80s Classic.

    Breakout (1987) – Swing Out Sister

  103. Elle

    ….the stoushing and nite battles….

    I’m going back to being a silent observer. Most unpleasant experience getting involved. I’m a lover not a fighter. Apologies if I offended anyone.

  104. Geriatric Mayfly

    I see Warren Mundine has doubled down on his uppitness, still not subservient to his betters at the ABC, who have done their very best to placate him with one of their usual slimy responses. No heat applied to Bungjourno as yet.

  105. Oh come on

    The ABC reports on the Trump-Putin meetings, finds the following people to condemn it:

    John Brennan
    John McCain
    Bob Corker
    Jeff Flake
    Lindsey Graham

  106. rickw

    How about before 1770? Most Australians weren’t keen either but this made little difference.

    They were, note the minimal resistance, most 1770 Australians were pretty happy to have regular food and an end to endemic tribal warfare.

  107. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    PhD Scholarship
    Innovations in qualitative methodologies:
    Exploring changes in gender equality related to
    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

    You know why they do ‘qualitative’ studies? It’s because they haven’t got a clue how to create a proper study design that would allow the gathering of far more useful statistical information. No-one teaches that in social sciences any more. Not only could they not design a good study with proper random stratified sampling, they also would not be able to statistically analyse the data produced. I have a professorial friend who is that rare bird, a social scientist with a fine track record in gathering very valuable statistics on many aspects of society we need to know about, including second-generation migrants in Britain. He then back this up with qualitative interviews of relevant statistical groups.

    Otherwise these qualitative studies we hear so much about are done with ‘convenience’ samples, statistically irrelevant, and often drawn together in a very ‘convenient’ fashion from friendly networks of lefties. For all I know from its title, the study above could be a look at how a group of ex-academic women living in an all-female commune do their washing up co-operatively with ‘sustainable’ rainwater in a way different from that in their ‘natal’ households and in the households of their previous marriages to (horrors!) men living within the industrial patriarchy.

    Far-fetched? Nope. I’ve seen worse PhD topics in leftie lunacy academia.

  108. Old School Conservative

    Steve Price’s lack of self awareness is evident again.
    On 2GB, he is talking about My Health records and the opt-out process.
    In the one breath he says “who would want to hack into your health records”.
    Next, he lets pass a comment by a My Health executive who says “we have military grade cyber security protections around the My health records.”
    Obviously they think someone wants to get access to those records.

  109. .

    You know why they do ‘qualitative’ studies?

    Outside of monetary data and public finances, a lot of economic data is survey data. Som quant. data is better than others.

    Proper treatment of qualitative data is actually higher level work than econometrics. The problem is a lot of the people handling qualitative data aren’t well versed in the methods, even if they know the scales and how to sample well.

  110. calli

    Don’t let unpleasantness faze you, Elle.

    That’s the purpose. According to one demented person some time ago, “it’s not personal, it’s business”. You’d have to be paid to do it. What a waste of a life.

  111. .

    In the one breath he says “who would want to hack into your health records”.

    Who would want your full name, address, date of birth, next of kin, previous addresses, Medicare number, and so on?

    Clueless indeed.

  112. .

    What was the result? Enter the bushranger!! Peter Costello told the litigants to withdraw their writs otherwise he would introduce retrospective legislation into the federal parliament to legitimise those taxes.

    …and the bloody marvel that was, is and continues to be Kevin Michael Rudd continued similar nonsense to this into 2008.

  113. Zyconoclast

    Mother Teresa group Missionaries of Charity under investigation for baby trafficking
    India has instructed all its state governments to conduct an immediate inspection of all childcare homes run by the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic order founded by the late Mother Teresa, amid concerns over baby trafficking.

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-17/india-inspects-mother-teresa-group-over-child-trafficking-fears/10000942

  114. calli

    Anyway, we need references to fishnets on Sunday mornings. The blog is the richer for it.

  115. Elle

    Awwe, thank you Calli and Tom.

    Lizzie had a great response to my fishnet query.

    Was looking forward to the Q&A thread. It does make watching the leftist love-fest a hoot. Next week.

  116. .

    https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/security/its-time-to-decide-if-you-want-to-opt-out-of-new-my-health-record/news-story/77dc11f719eab73adcd851145cd2517a

    “Cue Seinfeld music between scenes”

    Police will also be able gain access to the information under certain circumstances, including, but not limited to, if there is reasonable belief it could be helpful in the prevention or detection of a crime or to protect government revenue.

    So the e-Health scamola is about turning cops into uniformed tax collectors?

    Taxation is theft!

    Also, “possible” future crimes are a reason for access, but the scope is wider.

    Sounds like a real good idea, perhaps in East Germany.

  117. struth

    Horsham and Stawell.

    Don’t Victorians love their Maccas?

  118. .

    I’m sure the pricks are creating a database of Opt Outerinos and won’t even wipe us off the main file, just the user end.

    Pricks.

  119. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I’m going back to being a silent observer. Most unpleasant experience getting involved. I’m a lover not a fighter. Apologies if I offended anyone.

    Noooo Elle. Don’t go away, we need some more Kittehs commenting on the OF. Here, take my seat, as I won’t be on the internet on the Serengeti (especially if Hairy gets me up in that balloon as he’s keen to do; I’m resisting so far). We know we are different to the guys, and we need to be present to show that, just as we need to be present to show our female brains are in tip top order as good brains go, capable of besting any ‘orrible brute bloke or runaway menopausal Kitteh. Just ignore the stoushing on days when it gets to you. I was brought up in a dysfunctional fighting family, and I usually back away from conflict IRL and try to pour oil on troubled waters; like you, love not hate etc. However, it’s just a blog, and if one’s dander is up, I think it’s OK to show it occasionally. Personally, I thought you were doing well, no apologies needed. 🙂

    ps. if you are free on Friday nites in Sydney for drinkies in the CBD (parking nearby), throw me your email (get mine from Sinc) and I’ll pass it on to the Convenor to invite you. Same for other Cats who’d like to come too. We are out for three months, but there are others just as friendly.

