Something to be proud of

A picture paints a thousand words

And note the narrative here.

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41 Responses to Something to be proud of

  1. NuThink

    Can you imagine what the costs would be if we still had heavy industry – the diesels in South Australia would be going flat out 24/7, and diesel fuel is not that cheap.
    And we would have to get more diesels than just the nine, a lot more.

  2. Rafe Champion

    Re Belgium it helps being little when you are building roads and electricity lines also it helps to be next to France with a bundle of nuclear power stations.

  3. H B Bear

    Failed Australian State, Mainland Tasmania world class in something at last. All praise the Weatherdildo. Shoulda stuck with him kd wrong.

  4. Old School Conservative

    Robert Gottliebsen in today’s Oz says rising energy prices are a result of wire carrier networks being used incorrectly and over-invested.
    He also identifies renewables as the prime cause of destroying the economics of the existing coal and gas generators.

    Unfortunately he is on the “batteries, gas-fired stations, hydro like the Snowy, diesel power and carefully planned capacity in coal-fired stations” bandwagon.

    A scary comment from RG’s article is There are other worthwhile mechanisms like planned consumption reduction in an emergency and using the reserve power units of large companies like Telstra..
    He is advocating rationing. Bastard.

  5. Rafe Champion

    Speaking of France, where are they on the table. Surprising that Britain is so cheap.
    Remind us of the US cost.

  6. C.L.

    Our politicians grandstand about Trump/Putin and MH-17 – like Scott Morrison did yesterday – while they cravenly capitulate to Green lunatics and endanger the lives of thousands of sick and elderly Australians’ to say nothing of the families they will destroy when businesses fold and households go broke. Just as bad as shooting down an airliner for no reason.

    One word: treason.

  7. Dr FRED LENIN

    SA is third in the world ,the other states are lagging behind ,I am sure the turnbull alp government has plans for us to beat Denmark and Germany ,I have every confidence in our socialist politicians making us world leaders in climate stupidity . We will be a shing light to all suicidally inclined countries of the west,following the u.n. Shining path to the lowest common denominator ,the golden socialist aim ,the lower they are the easier to rule and control . Long Live Comrade Narx .

  8. JohnL

    And politicians who caused this disaster are still out of jail and enjoying benefits. They are oxygen thieves and should be put on Carbon Monoxide (CO) treatment!

  9. A reader

    I guess Victoria is only boosted by having Hazelwood in this data set. Next year won’t be so rosy

  10. duncanm

    It says something that SA is ahead of Spain, and the rest of Australia on par with them.

    Spain, of course, is the country known for shining genset-powered floodlights on their solar panels at night in order to extract the rivers of cashola.

  11. duncanm

    .. and NSW – with the world’s largest and most efficient coal export terminal.

  12. Roger

    Surprising that Britain is so cheap.

    Relatively speaking…price cap legislated by government earlier this year may have something to do with it.

  13. Pyrmonter

    ‘Something of which to be proud?’, surely?

    @ Old School Conservative: what is wrong with matching supply to quantity demanded? We do that with most other commodities: we haven’t insisted that there be a flat price for air fares, and that government intervene to require all airways provide on demand service, why should electricity be any different? The tech may not have existed to allow widespread matching of supply to demand a century ago, but why, in the face of technological change (smart metering and the like) should better matching of consumers and producers not displace network socialism?

  14. Michael Warren

    What baffles me in this whole renewable endeavor is this: I’ve studied power systems at an undergraduate level and the problems of fluctuating loads and generation sources are not unknown. They are known at the level of introduction to power systems analysis! They are fundamental to power networks. It’s in the physics and math of capacitance and inductance. The whole endeavor presupposes that some new technology will come along to manage loads and supplies and iron out the fluctuations.

  15. Confused Old Misfit

    There is nothing wrong with match in supp;y to demand. That is what a FREE market does. The instant government becomes the determining arbitrator of who, what, where, when and how a commodity is supplied, as is being promoted, you no longer have a market; of any type.

  16. Roger

    The whole endeavor presupposes that some new technology will come along to manage loads and supplies and iron out the fluctuations.

