If only there was a technology that could solve this problem II

I’ve been having a bit of fun at the expense of the government’s My Health Record fiasco. To be fair, I did have some inside information.

RMIT University and DB Results have announced a major industry partnership to pioneer innovative healthcare solutions using blockchain technology.

The relationship brings together the global industry and digital business expertise of DB Results and RMIT’s world-leading interdisciplinary capabilities and research, to transform business as we know it, starting with health.

The new patient care model leverages technology to disrupt traditional healthcare, with the development of protected uses of blockchain technology. The partnership aims to define and build solutions that can have a positive impact on the Australian and global health industry, and society in general.

DB Results CEO Gavin Bunshaw said the opportunity available through blockchain was not just a secure method of recording health information but a framework for supporting the use of information as a valuable asset that can be protected and traded.

“We are delighted to collaborate with RMIT University, one of the world’s leading universities. The collaboration will initially focus on developing innovative solutions for health using blockchain to make a positive and lasting impact on the healthcare system,” he said.

The partnership leverages both organisations’ deep industry experience in domains such as financial services, utilities and health, and RMIT’s global research, development and design expertise.

RMIT and DB Results have developed a platform for innovating new ideas and have applied models from other industries and disciplines.

RMIT Blockchain Innovation Hub Director Professor Jason Potts said that blockchain technology will change how property rights in private data works.

“For the first time, patients will own their personal health data and personally decide how to use it. They can share it with trusted medical professionals, gift data to research pools, or even sell that data for commercial use, and so open a new source of revenue for people,” Potts said.

“Our researchers at the RMIT Blockchain Innovation Hub are excited to be working with the great team at DB Results to develop the next generation of health technology infrastructure.

Bunshaw agreed, and said the alliance was a catalyst for creating significant opportunities to drive advancements and transform the health industry globally.

“It also provides an opportunity for RMIT students to gain hands-on experience with a global company at DB Results’ Innovation Centre in Melbourne.”

“Proof of the value of the relationship has already been achieved. Both organisations have successfully transferred learnings from the finance industry to create a solution for health which enables secure management and sharing of medical records, utilising blockchain technology, which are fully controlled by the patient,” he added.

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17 Responses to If only there was a technology that could solve this problem II

  1. Roger

    Both organisations have successfully transferred learnings from the finance industry…

    Learnings?

  2. sfw

    I just spent trying to work out how to restrict access to my health records, 20 minutes later and I still can’t work it out. The gov opts you in and makes it very difficult to opt out.

  3. Vic in Prossy

    It’s just about impossible thru the computer.
    Ring the 1800 number and eventually it works.

  4. pbw

    By and large, people don’t want to control their own health records. That’s what GPs are for. NeHTA commissioned a survey about this some years ago, which “discovered” what anyone with an ounce of nous already knew.

    The purpose of health records is not to “empower” consumers, not to “protect” their data from wicked hackers, but purely to gather a mass of individuals’ health data in one place where it can be plundered for any information which can be used to lower the govt health budget. What do you think the NeHTA business case was? Why did successive governments pour good money after bad into NeHTA for years, as this govt is still doing on its misbegotten offspring? Why opt-out instead of opt-in?

    Any scheme based on the assumption that healthcare consumers are anxious to control their own records is doomed to failure.

  5. 2dogs

    personally decide how to use it

    So when you are admitted to hospital in an unconscious state, how do the emergency room doctors obtain your history in order to diagnose you?

  6. Rohan

    2dogs
    #2777403, posted on July 31, 2018 at 7:17 pm
    personally decide how to use it

    So when you are admitted to hospital in an unconscious state, how do the emergency room doctors obtain your history in order to diagnose you?

    Blockchain! Or hopefully someone can crack it before you cark it.

  7. RobK

    What happens when a distributed ledger is infected with a distributed virus?

  8. win

    Block Chain. Block Head . Any thing like that ” Supply Chain that” saw Australian jobs go to China?

  9. win

    My problem with this is the human eror component. Can errors be corrected and the cock ups not recorded be documented .
    Much as I am against it I can see where for physically and intelectually impaired people who can not stand up for them selves this would be of great help. Both for them and their families who do not have much medical knolwge . It might protect them from the “Organ Harvesters” and ” work experience” practicioners.
    Jayent Patel was not the only one who should not have been employed by Qld>Health under Beattie.