  120. Rococo Liberal

    What was the result? Enter the bushranger!! Peter Costello told the litigants to withdraw their writs otherwise he would introduce retrospective legislation into the federal parliament to legitimise those taxes.

    Of course the publicans didn’t deserve the money from the excise. They had passed it on to the consumer. it is a longstanding rule in tax law that no-one gets a refund of any excise or sales tax unless he can prove that he has not passed it on to someone else. So the publicans in this case would have to prove that they had refunded the money to each and every customer, before they could receive a refund. It is the rule against windfall gains for shyster businesses.

  121. Mother Teresa group Missionaries of Charity under investigation for baby trafficking

    Actually, the article presents a different picture.

    There has been a number of reports of babies and children being trafficked through charity-run homes and hospitals in India, which campaigners say is driven by a long waiting list for adoption.

    The Missionaries of Charity stopped organising adoptions in India in 2015 saying they disagreed with government rules that made it easier for single, divorced, and separated people to adopt children.

    The ministry said under the Juvenile Justice Act which came into effect more than two years ago it was mandatory for every shelter home dealing with children and their adoption to register and also link the organisation to the Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA).

    However, about 4,000 institutions are yet to be linked, the ministry said.

    It looks like this is all about licensing and the fact that the Sisters didn’t like the weakening of the rules that would have hindered their vocation.

  122. Bruce of Newcastle

    Blair. Awesome. Read!

    TOURING TRUMPLAND – AND FINDING IT LARGELY TRUMPLESS

    Don’t miss the photos that David Burge took of the trip. Worth it. Majestic car pron.
    Arky will feel inadequate.

  123. Rafe Champion

    Don’t go away Elle, we need new people in the comments.
    Think of the gender balance!

  124. Rafe Champion

    What is this about drinks in Sydney that nobody invited me to?

  125. Chris

    It looks like this is all about licensing and the fact that the Sisters didn’t like the weakening of the rules that would have hindered their vocation.

    India has been passing laws to hinder ‘foreign’ organisations – we cannot sponsor children anymore, or transfer money to Christian missionary schools through groups like Compassion.

  126. calli

    Go in the balloon, Lizzie.

    There is nothing like floating over a game park at dawn. You suddenly see all the little animal “roads” that are hidden on the ground.

    And you might have the excitement of decending into a copse of thorn bushes to break the fall. 🙂

  127. Myrddin Seren

    The future of the Democratic Party.

    For American readers – continue stockpiling ammo and MREs. In power, the NextGen D-rats will deliver Venezuela.

    For Australian readers. Pray.

  128. Old School Conservative

    From .’s link about My Health records:

    The data will be available on demand to a raft or medical professionals who work in healthcare — about 12,800 health organisations and up to 900,000 health workers.

    No potential problems at all!

  129. Some History

    For anyone interested.

    The legendary drummer of the “Big Band” era,
    Buddy Rich, on the Johnny Carson Show, 1979.
    [Rich was 61 at the time]

  130. Geriatric Mayfly

    And you might have the excitement of decending into a copse of thorn bushes to break the fall.

    Buffalo bush is the champion amongst many of Africa’s plants bristling with thorns. Each alternate thorn points in the opposite direction along the stem. Sharp as all get out too, as I fell off a rock into one. The local name “wait-a-wee-bit” is very apt, as unpicking yourself does take time. Buffalo like to park their backsides in front of a bush, as it minimizes the risk of lion attack from behind.

  131. .

    The thing about e Health is that these ‘tards have been trying to stitch this ridiculous idea together for over half a decade now, and given the “confidential” census data could be picked apart with a simple algorithm and knowing someone’s full name (we all saw the keys for Kylie Minogue and Malcolm Turnbull as a demonstration) basically gets you access with the algorithm, you are either don’t care or are clueless/rocks in your head if you think your data won’t be viewed or misused.

    Any guarantees of security are laughable. The Titanic was unsinkable, the Census was unhackable.

    Remember, at least 900,000 people have access to it, and it is being given to the police for future crimes and the equally odious task of “revenue protection”.

    We all should opt out today. I have done so now.

  132. Read the Durack story: Mary Durack, ‘Kings in Grass Castles’, then ‘Sons in the Saddle’.
    It’s not just about the Kimberley region either.

    You’ve floored me Lizzie.
    Where has this misconception come from that the Durack story is a Kimberley story?
    The Kimberley is merely an appendix on the end, the place they ended up after the big balls-up.

    All my life the Durack story was regaled to me as a Queensland story – which principally it is.
    The country Patsy took up in Qld is about ten times the quality of that his wooden-headed sons ended up with in the Kimberley.

  133. Senile Old Guy

    From .’s link about My Health records:

    The data will be available on demand to a raft or medical professionals who work in healthcare — about 12,800 health organisations and up to 900,000 health workers.

    No potential problems at all!

    Yes, roughly 1 in 25 of all Australians. Exclude under 16/18 (which I can’t be bothered to find) and about 1 in 20 (or less) of all Australians can see your highly personal health data.

    But with a significant portion of data breaches in Australia occurring in the healthcare sector (roughly a quarter of those reported) and the Government’s past failures in securing certain confidential health data, many commentators are worried about the potential risk to patients.

    The Government’s Australian Digital Health Agency responsible for the scheme has played down the security concerns touting the fact that patients can control who has access to their file. But in an interview with Fairfax, the agency’s Dr Steve Hambleton said he couldn’t rule out the possibility of security breaches occurring on the platform — something which cyber security experts have labelled as an inevitability, particularly given the coveted nature of health data among criminals and fraudsters.

    Anyone who thinks this data is secure should remember those dumped filing cabinets. Tech site, The Register, routinely reports on security breaches and data leaks.

    It is problematic for me, because the linked data might be helpful in my case. But once the fuss has died down, I will review it, although getting onto any government site is an art in itself.