    Which is what the expert advisers keep whispering in politicians’ ears.

    Even if it happens, I dare say that because of set up, maintenance and replacement (how long will even super batteries last?) costs, we’ll end up with a platinum plated system that is unaffordable.

  17. sfw

    Got my bill yesterday,we live in a cold winter area {Tawonga, Vic} two adults, two kids, small house, solar hot water and panels, wood heating and two split systems, Latest bill $800 for 1 calendar month, Two hundred dollars a week to keep warm, I don’t know how pensioners etc can survive.

  18. The Vic Price is 36 cents/kwh but I’m paying about 20 cents/kwh. What am I missing here? Are there millions of Victorians 50% more per kwh than I am?

  19. a happy little debunker

    sfw @ 10:38 am

    Southern Tasmania, regular frosts, by the seaside with the southerly cold fronts impacting – Single person $90 per month Hydro power (PAYG) – reducing to $70 per month over summer.

  20. RobK

    Denmark has a history of wind turbine technology. They have little in the way of fossil fuel resources and recognised early the potential of cables to Scandinavian hydro. Even so they have high costs. They developed wind harnessing technology ahead of everyone else. Even so they have high costs. They have a huge EU grid to sink surplus supply. Even so they have high costs. They have EU carbon credits to prop up the works. Even so…..
    Now SA is going to show how its done better! Idiots.

  21. Clearly Australia is not doing enough to save the planet.

  22. Fat Tony

    A scary comment from RG’s article is There are other worthwhile mechanisms like planned consumption reduction in an emergency and using the reserve power units of large companies like Telstra..
    He is advocating rationing. Bastard.

    Rationing is such a nasty word – it won’t come to that.

    What we will have is electricity so expensive, only the rich will be connected to the system and able to afford it. There will be no rationing for them.

  23. Michael Warren

    Which is what the expert advisers keep whispering in politicians’ ears.

    There’s no problem (or physical law) these advisers can’t fix with infinite computation power, data and credit.

  24. RobK

    Pyrmonter,
    No. You are missing some major elements in your argument.
    The grid is a facility to exchange energy, there is no parallel to air travel here.
    There are various forms of energy sources that are dispatchable to meet market demand. Then there are non-dispatchable forms. These should have a lower value because they can only supply randomly. These forms are given first place to supply and paid double by extorting funds from the dispatchable source (coal). Further, there are complications beyond the new tech billing and load shedding you mention (which adds costs).
    These things include the ancillory services of frequency and voltage control which also adds costs.
    Then there’s the redesign of the basic grid. More energy needs to flow in different directions in surges over different time scales, unheard of previously. This creates headaches in the design of fault-current discrimination used to minimize catastrophic failures. There are complications with regard to ground current returns. There’s increased sensitivity to stray currents and surges. Many of these issues are difficult to pin point before they arise and will be dealt with as they present. The cost is not yet determined, nor the inconvenience impost. It’s not simply everyone can be a generator in a community grid. That works ok at small percentage input but at higher penetration the costs escalate…and the baseload efficiency is reduced to standby rates. It’s a non-viable hydrid at this stage. Some streets already see solar PV triping out on high local voltage.

  25. Seza

    The Greens blather on about Demand Management and its ability to provide XX GW/H of power, but they are really talking about shutting off power to consumers, not creating anything. At the moment, it is large users like the aluminium smelters etc., but it will trickle down as they need to shed more and more. What annoys me is the propaganda inherent in the term – call it load shedding or power limitation! It is right up there with their brainwashing of the proletariat with “Carbon Pollution” for CO2, where people think that it is bad black stuff coating everything rather than a life essential trace gas at .04% of the atmosphere.

  26. Tim Neilson

    The Greens blather on about Demand Management and its ability to provide XX GW/H of power, but they are really talking about shutting off power to consumers, not creating anything.

    “You can’t make an omelette without breaking a few eggs” V.I. Lenin
    “Accidents happen” Sarah Hanson-Young

    The collectivists really don’t care if old people freeze to death.

  27. Habib

    The fact that Poms pay less for power than we do should be more than enough to have heads on sticks in every jurisdiction. It’s probably a matter of time before migration reverses.