  10. Mark A

    win
    #2777665, posted on August 1, 2018 at 6:02 am

    My problem with this is the human eror component. Can errors be corrected and the cock ups not recorded be documented .
    Much as I am against it I can see where for physically and intelectually impaired people who can not stand up for them selves this would be of great help. Both for them and their families who do not have much medical knolwge . It might protect them from the “Organ Harvesters” and ” work experience” practicioners.
    Jayent Patel was not the only one who should not have been employed by Qld>Health under Beattie.

    How?

  11. There is a running joke in IT , many crappy patents were issued because you automated an existing manual process and added the magic words “on a computer”, then another lot of truly obvious processes were patented with the words “on a mobile device”, now it seems the same is being done with “with/on a blockchain”.

    I watched the video , and am still no wiser as to why storing anything on a blockchain is a good idea; – you have data, it is hashed to give a value, the hash is added to the data , and the block is written, and the hash becomes part of the hash for the next block so that you can detect changes. So how does this protect me from unauthorised access? I can do better by keeping a USB in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard.”

  12. PB

    Blockchain can wipe arses now? Maybe they should call it Pullchain (older posters will know what I mean)

  13. None

    Oh my god that’s probably one of the worst press releases I have ever read. The first three paragraphs are absolute gobbledygook – totally meaningles, say nothing. A public servant would be proud of that. The rest is not much better. I bet you 90% of people reading that would not even understand what the hell this is about. This is just another nail in the coffin of our universities who cannot explain to the people who fund them, what the hell they do with all that money. If this press release is indicative of the quality of research and its practical application that we can expect from this venture then all I can say is RMIT and friends are setting up a ponzi scheme to pay themselves do nothing money out of our pockets.

  14. None

    So when you are admitted to hospital in an unconscious state, how do the emergency room doctors obtain your history in order to diagnose you?

    The same way they do it now. FFS. This is like NBN all over again with all the fuckwits who were salivating over high-speed p***.

  15. 2dogs

    The same way they do it now.

    If one is registered with My Health Record, the way they would do it now would be to look it up on that. The privacy hole means they can. But Sinc’s proposal is instead of My Health Record.

    Try again, be specific next time.

  16. Alex Davidson

    There are so many bad things about the proposed ‘My Health Record’ it’s hard to know where to start, and I don’t see how blockchain technology addresses any of them.

    1. It would be more honest to call it ‘Their Health Record’. It’s only needed because we are compelled to accept a centralised, socialised health system. Finding ways to make the proposed system more ‘secure’ or whatever might be achieved using blockchain technology simply plays into the hands of those who want socialism to endure forever.

    2. A free society respects property rights, contract and consent. By setting this up as ‘opt out’, our masters are following the wrong and dangerous principle that doing nothing equals consent, which it most certainly does not. They are also following the other guiding principle of government in Australia, that consent is something for citizens to obtain from government, not the other way around as it should be.

    3. If there is going to be any ‘opt out’, it should apply to the entire socialised health system, including the taxes we are forced to pay for other people’s health care, regardless of whether they make any effort to look after themselves or pay taxes.

    4. How often have we heard the news breathlessly reporting on someone’s death due to lack of access to health records? Never. The real reason for ‘Their Health Record’ is control, empire building, and another futile attempt to solve the socialist calculation problem.

    5. To many people, privacy and anonymity are just as important as security when it comes to personal records. A centralised database operated by the government can never be trusted to honour the first two of those, nor probably the third. Some sort of personal device would provide a far better solution.

    How does blockchain technology address these issues? It is a method of validating data, and in that sense provides security, but it doesn’t appear to be capable of achieving privacy or anonymity without additional layers, which no one seems to be able to explain in an understandable way. One article I came across started by claiming “Since early human history, centralization has been a major competitive advantage”. Not hard to see where they are coming from.

  17. Rob MW

    DB Results CEO Gavin Bunshaw said the opportunity available through blockchain was not just a secure method of recording health information but a framework for supporting the use of information as a valuable asset that can be protected and traded.

    Oh dear, they have no integrity or shame.

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