  134. Leigh Lowe

    Rafe Champion

    #2765331, posted on July 17, 2018 at 9:23 am

    What is this about drinks in Sydney that nobody invited me to?

    I was all for inviting you, but JC and Johanna colluded to exercise a veto.

  135. …you are either don’t care or are clueless/rocks in your head if you think your data won’t be viewed or misused.
    Any guarantees of security are laughable. The Titanic was unsinkable, the Census was unhackable.

    +1
    Received a phone call yesterday from some Kath&Kim accented sheila who was flogging something via telemarketing.
    I declined to say who I was, so she launched into “proving” I was who she said I was, via the phone number I’d answered being ‘associated’ with a certain yahoo account, which was ‘associated’ with my name, which was ‘associated’ with… etc etc.

    I felt like moving into a cave & living off moss & wallabies from now on.

  136. Leigh Lowe

    Re the Health tax-eater database …
    Is it all or nothing in terms of opting in or out?
    I mean I am happy to share the data with my GP, my dentist, my plastic surgeon, my psychiatrist, my proctologist, my psoriasis physician and my bikram yoga instuctor, but not 200,000 tax-eaters.

  137. H B Bear

    John Faine (ABC radio 774) told his audience today that he owns a camp dog he adopted from the Kimberly.
    Pathetic and funny at the same time. So ABC.

    So Jon Paine has the mangiest dog in Fitzroy? That’s a great story for his next dinner party. One in the eye for those homeless bums.

  138. Anthony

    The left in the US are calling for the military to rise up and depose the treasonous Trump for stating the obvious. Duh.
    Now that that transgender trooper is no longer in the US forces who, in the forces, will rise up for the left?
    Is John Cain still on the reserve list or has his reliance on morphine excluded him?

  139. Elle

    Thanks, Lizzie and Rafe. I’m all for balance. There is a lot of testosterone here. It is rather addictive reading – the open thread and the blog in general. It has taken me away from Tim Blair’s blog, where I’ve been for years. I pop back in there every now and then. He’s a hoot! He has a good piece on his trip to the US that Bruce linked to. 

    Started at Bolt’s well over ten years ago. He’s conservative eye candy for me. Mreow! Then popped across to Piers Akerman’s blog and became part of the broad church there, but the blog has died a slow death. Sigh. 

    Is it too rude to ask what the average age is here? I’m 52. Started off as a lefty feminist in my younger uni years. Soon tired of being a victim and jumped to the right. Happy days!

  140. Elle

    Oh and the drinks night sounds fab! I work in the inner city, so easy access.

  141. Leigh Lowe

    Is it too rude to ask what the average age is here?

    It’s 74.
    I got that off the Health Dept database so it is rock-solid.

  142. Rafe Champion

    I am 105 as of Wed last week.

  143. Elle

    You’re aging well, Rafe.

  144. Des Deskperson

    ‘John Faine (ABC radio 774) told his audience today that he owns a camp dog he adopted from the Kimberly.’

    A flamboyantly gay dog??

  145. Senile Old Guy

    I mean I am happy to share the data with my GP, my dentist, my plastic surgeon, my psychiatrist, my proctologist, my psoriasis physician and my bikram yoga instuctor, but not 200,000 tax-eaters.

    You’re out by a factor of 4.5: it is 900,000.

  146. Farmer Gez

    So Jon Paine has the mangiest dog in Fitzroy? That’s a great story for his next dinner party. One in the eye for those homeless bums.

    Probably had it de-sexed like himself.

  147. Snoopy

    John Faine (ABC radio 774) told his audience today that he owns a camp dog he adopted from the Kimberly.
    Pathetic and funny at the same time. So ABC.

    Faine’s a self-confessed dog napper. His white privilege eyes may have told him the dog had no owner, but that wasn’t the case.

  148. C.L.

    Tod Ender, you are right.

    The Australian’s beat-up of Trevor Ruthenberg’s (or somebody else’s) simple error re Australian Defence Medal vs. Australian Service Medal is a disgrace.

    The latter is NOT awarded for “distinguished” service. It is very much a generic award. So far, it has been given to 38,681 personnel. The ABC jumps on the fake news bandwagon by describing the ASM as “prestigious.” It is not especially prestigious.

    I know from personal experience that there are quite a few general service medals, some of which overlap (so to speak). It can be confusing. This error was undoubtedly innocent.

  149. Myrddin Seren

    …up to 900,000 health workers

    Whaaat ?!

    900,000 ? In how many countries – like is there a direct feed to the Ministry of Health in China so they can keep tabs on the well being of the Han Settler-Colonists here ?

    Or does everyone including the floor sweepers have access ?!

    We must be the fatest, broken down, chronically unwell, unbalanced people in the world. Who is going to do the work when we are all on the DSP and NDIS ?

  150. Dr Faustus

    Anyone who thinks this data [My Health] is secure should remember those dumped filing cabinets.

    The data will be hacked and sold in late 2018/early 2019. The only delay will be waiting for GP’s to populate the records sufficiently for the db to be commercially valuable.

    Any online presence called ‘My anything’ is not secure.

  151. Myrddin Seren

    Elle

    Is it too rude to ask what the average age is here? I’m 52. Started off as a lefty feminist in my younger uni years.

    Very hard to say, giving it is a moving average.

    Take Grigsey, for example.

    Started here as a 50-something man, wound up as a 6-year old girl. Life comes at you fast.

  152. Cactus

    I’m 35 and have attended the last couple of Sydney drinks. Good crowd. Love it when Rabz gets passionate!

  153. Leigh Lowe

    Faine’s a self-confessed dog napper. His white privilege eyes may have told him the dog had no owner, but that wasn’t the case.

    Gasp!
    The Stolen Generation reprised!

  154. cohenite

    Is it too rude to ask what the average age is here? I’m 52. Started off as a lefty feminist in my younger uni years. Soon tired of being a victim and jumped to the right. Happy days!

    I measure my age in Martian years so I’m younger. I’m 35 years of age!