  28. Rob MW

    The Gordon below Franklin would have been handy about now except…………..well, you know, the 2 uncle Bob’s didn’t want it because, you know votes inall that, so they fucked that up as well. God bless the brain-dead green vote and the pristine adventures of the Fabian Social meat raffle with the second uncle Bob as MC.

    God bless this fucked up place.

  29. Kneel

    “God bless this fucked up place.”

    I prefer the Monty Python version from the “Life of Brian”

    “The universe song” –

    “And pray that there’s intelligent life
    Somewhere up in space
    ’cause there’s bugger all
    Down here on Earth”

  30. Rob MW

    When one looks at both the fucked up electricity situation and couple it with Australia’s 51 day (April) oil stock level including IEA country comparison then the only conclusion that can be drawn is a speed-lane slide down the toilet for both production and competitive advantage.

    Any small to moderate international or domestic disruption to oil import supply then the politicians are going to have to work out how whole production, transport and retail can be powered by fucking windmills. I’m looking forward to my new subsidised 620 hp nuclear power tractor turning up any day now.

  31. BoyfromTottenham

    Spartacus – it would be interesting to compare the wholesale prices to the retail prices in each market on that chart. And why wasn’t the US price shown as well – too embarrassing?

  32. Perth Trader

    West. Aust. figures should be 30.6737 cents per unit inclusive of supply charge and GST. That’s the new price from July 1.

  33. Perth Trader

    I’d like to see a chart on Asian countries elect. prices. Prices in Indonesia for non subsidized domestic power is 13cents a unit plus a 5% loading on top of your bill. for street lighting costs . No taxes that I know of. In West Aust its 25.7520 cents per unit plus 92.3175 cents per day supply cost plus GST.

  34. Aynsley Kellow

    A more important measure is the cost of electricity net of taxes.
    On this basis, I believe South Australia tops both Germany and Denmark, which have high levels of taxation.
    But Rob MW: the GBF would have produced only 182MWav – significant in the Tasmanian context, but not a huge source of energy (one reason why it failed to gain support). To provide context, a single 500MW generator at Loy Yang would provide 450MWav at 90% capacity factor.
    What we do find in Tasmania, now that we have significant wind on the system, is less voltage stability. This is visible as flickering in lights, but occasionally my heat pump fails to start.When I ran the diagnostics, it told me that there was insufficient voltage!

  35. RobK

    Aynsley,
    It might be an idea to have that checked out as wiring joints are subject to screws loosening and causing hot joins which lead to volt drop. (It may even be the supply side of the meter). In industrial settings electricians routinely nip-up switch boards and motor connections say annually.

  36. Entrop

    Anthony
    #2767323, posted on July 19, 2018 at 10:39 am
    The Vic Price is 36 cents/kwh but I’m paying about 20 cents/kwh. What am I missing here? Are there millions of Victorians 50% more per kwh than I am?

    You need to consider fixed connection costs too.

  37. Aynsley Kellow

    Thanks for the tip RobK. It has only happened a couple of ties that the heat pump has failed to fire, but the lighting output is variable during the period when people are coming home and rooftop solar output is dropping. All seems well for most of the day.

  38. Rob MW

    But Rob MW: the GBF would have produced only 182MWav – significant in the Tasmanian context, but not a huge source of energy (one reason why it failed to gain support). To provide context, a single 500MW generator at Loy Yang would provide 450MWav at 90% capacity factor.

    Sorry Aynsley but I’ll have to bullshit on that. Hawke made stopping the development an election promise. His first attempt to stop it came under the National Parks & Wildlife Act and got ruled unconstitutional so he used a UN “treaty” to shut the development down as detailed in the Tas Dams case.

    Regardless of how much power the project would have or could have produced the political principles had been set in place that allowed individuals or organizational environmental claimants with no-standing at equity to have legal standing at law, and it’s been one disaster after disaster ever since.

  39. RobK

    Aynsley,
    It may well be the solar feed in the district fluctuating the voltage in your street but it’s not a bad idea to let the local electrician know.

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