  155. Peter Campion

    Today’s Letters to the Editor submission consequent to last nights Cairns Free Speech Forum…

    The Editor

    At Monday night’s Cairns Free Speech Forum, reef expert Dr Peter Ridd completely destroyed the alarmists’ reef-doom narrative.

    In a short statement supported by a couple of simple Powerpoint slides, Dr Ridd pointed out massive flaws in the science alarmists rely on.

    In the Q-and-A that followed I had the privilege of asking Dr Ridd how we can fix the science. His reply was straight-forward and impossible for anyone to object to.

    One percent of funding for reef research needs to be set aside for independent peer review, separate from the researchers’ universities.

    With half a billion taxpayer dollars earmarked for the reef it is completely reasonable to dedicate one percent of it to being certain about the science.

    What say you, Mr Entsch?

    (124 words)
    Peter Campion

  156. BrettW

    Totally agree with CL. It is very common for service people to refer to the Australian Defence Medal as the service medal. The ADM is for 4 or more years service or the terms of engagement which can be as low as 3 months service for a National Servicemen. It is awarded for service and easy to confuse with the Australian Service Medal which is for overseas non warlike service such as Timor or Solomons.

  157. Good to see Google celebrate Georges Lemaître’s birthday.

  158. .

    This has to be repeated here.

    Wow, just wow.

    ….Mudd ominously proposed an insurrection against Trump, saying, “A curious point in American government: when do we see almost a shadow government come out and say ‘we cannot side with the government,’ whether it’s the Cabinet or the Senate. I think that’s the big question.”

  159. H B Bear

    Probably had it de-sexed like himself.

    Jon Paine is more likely to have his dog trans-sexed. It’s a very common operation among inner-Melbournibad vets.

  160. Farmer Gez

    Faine’s a self-confessed dog napper. His white privilege eyes may have told him the dog had no owner, but that wasn’t the case.

    My sympathies are with the dog.
    “Come and get your smashed avocado din dins”.

  161. stackja

    Mining could threaten new snake species
    Aaron Bunch, Australian Associated Press
    14 minutes ago

    A new species of venomous snake has been discovered in Queensland but scientists fear it may already be at risk of extinction.

    The newest member of the Bandy Bandy snake family, named Vermicella Parscauda, has been found at Weipa on Cape York Peninsula, near Rio Tinto’s bauxite mining operations.

    University of Queensland biologist Bryan Fry found the snake on a loading wharf, with the discovery detailed in a new paper published in the international journal Zootaxa.

    “Just looking at it, we knew it was a new species immediately just because of how many bands it had,” Professor Fry has told AAP.

    “It was right next to the big ship loader where they are loading all the rocks and soil they’d scooped up during the bauxite mining.”

    Other specimens were found during a subsequent search.

    “They are living in the exact habitat that is being scooped up for bauxite mining,” he said.

    Only six specimens of the new snake have been found.

    Prof Fry believes they may only be living in the mining area, and that could mean trouble for the species.

    “Bauxite mining is a major economic activity in the region, and it may be reshaping the environment to the detriment of native plants and animals,” he said.

    “Every species is precious and we need to protect them all, since we can’t predict where the next wonder-drug will come from.”

    Modified snake toxins are already used in pharmaceutical products, including the blood pressure medication Captopril, which generates $10 billion in sales each year.

    The new snake species is about 30-40cm long, and features thin white bands, and fatter black bands along its body.

    There are now five recognised species of the Bandy Bandy genus, all in Australia.

  162. stackja

    Where have all the TV viewers gone?
    CAMERON ADAMS
    Cameron Adams
    July 16, 2018 11:46am
    Subscriber only

    IT is now two months since a program that wasn’t news, sport or the royal wedding — cracked the magic million mark when it comes to big city ratings on Australian TV.

    So where are the viewers going after 7.30pm?

    It must be baffling for networks — people will tune in for news, and the occasional TV ‘event’, but then tune out to get their nightly entertainment fix elsewhere in the competitive new media environment.

    Both Nine and Seven’s news broadcasts usually get around a million viewers each, each night. That’s two million people switching on. Some viewers hang on for some neighbour from hell or bogan love rat action on A Current Affair.

    The news can’t be streamed on Netflix and people still watch it over dinner — it’s comfort (or discomfort) TV for families.

    But once that’s over, the TV landscape has all changed.

  163. Zyconoclast


    The nation’s energy operator has warned that coal must be part of Australia’s energy mix for the next two decades, to ensure people’s power bills do not skyrocket further.

    In its latest report, the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) says Australia’s power network will not be reliable if coal-fired power stations close before the end of their technical life.

    “This approach is also cost-effective, because while existing generators still operate, they can generate at lower costs than new investment,” the report said.

    But AEMO does not recommend expanding coal-fired power generation beyond what already exists.

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-17/coal-must-stay-for-20-years-to-keep-prices-down-aemo-report/10000894

  164. Chris

    Thanks, Lizzie and Rafe. I’m all for balance. There is a lot of testosterone here. It is rather addictive

    This much testosterone certainly results in… addictive behaviour.

    Average age? Pfft. Our cumulative life experience rivals the dynastic Pharaohs.

  165. .

    We must be the fatest, broken down, chronically unwell, unbalanced people in the world. Who is going to do the work when we are all on the DSP and NDIS ?

    760,000 Australians are on the DSP. 4.5% of the voting age population, also more people on DSP than officially unemployed (723,000). The DSP recipients are equal to 5.7% of the entire labour force.

    (Serious question, how many on DSP are in Tasmania?)

  166. stackja

    Three shot, stabbed in bloody Sydney home invasion
    Nick Hansen, The Daily Telegraph
    15 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    POLICE are investigating whether a violent home invasion in which a man and woman were stabbed in western Sydney last night could have been carried out by members of outlaw bikie gangs.

    Police are still piecing together clues from three separate crime scenes, including a car crash, to establish what happened.

    Police have been told a man and a woman armed with a gun and a knife forced their way into a semirural property in Mersey Rd, Bringelly just before 11.30pm last night.

  167. If we had any sense at all, we’d recruit a Ghurka battalion.

  168. .

    University of Queensland biologist Bryan Fry found the snake on a loading wharf

    Of course he did.

    If it can survive at the docks, it is resilient, agile and innovative. I think we can let the mine go ahead.

  169. JC

    Really good research piece here on the economics of Vichy France. The Germans tore the Frog economy apart. At one stage they were taking 30% of production for German use. At first, the Vichy government and the Germans wanted to de-industrialize France and send people back to the country side because it’s how they thought the French should live.

    Germany demanded and received reparations for attacking the frogs. How about that!
    https://eml.berkeley.edu/~webfac/eichengreen/e211_fa05/white.pdf

  170. Roger

    “This approach is also cost-effective, because while existing generators still operate, they can generate at lower costs than new investment,” the report said.

    And there you have it: AEMO, no less, says coal is cheaper than renewables.

    But they then go on to posit that the grid will in future be powered by pumped hydro, battery stored renewables and gas. A Rolls Royce system for people who can only afford a Holden.

  171. stackja

    Helpmann Awards: Sydney Theatre Company the biggest winner across split ceremony at Capitol Theatre
    ABC Arts
    By Arts Editor Dee Jefferson

    Updated about 5 hours ago

  172. Cactus

    A new species of venomous snake has been discovered in Queensland but scientists fear it may already be at risk of extinction.

    The stupid it hurts. It is pretty common when a mining company is doing an environmental impact statement that they ‘discover’ a new species of flora and fauna. They then have to go out and ‘discover’ it elsewhere and prove it is abundant.

  173. Peter Castieau

    Peter Campion
    #2765387, posted on July 17, 2018 at 10:38 am

    Good letter Pete and many thanks for your blogging from last nights event. Sadly I fell asleep on the couch but read through your summary this morning.

  174. H B Bear

    The best way to slow the rate of Australian species extinctions would be to announce the opening of more mines. No better way known to have them turn up again.

  175. Zyconoclast

    Solar panel detected on four wheel drive bonnet, Adelaide driver cautioned

    An Adelaide man has been issued with a caution and a fine for modifications to his car, including a solar panel on the bonnet and gas bottle attached to the rear.

    Just before 10:00am on Saturday, police spotted the Toyota four wheel drive travelling on Belair Road, south of Adelaide, with a solar panel fitted to the bonnet and a gas cylinder attached to the spare tyre holder at the rear.

    Police also discovered that the driver’s number plate had been cut in two.

    He was handed a fine of $752.

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-17/adelaide-driver-detected-with-illegal-modifcations-to-car/10002276

  176. .

    An Adelaide man has been issued with a caution and a fine for modifications to his car, including a solar panel on the bonnet and gas bottle attached to the rear.

    We’ve become an unimaginative bunch with no sense of adventure, wonder or innovative spirit.

    If coffee, beer, soccer and motorbikes were invented now, they’d all be banned before most of us could participate or try them out.

    The quip that Australia was full of anti-authoritarian “larrikins” must have been made by an ironic hipster in 1890. Dman that guy was sharp!

  177. stackja

    Winston Smith
    #2765407, posted on July 17, 2018 at 10:52 am
    If we had any sense at all, we’d recruit a Ghurka battalion.

    Story that Ghurkas surprised that they were to wear parachutes when they jumped out of a plane during WW2 operation.

  178. Cactus

    Just before 10:00am on Saturday, police spotted the Toyota four wheel drive travelling on Belair Road, south of Adelaide, with a solar panel fitted to the bonnet and a gas cylinder attached to the spare tyre holder at the rear.

    How dumb can someone be? Wouldn’t want anyone to rear end that car…

  179. stackja

    One in 10 regional migrants use country towns as a pit stop before moving to a city
    Sheradyn Holderhead, National Political Reporter, The Daily Telegraph
    July 17, 2018 12:30am
    Subscriber only

    PRIME Minister Malcolm Turnbull has vowed to strengthen rules requiring new migrants to fill skills shortages in regional areas, as new figures confirm one in every 10 foreign worker moves from the country to a city within 18 months.

    The Home Affairs data released yesterday has also laid bare the skewing of the country’s flagship regional migration visa, which has been sending people to capital cities in smaller states rather than country towns.

    The new figures come after The Daily Telegraph revealed in May that the federal Home Affairs office was developing new visa rules to “bind” migrants to regional areas.

    The new Home Affairs data shows half of foreigners using the regional sponsored migration scheme in the past two years were living in Perth.

  180. Tel

    Remember, at least 900,000 people have access to it, and it is being given to the police for future crimes and the equally odious task of “revenue protection”.

    We all should opt out today. I have done so now.

    Read the fine print… your data is still collected exactly the same regardless of what you do. There is no “opt out” there’s a bullshit button you can press if it makes you feel better to be doing something.

  181. Des Deskperson

    “The Australian’s beat-up of Trevor Ruthenberg’s (or somebody else’s) simple error re Australian Defence Medal vs. Australian Service Medal is a disgrace.”

    Labor is non the less outraged:

    “But Labor senator Jenny McAllister said Mr Ruthenberg had “some explaining to do”.

    She told Sky she would be surprised if the voting public in Longman was persuaded by the explanation he had given so far.

    “This is unlikely to be something that the general public just is willing to brush away — these are very serious allegations,” Senator McAllister said.”

    Here’s McAllister’s bio.

    https://www.aph.gov.au/Senators_and_Members/Parliamentarian?MPID=121628

    She’s a Senator from NSW; the reason she is getting so upset about something a bloke mistakenly claimed while he was a Queensland State MP escapes me. It is also probably the first time in her life she has ever concerned herself about anything related to defence or the ADF.

  182. stackja

    Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull denies government is stoking racism as complaints jump
    Wendy Tuohy and Claire Bickers, Herald Sun
    19 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    MALCOLM Turnbull says claims his government is stoking racism are “nonsense” despite new figures showing race discrimination complaints have jumped by more than 75 per cent in Victoria in one year.

    But the Prime Minister also says he has heard “from people in Melbourne” that people are afraid to go to restaurants because of Sudanese gang violence.

    “There is real concern about Sudanese gangs … you’d have to be walking around with you’re hands over your ears in Melbourne not to hear it,” he told Melbourne radio 3AW today.

  183. Myrddin Seren

    “Every species is precious and we need to protect them all, since we can’t predict where the next wonder-drug will come from.”

    Green Year Zero.

    Most of Australia cleared of productive activity and turned in to a national park ( including offshore ).

    Deplorable Proles crowded in to a few high density conurbations.

    Don’t ask what we will be eating in this scenario. You can bet your boots the Green elites don’t plan to be sharing Prole Rations.

  184. stackja

    UFU boss Peter Marshall sparks fury among Labor MPs over intervention in party preselections
    James Campbell and Monique Hore, Herald Sun
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    TWO of Victoria’s most powerful unions are at loggerheads over the future of former emergency services minister Jane Garrett as anger over a factional deal threatens to derail federal and state pre-­selections.
    The Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union has slammed the United Firefighters Union after its firebrand leader Peter Marshall attempted to intervene in an ALP preselection battle.
    Mr Marshall wrote to state Labor MPs on Monday morning in a bid to kill off a plan that would see Ms Garrett given a seat in state Parliament.

    But CFMEU Victorian assistant secretary Shaun Reardon followed with a letter to Premier Daniel Andrews last night that “vented my absolute dismay and frustration” at the campaign against Ms Garrett.
    “I am horrified that another party member, and a union leader at that, would threaten to campaign against the return of an Andrews-led government,” Mr Reardon said.
    “I implore you to stand strong on party matters with any undertone of misogyny or workplace bullying and to continue your outstanding work in relation to violence against women.”

  185. C.L.

    Huffington Post lead ‘story’ this morning:

    ‘Treason’ Is Top Searched Word After Trump-Putin Press Conference.

    Huffington Post, 2011:

    Obama: Bush, McCain Should Explain Their Problem With JFK.

    Sen. Barack Obama went one step further today in his pushback against presumptive GOP presidential nominee Sen. John McCain and President Bush on appeasement, suggesting that both Republicans have a problem with presidents past who have engaged in direct diplomacy.

    “If George Bush and John McCain have a problem with direct diplomacy, led by the president of the United States, then they can explain why they have a problem with John F. Kennedy because that’s what he did with [Soviet leader Nikita] Khrushchev, or Ronald Reagan, ‘cause that’s what he did with [Soviet leader Mikhail] Gorbachev, or Richard Nixon ‘cause that’s what they did with [Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung],” Obama said in Roseburg, Ore. “That’s exactly the kind of diplomacy we need to keep us safe.”

  186. .

    Read the fine print… your data is still collected exactly the same regardless of what you do. There is no “opt out” there’s a bullshit button you can press if it makes you feel better to be doing something.

    I suspected as much.

  187. Roger

    Read the fine print… your data is still collected exactly the same regardless of what you do. There is no “opt out” there’s a bullshit button you can press if it makes you feel better to be doing something.

    But opting out gives you a stronger case to sue when the inevitable data breach occurs.

  188. stackja

    Helsinki summit: Donald Trump’s most jaw dropping moment
    Dennis Atkins, The Courier-Mail
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    IN what’s been 18 months of a whiplash, history making presidency, Donald Trump has caused jaws to drop around the world on many occasions.

    None has come close to the news conference he held, early evening Monday local time in Helsinki, Finland, with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    Over three quarters of an hour, the two leaders ran through a range of issues of global importance and mutual interest.

    Despite this Trump stood there and said he believed Putin above his intelligence and law investigators. It is beyond belief.

    When quizzed, Trump said Putin had made a strong case for why the Russians didn’t do anything. As they say in the spy business, he would say that wouldn’t he.

    Trump said he couldn’t see any reason why Russia would meddle in US elections.

    That statement makes him either a liar or a fool. It also says he’s unfit to be President of the United States.

  189. Myrddin Seren

    In its latest report, the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) says Australia’s power network will not be reliable if coal-fired power stations close before the end of their technical life.

    Which they inevitably will under Turnbull’s NEG per this analysis from Tony Quirk:

    ( By 2030 – note not ‘at’ 2030 – BY 2030 )

    15,000 MW of black coal burning power stations have been closed. This leaves 3,000 MW of plant that operate with 71% utilisation (in AEMO speak – Capacity Factor).

    So probably Kogan Creek and Bayswater and that is it. And they will probably have to be subsidised to keep going in a Renewables First environment. The Labor-Greens Coalition will of course doubledown on Turnbull.

    But AEMO does not recommend expanding coal-fired power generation beyond what already exists.

    ‘Yes PM, – a wonderful and courageous commitment to globalisation and the Paris Accord. Thank you, PM !’

  190. Leigh Lowe

    Police also discovered that the driver’s number plate had been cut in two.

    The letters and numbers were still fully legible, but he had removed the hyphen, which is illegal in S.A.

  191. Cactus

    The letters and numbers were still fully legible, but he had removed the hyphen, which is illegal in S.A.

    Ha!

  192. Bruce of Newcastle

    I suspected as much.

    It’s a nice convenient way of getting problematic proles to identify themselves.

  193. Leigh Lowe

    Helsinki summit: Donald Trump’s most jaw dropping moment
    Dennis Atkins, The Courier-Mail

    Breaking : Fatso Atkins doesn’t like Trump.

  194. .

    We’re living the Dystopian Dream, re e-Health records.

    Queensryche 1991, Operation Mindcrime.

    Let’s hope our agile and innovative public service can prevent all future crimes and protect all revenues – all necessities will be provided, all anxieties tranquillised, all boredom amused.

  195. stackja

    Man in coma in Royal Darwin Hospital’s intensive care unit after allegedly being kicked by two attackers
    JUDITH AISTHORPE, NT News
    July 17, 2018 9:34am

    A MAN, kicked in the head and body by two men, is in a coma at Royal Darwin Hospital’s intensive care unit.

    His alleged attackers have been arrested, one of whom was taken into custody when he showed up at the Royal Darwin Hospital Emergency Department with a foot injury.

    CCTV operators allegedly witnessed the 33-year-old man being struck by the men, aged 23 and 36, at John Stokes Square unit complex in Nightcliff at 8pm Monday night.

    Duty Superintendent Rob Burgoyne said two men continued the attack as he lay on the ground.

    Police believe the victim and the allegedly attackers knew each other.

    The injured man was taken to RDH with serious facial and head injuries.

    He said the 36-year-old man was arrested at the scene and was in custody while the 23-year-old was under guard at RDH.

    Crime Division detectives wish to speak with anyone who witnessed the assault or has any information about it.

    If you believe you have information which may assist police with their investigations, please call 131 444 or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

  196. One in 10 regional migrants use country towns as a pit stop before moving to a city

    Huh? Only one in ten?….. Oh… I see… within 18 months of arriving.
    Yep.
    Take it out to within 36 months of arriving, the figure will be more like 80%

  197. thefrolickingmole

    Imagine the contempt this mob have for their victims..

    Then realize our own version get the money delivered without the “stress” of collecting it themselves.
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/jul/16/tv-licensing-will-only-prosecute-as-a-last-resort

    A letter (13 July) inaccurately stated that one in three cases brought to prosecute non-payers of the TV licence is thrown out. That is not the case. There is a 99% conviction rate for licence fee evasion cases determined by the courts in England and Wales, with the exception of those we withdraw.

    Our inquiry officers focus their visits on unlicensed addresses in which occupants have ignored previous attempts from us to make contact to find out if a TV licence is needed. Inquiry officers are required to follow rules of conduct laid down for them. These are available on our website. They must prove their identity by showing an identity card, explain why they are visiting and conduct themselves professionally and courteously at all times.

    TV Licensing will only prosecute when all other options have been exhausted. The majority of first-time offenders will be able to avoid prosecution if they buy a licence before their case comes to court. TV Licensing is also trialling a simple payment plan designed to support customers who may need a little more help paying their bills.
    Suzy Vickers
    TV Licensing

    Imagine the self hate these people should have for their positions as panderers for a state propaganda outlet.

  198. stackja

    C.L.
    #2765438, posted on July 17, 2018 at 11:16 am

    FDR/WSC negotiated with Stalin and Leftists were happy.

  199. Snoopy

    C.L.
    #2765373, posted on July 17, 2018 at 10:15 am
    Tod Ender, you are right.

    The Australian’s beat-up of Trevor Ruthenberg’s (or somebody else’s) simple error re Australian Defence Medal vs. Australian Service Medal is a disgrace.

    It was Dennis (Foxtail) Atkins’ Courier Mail. Enough said.

  200. stackja

    Top NT cop Assistant Commissioner Peter Bravos sets sail on long-running paid sick leave
    CRAIG DUNLOP, EXCLUSIVE, NT News
    July 17, 2018 9:46am
    Subscriber only

    ONE of the Northern Territory’s highest-paid police ­officers is skippering his $250,000 yacht in an international ­sailing regatta while on long-running paid sick leave.

    Assistant Commissioner Peter Bravos, who earns a ­salary package in excess of $260,000, left Darwin on ­Saturday as part of the 425-nautical-mile Darwin Dili Yacht Rally.

    Mr Bravos’s social media accounts describe his yacht Anastasia as having sailed throughout Indonesia, the Mediterranean, and the ­Dalmatian Coast in the ­Adriatic Sea.

    Police Commissioner Reece Kershaw last month told Parliament Mr Bravos was away from work on sick leave, which the NT News understands has been the case for at least a year.

    Mr Bravos had been occupying the role of Assistant Commissioner for “People and Capability”, a position which included oversight of professional standards, police recruitment and training.

  201. John Constantine

    People haven’t believed how the next desalinisation push will come.

    Mass imported voteherds will be bound to welfare plantations in refugee dispersal areas in the poorest rural areas in the country.

    Freedom of movement means nothing compared to our quisling elites fashionable decolonisation Ponzi theories.

    Gulags, Comrades.

  202. Roger

    Moonbeams from the larger lunacy:

    Average French electricity price thus far in 2018: 0.16 Euros per kWh

    Average German electricity price thus far in 2018: 0.30 Euros per kWh

    For comparison:

    QLD in January 2018: $0.29 per kWh (= 0.18 Euros)

    SA in January 2018: $0.43 per kWh (= 0.28 Euros)

    A crucial difference:

    German politicians at least concede coal has a permanent place in their energy mix because of the country’s strong industrial base (i.e. for reliability of supply and maintaining comparative advantage).

    The irony:

    Germany’s swift exit from nuclear power generation has seen old brown coal mines re-opened to supplement power requirements.

  203. Snoopy

    “They are living in the exact habitat that is being scooped up for bauxite mining,” he said.

    Just an uneducated guess, but I suspect this snake might also be found in rehabilitated mined areas. If anyone cared to look.

  204. John Constantine

    Decolonialisation, not desalinisation.

    Damn commo hippy phone.

  205. cohenite

    Currently in NSW Eraring is supplying 30% of electricity. Origin which owns Eraring, in accord with turdball’s paris ratification, will close it in the near future, 5 – 9 years.

  206. stackja

    Do Greens use mains power. Or solar/wind? Most Greens probably have money to pay whatever. Only poor suffer. And survival of the fittest cuts down on the poor.

  207. .

    So wait, Georges Lemaitre had a PhD in physics AND a PhD in maths?

  208. stackja

    Mudd related to Mudd?

    Samuel Mudd – Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Mudd
    Samuel Alexander Mudd (December 20, 1833 – January 10, 1883) was an American physician who was imprisoned for conspiring with John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

  209. Old School Conservative

    Brilliant work by Teachers Health and Police Health in defending their decision to send top brass to Lisbon to attend an international conference.
    Their rationale undercuts Shorten’s complaints that “big heath funds” used members’ money to send their top brass. The ALP (Qld) president also attended.

    Details Bill, pay attention to the details.

  210. stackja

    Old School Conservative
    #2765469, posted on July 17, 2018 at 11:52 am

    More BS from BS.

  211. Myrddin Seren

    John Constantine

    Decolonialisation, not desalinisation.

    Actually, you are correct the first time.

    The coastal metro areas are being immigration pumped. No one is building dams. ( The Snowy 2.0 boondoggle does not count ).

    Inevitably, the next dry spell will see more desal plants contracted with the usual suspects; built by the CFMMEU, ETU and AWU; and with ‘clean, green energy’ supplied by AGL – en route to becoming Australia’s richest company – before it is nationalised.

  212. Roger

    “There is real concern about Sudanese gangs … you’d have to be walking around with you’re hands over your ears in Melbourne not to hear it,” [Turnbull] told Melbourne radio 3AW today.

    If you’re so concerned, Maladroit, why not a moratorium on refugee applications from Africa?

    1200+ applications were approved by Australian officials in Nairobi in 2016-17 according to government records.

  213. Old School Conservative

    stackja
    #2765464, posted on July 17, 2018 at 11:47 am
    Do Greens use mains power. Or solar/wind?

    Some tech guy on 2gb last week was boasting about being off the grid. He had installed solar panels, added a battery for storage, and linked to a bunch of neighbours with the same systems. Claimed to have cut his electricity bills by quite a lot.
    Didn’t get any further details but I assume they have access to the grid just in case.

  214. Roger

    1200+ applications were approved by Australian officials in Nairobi in 2016-17

    That’s not 1200 individuals, btw, but 1200 families.

  215. stackja

    Plane on fire at Sydney Airport, passengers on board aircraft
    Updated 8 mins ago
    EDITOR ON DUTY: Angelo Risso
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    A plane with passengers on board is on fire at Sydney airport.

    Paramedics were called out to the incident this morning, reportedly involving a Virgin Australia aircraft.

    “It is believed passengers are on board the aircraft but no evacuations have taken place,” a NSW Ambulance spokeswoman said in a statement.

  216. Slayer of Memes

    stackja
    #2765436, posted on July 17, 2018 at 11:14 am

    UFU boss Peter Marshall sparks fury among Labor MPs over intervention in party preselections
    James Campbell and Monique Hore, Herald Sun

    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    TWO of Victoria’s most powerful unions are at loggerheads over the future of former emergency services minister Jane Garrett as anger over a factional deal threatens to derail federal and state pre-­selections.

    The Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union has slammed the United Firefighters Union after its firebrand leader Peter Marshall attempted to intervene in an ALP preselection battle.
    Mr Marshall wrote to state Labor MPs on Monday morning in a bid to kill off a plan that would see Ms Garrett given a seat in state Parliament.

    But CFMEU Victorian assistant secretary Shaun Reardon followed with a letter to Premier Daniel Andrews last night that “vented my absolute dismay and frustration” at the campaign against Ms Garrett.
    “I am horrified that another party member, and a union leader at that, would threaten to campaign against the return of an Andrews-led government,” Mr Reardon said.

    “I implore you to stand strong on party matters with any undertone of misogyny or workplace bullying and to continue your outstanding work in relation to violence against women.”

    Caught between two opposing unions that he is beholden to…. What will Denial Andscrew do…

  217. stackja

    Old School Conservative
    #2765476, posted on July 17, 2018 at 11:58 am

    Yes the grid!

  218. stackja

    2GB reports just fire alarm not fire on plane.

  219. John Constantine

    Decolonialisation requires open borders and freedom of movement for all, into Australia, under our signed capitulation conventions.

    Once in Australia however, our imported revolutionary consumption Ponzi machines,will be required to remain dug in wherever the revolutionary forces require them as cannon fodder.

    Prosecution for deserting your post as a freedom fighting revolutionary Bollard.

    Freedom of movement and freedom of speech means exactly what they want it to mean.

    Boil my Water and scrub my crapper with gratitude, imported revolutionary Comrade.

    Then wash my dishes.

    Importing small brown people from far away places to make our Boiling Water is our Strength.

  220. Sean Davis

    Verified account

    @seanmdav
    22 minutes ago

    The assassination of a U.S. president following a bloody civil war over the issue of slavery was pretty dark.Sean Davis added,

    Garry Kasparov
    Verified account

    @Kasparov63
    I’m ready to call this the darkest hour in the history of the American presidency. Let me know if you can think of any competition.

    Checkmate.

  221. I see Trump has sided with Putin on every issue after his GRU performance review, including against his own party. Meanwhile, the FBI arrests Maria Butina, a Russian spy who infiltrated the NRA.

  222. Bruce of Newcastle

    He had installed solar panels, added a battery for storage, and linked to a bunch of neighbours with the same systems. Claimed to have cut his electricity bills by quite a lot.

    Even with subsidies it’ll never repay the investment in real terms. Greens don’t seem to know about financial analysis tools.

  223. Bruce of Newcastle

    Meanwhile, the FBI arrests Maria Butina, a Russian spy who infiltrated the NRA.

    Surely you meant to use the word “coincidentally”.
    It’s a mystery how these things are so coincidental. A mystery!

  224. Peter Campion

    Just before 10:00am on Saturday, police spotted the Toyota four wheel drive travelling on Belair Road, south of Adelaide, with a solar panel fitted to the bonnet and a gas cylinder attached to the spare tyre holder at the rear.

    I once saw, on the Cairns Esplanade, a budget grey nomad campervan with a gas cylinder mounted on each front corner. Clearly owned by someone who fails to consider consequences.

  225. H B Bear

    Caught between two opposing unions that he is beholden to…. What will Denial Andscrew do…

    Whatever he is told by whoever has the numbers.

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